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Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood Action Plan

Rebuilding

Revitalizing

Restoring

Planning and Development Department


Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood Action Plan

August 2001 City of Jacksonville Planning & Development Department 128 E. Forsyth Street Jacksonville, Florida 32202 The Honorable John Delaney Mayor

Jeannie Fewell Director Planning & Development This Document was prepared by Asset Properties Disposition, Inc. in association with the City of Jacksonville’s Planning & Development Department


Acknowledgments Mayor of Jacksonville

City of Jacksonville Planning & Development Department

John A. Delaney

Jeannie L. Fewell, Director Coen Purvis, Division Chief Jennifer Hewett, Planner Courtney Harris, Planner James Reed, GIS Planner

Consulting Team Asset Properties, Inc.

In addition to the City planning staff and the consulting staff involved in the planning process, a Citizen’s Advisory Committee (CAC) was established to solicit input from a variety of government agencies, grassroots organizations, neighborhood residents, and neighborhood employers.

Citizens Advisory Committee Reggie Fullwood, Councilman of District 9

Willie Sapp, Shiloh Metropolitan Baptist Church

Gwen Yates, Councilwoman of District 8

Hallie Williams-Bey, MANIA and CADC

Charles Chupp, Load King Manufacturing

Patricia Vail, Florida Legal Services

James Thurman, Edwards Ornamental

Lew Belkin, Jacksonville Housing Authority

Ret Watkins, Schuman Casters

Marilyn, Department

Frank Barker, Habijax

Linda Brown, resident

David Gueterman; Chief of Zone 5 for the Sheriff’s Office Rahman Johnson, Edward Waters College

Michael Bryant, Fresh Ministries

Richard McKillop, Kings Road Post Office

Ida Denson, resident Reverend Elder Lee Harris, Community Alliance Development Corporation (CADC) Better

Neighborhoods

Ronnie Furguson, Jacksonville Housing Authority

Eddie Brown, Neighborhood Watch of College Park/College Gardens/Newtown

George Leverett, Association

Fenton-Harmer;

Living

Celia Miller, Myrtle Avenue Improvement Association (MANIA)

Communities Neighborhood

Dr. James A. McLean, Institutional Advancement Department, Edward Waters College Elaine Spencer; US HUD Paul Tutweiler, Jacksonville Housing Authority Shelia Williams, Community Services Department of Edward Waters College

Dr. Janetta Norman, Urban Core Citizen’s Planning Advisory Committee (CPAC) The community involvement process employed through the CAC allowed for the perspectives of the community to be introduced in an organized manner that established a basis for consensus building. The end result of this process is a plan that creates unique strategies to revitalize the Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood. The City would like to extend a special thanks to all the volunteers that donated their time and ideas to this plan.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Section 1 2 3

4 5

6 7 8 9 10

11

12 13

14 15 16 17 18 19

Section Title

Page

Executive Summary Introduction Historical Background Demographic Overview Social Characteristics Population & Housing Employment Work Location & Commute Existing Development & Activity Existing Uses & Conditions Existing Land Uses Existing Conditions Planning Sections Environmental Concerns Visions for Redevelopment Edward Waters College Growth & Expansion Zoning & Land Use Issues Summary of Recommendations Neighborhood Conservation Neighborhood Conservation District Issues Summary of Recommendations The Kings Road Commercial Corridor Commercial Revitalization Streetscape Improvements Kings Road Corridor Study Community Redevelopment Area Summary of Recommendations The Industrial Sections of the Southern Area Infill Housing & Rehabilitation New Construction Vacant Single-Family Rehabilitation Owner-Occupied Rehabilitation Vacant Multi-Family Rehabilitation Marketing Summary of Recommendations Recreation & Open Space Crime Infrastructure Summary of Recommendations Implementation Appendix

i 1-1 2-1 3-1 3-1 3-3 3-9 3-9 4-1 5-1 5-2 5-3 5-4 6-1 7-1 8-1 9-1 9-2 9-5 10-1 10-2 10-7 10-10 11-1 11-1 11-5 11-6 11-7 11-7 12-1 13-1 13-2 13-5 13-6 13-7 13-8 13-8 14-1 15-1 16-1 17-1 18-1


LIST OF TABLES

Table 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Title Social Characteristics Age Distribution of the Population Summary of Housing Data Residential Building Permit Activity Occupations & Selected Industries: Percentages Work Location & Community Time Study Area Existing Uses Building Conditions by Land Use Existing Uses: Comparisons of the N & S Sections Building Conditions: Comparisons of the N & S Sections Kings Road Existing Uses Residential Zoning Districts Within the Study Area Industrial Zoning Districts Within the Study Area Commercial & Institutional Zoning Districts Within the Study Area Proposed Zoning Changes for the Study Area Example Project Costs Using Proposed New Construction Model Example Project Costs Using Vacant Single-Family Rehab Model Example Project Costs Using Occupied Single-Family Rehab Model Example Project Costs Using Rental Rehab Program Report of Offense by Type for Subsector M3

LIST OF FIGURES

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Figure

Title

Page

1 2 3 4

Public Transportation Use For Tracts and County Vacant Lots & Buildings: Comparison of Sections Multi-Family & Commercial Uses: Comparison of Sections Purchase Potential Indexes: Zip Code 32209

3-11 5-6 5-6 11-9

LIST OF MAPS


Map

Title

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Study Area Boundaries with Proposed CRA Districts Current Land Use Current Zoning Existing Uses Existing Conditions EWC Development & Impact Areas, with EWC-Owned Properites Proposed Zoning

APPENDICES


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY General Background The Planning and Development Department (PDD) in association with Asset Property, Inc. formed a collaboration to prepare the Kings Road/Myrtle Avenue Neighborhood Action Plan for the Newtown, Mid Westside, and College Park neighborhoods. The study area is bounded by 16th Street and 17th Street on the north, Fairfax Street on the west, 2nd Street on the South, and Myrtle Avenue on the east (refer to map 1). The Kings Road/Myrtle Avenue neighborhoods suffers from many of the problems familiar to older residential neighborhoods, including frequent incidents of crime, drug activity, land use and zoning conflicts, declining property values, aging population, and aging infrastructure. Each of these problems are evident in the Study Area in varying degrees and each of the problems, when combined, create a community environment that has not been attractive to economic or residential reinvestment. Over the past 20 years there have been very little public investment in the Study Area in housing, infrastructure, or economic development. Neighborhood organizations including M.A.N.I.A. and Community Action Development Corporation (CADC) have struggled to establish a presence. There has been very little acknowledgement of the historic significance of the neighborhoods even thought the area contains unique examples of residential construction by African American contractors and, Edward Waters College, a Historically Black College and University one of the oldest institution of higher education in Florida. This plan was written to establish a basis for why it would be important to re-invest in the Study Area and how the re-investment could be accomplished without displacing families who are indigenous to the neighborhoods. Even thought census tracts 28 and 29 are not congruent with the boundaries of the study area the data collected as part of the preparation for this plan reflects definite trends of population loss and a population that is aging. Population losses for both


census tracts were approximately 22%, with a loss of 5,761 from 1980 to 1990. The population for the County, however, increased by 16% (104,968 persons) for the same period. The median age increased for both census tracts by approximately five to seven years from mid to late twenties to early to mid thirties. The County median age increased by only two years. Additionally the age distribution shows a higher percentage of person aged sixty-five or more in the two census tracts than the county as a whole. Even thought these figures are ten years old, we suspect that this trend continues and has the distinct possibility of destroying the fabricate of this important community unless strategic and aggressive revitalization measures are not taken. Perhaps the most disturbing demographic indicator of the study area is represented in the crime statistics. The study area is located within the subsector M3, which is one of fifty-two (52) subsectors in the City. The worse year for crime in the study area was 1999, with 14% of all the City’s homicides being committed within subsector M3. While there seems to be a decline in most crime categories in 1999, a disturbing trend continues in subsector M3 as having the highest number of rapes and residential burglaries in the City. Crime within the study area is a major problem and must be addressed as a part of the overall strategy for neighborhood revitalization. As part of this plan we recommend specific action that could start the process of crime reduction, however it should be noted that a major crime reduction study should be undertaken within the study area. The neighborhood has been a historically close-knit community with important activist and community leaders that helped the community grow and prosper. Many opportunities were created in support of residents including the Jefferson Street swimming pool, which created programs for youth and the Roberta Holland Golf Club which begin in 1947, and still exist. In addition, the study area is the home of Edward Waters College, the first African-American College in the state, and the oldest institution of higher education in the City. As a result of the HOPE VI Project developed by the Jacksonville Housing Authority a new Durkeeville Historical Center was established and now includes photographs, news paper clippings, and memorabilia reflecting on the rich heritage of the neighborhood.


New-town, Mid-westside, and College Park neighborhoods have enjoyed a rich cultural heritage that the plan recommends using as the basis for fostering reinvestment and growth within the study area. The study area is at a critical point within the life cycle of an aging urban neighborhood. Very little progress has been made in the areas of new single family homes being built, rehabilitation of existing vacant houses, or renovation of occupied homes that are in sub-standard or deteriorated condition. Fortunately the new Oaks of Durkeeville project, located to the immediate east of the study areas eastern boundary, and provides an excellent example of successful economic and residential development occurring within a urban setting with demographic characteristics similar to the those found within the study area neighborhoods. Compared to the County, the neighborhood’s census tracts are more oriented towards lower unskilled labor positions while the County has higher percentage of Managerial, Professional, Technical, Sales, and Administrative support occupations. The percent of persons under proverty level within the study area decreased, however the median income levels decreased as well. There was an increase in the percent of unemployed workers in both census tracts by 2 to 3 percent, however the County unemployment rate actually decreased by 2 percent for the same period. While the slight increase in unemployment would generally be considered only minor, the fact that the country’s economy as a whole is rising and the location of the study area is in such close proximity to downtown and public transportation routes raises troubling concerns about the population shift occurring within the study area. The Community Redevelopment Plan being prepared by the Planning and Development Dept. and Asset Property, Inc. share a common boundary with the study area’s Southern boundary on 2nd Street. The CRP, when complete will include Light Industry and Manufacturing development opportunities that could significantly impact employment in a positive manner within the study area. EXISTING USES AND CONDITIONS The Study Area is a predominately single family neighborhood with some multi-family and commercial uses scattered through-out the area. Conditions of the majority of the buildings are substandard and deteriorating and consist of a disproportionate number of vacant and condemned buildings in the southern sector of the study area. The study area can generally be divided into three sections:


♌ The residential section north of 8th Street consists primarily of single family houses in good to fair condition with well kept lawns and streets. The lot sizes are larger, deeper set-backs of homes, and less commercial and multi-family uses than any part of the study area. There are some poor to deteriorated homes that reflect an aging population and neighborhood ♌ The residential section south of 8th Street consists primarily of single family homes, but the area has experienced considerable change. The housing conditions tend to be in poor to deteriorated conditions. There is a greater amount of vacant lots and buildings as well as a significant amount of mull-family houses, many of which are vacant. ♌ The Kings Road Corridor is a state maintained minor arterial highway that runs through the study area. The portion of the highway within the study area between Myrtle Avenue and Fairfax Street consist of several EWC building that were recently nominated as local Historic Landmark sites. However the majority of properties along the Kings Road Corridor are vacant commercial buildings, and existing uses that are not conducive to retail shopping for a college students, faculty, or adjacent residents. The Kings Road Corridor is a focal point for analysis and revitalization within the plan. Vacant lots and buildings are evident in both the southern and northern sectors, however a greater concentration can be found in the southern area. Approximately ten percent of the parcels in the study area as a whole are vacant, and nine percent of the buildings are vacant. The portion of the Kings Road Corridor located within the study area is also characterized by a large number of vacant buildings. Twenty-seven percent of the parcels along the corridor are vacant lots, and nineteen percent of the commercial buildings are vacant. Even the buildings that are occupied are in fair to poor condition and most of the vacant buildings are severely deteriorated or condemned. There are a few residential homes located along the Kings Road corridor, but most are in need of repair and both the residential and commercial buildings lack sufficient parking because the widening of Kings Road from two lanes to four lanes sometime prior to 1971.


Even thought the existing conditions and land uses in the study area portray a depressed neighborhood on the brink of total deterioration, the study area is a stable neighborhood with a history and tradition that should serve as a basis for revitalization. The plan identifies five major development activities within and around the study area that should continue to impact the neighborhood: ♦ Habitat for Humanity of Jacksonville ♦ HOPE VI ♦ The Beaver Street Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) ♦ Community Alliance Development Corporation (CADC) ♦ The growth of Edward Waters College The study area only has thirteen Habijax homes, all located south of Kings Road. However the staff of Habitat for Humanity has begun assembling lots within the study area for the purpose of building new single family homes. Habijax provides an important housing resource for lower income first time homebuyers. However, a large increase of these homes in the study area without altering the architectural design to make the home more compatible with the architecture of existing would adversely affect the historical character of the neighborhood. Discussion with the staff of Habijax suggests that they would be open to exploring options to their home design to incorporate more compatible architectural styles if funding sources could be identified for the additional cost of construction. Because of Habijax’s significant potential to develop in volume and their commitment to affordable housing, the City should initiate discussion with Habijax staff to determine how they can facilitate the design and building of architecturally compatible. The recent work of CADC within the study area, exemplifies the type of development activities needed by a non-profit development corporations. CADC has recently begun to engage in its own development activities with two single family homes at the corner of Myrtle and 10th Street. It is important that CADC expand its development activity by building homes on other vacant lots and renovation of vacant houses for rehab and purchase by homeowners. As the organization expands it capacity, the City should consider how best to support their development activities in order to increase homeownership opportunities within CADC’s primary target area.


The HOPE VI Oaks of Durkeeville Project provides an excellent anchor on the eastern boundary of the Study Area, and the project illustrates that carefully planned redevelopment activity can be successful in a neighborhood that has experienced years of decline and neglect. Over $20 million was spent on planning, site clearance, infrastructure improvements, and new construction development in the Oaks project. The approach to the project not only address physical improvements to the neighborhood, but also made an attempt to address social service needs. A wellness facility was incorporated into the commercial development built on Myrtle Avenue. A cooperation agreement was negotiated with Shands Jacksonville Hospital to staff the facility. In addition a Senior Citizen Center was incorporated into the commercial development immediately adjacent to the Shands Jacksonville Wellness Center. Beyond the physical developments this plan recommends for the study area is a need to take into consideration the social service needs of residents who currently reside in the area. Well intentioned redevelopment activities in severally depressed neighborhoods, run the risk of overlooking senior citizens, and underprivileged children as part of the neighborhood revitalization process unless social services needs are addressed as part of the overall redevelopment plan. Further study concerning the development of a comprehensive social service component to this plan is recommended. Edward Waters College (EWC) is at a critical point in its tenure as a viable institution in Jacksonville and in the study area. Over the past five years EWC has seen its enrollment drop to a record low of approximately 300 students coupled with concerns regarding accreditation and financing. As a result of new dynamic leadership, EWC’s enrollment has increased to over 1000 students and significant strides have been made in the areas of finance and overall institutional stability. The plan places significant emphasis on the importance to EWC as an "anchor� to the Kings Road Corridor, and to the overall study area. In order to take advantage of the growth and development of EWC the plan has designated an EWC Development Area to establish the boundaries of growth within the immediate area surrounding the college. Additionally, an EWC Impact area has been established to suggest the portion of the neighborhood outside of the Development Area that will most likely be influenced by EWC’s growth. The City is encouraged to work closely with EWC in developing specific plans of action that define the how Kings Road can be developed, and to provide guidance and support to the preparation of a Master Plan for the overall growth and development of the College.


