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BLAKE G HAGEN


HONEYCOMB HABITAT

POCKET PARK

HIGH RISE

EDUCATION AFRICA

FABRIC FORM

BIRD HOUSE


HONEYCOMB HABITAT


HONEYCOMB HABITAT This project has been submitted as an investigation for the international competition, ReGEN Boston. This project attempts to provide an affordable, sustainable, and community-based solution for Boston’s need to house the continuing life cycles of its residents. Boston needs a more innovative solution than the typical apartment-style residence. Boston has a history that stretches farther than many of America’s cities. With so many generations past, I believe there are many generations to come, and the architecture of this city should respond appropriately. “Honeycomb Habitat,” the title given to this project, reflects my intention to create an architecture that allows for flexible and sustainable growth in a communitybased environment against the waterfront. Staggering horizontal hexagon units are lifted and placed into a steel framework constructed directly against the existing boardwalk to provide views of Boston Inner Harbor for everyone. These units may be assembled very easily off-site and are able to be customized by any potential dweller at a flexible cost. The southern side of the architecture contains the vertical circulation enclosed in a honeycomb curtain wall. This large curtain wall may allow for multi-purpose uses such as a drive-in theater, which would bring the city of Boston onto the site, and back into a public realm. The site features an elegant pattern of “fallen hexagons” created from wooden planks to compliment the boardwalk. Tall grasses shield a parking pad created as an extension of the boardwalk to minimize the amount of concrete while shrubbery is scattered throughout.


POCKET PARK


POCKET PARK Ole Tangen Triangle park is Fargo’s smallest park with only .076 acres. It floats between Northern Pacific Avenue to the south and Roberts Street, which cuts northeast and creates the park’s hypotenuse. This dismal right triangle is home to a few lowly trees and couple unkept flower beds. This design focuses on revitalizing the small park by playing with sharp edges to shape more places to sit, lay, and relax against green bed of sloping grasses. It also gives the park a bold identity by planting large letters spelling out the city of Fargo. This also attempts to compliment the well-known turquoise “Fargo” sign dressed in vintage light bulbs above the downtown Fargo theater.


HIGH RISE


HIGH RISE Goal 1: Create a vertical community instead of a vertical separation between people and uses. Goal 2: Create architecture through passive technologies Goal 3: Provide green space and natural light throughout This tower, appropriately named the Bay Bridge Tower, was inspired by the suspension structure of the Oakland Bay Bridge. The building analyzes the possibilities of the direct translation of a horizontal suspension bridge into a 400-foot vertical tower. The tower supports a variety of shops and restaurants at the base, moving upwards to office, premium office, apartments, and viewing platform at the top. The load of each floor is attached at two points on the north face carried over the peak of the building and grounded at the base of the tower on the south side.

2 1


1: DETAIL OF CABLE CONNECTION

2: DETAIL OF GREEN SPACES


EDUCATION AFRICA


EDUCATION AFRICA Hope’s Journey, a non-profit organization desired to help plant a new educational campus in Ghana, Africa. The organization was on a limited budget, with limited resources. Our task was to create a master plan of the campus which included a multipurpose activity space, classroom spaces, and guest housing for the staff. Due to a limited palette of materials and education about complex construction techniques, each of these designs is intended to be constructed using a blend of wood, concrete, straw, and steel sheathing. The multipurpose activity space is featured at the top and resembles the familiar symbol of the Jesus Fish in consideration of the non-profit’s affiliation to Christianity. These sloping wooden beams overlap and array to create a visually stimulating resemblance of a fish while providing adequate shading for the student’s activities. The classroom space shown in an exploded axonometric view was designed to implement water catchment capabilities, passive ventilation, and simple construction methods.


FABRIC FORM


FABRIC FORM Fabric form concrete, unlike traditional board form concrete is the process of casting concrete into a flexible formwork such as fabric. The fabric possesses the unique ability to stretch and shape itself into complex shapes that would otherwise be impossible or very expensive using traditional formwork methods. This study particularly explored the potential for fabric form to provide an additional bench to the plaza outside of Renaissance Hall. We cast into a waterproof plastic-woven fabric and set a grid of threaded rod through the form to pull back the fabric allowing a traditional spring mattress shape to be replaced with a slab of carefully crafted concrete.


BIRD HOUSE


BIRD HOUSE This object focused on designing a birdhouse for the Eastern Blue Bird, through the interpretation of Frank Gehry’s design philosophy. Our challenge was to come up with a creative design, realized in a built solution for habitation by the Eastern Blue Bird. This house was to be fully usable by an actual bird, made of non-toxic materials, and able to withstand local weather conditions. Gehry’s architecture increasingly focuses on the definition of the baffling forms founded in the art of sculpture. At the same time, the work transcends the limitations of art and successfully addresses the pragmatic nature of architecture as the art form that must also meet practical needs. Understanding and recreating Frank Gehry’s style was a step out of my comfort zone to say the least. My main goal was to try and capture Gehry’s use of sculptural forms. This was attempted through wrapping a simple bird house in translational and saddle curves. I found that the difficulty in making this happen lies less in sketching and modeling and more in making the design come to life as a functional, usable space.


AURAL HALLS DESIGN THESIS: IN PROGESS


AURAL HALLS The Aural Halls attempt to ontologically reenvision the desire to hear sound. This may include the traditional musical performance fulfilled by a band or orchestra, but may extend into less traditional realms such as encouraging the awareness of the sounds we hear or don’t hear on an everyday basis. The Aural Halls are inspired by the traditional acoustical paneling employed by many performance venues around the world. They eliminate the need for paneling by making the architecture the paneling itself. The building features overlapping hallow shells that create a separation of spaces as well as draw and push sound from the site into the building.


CONTACT Blake Hagen 15194 Cimarron Court Rosemount Minnesota 55068 blake.hagen.3@gmail.com 952.454.5484


THANK YOU


Blake Hagen Architecture Portfolio