Several zoning changes are proposed as part of the plan. The proposed rezoning was recommended because it has been a large part of the problems currently affecting the study area. Current residential designation does not allow for the renovation of small residential properties that have been vacant for more than one year. The commercial designation along Kings Road are too intense and allows for the development of land uses and services establishments that are not conducive to a rebuilding college or a neighborhood attempting to revitalize itself. The plan outlines an overview of the proposed zoning changes in Table 17, however the zoning is designed to accomplish two primary objectives: ♌ Facilitate the development of single family homes in the study area but at the same time allow for the development of multi-family buildings that have been vacant for more than one year ♌ Zoning flexibility that will encourage the growth and development of EWC within the proposed EWC Development Area without impeding the historic single family character of the study area ♌ Scale down the intensity of land uses along Kings Road and other uses near the college to facilitate pedestrian oriented retail for the residents of the area and for EWC faculty and students

SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS The Plan outlines three specific categories of recommendations that when implemented will establish a course of action within the study area that is designed to stimulate both commercial and residential redevelopment within a 3 to 5 year period. NEIGHBORHOOD CONSERVATION The Plan recommends a Neighborhood Conservation Pilot Program that combines elements of historic preservation and code enforcement to curb the deterioration of the


buildings while protecting the historical integrity of the neighborhood. The City should initially implement the pilot program in the EWC Impact Area. KINGS ROAD COMMERCIAL CORRIDOR The corridor serves as the major transportation route to the Kings Road/Myrtle Avenue Neighborhood. Improvements to the corridor are critical to the EWC redevelopment and to the overall redevelopment of the study area. Improvement should focus on both commercial improvement and streetscape improvements. The City should consider the preparation of a Kings Road Corridor Study and create a Community Redevelopment Area within the EWC Development Area to attract businesses desired by the residents and conducive to the atmosphere created by the college. INFILL HOUSING AND REHABILITATION Over the past 20 years that soci-demographic information for the study area details a trend of population loss, and an accelerated loss of single family housing. There have also been an increasing number of vacant houses that create a visual blight on the neighborhood. The plan outlines housing programs, financing scenarios, and specific steps to attract builders and developers to the study area. The City is encouraged to take an aggressive approach to working with non-profit and for profit developers in building new single family homes, rehabbing vacant houses, and rehabilitating vacant small multi-family buildings, and rehabilitating single family homes occupied by lower income elderly homeowners. For the past six months the study area has been researched to determine the existing conditions that define the community comprised of the Newtown, Mid Westside, and College Park neighborhoods. The study area can be characterized as a low-income, traditionally African American community that is in a state of decline. Census data and crime statistics portrays a neighborhood with low-income levels, high unemployment rates and an aging population. The existing housing stock has continued to age with almost no new single family homes being built until very recently. However, the purpose of the plan extends beyond characterizing the study areas existing conditions and


identifies specific strategies that can be initiated by the City and result in the revitalization of one of Jacksonville’s most important neighborhood resources. The plan recommends strategies for growth and development through out the study area and links potential financial sources to each strategy. Strategies are recommended for the growth and development of Edward Waters College, zoning, neighborhood conservation, recreation and open space, crime, commercial investment and streetscape along the Kings Road Corridor, the rehabilitation of occupied and vacant homes, and infill housing on vacant lots.


SECTION 1 両

Introduction

SUMMARY The Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood Action Plan is a document that will include strategies to address the deterioration, population decline, and disinvestment that has plagued the Study Area for years. The planning team created a Citizens Advisory Committee to obtain input on the various visions and strategies recommended in this plan. This plan has addressed such issues as the growth and development of Edward Waters College, zoning, neighborhood conservation, the commercial investment and future streetscape of Kings Road, recreation and open space, crime, the development of the industrial sector, and the rehabilitation of occupied and vacant homes, infill housing on vacant lots.

The Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood Action Plan Study Area comprised of several Durkeeville neighborhoods, including New Town, Mid-Westside, and College Park. These neighborhoods are experiencing deterioration.

The single-family homes are aging and

falling into disrepair. Boarded up buildings are increasing, and vacant lots with trash and debris are familiar sights in the area.

Crime rates are high, and investment in these

neighborhoods is low. With the exception of the Hope VI project, there has not been any substantial residential or commercial development activity in the area within the past decade. Aside from a few small, single lot developments, virtually no commercial investment activity has happened in the area since its peak in the early 1900s.

Residential development has been slow, and

demolitions have outnumbered the new unit development by approximately 200 units since 1990. Habitat for Humanity of Jacksonville (Habijax) has developed some new homes south of the Kings Road Corridor.

However, this has been the only significant residential

development activity in the Study Area. There have been some recent organizational activity in the area, most of which has been the result of the Hope VI project, which is located directly east of the Study Area. The Myrtle Avenue Neighborhood Improvement Association (MANIA) has become a significant voice in

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the area, and has given the residents an organizational structure for community participation.

The Community Alliance Development Corporation (CADC) is currently

developing two single-family homes in the neighborhood, and is looking to become a significant non-profit developer of residential and commercial properties in the area. Edward Waters College (EWC) is in the process of organizing a non-profit development corporation for the purpose of acquiring and developing properties in the Kings Road corridor and within the recently delineated EWC Development Area. In an effort to access the knowledge and insight that exist within the community about concerns that influence neighborhood revitalization, our planning process organized a Citizens Advisory Committee (CAC). The CAC was organized to accomplish three primary objectives: 1. To convey the objectives of the Neighborhood Action Plan to the community; 2. To involve a cross-section of civic, business, and institutional community representatives in the planning process; 3. And to develop community consensus for the recommended neighborhood revitalization strategies evolving out of the planning process. Throughout the course of the NAP development, four (4) meetings with the CAC were held. In addition, three (3) meetings were held with MANIA. Each CAC member was provided a notebook as a means of managing the reports and related documents that were provided for their review (refer to Appendix A). The community involvement process employed through the CAC allowed for their perspectives of the community to be introduced in an organized manner that influenced the plan and established a basis for consensus building. This level of communication established within the CAC will be an important factor in successfully implementing the recommended planning activities offered through the NAP. The work with the CAC, along with the research conducted in preparing the NAP, identified many assets within the study area that will serve as a basis to begin the redevelopment process. The neighborhood that is contained within the study area has a rich cultural history, particularly within the African-American community. While a portion of this important cultural history has been lost, a significant portion has been retained through buildings and family history that is still evident. The Durkeeville Historic Society, organized by Rodell Roberts,

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Paul Tutweiler, and the Jacksonville Housing Authority’s Hope VI project, serves as a testament to the legacy of the community in which our study area is included. There are many assets within the neighborhood that the community, in partnership with the City, can use as a platform for redevelopment. These include: 1. The rich cultural history of the neighborhood, particularly to the African-American community. The neighborhood has retained much of that history in many of the buildings that still stand throughout the Study Area. 2. The neighborhood also has a historically black college within its boundaries. The strong growth of Edward Waters College serves as a point of stability and pride. 3. Vacant lots offer another type of resource that can make infill projects and commercial projects easier to accomplish. 4. Reinvestment activities are currently underway through the HOPE VI project in an area adjacent to the Study Area, as well with the CADC within the Study Area. 5. Large employers are located near the Study Area, such as Edward Waters College, Load King, and the U.S. Post Office. 6. The Study Area is in close proximity to Downtown. 7. There are neighborhood organizations that are concerned and involved in the community. The purpose of this plan is to provide an analysis of the neighborhood, and to recommend specific strategies in which the City of Jacksonville and neighborhood organizations can use to preserve the historical character of the neighborhood, and to revitalize the deteriorating residential and commercial sectors. The plan will also link potential financial sources to those strategies. Strategies are recommended for the growth and development of Edward Waters College, zoning, neighborhood conservation, recreation and open space, crime, the commercial investment and streetscape opportunities along the Kings Road Corridor, the rehabilitation of occupied and vacant homes, and infill housing on the vacant lots. The purpose of this plan is also to delineate the boundaries for Load King Manufacturing and the Community Redevelopment Area (CRA). The CRA designation for the Load King Manufacturing expansion will allow the Jacksonville Economic Development Commission (JEDC) to use a variety of tax incentives and exercise eminent domain to assemble property needed for expansion.

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This plan will also serve as the Community Revitalization Strategy for the Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood to be submitted to the Department of Housing and Urban Development pursuant to the Community Development Block Grant (CBDG) Community Revitalization Strategies program. This program allows cities that are receiving state CBDG funds to submit a comprehensive development strategy for the purpose of relaxing requirements of the CBDG program, such as income requirements. Therefore, this plan will serve as the planning document for all CBDG funds directed to the Study Area. This Neighborhood Action Plan gives the stakeholders of the community and the City the opportunity to preserve and protect an important historical area; to create affordable housing in the downtown area; to improve the economic sector of the neighborhood through commercial development that serves the neighborhood; and to improve the aesthetic appearance of the community.

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SECTION 2 両

Historical Background

SUMMARY The Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood Action Plan Study Area is part of the historical Durkeeville community, and is comprised of two different neighborhoods: New Town and Mid-Westside. The Study Area neighborhoods were built around the first decade of the 20th century, and are traditionally African-American working class communities. The community has a long history of locally famous baseball players, architects, and community activists. Additionally, the community is home to the first African-American College in the State, and the oldest institution of higher of education in the City.

Kings Road was constructed during the British period of occupation between 1771 and 1775. The road extends between Savannah, Georgia and New Smyrna, Florida. Branches of the road spread out from the area of what is now downtown Jacksonville. One of those branches is still maintained today, and begins at the intersection of Interstate 95 and State Street extending past Edward Waters College into West Jacksonville, and is referred to as the Kings Road Corridor. The section of Kings Road that is within the Neighborhood Action Plan boundaries is part of this historically significant roadway. The Kings Road Corridor is surrounded by two neighborhoods: New Town and MidWestside. New Town is located to the south of Kings Road, and Mid-Westside is north of Kings Road. The general area surrounding Kings Road is also referred to as College Park (because of the proximity to Edward Waters College), and the area north of Kings Road is also considered part of the Durkeeville neighborhood. La Villa, the area adjacent to New Town on the east,

historically extended east of Myrtle Avenue, though construction of

Interstate 95 divided the neighborhood.

Neighborhoods that are near, but not directly

adjacent to Kings Road, include Grand Park to the northwest, College Gardens to the west, Brooklyn to the southeast, and Durkeeville to the east. The larger Durkeeville neighborhood is bounded by Old Kings Road to the south, Spires Street to the west, 20th Street to the north, and Jefferson Street to the east.

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neighborhood is named for the Durkeeville Housing Project historically located east of Myrtle Avenuei. This project was built by the Federal Works Administration in the 1930s, and named after Joseph Durkee, who eventually became the Sheriff. The first public housing project in Jacksonville, the project became the center of a larger residential community for African-Americans. All neighborhoods in this general area are traditionally African-American communities. The development of New Town and Mid-Westside neighborhoods began in the first decade of the twentieth century, and housed much of the African-American community employed in the industrial and railroad sectors. These neighborhoods enjoyed considerable growth due to the streetcar that ran down Kings Road. The area south of Beaver Street developed around the turn of the century as an industrial center. The presence of multiple rail lines throughout the area proved advantageous for such development. The Durkeeville community has been historically close-knit, and has many community activists and leaders that helped the community to grow. The baseball player, Emmitt Reed, and his wife were some of the first residents to move into the Durkeeville Housing Project, and he became the Director for Recreation. The Durkeeville Mother’s Club began and sponsored the Durkeeville Nursery School and Kindergarten. J.P. Smalls, also called “Papa Smalls,” coached at the local high school, Stanton, for twenty-six years.

Smalls also

directed the Majorettes, Cheerleaders, and the first band. Alpha Hayes Moore formed a Glee Club that performed around the world, and was able to attract the internationally known pianist, Felipe Duke Skyler. The Durkeeville project was also the first project contracted by J.E. Hutchins, a local AfricanAmerican contractor. He went on to build many homes surrounding the Durkeeville project. S.A. Brookens was another local African-American contractor that built many homes in the College Gardens area. Other successful professionals include A.L. Lewis, the founder of the Afro-American Insurance Company, and Edith Boyd, the first woman manager of the Durkeeville Housing Project. The Durkeeville neighborhood, or College Park, created many opportunities and areas of support for the residents. The Jefferson Street swimming pool created programs for youth, and had staffing to support those programs. The Roberta Holland Golf Club, which began in

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1947, still exists. As a means of financial support for its residents, the neighborhood began a burial society to provide financial assistance to families whose loved ones had died. Edward Waters College is the oldest institution of higher education for African-Americans in the state, and the oldest institution of higher education in the City. Although originally located on Beaver Street before the Great Fire of 1901, the College built its first building, Salter Hall (now demolished), along Kings Road in 1908, and later built Centennial Hall in 1916. Centennial Hall was designed by the firm of Howell and Stokes, whose architects also designed Woodbridge Hall at Yale University, St. Paul’s Chapel at Columbia University, First Congregational Church in Danbury, and the Stock Exchange Building in Baltimore. Edward Waters College presently has an enrollment of approximately 1000 students, and offers degree programs in business administration, hotel management, psychology, religion, philosophy, communications, sociology, physical education, biology, criminal justice, gerontology, and political science. Richard Brown, a local contractor who later became

Jacksonville’s

first

African-American

architect, supervised construction of Centennial Hall. His other projects include Mount Olive AME Church, St. John’s Baptist Church, the apartment building at 1208-1210 Florida Avenue, his own home on Brown’s Alley, and several dwellings in the R.L. Brown subdivision.

He also designed

schools, including Beulah Beal, Lackawanna, and West Elementary.

Historic Edward Waters College, located along Kings Road

The West Union Missionary Baptist Church was designated a local historic landmark in early 2000. The church was founded in 1900, with the present sanctuary constructed in 1938. The church is one of the earliest religious organizations in the New Town area. Churches have historically been significant social and cultural institutions in African American communities, serving a variety of community needs.

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The greater Durkeeville community residents have held on steadfastly to their history. Many of the elderly residents can recall the names of each family that resided on their block, and can remember major events that were important to the community.

Their

memories,

along

with

contributions of photographs, newspaper clippings, and memorabilia have created the new Durkeeville Historical Center, located on 1260 W. 7th Street in the newly built community center. The community

West Union Missionary Baptist Church

center is a part of the HOPE IV Oaks of Durkeeville project. The Historical Center is an important tribute to this historic neighborhood.

Endnotes i

All information for this section was obtained from the following sources: Historic Building Survey of Urban Core Southwest of the City of Jacksonville (no date) Submitted by Historic Property Associates, Inc. to City of Jacksonville, Planning and Development Department. Films: “Durkeeville, A Rich Legacy” &” From There to Here” by the Jr. Historical Society of the Durkeeville Historical Society.

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SECTION 3 Ξ

Socioeconomic & Demographic Overview SUMMARY

The Study Area is a low-income, traditionally African-American community that is in a state of decline. Using data from the U.S. Census this section describes a neighborhood with low income levels, high unemployment rates, and an aging population. Population has decreased rapidly, and the housing stock has continually aged without any new construction. The Study Area’s employed persons are concentrated within the Operators, Fabricators & Laborers occupations, and many rely on the transit system for transportation. Introduction The socioeconomic trends for the Study Area are determined by examining and comparing 1980 and 1990 U.S. Census data. The Study Area contains portions of Census Tracts 17, 18, 26, 28, and 29. Since the residential areas are concentrated in tracts 28 and 29, the analysis focuses on these tracts.

Tracts 17 and 18 contain small residential enclaves,

though they are primarily industrial in nature. Tract 26 was omitted from this analysis since it contains no population within the Study Area. Social Characteristics There is a large portion of female-headed households in the Study Area. In 1990, women headed approximately half of households in tracts 28 and 29 (refer to Table 1).

This

represents an increase of approximately ten (10) percent from 1980. This is contrary to the trend for Duval County, which experienced a one-hundred and six (106) percent decrease from forty-one (41) percent in 1980 to twenty (20) percent in 1990. The racial composition of the Study Area remained constant from 1980 to 1990 with 99% of the population of tracts 28 and 29 describing themselves as African-American.

By

comparison, 24% of the population in Duval County described themselves as AfricanAmerican in 1980 and 1990 (refer to Table 1).

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Social Characteristics

Table 1

Tract 17 Tract 18 Population Median Age (years)

1980 Tract 28

Tract 29

Duval County

Tract 17 Tract 18

1990 Tract 28

Tract 29

Duval County

% Change Tract Tract Tract 17 Tract 18 28 29

Duval County

3,843

1,683

14,690

11,493

571,003

2,049

1,000

11,499

8,923

672,971

-88%

-68%

-28%

-29%

15%

25.4

44

26.2

30.6

29.0

32.4

41.3

33.2

35.2

31.4

22%

-7%

21%

13%

8%

Race % White

3%

2%

1%

< 1%

74%

3%

8%

1%

< 1%

73%

0%

0%

0%

0%

-1%

% Black

97%

98%

99%

99%

25%

96%

90%

99%

99%

24%

-1%

-9%

0%

0%

1%

Persons Per Household

2.54

2.61

3.12

2.64

2.81

2.26

2.46

2.72

2.42

2.54

-12%

-6%

-15%

-9%

-11%

% Female Headed Households

70%

46%

42%

45%

41%

75%

48%

47%

50%

20%

7%

5%

11%

10%

-106%

27%

53%

9%

10%

13%

37%

57%

15%

18%

8%

27%

7%

40%

44%

-57%

25%

30%

39%

42%

67%

42%

26%

56%

53%

77%

42%

-13%

30%

21%

13%

2%

2%

6%

7%

14%

4%

1%

7%

10%

18%

45%

-87%

17%

30%

24%

in the Labor Force

23%

49%

55%

49%

63%

39%

36%

62%

41%

70%

42%

-37%

12%

-20%

10%

% Unemployed

16%

11%

10%

11%

5%

13%

18%

13%

14%

3%

-23%

37%

27%

23%

-98%

$9,084

$15,021

$19,831

$17,984

$34,283

$6,720

$14,262

$18,635

$15,737

$45,088

-35%

-5%

-6%

-14%

24%

68%

50%

37%

39%

16%

76%

62%

34%

34%

13%

11%

19%

-7%

-14%

-25%

% without children % High School Graduates* % College Graduates* % Persons Aged 16 & Over

Median Household Income** % Persons Living Below Poverty*** *Of persons over 25 years of age

**Adjusted to 1999 US$, using the CPI 1.295 for 1980 and 1.344 for 1990 ***Of persons for whom poverty status has been determined Data Source: U.S. Census of Population and Housing, 1980 & 1990

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The Study Area population is characterized by low educational attainment (refer to Table 1). Fifty-six (56) percent of persons aged 25 or older in tract 28 and fifty-three (53) percent in tract 29 had completed high school in 1990. This is a sizeable increase from 1980, when thirty-nine (39) and forty-two (42) percent of persons over the age of 25 in tracts 28 and 29, respectively, had completed high school, but it is still much lower than the proportion for Duval County as a whole (77%). More than one-third of the population in the Study Area lived below the federally defined poverty level in 1990 (refer to Table 1). Thirty-four (34) percent of the population in tracts 28 and 29 lived below the poverty level in 1990, compared with thirteen (13) percent in Duval County. In real termsi, the median household income decreased six (6) percent for tract 28 and fourteen (14) percent for tract 29, while the County experienced an increase of twenty-four (24) percent from 1980 to 1990 (refer to Table 1). Median household income for the Study Area in 1990 was less than fifty (50) percent of the County median. Population and Housing The census tracts in the Study Area lost approximately thirty (30) percent of their population from 1980 to 1990, with a loss of 3,191 persons for tract 028 and 2,570 persons for tract 029 (refer to Table 1).

The population for the County, however, increased by 15% (104,968

persons) during this same period. Population loss has occurred for primarily three reasons: â&#x2122;Ś Decrease in household size; â&#x2122;Ś An aging population; and â&#x2122;Ś A decline in the housing stock. The Study Area census tracts have echoed regional and national trends in decreasing average household sizes (refer to Table 1). The census tracts decreased by approximately nine (9) to fifteen (15) percent, while the County average household size also decreased approximately ten (10) percent.

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Age Distribution of the Population

Table 2

Age

Tract 17 Tract 18

1980 Tract 28

Tract 29

Duval County

Tract 17 Tract 18

1990 Tract 28

Tract 29

Duval County

0-14

31%

13%

27%

23%

23%

26%

12%

22%

22%

15%

15-24

18%

14%

21%

18%

19%

15%

7%

17%

13%

15%

25-44

18%

24%

22%

20%

28%

22%

37%

26%

26%

35%

45-64

18%

31%

19%

21%

19%

20%

27%

21%

18%

17%

65+

15%

18%

10%

17%

10%

17%

16%

14%

20%

11%

Total

3,843

1,683

14,690

11,493

571,003

2,049

1,000

11,449

8,923

672,971

Data Source: U.S. Census of Population and Housing, 1980 & 1990

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The population in the Study Area is aging, with the median age increasing from 26.2 years to 33.2 years in tract 28, and from 30.6 years to 35.2 years in tract 29 from 1980 to 1990 (refer to Table 2). This represents a thirteen (13) to twenty-one (21) percent increase in the median age over just ten years, while the County increased only eight (8) percent during the same time period. The aging of the population is clearly demonstrated by the age distribution in the Study Area (refer to Table 2). The proportion of the population in tracts 28 and 29 aged 0 – 14 and 15 – 24 decreased significantly, while the proportion of the population in the 25 – 44, 45 – 65, and over 65 age brackets showed a significant increase. This trend was not mirrored by Duval County as a whole, which experienced the greatest increase in the proportion of population aged 25 – 44, and had only a small increase in the proportion of residents over age 65. The amount of occupied housing units has decreased for both tracts by approximately four (4) to nine (9) percent, with a vacancy rate reaching sixteen (16) percent for tract 029 in 1990 (refer to Table 3). The County, however, had a vacancy rate of ten (10) percent in 1990. Additionally, all tracts, including tracts 17 and 18, lost a total of eight-hundred and thirteen (813) units from 1980 to 1998, while only gaining four hundred and twenty-four (424) units. This is a net loss of three hundred and eighty-nine (389) units (refer to Table 4). Housing values and tenure are important indicators of the overall condition and stability of an area (refer to Table 3). Census tracts 28 and 29 experienced an approximately ten (10) percent increase in the proportion of owner-occupied housing from sixty-two (62) percent in 1980 to sixty-eight (68) percent in 1990 in tract 28 and from fifty-three (53) percent to fiftynine (59) percent in tract 29.

The proportion of owner-occupied housing in tract 28 is

actually higher than in Duval County as a whole, which experienced a slight decline in the proportion of owner-occupied housing from sixty-three (63) percent in 1980 to sixty-two (62) percent in 1990.

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Table 3 Tract 17 Total Housing Units

Tract 18

1980 Tract 28

Tract 29

Duval County

Summary of Housing Data 1990 Tract Tract Tract 28 17 18

Tract 29

Duval County

% Change Tract Tract Tract 17 Tract 18 28 29

Duval County

1,670

694

4,997

4,647

227,077

1241

409

4,640

4,355

284,673

-35%

-70%

-8%

-7%

20%

1,509

598

4,720

4,306

208,351

894

321

4,161

3,672

257,245

-69%

-86%

-13%

-17%

19%

Owner-Occupied Units As a % of occupied units

149 10%

83 14%

3,080 62%

2,442 53%

130,176 63%

250 28%

47 15%

2,811 68%

2,178 59%

159,444 62%

40% 65%

-77% 6%

-10% 9%

-12% 11%

18% -2%

% Vacant Units

10%

14%

6%

7%

8%

28%

22%

10%

16%

10%

66%

36%

46%

53%

17%

$29,605

$35,113

$39,933

$38,786

$73,899

$31,046

$27,267

$46,771

$39,379

$85,747

5%

-29%

15%

2%

14%

Occupied Housing Units

Median Housing Value (dollars)*

*Adjusted using the CPI of 1.295 for 1980 and 1.275 for 1990 Data Source: U.S. Census of Population and Housing, 1980 & 1990

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Table 4

Year

Residential Building Permit Activity Single Family

Duplex

Triplex/ Conver- Mobile Quad 5+ Units sions Home

Demolitions*

Net Units**

1980 Tract 17

0

0

0

0

~~~

0

~~~

0

Tract 18

0

0

0

0

~~~

0

~~~

0

Tract 28

3

0

0

0

~~~

1

~~~

3

Tract 29

3

0

0

0

~~~

0

~~~

3

Tract 17

0

0

0

0

~~~

0

~~~

0

Tract 18

0

0

0

0

~~~

1

~~~

1

Tract 28

6

0

0

0

~~~

0

~~~

6

Tract 29

6

0

0

0

~~~

0

~~~

6

Tract 17

0

0

0

0

~~~

0

~~~

0

Tract 18

0

0

0

0

~~~

0

~~~

0

Tract 28

4

10

0

0

~~~

0

~~~

14

Tract 29

4

2

0

0

~~~

0

~~~

6

Tract 17

0

0

0

0

~~~

0

~~~

0

Tract 18

0

0

0

0

~~~

0

~~~

0

Tract 28

2

0

0

0

0

0

6

-4

Tract 29

4

0

0

0

0

0

17

-13

Tract 17

0

0

0

0

0

0

9

-9

Tract 18

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

-1

Tract 28

1

0

0

0

0

0

6

-5

Tract 29

2

0

0

0

0

0

7

-5

Tract 17

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Tract 18

0

0

0

0

0

0

8

-8

Tract 28

0

0

0

0

0

0

12

-12

Tract 29

0

0

0

0

0

0

15

-15

Tract 17

0

158

0

102

0

0

45

215

Tract 18

0

0

0

0

0

0

12

-12

Tract 28

2

2

0

0

0

0

16

-12

Tract 29

0

0

0

0

0

0

11

-11

Tract 17

0

0

0

0

0

0

9

-9

Tract 18

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

-2

Tract 28

2

0

0

0

0

1

15

-12

Tract 29

3

0

0

0

0

0

47

-44

1985

1989

1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

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Table 4

Year

Residential Building Permit Activity (Continued) Single Family

Duplex

Triplex/ Conver- Mobile Quad 5+ Units sions Home

Demolitions*

Net Units**

1995 Tract 17

0

0

0

0

0

0

18

-18

Tract 18

0

0

0

0

0

0

74

-74

Tract 28

3

0

0

0

0

0

11

-8

Tract 29

1

0

0

0

4

0

10

-5

0

0

0

0

0

1

66

-65

1996 Tract 17 Tract 18

0

0

0

0

0

0

63

-63

Tract 28

2

0

0

0

0

0

33

-37

Tract 29

1

0

0

0

0

0

34

-35

Tract 17

0

0

0

0

0

0

29

-29

Tract 18

0

0

0

0

0

0

34

-34

Tract 28

56

0

0

4

0

0

46

10

Tract 29

0

0

0

0

0

0

24

-24

Tract 17

0

0

0

0

0

0

29

-29

Tract 18

0

0

0

0

0

0

44

-44

Tract 28

28

0

0

4

0

0

29

-1

Tract 29

3

0

0

0

0

0

31

-24

136

172

0

108

4

4

813

-389

1997

1998

Total

*Demolitions include only those unit types that are given in this analysis. **These numbers are not entirely accurante due to the lack of data on demolitions for 1980,85, and 89. These numbers possibly overestimate the net number of units. Source: City of Jacksonville, Planning and Development Department, 2000

Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood Action Plan

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Employment Occupations for all census tracts in the Study Area are concentrated in the Technical, Sales, and Administrative Support occupations, the Service occupations, and the Operators, Fabricators, and Laborers occupations (refer to Table 5). There have been some changes from 1980 to 1990, however, with a rise in Technical, Sales, and Administrative Support occupations, and a significant decrease in Operators, Fabricators, and Laborers. The Professional and Related Services industry remained relatively unchanged while the Wholesale and Retail Trade increased in tract 028 and Manufacturing decreased dramatically in tract 029. Compared to the County, the neighborhood census tracts are more oriented towards the lower, unskilled labor positions. The County has higher percentages in the Managerial & Professional Specialty and the Technical, Sales, and Administrative Support occupations. The Study Area, however, is more concentrated within the service and labor occupations. Work Location and Commute Since most of the residents work within the Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), with approximately 25-minute commute times, it is assumed that the residents work within the City and near the urban core area (refer to Table 6). Additionally, public transportation is relied upon more heavily in the Study Area than in the County as a whole; with approximately (10) to twenty (20) percent in tracts 28 and 29 and thirty (30) to forty (40) percent in tracts 17 and 18 and only three (3) percent of the County population (refer to Figure 1). Data Limitations Because the socioeconomic data are from the U.S. Census, they do not present a totally accurate picture of the study area. First, the data are 10 years old. Conditions in the study area may have changed somewhat in that time period.

Second, since the study area

occupies parts of five census tracts, the available data describes a larger area than what is being studied. Despite these limitations, the available data demonstrate socioeconomic trends for the Study Area and adjacent neighborhoods, and these trends are assumed to have continued to the present day. Data for housing value and tenure are also from the U.S. Census, and therefore have the same limitations as the socioeconomic data.

Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood Action Plan

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Table 5

Occupations and Selected Industries: Percentages Tract 17 Tract 18

Employed Persons Aged 16 & Over

473

645

1980 Tract 28 5,115

Tract 29 3,773

Duval County

Tract 17 Tract 18

1990 Tract 28

Tract 29

Duval County

241,225

510

274

4,774

3,149

314,432

As a % of Persons Aged 16 & Over Managerial & Professional Specialty

7%

6%

12%

11%

23%

10%

4%

12%

14%

25%

Technical, Sales, & Admin. Support

10%

9%

24%

19%

35%

21%

1%

27%

22%

37%

Service

40%

31%

29%

33%

13%

43%

35%

29%

35%

13%

1%

7%

2%

2%

1%

2%

7%

1%

2%

1%

Farming, Forestry , and Fishing Precision Production, Craft, & Repair

10%

5%

6%

10%

12%

7%

15%

8%

7%

11%

Operators, Fabricators, and Laborers

32%

41%

27%

25%

15%

17%

38%

23%

20%

12%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

Data Source: U.S. Census of Population and Housing, 1980 & 1990

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Work Location and Commuting Time

Table 6

Tract 17

Tract 18

1980 Tract 28

Tract 29

Duval County

Tract 17

Tract 18

1990 Tract 28

Tract 29

Duval County

Workers 16 Years & Over

460

573

4,943

3,580

250,332

471

274

4,592

3,140

333,152

Mean Travel Time to Work (min.)

23.1

22.2

26.5

24.7

21.2

27.4

31.8

23.5

23.6

21.4

Private Vehicle

45%

40%

76%

73%

87%

52%

38%

83%

69%

90%

Public Transportation

37%

31%

20%

21%

5%

31%

32%

10%

20%

3%

Other Means or Work at Home

18%

29%

4%

6%

7%

16%

30%

6%

11%

8%

Mode of Travel to Work

Data Source: U.S. Census of Population and Housing, 1980 & 1990

Percent of Workers Aged 16 Years and Over

Figure 1 Public Transportation Use for Neighborhood Census Tracts and County, 1980 and 1990 25% 20%

1980

15%

1990

10% 5% 0% Tract

28

Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood Action Plan

Tract

29

Duval County

3-11


Conclusion The Study Area has many issues, such as low incomes, high vacancy rates, and declining housing stock.

However, there are some assets that indicate high potential for

neighborhood revitalization. With an overall decline in housing stock and population, the stable median housing values for the Study Area is uncharacteristic of a visibly declining neighborhood. The stable values could be a positive indication that the neighborhood has the potential for revitalization. The housing values also indicate that the Study Area is a valuable source of affordable housing. Additionally, the high homeownership rates demonstrate a residential population that has a high degree of investment in the community. Since homeowners typically have a larger stake in a community than renters, the high homeownership rates are a positive indicator of neighborhood stability

i

Median household income for 1979 and 1989, the years for which census data were collected, was adjusted to 1999 U.S. dollars using the Consumer Price Index. All dollar amounts are 1999$.

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SECTION 4 ξ

Existing Development and Activity SUMMARY

Although there has not been much investment in the Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood for years, there is still some activity that puts a positive perspective on the possibility of revitalizing the community. Although most of the current development activity is the result of non-profit or public efforts, the neighborhood is benefiting greatly. Habitat for Humanity, the Jacksonville Housing Authority, and the Community Alliance Development Corporation are all providing affordable housing to new residents. The proposed Beaver Street Enterprise Center will create and support businesses in the area. Additionally, Edward Waters College is growing and looking for housing for new students. These activities can serve as a basis for revitalization within the neighborhood.

Seven major development activities within and around the study area that will continue or begin to impact the neighborhood are the following: •

Habitat for Humanity of Jacksonville (Habijax)

Hope VI

Community Alliance Development Corporation (CADC)

The growth of Edward Waters College

Shiloh Metropolitan Baptist Church expansion

Beaver Street Enterprise Center

Load King Manufacturing expansion

Habitat for Humanity of Jacksonville (Habijax) has become a familiar and strong presence in many of the City’s deteriorating neighborhoods. The Study Area has approximately ninety (90) Habijax homes, all of which are located south of Kings Road. While Habijax provides a needed service to low-income neighborhoods, a large increase of these homes in the Study Area could raise issues concerning architectural compatibility with the historical character of the neighborhood and vacant lot acquisition for more comprehensively planned projects.

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The Hope VI project completed east of Myrtle Avenue, and the Myrtle Avenue improvements have provided a positive impact within this area. The project includes public housing for the elderly and handicapped, as well as single-family homes for sale. Myrtle Avenue streetscape improvements have significantly impacted

the

neighborhood.

visual The

character

project

also

of

the

has

a

component that includes renovation loans to

Habitat for Humanity homes along Windle Street, just south of Kings Road, near Load King Manufacturing.

businesses along Myrtle Avenue. The Community Alliance Development Corporation (CADC) is a local development corporation that began with the Hope IV project and is now beginning to engage in its own development

activities.

The

CADC

is

developing two single-family homes on the corner of 10th Street and Myrtle Avenue, after obtaining

HOME

Jacksonville

CHDO

Planning

funds and

from

the

Development

Department early this year. Edward Waters College (EWC) is the anchor tenant of the Kings Road Corridor. The College is concentrated on the western side near Fairfax Street, and is the dominant presence

CADC development of two single-family homes on the corner of Myrtle Avenue and 10th Street

along the roadway. EWCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s enrollment is continuing to increase, from 813 students in the fall of 1999 to a projected 1000 in the fall of 2000. The College has a football team beginning next year, and is looking toward building a stadium, as well as expanding for additional classroom space. Additionally, with 247 of the 813 students (approximately thirty percent of the student population) living in residence halls in 1999, the College is beginning to look for more student housing near the campus and has purchased Society Court apartments, which is located just north of the campus. Additionally, the College has recently been awarded a $250,000 Historically Black Colleges

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and Universities Grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) for redevelopment along Kings Road. Shiloh Metropolitan Baptist Church is located on Beaver Street near Interstate 95. The church is currently in the midst of an expansion of its present facilities. The expansion includes a new main auditorium and parking lots as well as improvements to existing parking areas. As part of the expansion, the church has sought and received closure of portions of Little Beaver Street, Cleveland Street, and Ashley Street. The new auditorium will seat approximately 5,000 persons, and occupy 40,172 square feet. In addition to the 448 on-site parking spaces, 1219 off-site parking spaces will be provided at Gateway Shopping Center and JTA Park-N-Ride lots, with shuttle service provided to Shiloh. Another development activity planned for the southern portion of the Study Area is the Beaver Street Enterprise Center. This project is a business incubator being developed by a coalition of local organizations, with FRESH Ministries acting as the lead agency. A new non-profit organization, Core City Business Incubators, Inc., has been formed to operate the incubator. The primary goals of the Enterprise Center are to create and support businesses owned by core city residents and to create higher wage jobs in the core city. The incubator will be located on the north side of Beaver Street, between Blanche and Minnie Streets, and will house 20 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 25 early stage light industrial and manufacturing businesses, as well as support staff and services. Construction expected to begin during the fourth quarter of 2000, and is expected to open during the second quarter of 2001. Load King Manufacturing is a light industrial company located in the southern section of the Study Area.

The company management has

approached the City about expanding its existing facilities assembling

and

receiving

adjacent

assistance

parcels.

JEDC

with has

indicated that the City will assist in the acquisition of the area bound by Beaver Street, Myrtle Avenue, Barnett Street, and State Street. The proposed expansion of Load King Manufacturing

Load King Manufacturing on Beaver Street.

will be more thoroughly addressed in Section 9 of this report.

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With the exception of the expansion of Load King Manufacturing, these development activities are the results of non-profit or public agencies. While there is not much private investment in the neighborhood, the efforts of the non-profit and public entities demonstrate that the neighborhood is important to the residents and community. While the initiatives launched by these entities are important, they must leverage private investment in order to sustain the efforts.

Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood Action Plan

4-4


SECTION 5 両

Existing Uses & Conditions SUMMARY

This section compiles data collected in the Study Area on land uses and building conditions. The Study Area is a predominately single-family neighborhood, with some multifamily and commercial uses scattered throughout the area. The conditions of the buildings are substandard and deteriorating, and there are many vacant and condemned buildings. The Study Area can generally be divided into four sections: the southern section, the northern section, the Kings Road Corridor, and the industrial section. The southern section has the most vacant lots and buildings, as well as the most buildings in deteriorating and dilapidated conditions.

Land Use and Zoning Designations Land Use The land use designation pattern for the study area can generally be divided into four sections: the residential area north of 8th Street to 17th Street, the residential area south of 8th Street to Beaver Street, the industrial areas south of Beaver Street and east of Myrtle Avenue, and three corridors: the Kings Road Corridor, the Myrtle Avenue Corridor, and the Beaver Street Corridor (refer to Map 2). The northern area is designated Low Density Residential (LDR) which allows for a gross density of up to seven (7) dwelling units per acre. The southern section is designated Medium Density Residential (MDR) which allows for a gross density of up to twenty (20) dwelling units per acre. The Kings Road Corridor and the Myrtle Avenue Corridor are both interspersed with Community/General Commercial (CGC), Public Buildings and Facilities (PBF), and Residential-Professional-Institutional (RPI) land uses. However, C/GC is the dominate land use category for Kings Road, while RPI is the dominate land use category for Myrtle Avenue north of Kings Road, and Light Industrial (LI) and Heavy Industrial (HI) south of Kings Road. C/GC allows for commercial, office, and institutional uses that serve a large area of the City and offer a wide range of goods and services. These uses can include hotels, restaurants, auto repair shops, and auditoriums. The RPI designation allows for mixed uses, such as office, limited retail and service establishments, institutional uses, and medium density

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residential units. PBF designation allows all major public uses or community service activities. LI and HI allow for industrial and manufacturing uses. Zoning The zoning district pattern follows the land use pattern closely, with the exception of the southern part of the study area north of Kings Road (refer to Map 3). The western half of this area is zoned Residential Medium Density-E (RMD-E) and the eastern half is zoned Residential Medium Density-A (RMD-A). The only difference in the two districts is that RMD-E allows for multi-family dwelling units as a permitted use by right, and single-family homes as a permissible use by exception, while the RMD-A district allows only single-family homes as a permitted use by right. The northern half of the study area is designated Residential Low Density-G (RLD-G), which has the same minimum lot size requirements as the RMD-E, but does not allow for multi-family housing. The southern half of the study area below Kings Road is all designated RMD-A. Prior to 1997, the eastern half of the southern area below Kings Road to Beaver Street was RMD-E, but was changed to a lesser density (from 20 units per acre under RMD-E to 7 units per acre under RMD-A). Myrtle Avenue, north of Kings Road, is almost completely zoned RMD-A. Kings Road, being far more intense in commercial uses, is almost completely zoned Commercial/Community General-2 (CCG-2). The Myrtle Avenue Corridor underwent a land use designation change in 1991 from CGC to RPI, while Kings Road Corridor remained CGC. Myrtle Avenue, south of Kings Road, however, is almost entirely Industrial-Light (IL). Beaver Street is dominated by both CCG-2 and IL. With the exception of the Load King Manufacturing parcel, the light industrial zoning districts are located south of Beaver Street and west of Myrtle Avenue. The heavy industrial zoning district is located south of Church Street, which is the southern most section of the Study Area. Existing Land Uses The existing land use distribution for the Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood is similar to the zoning and land use categories, with the exception of scattered non-conforming uses (refer to Map 4). The only zoning district that allows for multi-family housing is on the west side of the southern portion of the study area.

King Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood Action Plan

However, there is multi-family housing

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throughout the entire study area. There are pockets of commercial uses throughout the area, although most are vacant. Additionally, there are residential uses scattered throughout some of the light industrial zoning districts.

The following table shows the land use

distribution: Study Area Existing Uses

Table 7 Singlefamily

Multi-family

2045 68%

Percent

294 10%

Comm

Industrial

84 3%

Churches

82 3%

Parking

40 1%

20 1%

Public

Vacant Lots

24 1%

411 14%

Total Lots 3000 100%

Source: Windshield survey conducted by the Jacksonville Planning and Development Department, 2000

Existing Conditions The existing conditions of the neighborhood were collected by means of a windshield survey.

Therefore, the data only reflect the conditions of the property on the outside.

Surveyors did not attempt to look inside any of the dwelling units. Therefore, a dwelling unit could be viewed to be in â&#x20AC;&#x153;standardâ&#x20AC;? condition on the exterior, but the interior of the unit could be deteriorating.

Regardless, the survey does give an overall view of the declining

conditions of the housing stock and commercial structures (refer to Map 5). Conditions were collected only on single-family units, multi-family units, and commercial structures.

The following categories were used to determine the conditions of the

structures: Standard: Buildings need only minor maintenance that does not require a large amount of investment. Substandard: Building has some problems beyond routine maintenance. could be accomplished by owner or without extensive investment.

Most repairs

Deteriorated: Building has at least one major problem that requires extensive investment, such as roof damage. Dilapidated: Building appears to be unsafe for human occupation, but is not yet boarded and condemned. Vacant: Building is boarded and vacant.

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The conditions for the Study Area are generally poor, with the majority of the buildings rating in Substandard or Deteriorated condition (refer to Table 8). Table 8

Building Conditions by Land Use SubDetDilVacant Standard standard eriorated apidated Building

Single-family Residential Multi-family Residential Commercial Total % of Total

Total

353

739

689

84

180

2045

23

119

98

29

25

294

13

23

20

5

23

84

389

881

807

118

228

2423

16%

36%

33%

5%

9%

100%

Source: Windshield survey conducted by the Planning and Development Department, 2000

Only 353 single-family homes, twenty-three (23) multi-family homes, and thirteen (13) commercial buildings were rated in standard condition.

Additionally, nine (9) percent of all

residential and commercial structures in the Study Area are vacant. Planning Sections The windshield survey also revealed that the Study Area should be divided into four distinct sections of analysis, and that recommendations for each section should be made since each would require a different set of strategies. The sections of analysis are the following (refer to Map 8): ♦ The residential section north of 8th Street ♦ The residential section south of 8th Street ♦ The Kings Road Corridor ♦ The industrial section east of Myrtle Avenue & south of Beaver Street, as well as the Load King Manufacturing parcel.

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Southern and Northern Sections Multi-family housing, commercial, church and public facilities are, for the most part, concentrated south of 8th Street, near the Kings Road Corridor (refer to Table 9). Vacant lots, which comprise ten (10) percent of the land uses, are also concentrated near the Corridor. Density levels appear to increase near the Corridor. The southern portion tends to have more combined lots, half lots, and generally smaller lots. Additionally, some blocks in the southern area have alleys through them, while the northern area has street access only. The northern section of the study area, north of 8Th Street is predominately single family homes, with less multi-family and commercial uses (refer to Table 9). The lot sizes are larger, and the blocks are on more of a grid pattern than in the southern portion of the study area. Existing Uses: Comparison of North and South Sections

Table 9 Singlefamily Northern Southern

Multifamily

82% 64%

Comm

7% 11%

Churches Parking

1% 4%

1% 2%

Vacant Lots

Public

0% 1%

0% 1%

8% 17%

Total Lots 100% 100%

Source: Windshield survey conducted by the Jacksonville Planning and Development Department, 2000

The southern subsection has undergone a considerable amount of change. The housing conditions are generally poor to deteriorated (refer to Table 10). There are also a greater amount of vacant lots and buildings, as well as a significant amount of multi-family housing (refer to Figures 2 and 3).

Table 10

Building Conditions: Comparisons of the North and South Sections SubDetDilVacant Standard standard eriorated apidated Building

Northern Southern

9% 20%

50% 29%

33% 32%

2% 7%

Total

6% 12%

100% 100%

Source: Windshield survey conducted by the Planning and Development Department, 2000

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Figure 2

Percent

Vacant Lots and Buildings: Comparison of Study Area and Sectors 18% 16% 14% 12% 10% 8% 6% 4% 2% 0%

Study Area Northern Section Southern Section

Vacant Lots

Vacant Buildings

Figure 3

Multi-family and Commercial Uses: Comparison of the Study Area and Sections 12% 10%

Percent

8% Study Area

6%

Northern Section

4%

Southern Section

2% 0% Multi-family

Commercial

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Kings Road Corridor Kings Road is a state maintained (US 1 & 23) minor arterial highway that runs east/west from Downtown into West Jacksonville. The portion of the Corridor in the study area is between Fairfax Street and Myrtle Avenue.

The Corridor should be the hub of commercial

activity for the College Park/Mid-Westside Neighborhood. However, the existing commercial uses along the Corridor do not adequately meet the neighborhoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s needs. Therefore, the Corridor will be a focal point for future analysis and revitalization. The Kings Road corridor from Myrtle Avenue to Fairfax Street contains a mix of residential, commercial, and educational uses. Since residential uses are not a permissible use by right under the existing zoning and land use designation, the single-family homes that historically lined the roadway are gradually being replaced by commercial uses. However, Edward Waters College is an â&#x20AC;&#x153;anchor tenantâ&#x20AC;? for this corridor, since the college dominates the western portion of the roadway near Fairfax Street, and provides a rather stable presence on a corridor surrounded by change and deterioration.

Kings Road Existing Uses

Table 11 Singlefamily Percent

29%

Multi-family

Comm

3%

26%

Churches 1%

Parking

Public

5%

Vacant Lots

7%

29%

Total Lots 100%

Source: Windshield survey conducted by the Jacksonville Planning and Development Department, 2000

Kings Road is characterized by a large number of vacant lots and buildings. Twenty-seven (27) percent of the parcels along the corridor are vacant lots, and nineteen (19) percent of the commercial buildings are vacant. Many of the commercial buildings are in poor or deteriorating condition. Most of the buildings are brick masonry, and are buildings containing three to four businesses in each.

The occupied buildings are generally in fair to poor

condition, while the vacant buildings are deteriorating or condemned.

The older, more

historical commercial buildings directly abut the sidewalk, while the newer, more modern commercial buildings (Jax Liquors, Discount Auto Parts, and Amoco) are on larger parcels with parking lots and setbacks.

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Most of the homes along the Kings Road Corridor appear to be older than fifty years. The majority of single-family houses are constructed out of wood. Most of the housing is in fair to poor condition, and some homes are condemned. Additionally, there are a few loft-style dwelling units located on the second floor of commercial buildings, although the units appear to be empty. Kings Road was expanded from two lanes to a four lane principal arterial road sometime prior to 1971. In doing so, the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) acquired a significant proportion of the front yards of many residential properties, thereby the severely impacting the character of the corridor.

Most of the residential properties are now

completely lacking parking areas. Additionally, since most of the older commercial buildings now directly abut the street and sidewalk, many of the commercial areas lack parking lots that are visible from the roadway. Additionally, there is not on-street parking. Although potentially illegal, both residents and commercial tenants of Kings Road use many of the vacant lots for parking. There are sidewalks along both sides of the corridor, and these are approximately six (6) feet wide, although the width does vary. However, the four-lane highway does not have crosswalks except at the College entrance to the Administration Building. The Corridor lacks bike lanes, as well as any infrastructure to support bicycle transportation, such as bike racks or posts. Additionally, there is no median and very little right of way left over from the first road expansion. Industrial Section There are several key issues of concern in the industrial section of the Study Area west of Myrtle Avenue. Older warehouse-style buildings occupy the majority of the industrial sites. Many of these buildings are vacant and in poor condition. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Flexible spaceâ&#x20AC;? warehouses, such as are found in newer business and industrial parks are not represented in the Study Area. One issue is the absence of buffers between residential and industrial uses. Several of the new Habijax homes

King Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood Action Plan

Corner of State and Barnett Streets

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as well as many other residences are located less than one block, and in some cases directly across the street, from Load King Manufacturing.

There are no buffers

between these uses in the form of areas with land

uses

of

intermediate

intensity,

landscaping, or opaque fencing.

Transportation

Vacant warehouse south of Beaver Street.

The two major roadways dividing the Study Area are Beaver Street and Kings Road. Both of these roadways are four-lane arterial highways, and are heavily used by the industrial businesses, as well as the adjacent neighborhoods.

Additionally, both of the

roadways provide access to Interstate 95, and are major thoroughfares into Downtown. Beaver Street has an annual average daily traffic counti between 17,000 and 22,000 trips, with the highest trips extending out of the western portion of the Study Area. Beaver Street is currently at a Level Of Service (LOS) C. Kings Road has an annual average daily traffic count of 19,500 through the Study Area, with larger counts travelling west, similar to the counts of Beaver Street. Kings Road is also at an LOS C. The residents of the New Town neighborhood are heavily dependent on transit services. Census data indicates that approximately 13 to 21% of the residents rely on public transportation to journey to work. Five JTA bus routes service the Study Area: Westside-9, Northside-1, Northside-2, Northside-3, and Northside-11. All bus routes travel along Myrtle Avenue, Kings Road, and Beaver Street. Infrastructure The Study Area has complete water and sewer coverage, though there are planned improvements. A Jacksonville Electric Authority (JEA) water groundworks project for the southern portion of the Study Area is in the design phases. Construction for this project will occur from West 2nd Street from Tyler Street to Rushing Street, West 1st Street from Tyler Street to Barnett Street, West State Street from Tyler Street to Brady Street, Tyler Street

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from West 2nd Street to State Street, and Rushing Street from West 2nd Street to State Street. South of Kings Road lacks curb and gutter, and there are many areas with drainage problems. Drainage problems have been a common complaint of local industrial businesses for some time. Additionally, there are numerous roadway problems that affect industrial businesses, such as the narrow width of Beaver Street and the narrow turn radii of the streets throughout the industrial section.

i

This data was obtained from the Transportation Planning Division of the City of Jacksonville Planning and Development Department. See Appendix I.

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SECTION 6 両

Environmental Conditions SUMMARY

Given the historically industrial nature of the Study Area, environmental concerns are likely to impede development, even on a small level. There are currently two assessments underway, and the preliminary findings from the southern area give some insight into the types of environmental problems the City will have to mitigate to accomplish revitalization and redevelopment.

The Study Area has historically been a working class African-American community that grew out of the rail lines and adjacent industrial areas. Due to the historically strong industrial presence, as well as the recent attention focused on old incinerator sites in the Jacksonville Urban Core, an environmental assessment study has been commissioned for the southern portion of the Study Area.

Although the study is not yet completed, there are some

preliminary findings that can provide some insight into the environmental conditions that new and existing development may confronti. The largest environmental concern is underground and above ground storage tanks. The Study Area currently has twenty-five (25) tanks scattered throughout the southern portion. The preliminary assessment ranked the area in terms of Low, Medium, and High risk areas. The majority of the southern area was found as having no risk of contamination. However, there were fifteen (15) sites that were considered to be low risk for contamination, three (3) sites considered to be medium risk, and fourteen (14) sites that were considered high risk. While the findings are preliminary, they do present a useful tool for determining obstacles for development in this area. In addition to the assessment for the southern section, the HOPE VI Oaks at Durkeeville project that is adjacent to the northern portion of the Study Area, is currently halting all new construction of the single-family homes until an environmental assessment is completed for the area. The Emmitt Reed Ballpark historically was the site of an incinerator, and many of the surrounding residents used the ash as fill for their yards.

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Therefore, the Housing

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Authority is working with the Environmental Protection Agency to determine the extent of the problem, and suggest strategies to correct the problem.ii

i ii

Preliminary maps provided by Aerostar Environmental Services, Inc., 8-11-00 Information obtained from the Jacksonville Housing Authority, 9-00

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SECTION 7 ξ

Visions for Redevelopment SUMMARY

The Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood has many assets that can be used in redeveloping the area: the historical character, the housing stock, the College, the Corridors, the many vacant lots and buildings, and employment centers. This plan recommends that the redevelopment efforts should focus housing rehabilitation throughout the neighborhood, while focusing infill housing efforts in the southern section. Additionally, the historical character of the neighborhood should be protected. Kings Road should be redeveloped in terms of commercial revitalization that could be directed towards the needs of EWC students. Kings Road should also undergo streetscape improvements to improve the surroundings of the College. A positive economic environment in this area should be fostered in order to strengthen existing employment centers and encourage the development of new ones.

The Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood has many assets that could be used as avenues for redevelopment: •

The historical character of the neighborhood

The housing stock

Edward Waters College

The Kings Road Corridor

The substantial amount of vacant properties and buildings

Community Organizations and Resources

Employment centers (Load King and U.S. Post Office)

The history of the Neighborhood is rich and could be a marketing point, as well as a design guide for future development. Preserving and restoring some of the original buildings could create a more historical feel within the neighborhood, while giving the community the opportunity to embrace their history. Design guidelines for new development could follow the older development, in terms of setbacks, building materials, and architectural compatibility.

The existing housing stock can be rehabilitated and reused to ensure the

historical integrity of the neighborhood remains intact. Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood Action Plan

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Edward Waters College (EWC) is also a historical asset, and has just received local designation as a local historical landmark.

The college has five buildings that are of

tremendous local historical significance, especially to the African-American community. The college, being the oldest African-American institution of higher education in the state and the oldest institution of higher education in Jacksonville, is a large source of pride for the surrounding communities, and is a stable presence along the Kings Road Corridor. Creating conditions that would be favorable for EWC expansion could positively impact the physical conditions of the area. Conditions along the Kings Road Corridor, however, are not favorable to the student population of the College. The Corridor lacks any retail or service outlets that would cater to a student population, housing conditions near the College are poor and deteriorating, and the Corridor does not offer a pedestrian friendly atmosphere.

Therefore, through the

creation of favorable conditions for EWC expansion, and the creation of development that would generate student oriented uses along the Corridor, the Corridor could offer a college environment, and give the neighboring residents a commercial hub as well. Additionally, the Kings Road Corridor (from Myrtle Avenue to College Circle) and the Kings Road/Myrtle Avenue intersection were identified by the March 1999 Assessment of Jacksonvilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Core City Study Area as two of six areas in the Core City region as having the best potential for retail development or redevelopment. The study assessed the areas on the basis of current and future land use, vacant parcels and buildings, the location along a major corridor, and the lack of incompatible special land uses located nearby the areas. The Study recommended uses to support Edward Waters College, as well as neighboring residential areas. While vacant properties are often the telltale sign of the physical deterioration of a neighborhood, vacant properties can also be assets. Vacant lots and buildings are easier to assemble for development, and lack any costs associated with relocation of residents or businesses. The Study Area presently has four hundred and eleven (411) vacant lots, and two hundred and twenty-eight (228) vacant buildings out of a total 3000 properties. However, the southern section of the Study Area, south of 8th Street, has twice the amount of vacant lots and buildings than the northern section. Therefore, the southern section

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should be designated as an area for infill housing efforts and rehabilitation, while the northern section should be designated for stabilization efforts and rehabilitation.

In addition to the numerous churches and schools, the neighborhood currently has strong employment centers, as well as community organizations that are working as developers, community representatives, and service providers: ♦ The industrial section of the Study Area south of Kings Road is a key employment center for the neighborhood as well as the core city as a whole. Key employers in this section include Load King Manufacturing, the U.S. Postal Service, the Jacksonville Transportation Authority, and Schumann Casters and Equipment.

Load King

Manufacturing is in the early stages of an expansion plan that will generate a substantial number of new jobs for the area. ♦ The Community Alliance Development Corporation was formed in 1996 as the development entity for all off-site construction and rehabilitation of the HOPE IV project in Durkeeville.

Although the CADC is no longer serving this role for the HOPE IV

project, the organization is becoming a developer of single-family homes in the Study Area. Currently, the CADC is developing two homes on the corner of Myrtle Avenue and 10th Street.

♦ Good Neighbor M.A.N.I.A. began in 1993, and has grown to over a hundred members. The organization has been able to rezone Myrtle Avenue from a zoning district that was completely commercial to a variety of district that reflect the mixed uses along the roadway. Additionally, M.A.N.I.A has participated in clean-ups, community policing, and voter registration. M.A.N.I.A. continues to be the grassroots voice of the neighborhood, while also being a part of the CADC. ♦ The Schell-Sweet Community Resource Center, which is financed by the City of Jacksonville, is located at Edward Waters College on Kings Road. The resource center provides health and medical care to residents of the neighborhood, while also providing meeting space for community activities.

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This plan recommends the following overall visions and strategy directions for the study area and individual planning sections: ♦ There should be a historical preservation and neighborhood conservation emphasis in rehabilitation efforts, as well as in guidelines for new construction for housing, commercial, and industrial development projects. ♦ The northern section should be targeted for stabilization efforts, which could include rehabilitation of homes occupied by seniors and rehabilitation of homes for sale to moderate to middle income families. New construction on vacant lots could also be marketed toward moderate to middle income families and should be architecturally compatible with the existing housing stock. ♦ The southern planning section should be targeted for redevelopment efforts, which could include infill development of single-family housing and rehabilitation of multi-family housing. Rehabilitation of single-family homes would also help increase the housing stock and improve the housing conditions.

All housing

th

south of 8 street should be marketed to low to moderate income families, since the lots and houses are generally smaller than the lots and houses in the northern planning section. ♦ Edward Waters College expansion should be master planned and guided to limit the negative impact students and commercial intrusions can have on single-family residential areas. Two area designations are proposed: the EWC Development Area (designated for physical expansion of the college and student housing accommodations) and the EWC Impact Area (the area surrounding the college that will be influenced by the expansion) (refer to Map 9). ♦ Kings Road should be the hub of commercial activity for both the college and the surrounding residential neighborhoods. Retail and service uses that serve the residents, rather than the region, should line the Corridor.

Land should be

assembled to create a neighborhood scale commercial center. Additionally, Kings Road should be the location of any social services that locate within the neighborhood.

The City should work closely with the local community

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organizations to attract and locate businesses and social services along the Corridor. â&#x2122;Ś Kings Road should serve as a main transportation corridor for pedestrians, cyclists, and buses, as well as the automobile. Since the Corridor is the location of a college, and a commercial area, the roadway should be safe for cyclists and pedestrians.

The Corridor should have landscaping and signage that would

create a visually pleasing entrance into the neighborhood, and provide a campusoriented atmosphere for the College. â&#x2122;Ś The industrial section should continue as a central location of light industrial and manufacturing activities in the core city.

Efforts should focus on expanding

existing businesses and attracting new employers to this area through a variety of mechanisms, such as infrastructure improvements and financial incentives. Adaptive reuse of vacant buildings should be employed where possible in this area. The remaining sections of this plan will outline specific implementation strategies that will help achieve the overall visions outlined above.

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SECTION 8 両

Edward Waters College Growth & Expansion

SUMMARY The growth and expansion of Edward Waters College is inevitable. The College has reached 1000 students in the fall semester of 2000, an increase of 200 students from last year. An additional expansion to 2000 students is projected by year 2005. The surrounding neighborhood will be impacted by the growth of Edward Waters College. Therefore, the growth should be managed and the impacts on neighboring residents lessened. The EWC Development Area proposed in this section should be the boundaries for the physical expansion of the College. The Impact Area should be the area that is influenced by the growth of the College.

The growth and expansion of Edward Waters College is an important factor to consider when planning the revitalization of the Kings Road/Myrtle Avenue Neighborhood.

The

College has recently moved forward in its effort to grow after financial troubles and bad publicity. This fall semester of the 2000-2001 school year attracted 2,000 applicants, and the projected student count is expected to be 1000, which is 200 more than the last year. Additionally, the college will have a football team in the fall semester, and will need a stadium in the near future to hold games. EWC has also been awarded a $250,000 Historically Black Colleges and Universities Grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD).

The College has

formed a Community Development Corporation (CDC) to administer this grant and expects to use the funds for redevelopment along the Kings Road Corridor. In partnership with the Transportation Division of the Jacksonville Planning and Development Department, the College has also applied for $475,372 in road enhancement funds from the Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) for projects along Kings Road (refer to Appendix I). While expansion of Edward Waters College (EWC) will require the encroachment of college related buildings into the neighboring residential areas, the growth of the college is an important issue for surrounding residents.

The College has been a landmark in the

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neighborhood since the development of the community, and is a source of the pride for the neighborhood.

Many of the students of the College are from the neighborhood, and

continue to stay there after graduation.

This College is an indelible resource to the

community. Since the growth of EWC will have an impact on the residential community, the growth should be managed and thoroughly planned. The first step in this process is the decision of where the College should expand, and where the impacts will be. Therefore, this plan recommends that boundaries for the physical development of the College be in place, as well as boundaries to control the impact of this development. These boundaries, referred to as the EWC Development Area, and the EWC Impact Area are displayed in Map 6. The EWC Development Area takes into consideration the prevalence of vacant lots, vacant buildings, and multi-family homes. Since the Development Area will be the boundaries for the actual physical expansion of the College, a high amount of vacant lots, as well as vacant buildings, will make property acquisition less complicated.

Additionally, multi-

family complexes could be renovated to provide affordable housing to students who chose to live next to the College. The Development Area also takes into consideration the existing pattern of development

of

the

College,

by

recognizing the need for a cohesive campus with contiguous buildings. The EWC Development area has a total of 302 parcels.

Typical multi-family buildings within the Study Area

Fifty-one (51) of the

parcels are vacant lots, thirty-one (31) of those parcels have vacant buildings, and twentyseven (27) of the lots have multi-family homes (See Map 9). Many of these lots are near existing EWC buildings. All EWC owned property, at the time of this plan, lies within the Development Area (refer to Map 6).

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The EWC Impact Area is designed to limit the effects of the College expansion. The impact area also contains a number of vacant lots, buildings, and multi-family housing. However, the physical expansion of the college should be limited to the Development Area, and the Impact Area should absorb the residual effects of growth, such as the overflow of student housing, and the population density that will occur during the course of the day. The Impact Area is designed to provide the necessary buffer between the busy activities of the College and the relatively quiet activities of the residential neighborhood. The first step in planning for EWC’s growth is to decide where this growth will occur. Additionally, the College needs to develop a strategic plan that will fit into a campus master plan. The College will need a concrete development guide to attract funding and technical assistance for projects.

Growth and development of EWC will impact the agendas of

various governmental, non-profit, and private entities. Therefore, the City should play an integral role in the master planning process by acting as a coordinator and facilitator for all of the key stakeholders and for the overall master planning process. Summary of Recommendations ♦ The EWC Development Area should guide the physical development of Edward Waters College; ♦ The EWC Impact Area should absorb the impacts of the EWC growth. ♦ The City should coordinate and facilitate a master planning process for the growth and development of EWC.

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SECTION 9 ξ

Zoning and Land Use

SUMMARY Many of the problems within the Study Area exist because of zoning designations. The current residential designations do not allow for the renovation of properties that have been abandoned for more than a year. The commercial designation along Kings Road is the most intense commercial zoning district. The zoning surrounding the College is not conducive to its growth. Additionally, the industrial sections contain areas of improper zoning. New construction must adhere to setback requirements that are incompatible with the existing development. This section recommends that the southern residential section be rezoned to RMD-B, Kings Road be rezoned to a less intense commercial district, the EWC development be rezoned to CRO, and that industrial areas currently zoned for residential use be rezoned to reflect the current uses. These proposed zoning changes will allow for more flexibility for renovations of vacant properties, more flexibility for the growth of the College, more appropriate neighborhood-oriented uses along Kings Road, compatible zoning in industrial areas, and the use of the administrative deviation process for new construction to relieve setback requirements.

Introduction The zoning districts are numerous, with three major residential districts, two commercial corridors with a variety of commercial, public, residential sections, and several large industrial districts south of Kings Road (refer to Tables 12, 13 and 14). The Study Area has the following issues concerning the current zoning designations: ♦ Vacant structures cannot be renovated because of restrictive zoning districts; ♦ The commercial corridor serving the neighborhood is zoned under the most intense commercial district; ♦ The zoning surrounding Edward Waters College is not conducive to the growth and development of school; ♦ Improper zoning within industrial areas; and ♦ New construction is incompatible with the existing development due to large setbacks and lot coverage requirements.

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Issues Kings Road Kings Road is currently zoned CCG-2, which is the most intense commercial zoning district. The district allows for nearly every type of use that is not industrial or residential. The uses currently along Kings Road are beginning to show the effects of the intensity of the district, with a liquor store, an auto parts store, gas station, and tire store. Most of these uses are along the eastern half of the Corridor, and do not provide for the daily retail needs of the residents or the students of EWC. This action plan envisions the rehabilitation/ redevelopment of Kings Road into a more “college” like atmosphere, especially near Edward Waters College (the eastern portion near Fairfax Street). Since the Corridor cuts through a neighborhood,

Kings Road: new and older development

uses should serve the residents as well. Therefore, this plan recommends that the portion of Kings Road near Edward Waters College, west of Whitner Street, that is currently zoned CCG-2 be rezoned to Commercial Neighborhood (CN) (refer to Maps 3 and 7).

This zoning district is less intense, and

provides for the types of uses that would be conducive to neighborhood retail and uses that would support the students of the College. The CN zoning district would exclude uses that normally would be considered too intense to be located near homes and schools, such as pawnshops and car repair shops. The plan is not recommending a zoning change for the eastern portion of the CCG-2 district along Kings Road, simply because of the many existing uses are typically represented in the CCG-2 district, and the lots are, for the most part, built out. However, rezoning the eastern portion of the Corridor will “down zone” forty properties. Seven of these properties have vacant buildings and 7 of the properties are vacant lots. The majority of the buildings (21) are single-family homes, which are non-conforming uses under any commercial zoning district.

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Property values were studied to determine whether or not the rezoning would reduce the properties below 65% of the original values and result in the likelihood of a takings issue. Like properties along Myrtle Avenue under the CN district actually have a higher property value average (approximately 25% higher) than the CCG-2 properties along Kings Road. Similar properties under the same districts in Springfield showed lower property values for the CN district, but only 39% lower. This is still 15% short of the takings threshold (refer to Appendix C for the complete analysis). EWC Expansion The expansion of EWC would require the construction of new multi-family housing, and/or the acquisition and rehabilitation of existing multi-family housing.

Additionally, the college

would need a flexible zoning category that would allow for office and institutional uses. The current zoning surrounding the college only allows for multi-family housing. This plan recommends that the designated EWC Development Area be rezoned from RMDE to Commercial, Residential, Office (CRO) (refer to Maps 3 and 7). This category allows a number of uses that encourage a college â&#x20AC;&#x153;campusâ&#x20AC;? surrounding, but without the intensity of multi-family or commercial zoning that could negatively impact the surrounding single-family homes. Vacancies and Rehabs In RMD-A districts, which allow for single-family units only, multi-family units that have been vacant for over a year cannot be renovated as the original use without a rezoning of the property. Similarly, in the RMD-E district, singlefamily units that have been vacant for over a year cannot be renovated without an exception or a rezoning. Since this neighborhood has seen years of decline, zoning districts should be flexible enough to allow for the renovation of properties without the need for rezoning or exceptions. The southern section of the Study Area has approximately twice the amount of non-conforming uses than the northern section, as well as more

Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood Action Plan

Vacant multi-family in the southern section of the Study Area

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vacant properties. Within the EWC Impact Area, eleven percent (11%) of the lots has a multi-family use, and eight percent (8%) of these buildings are vacant. The area south of the EWC Impact Area has fifteen percent (15%) of the residential structures in multi-family use, and eight percent (8%) of these are vacant. RMD-B allows for single-family homes and multi-family homes of four units or less, and would allow for the renovation of vacant single and multi-family homes. Therefore, the southern section within the EWC Impact Area as well as all residential areas south of Kings Road that are currently zoned RMD-A should be rezoned to RMD-B, and the southern section within the EWC Impact Area that is currently zoned RMD-E should be rezoned to RMD-B. The northern residential section should remain RLD-G. This rezoning would drastically reduce the number of non-conforming uses in the area from 323 to 190.i Rezoning the area that is currently RMD-A to RMD-B will create the possibility for additional multi-family development. However, many of these lots are smaller than the required lot size for multi-family development. The RMD-B district requires a minimum 5000 square feet lot for a duplex, and an additional 1000 square feet for each additional unit. Therefore, a four-unit multi-family structure would require a lot size of 7000 square feet or larger. Under the proposed RMD-B district, there would be a total of one hundred and sixty-two (162) lots that meet this requirement. Only thirty-one (31) of these lots meet the requirements for duplex, twenty (20) for a triplex, and fifteen (15) for a quad (refer to Appendix D for the complete tables). There are “clusters” of adjacent vacant lots throughout the area south of Kings Road that potentially could be combined to allow for more intense multi-family use, up to a quadruplex on any single lot. The locations of these clusters are as follows: •

Corner of Acorn and Morgan Streets: 5 lots

Corner of Acorn and Windle Streets: 4 lots

West corner of Tyler and Logan Streets: 7 lots (Note: Most of these lots are very small – 2000 square feet or less)

Corner of 1st Street and Marietta: 3 lots

Pearce Street: 2 lots

Logan Street: 5 lots

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Although the rezoning can create the possibility of additional multi-family development in the Study Area, the likelihood of a surge in private development is small given the near stagnant nature of private investment in the neighborhood in recent years. The development efforts of the City will be aimed at providing single-family homes in the neighborhood, and any attention given to multi-family homes will be in the form of renovating existing buildings. This rezoning is not encouraging more multi-family housing, but rather attempting to allow for the renovation of vacant and abandoned buildings that would otherwise create nuisances for neighboring residents. Industrial Zoning Another issue is the close proximity of residential and industrial uses throughout the proposed CRA. In the area northwest of the Beaver Street â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Myrtle Avenue intersection, an IL zoning district is adjacent to an RMD-A district, and a sizeable portion of the parcel occupied by Load King Manufacturing is erroneously zoned RMD-A. East of Myrtle Avenue, more than 50 parcels with vacant or occupied residential structures are located within IL zoning districts.

The area generally bound by Barnett Street, Union Street, Brady Street and State Street that is occupied by Load King Manufacturing should be rezoned to IL from RMD-A. Additionally, if the block bound by State, Brady, Union and Myrtle are acquired for Load King Manufacturing expansion, that area should also be rezoned to IL from RMD-A and CCG-2. This rezoning would also require a companion land use amendment. The current land uses for this area are Medium Density Residential (MDR) and Community/General Commercial (CGC). IL zoning is not permitted in either of these land use categories, therefore, the land use would need to be amended to Light Industrial (LI) prior to zoning changes. In other IL districts, the intent is to phase out residential uses.

Therefore, no zoning

changes are proposed in these areas. New Construction The design of new construction in this neighborhood must now follow new regulations that generally prescribe larger set backs and different lot coverage than the original structures. Although there is not a lot of new construction in the neighborhood, there are quite a few new Habijax homes that are structurally incompatible with the neighborhood. Additionally,

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this plan intends to prescribe specific actions for the construction of infill housing in the southern section. The City is currently rewriting the Zoning Code to be more responsive and sensitive to urban neighborhoods. Therefore, this plan recommends that specific zoning changes concerning this issue should be deferred until the submission of the new Zoning Code.

Any new

construction should be routed through the Administrative Deviation process to relax the setback requirements, thereby encouraging new construction to be consistent with the existing homes (refer to Appendix E for the regulations). Summary of Recommendations All changes are given in Table 18, and the proposed zoning districts are shown in Map 7: ♦ The section of Kings Road, east of Whitner Street, that is currently zoned CCG-2 should rezoned Commercial Neighborhood. ♦ The residential section currently zoned RMD-E should be rezoned RMD-B. ♦ The residential section south of Kings Road that is currently zoned RMD-A, with the exclusion of the EWC Development Area, should be rezoned to RMD-B. ♦ The residential section north of Kings Road, and in the EWC Impact Area that is currently zoned RMD-A should be rezoned RMD-B. ♦ The EWC Development Area should be rezoned from RMD-A and RMD-E to CRO. ♦ The industrial sites that are erroneously zoned for residential use should be rezoned to IL. ♦ All new construction should apply for setback changes to be consistent with existing

development

through

the

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administrative

deviation

process.

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Table 12

Residential Zoning Districts Within the Study Area: Uses and Minimum Lot Requirements Zoning District

Permitted Uses

Minimum Lot Requirements

Residential Low Density – G (RLD-G)

Single-family homes, group homes, churches, golf courses, and parks.

Residential Medium Density – A (RMD-A)

Single-family homes, elderly housing, foster homes, churches, golf courses, parks, and mobile homes (by exception). Single-family and multi-family homes, elderly housing, foster homes, churches, golf courses, parks, and mobile homes (by exception). Multi-family homes, elderly housing, foster homes, churches, golf courses, and parks, emergency shelters, rooming and group homes, single-family homes (by exception).

Width: 60 ft. Area: 6000 sq. ft. Lot coverage: 35% Yard Requirements: Front—20 ft., Side—5 ft., combined >15 ft., Rear – 10ft. Width: 50 ft. Area: 5000 sq. ft. Lot coverage: 35% Yard Requirements: Front – 20ft., Side – 5 ft., combined >15 ft., Rear – 20 ft.

Residential Medium Density – B (RMD-B) Residential Medium Density – D (RMD-D)

Residential Medium Density – E (RMD-E)

Table 13

Zoning District Industrial Light (IL) Industrial Heavy (IH)

Multi-family homes, elderly housing, foster homes, churches, golf courses, and parks, single-family homes (by exception).

Width: 60 ft. Area: 6000 sq. ft. (+2100 ea. add. unit) Lot Coverage: 35% Yard Requirements: Front – 20 ft., Side – 10 ft., Rear – 20 ft. Width: 50 ft. (single-family), 60 ft. (all other uses) Area: 5000 sq. ft. (1st two units, + 1000 sq. ft. ea. add. unit). No more than 4 units per lot. Lot coverage: 35% Yard Requirements: Multi-family: All sides – 20ft. Single-family: Front—20 ft., Side – 5 ft., Rear – 10 ft. Width: 60 ft. Area: 6000 sq. ft. (1st 2 units + 2900 sq. ft. ea. add. unit) Lot coverage: 35% Yard Requirements: Front – 20 ft., Side – 10 ft., Rear – 20 ft.

Industrial Zoning Districts Within the Study Area: Uses and Lot Requirements Permitted Uses Industrial uses, including wholesaling, warehousing, & storage, light manufacturing, printing, offices, service establishments, medical clinics, storage yards, & retail sales of heavy machinery Industrial & manufacturing, including railroad facilities, services, transportation & freight, scrap processing, recycling & composting, & offices.

Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood Action Plan

Lot Requirements None, with the exception that every use must be conducted in an enclosed building (except storage). None, with the exception of meeting certain noise restrictions where the IH districts adjoin less intense districts.

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Table 14

Commercial and Institutional Zoning Districts Within the Study Area: Uses and Lot Requirements Zoning District

Permitted Uses

Lot Requirements

Public Buildings & Facilities - 1 (PBF-1)

All government uses. Essential services and solid waste management facilities by exception.

None.

Public Buildings & Facilities – 2 (PBF-2)

Educational Institutions, churches, hospitals, cemeteries, Hospice facilities, cultural uses, parks, elderly and orphans homes. Parking lots and sale and service of alcoholic beverages by exception. Educational Institutions, cemeteries, cultural institutions, parks, group homes, offices, cosmetology uses, bed and breakfasts, employment office, and multi-family dwellings. Single-family homes and emergency shelter by exception. Retail outlets of all kinds, & service establishments of all kinds, recreational facilities, offices, hotels, & banks. Adult entertainment, bottle clubs and rescue missions by exception.

Width: 70 ft., Area: 7000 sq. ft., Lot coverage: 35% Maximum Height: 35 ft. or more with yard increase. Yard Requirements: Front – 20 ft., Side – 10 ft., Rear – 10 ft. Width: 50 to 70 ft (depending on building use) Area: 5000 to 7000 sq. ft. (depending on use) Lot coverage: 35% Yard Requirements: Front – 20 ft., Side – 5 to 20 ft., Rear – 10 to 20 ft. Width: none , Lot coverage: none, Max. Height: 60 ft. Yard Requirements: Front – none. Side – none, 15 ft. when next to residential. Rear – 10 ft. Width: none Lot coverage: none Yard Requirements: Front – none. Side – none, 15 ft. when next to residential. Rear – 25 ft. when next to residential without an intervening street. Width: 60 ft. Lot coverage: 35%, Area: 6000 sq. ft. Yard Requirements: Front – 20 ft., Side – 10 ft., Rear – 10 ft. Width: 75 ft. Lot coverage: 35 % Maximum Height: 35 ft. Yard Requirements: Front: 20 ft., Side: none, Rear: 10 ft.

Commercial Residential Office (CRO)

Commercial Community/ General – 1 (CCG-1) Commercial Community/ General – 2 (CCG-2)

Retail outlets of all kinds, including pawnshops. Service establishments of all kinds, recreational facilities, offices, hotels, hospitals, and wholesaling. Adult entertainment, bottle clubs and rescue missions by exception.

Commercial Office (CO)

Medical, dental, chiropractor offices, professional & business offices, & medical production facilities.

Commercial Neighborhood (CN)

Offices, retail outlets (but not pawn shops), service establishments (without drive-thrus), and other neighborhood uses. Parking, liquor retail, by exception.

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Table 15

Proposed Zoning Changes for the Study Area Area EWC Impact Area to the W. and S., Ella and 8th St. to the N., Whitner St. to the E. Whitner St. to the W., Steele St. to the N., Myrtle Ave. to the E., and Kings Rd. to the S. EWC Impact Area & Kings Rd. to the N., Study Area boundaries to the E., & W., & Beaver St. to the S. EWC Development Area with the exception of PBF-1 districts Properties west of Whitner St. and one block east of Pearce St. along Kings Road

N.W. of Beaver St./Myrtle Ave. intersection, bound by Union St., Barnett St., State St. & one parcel west of Myrtle Ave., except for the parcel on the corner of Myrtle Avenue & Union Street

Existing Zoning District RMD-E Multi-family homes, elderly & foster homes, churches, golf courses, and parks, single-family homes (by exception). RMD-A Single-family homes, elderly housing, foster homes, churches, golf courses, parks, and mobile homes (by exception). RMD-A Single-family homes, elderly housing, foster homes, churches, golf courses, parks, and mobile homes (by exception). RMD-A south of Kings Road RMD-E north of Kings Road CCG-2 Retail outlets & pawn shops, Service establishments, recreational facilities, offices, hotels, hospitals, & wholesaling. Adult entertainment, bottle clubs & rescue missions by exception. RMD-A CCG-2

Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood Action Plan

Proposed Zoning District RMD-B Single-family and multi-family homes, elderly & foster homes, churches, golf courses, parks, and mobile homes (by exception). RMD-B Single-family and multi-family homes, elderly housing, foster homes, churches, golf courses, parks, and mobile homes (by exception). RMD-B Single-family and multi-family homes, elderly housing, foster homes, churches, golf courses, parks, and mobile homes (by exception). CRO Educational & cultural institutions, cemeteries, parks, group homes, offices, , bed & breakfasts, employment office, & multi-family dwellings. Single-family dwellings and shelters by exception. CN Offices, retail outlets (but not pawn shops), service establishments (without drive-thru windows), and other neighborhood uses. Parking, liquor retail, by exception IL The IL district allows for a variety of light industrial and manufacturing uses. Residential uses are not permitted in this district.

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Reason for Change Need zoning that allows for both single-family and multi-family homes. RMD-B only allows up 4 units per lot, & will allow for the renovation of vacant multi-family homes. Need zoning that allows for both single-family and multi-family homes. RMD-B only allows up 4 units per lot, & will allow for the renovation of vacant multi-family homes. Need zoning that allows for both single-family & multi-family homes. RMD-B only allows up 4 units per lot, and will allow for the renovation of vacant multi-family homes. Need flexible zoning district to allow for the growth and development of Edward Waters College.

Need to scale down the intensity of uses near the college to provide the ambiance that facilitates pedestrian oriented retail and activities. Need to create a commercial center for the residents of the neighborhood as well. The northern section of the block occupied by Load King Manufacturing is zoned RMD-A. This area should be rezoned to IL for it to be in compliance with the Zoning Code. If the area proposed for Load King expansion is agreed to, the block bound by Myrtle, Union, State, and Brady will also need to be rezoned to IL.


i

These non-conforming uses were determined using data from the Property Appraiserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Database and are most likely an underestimate of the true volume of non-conforming uses in the Study Area. Additionally, this information was gathered only for the areas that are recommended for rezoning and not the Study Area as a whole.

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SECTION 10 両

Neighborhood Conservation SUMMARY

The Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood contains a wealth of historic resources, and many of these resources are the single-family homes that each exhibit the unique architecture common to working-class African American neighborhoods of the early twentieth century. Protecting these resources, while being sensitive to the senior and lowincome populations within the Study Area is important. Additionally, preventing further deterioration of the housing stock is also paramount. This section recommends a Neighborhood Conservation Pilot Program that combines elements of historical preservation and code enforcement to curb the deterioration of the buildings while protecting the historical integrity of the neighborhood. The recommended program is intended to initially be a pilot program applied to the EWC Impact Area.

Introduction The Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood, also known as College Park, Newtown, MidWestside, and the larger Durkeeville area, is a historically significant neighborhood to the local African-American community, and to the City of Jacksonville as well. The historic Kings Road Corridor is also the home of Edward Waters College, which has one building on the national register, and just recently won local designation for five buildings. Additionally, there are two historic bridges located near the study area, as well as a historic ballpark used by Negro League baseball teams as early as the mid 1930s. The Urban Core Southwest Historic Building Survey completed a survey of 1,352 buildings in the downtown, urban core district, and forty (40) percent of those buildings are located in the Study Area. The area shows a variety of architectural

styles:

Frame

Vernacular,

Bungalow, Shotgun, Mediterranean Revival, Collegiate Gothic, Classical Revival, Colonial Revival, and Masonry Vernacular.

Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood Action Plan

An example of frame vernacular construction at Duval Street, east of Myrtle Avenue.

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The residential structures recorded are predominantly of the shotgun or frame vernacular styles.

“Frame vernacular” refers to the common wood frame construction techniques

employed by self-taught builders. This is the prevalent style of residential architecture in Florida. These buildings are typically one or two stories in height and display a variety of footprints and forms. Porches are a common feature of this style. Buildings of this style either have gable or hip roofs. “Shotgun” typically refers to a modest single-story cottage one room wide and two or more rooms deep. Houses in this style typically have a steeppitched roof with a front-facing gable. Front porches are a common feature of this style. Most shotgun dwellings are very simple structures with little embellishment. The industrial and commercial buildings built prior to 1950 are predominantly of the masonry and industrial vernacular styles. “Masonry vernacular” is defined as the common masonry construction technique of self-taught builders. This style of construction is most commonly associated with commercial building types. A variety of materials are employed in this style, though brick and concrete block are the most common. “Industrial vernacular” refers to buildings with no formal architectural style. Buildings of this type are constructed explicitly for industrial and commercial uses. While the Study Area has a number of historically significant buildings, many of these buildings have been allowed to fall into disrepair, largely due to declining interest in the neighborhood and a long history of disinvestment. In addition to a rapidly deteriorating housing stock, new development in the neighborhood is constructed without consideration of the character and design of the surrounding existing development. Historic preservation is a concern for many of the neighborhood residents. However, there are also concerns about the difficulty elderly homeowners and lower income families would experience in maintaining their homes, especially as it relates to routine maintenance. While a significant number of the residents we interviewed expressed a strong interest in establishing a historic district designation that would help maintain the architectural character of the neighborhood, there is also concern that historic preservation regulations would create hardships for the elderly and low-income residents. Since the goal of this plan is to create a better neighborhood for the existing residents, and to attract more residents into the neighborhood, we are recommending the establishment of a Neighborhood

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Conservation District. The Neighborhood Conservation District is less restrictive than a historical preservation district and it would encourage the preservation of the historical character of the neighborhood, while allowing residents to continue maintaining their homes without excessive expense. The Neighborhood Conservation District outlined in this plan would be limited to a designated area within the Study Area. By limiting the area designated for conservation, the City of Jacksonville’s Planning and Development Department and the residents affected by the district will have an opportunity to gauge its effectiveness. Expansion of the district could occur into other parts of the study area and to other neighborhoods with similar characteristics after the effectiveness of the Pilot Area is reviewed. Neighborhood Conservation District The purpose of the Neighborhood Conservation District is to preserve and protect the architectural and historical character of the neighborhood and to protect the quality of life for residents occupying a house or apartment after a transfer of ownership occurs. While there are many different types of Neighborhood Conservation District, the recommended type for the Study Area includes components from various examples to create a program that will meet the special needs of the neighborhood.

The recommended District is one that

combines elements of historical preservation, as well as code enforcement. Combining these features will protect the selected target area of the neighborhood from further deterioration, as well as protect the unique historical quality of the area. The boundary lines for this pilot program should initially be limited to the Edward Waters College Impact Area (refer to Map 6). This Neighborhood Action Plan has recommended a zoning change in this area that will allow for both single and multi-family dwellings. The purpose of the zoning change is to allow for the renovation of vacant multi-family properties, as well as the development of single-family homes. Additionally, this area also contains the Edward Waters College Development Area, which is the specified “growth” area of the College. Given the likelihood of renovation and development activity in the Impact Area, this section of the Study Area provides a wide range of the neighborhood dynamics that would be influenced by the Neighborhood Conservation District designation. Monitoring the effects of the designation within the Pilot Area should allow the District to expand at a later date.

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Architectural Review and Design Considerations: Similar to that of a historical preservation district, this component of the Neighborhood Conservation District would regulate the design and character of the neighborhood. The Neighborhood Conservation District would establish a systematic process involving the use of a Commission to review all major alterations to existing buildings and new construction.

Since a

Neighborhood Conservation District typically has less stringent design standards than a historic preservation district, most reviews can be done administratively.

A Commission, however, should

review all major alterations and appeals.

Condemned â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shotgunâ&#x20AC;? home

It is recommended that the present Historical Preservation Commission act as the Neighborhood Conservation Commission during the initial stages of the program. Although the current membership composition of the Historic Preservation Commission does not have representation from the neighborhood, the lack of specific representation should not be a problem since the volume of reviews is expected to be very small. In reviewing the volume and type of reviews with the Planning and Developmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Special Projects section, the staff felt that the initial workload would most likely be handled administratively in the early stages of the Neighborhood Conservation District.

In the event that the volume of reviews or

appeals increases, the City should consider establishing a separate Commission or adding neighborhood representatives to the Historic Preservation Commission as a subcommittee. The Commission would render binding and non-binding reviews that were outside the purview of administrative review. Binding reviews would be applied to new construction or additions that are more than 750sq ft.; any demolitions; any changes to historically designated or public structures; and any changes to non-conforming uses. Staff would issue Certificates of Non-applicability if changes were not required to go under the review of the Commission. The Commission would issue Certificates of Hardship (if the change was allowed due to undue hardship on the homeowner) or Appropriateness (if the change was deemed appropriate under the guidelines) for all binding reviews depending on the application.

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For each application for binding review, the applicant would need to submit to the Commission the following information: a tax assessor’s plan of the area showing currently existing structures and the footprint of the proposed construction, as well as detailed, dimensioned elevations and plans showing all proposed construction, alteration, or demolition. The Commission would then have forty-five (45) days to make a determination after a complete application is filed. Architectural renderings for some of the residential buildings and façade renderings of the commercial buildings can provide a basis for review. However, the degree and scale of the design guidelines should be recommended by the Planning and Development Department and reviewed by the residents in public meetings, similar to the process under the present Historic Preservation Code. While this process is close to the Historic Preservation process, the degree and level of review would be less, since the Commission would review any major alterations or new construction based on the character of the neighborhood, rather than the architectural integrity of a certain building. Some examples of the differences between the Neighborhood Conservation and the Historic Preservation Districts are as follows: ♦ In a Neighborhood Conservation District, the addition of a work shed to the side yard of a residential property could be allowed if the height and scale of the building was consistent with the existing development in the neighborhood; while it would not be allowed in a preservation district because the building materials and the style did not reflect the architectural style of the home. ♦ While an open porch would be a general requirement in a Conservation District, the Historic Preservation District would also have very specific guidelines on windows, doors, and decorative attributes that would be in addition to the open porch requirement. The residents would need to decide on the content of the regulations, such as whether the construction of ranch style homes would be allowed in an area where most of the homes are prairie style, frame vernacular, and bungalow. The regulations could be displayed in a sketch or pattern book.

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Circumventing Neighborhood Decline While the Commission would regulate any major changes to buildings that would be inconsistent with the character of the neighborhood, this would only apply to persons either renovating or altering existing structures, or erecting new structures. On the basis of our review of the existing conditions within the Study Area, and the increasing number of properties that have existing conditions classified as deteriorating, there is also a need to establish a regulatory mechanism that would discourage the neglect and deterioration of properties. The increase in properties with deteriorating conditions is especially noted in formally owner-occupied single-family homes currently being used as rentals and the small two to four unit properties. “Slum lords” often take advantage of low-income families by charging rents for dwellings that have numerous

code

violations.

Additionally, some

homeowners neglect and allow their homes to fall into disrepair, while causing a visual nuisance for their neighbors. homeowners

Quite who

often

these

have

moved

are out

“former” of

the

neighborhood and re-occupy the house as rental property.

Multi-family structure with a commercial use attached.

The recommended code enforcement component would be introduced through a partnership between the City’s Code Enforcement Division and the City’s Housing Services Division’s rehab staff. Repairs of code violations on single family and multi-family property would occur through the use of HOME and SHIP funds. Code Enforcement Officers will identify code violations through-out the EWC Impact Area, however property owners would have access to repair funds through the rehabilitation programs outlined in Section 13 of this Plan. The primary funding source for repairs through the rehabilitation programs will be HOME and SHIP funds. Since properties rehabilitated with these funding sources require annual inspections for the length of the loan period, all properties receiving these funds would be monitored by the Planning and Development Department’s Housing Services Division with annual inspection reports shared with the Code Enforcement Division.

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Each property receiving HOME and SHIP funds must meet the Housing Quality Standards as established by the Section 8 guidelines. These guidelines include, but are not limited to, the following: ♦ The property must be considered structurally sound, so there is no threat to the health and safety of those who occupy the home. The ceilings, walls, and floors must be free of any serious defects such as severe bulging, or leaning, large holes, loose surface materials, or noticeable movement under walking stress. The roof must be firm and weather-tight. Stairways, hallways, porches, and walkways must not present a danger to tripping or falling. ♦ The home must have a living room, kitchen area, and a bathroom. The home must have at least one bedroom or living/sleeping room of appropriate size for each two persons, and lockable exterior doors and windows accessible from outside the unit. ♦ At least two electric outlets, one of which may be an overhead light, and a wall switch, must be present and operable in the living area, kitchen area, and each bedroom area. Also, at least one window must be present in living and sleeping rooms. ♦ The home must have a flush toilet in a separate, private room, as well as a fixed basin and a tub or shower with hot & cold running water. ♦ Safe heating facilities that are in proper operating condition and can provide adequate heat to each room in the home are required and must be appropriate for the climate to assure a healthy living environment. ♦ The kitchen must have adequate space for the storage, preparation, and the serving of food with a cooking stove and a refrigerator of appropriate size for the home, as well as a kitchen sink with hot & cold running water. The sink that must drain into an approved public or private system. ♦ The home must be free of pollutants in the air which are at levels that threaten the health of the occupants. There must not be any dangerous levels of air pollution from carbon monoxide, sewer gas, fuel gas, and dust. Air circulation has to be adequate throughout

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the home. Bathroom areas must have at least one operable window or other adequate exhaust ventilation. ♦ The home must comply with the provisions of section 302 of the Lead-Based Paint Poisoning Prevention Act must be followed.

Existing conditions studies over a ten-year period indicate significant increase in houses lost to demolition, and property conditions declining from standard to deteriorating conditions. Very little progress, if any, has been made to reverse this trend. If is also important to note that the Citizens Advisory Committee (CAC) to this Neighborhood Action Plan indicated keen awareness of the need to reverse the deterioration of property conditions. In a workshop conducted with the CAC, “housing and property conditions/code enforcement issues, especially with rental properties” was listed as the item they liked least about the neighborhood. This issue was, by far, the most prevalent concern raised by employers and residents who work and live in the Study Area. Additionally, a proposed Pilot Program that addresses architectural / historical character, as well as the code enforcement requirements, of the housing rehabilitation programs will compliment the rehabilitation and infill housing efforts that will be recommended in Section 13 of this plan. Housing construction of new architecturally compatible single family homes and the renovation of houses that are currently vacant and abandoned were cited by the Citizens Advisory Committee as the activity they would most like to see occur

in the

neighborhood. The rehabilitation of existing vacant and abandoned homes linked to both components of the Neighborhood Conservation District could slow, and eventually prevent, further deterioration of the neighborhood, and facilitate the future revitalization of the community. Considerations: Without question, the areas strongest assets are its affordable housing stock, and its place in the history and development of Jacksonville’s African American community. It is important that a strategy be developed that preserves both of the neighborhoods strongest assets. However it is recognized that the introduction of a Neighborhood Conservation District, even on a pilot basis confined to the EWC Development and Impact Area, raises a number of

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important issues that should be addressed as part of the process of program implementation. The historical preservation component of the District generally has two concerns: ♦ Preparation of the design guidelines: The public participation and general interest in the concept of a Neighborhood Conservation District will increase significantly when the process of deciding on general design guidelines is initiated. It is suggested that the Planning and Development Department follow the same procedures as was followed in establishing the Historical Preservation Districts. This process requires one public meeting on the issue of design, however additional meetings could be added at the discretion of the Planning and Development Department. The meetings would facilitate a heighten awareness of the Neighborhood Action Plan study area and interest in the EWC Development and Impact Area that would facilitate the creation of a neighborhood based Commission when need for the regulatory body materializes. It may be possible to use the architectural renderings as a basis for dwelling design. The City’s PDD could then work with the neighborhood to decide the extent of regulating other housing façade components such as : additions, porches, fences, driveways, etc.

Consideration could be given to simplifying

the degree of regulation by simply requiring a minimum roof pitch, etc. as an example. Summary of Recommendations ♦ The City should implement the Neighborhood Conservation Pilot Program outlined in this Plan, limited to the EWC Impact area, which combines elements of historical preservation and code enforcement to curb the deterioration of the buildings while protecting the historical integrity of the neighborhood. ♦ The Planning and Development Department should develop a partnership program with the Neighborhood Department’s Code Enforcement Division. The program would link targeted code inforcement inspections with HOME and SHIP funded rehabilitation programs for occupied/vacant single family and multi-family properties within the EWC Impact Area.

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SECTION 11 Ξ The Kings Road Commercial Corridor SUMMARY The Kings Road Corridor is a state maintained highway that serves as the major transportation corridor through the Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood. This Corridor is also a declining commercial center, with aging infrastructure. Improvements to the Corridor will focus on both commercial revitalization and streetscape improvements, and consider both the needs of the neighborhood residents, as well as Edward Waters College. Recommendations are made to complete a Kings Road Corridor study and create a Community Redevelopment Area to attract businesses that the Citizens Advisory Committee members expressed were most lacking in the neighborhood.

Introduction The revitalization of the Kings Road Corridor is the key component in creating a viable commercial center in the neighborhood. The Corridor is the â&#x20AC;&#x153;entranceâ&#x20AC;? to the community, and improving the roadway would create a visible improvement that could attract more businesses and homeowners into the neighborhood. The Corridor, which serves as the entry way to Edward Waters College, is the key to the growth and development of the College. The Kings Road Corridor has two major components to redevelopment: commercial revitalization and streetscape improvements. This section will analyze the potential for both components, and will recommend further analysis of the Corridor through the planning and creation of a Community Redevelopment Area for the Corridor and some surrounding properties. Commercial Revitalization While, the Corridor is a major transportation artery into Edward Waters College it is presently declining rapidly, with few active businesses and many vacant buildings. The majority of the commercial buildings are neighborhood shopping strip malls that front the

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roadway. These buildings are largely vacant. The few new businesses located along the Corridor do not offer neighborhood retail, grocery, or service opportunities. Therefore, the Corridor must attract more neighborhood-oriented businesses to create any commercial opportunities for residents. Economic Base Although the Community Advisory Committee has expressed the need for certain commercial businesses, such as a grocery store, a drug store, restaurants, and clothing stores, the Study Area must have the population and the economic base to support additional commercial activity. Data was obtained on the number of businesses, as well as the number of employees for each Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) Index within the 32209 Zip Code. These were obtained for the four-digit level, which is more disaggregated than the two-digit level. The 32209 Zip Code area is larger than the Study Area, extending to Beaver Street to the south and to Moncrief Road to the northwest. However, since residents will likely travel some distance for retail and commercial needs, the larger Zip Code area is more likely to capture the economic opportunities available to the Study Area residents, rather than limiting the data collection area to the Study Area. The data is displayed in Appendix F, and summarized below: â&#x2122;Ś Construction The data show a variety of small businesses, with a few larger businesses (more than twenty employees) in the Masonry (SIC 1741), Roofing and Sheet Metal Work (SIC 1761), and Family Housing Construction (SIC 1521). The smaller businesses are most likely misrepresented due to the large amount of contractors that use P.O. Boxes as addresses, and the presence of the U.S. Post Office on Kings Road. â&#x2122;Ś Manufacturing The largest businesses in this category are in Fluid Milk Processing (SIC 2026) and Partitions & Fixtures (SIC 2542).

These businesses have 100-499 employees.

However, there are many smaller businesses (less than 49 employees) within the steel and metal industries. â&#x2122;Ś Transportation and Public Utilities The trucking industry (SIC 4212 &4213) appears to be the largest in terms of number of businesses, as well as the size of the businesses. School bus operators (SIC 4151), Passenger Transportation Arrangement (SIC 4729), and Packing and Crating (4783) are also prominent industries in the area.

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♦ Wholesale Trade The largest businesses within this industrial category are within the Lumber and Plywood (SIC 5031), Packaged Frozen Foods (SIC 5142), and Fresh Fruits and Vegetables (SIC 5148). There are also numerous smaller businesses in a variety of industry types, with the most businesses in the Fresh Fruits and Vegetables industry. ♦ Retail Trade Most of the businesses within this category are small (0-9 employees) and the largest businesses (over 50 employees) are in the Grocery Stores (SIC 5411) and New and Used Car Dealers (SIC 5511). The smaller businesses are concentrated in the Grocery Stores, Gasoline Service Stations (SIC 5541), and Eating Places (SIC 5812). ♦ Finance, Insurance, & Real Estate Apartment Building Operators (SIC 6513) is the largest industry in terms of the number of businesses. Non-Residential Building Operators (SIC6512) is the largest industry in terms of the number of employees. There is one State Commercial Bank (SIC 6022), two Credit Unions (SIC 6061 & 6062), one Real Estate Agent (SIC 6531), and four Insurance businesses (SIC 6311, 6361, & 6411). ♦ Services Within this industrial category, Beauty Shops and Barber Shops (SIC 7231 & 7241), Auto Repair (SIC 7532 &7538), and Medical Doctors Offices (SIC 8011) are the most numerous small businesses. The larger business, but less numerous, are found in the Nursing (SIC 8051 & 8059), Employment and Help Services (SIC 7361 &7363), Repair Services (SIC 7699), Data Processing (SIC 7374), and Armored Car Services (SIC 7381). While there are a variety of industries within and around the Study Area, there also appears to be a large amount of small businesses with less than nine (9) employees. Out of the total 686 businesses, 533 (or 78%) are small businesses.

These businesses could be

misrepresented due to the location of the Post Office, and the tendency for smaller businesses to use P.O. Boxes as addresses. Additionally, businesses that would normally serve a neighborhood, such as retail clothing stores, shoe stores, drug stores, and department stores are not located within the area. Grocery stores and restaurants are represented in the Zip Code area, but a visual screening of Kings Road and Myrtle Avenue will show that these businesses are not located near the Study Area.

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Industries most

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common in the Zip Code area appear to be good sources of employment (manufacturing, wholesale trade), but do not provide the residents with daily shopping needs. Unmet Demand There are numerous studies and articles that discuss the untapped market potential of urban neighborhoods. Due to the lack of retail opportunities in the inner cities, residents must drive out of the cities to the suburbs for shopping needs. This situation also exists for the Kings Road/Beaver Street residents.

Commercial corridors within and around the

neighborhood are either empty, or offer services that do not meet their daily needs, such as auto repair. However, the feasibility of successful commercial business along the Corridor is an important issue. The populationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s income levels and purchasing power must be high enough to support the commercial activity. Purchase Potential Indexes (PPIs) for the Zip Code area were obtained from CACI Marketing Systems for 1994. These indexes use 100 as a benchmark for the likelihood that a business type will succeed. The more the number decreases from 100, the less likely that business type would survive. The more increases from 100, the more likely that business will survive.

The PPIs for the Zip Code area do not give a very positive view of the

purchasing power of the residents. Most of the numbers are below 85, and the highest number is for Lottery Tickets (refer to Figure 4).

Additionally, data obtained by

Demographics USA (1995), shows a twenty percent (20%) decrease in retail sales growth from 1994-1995. Regardless of the bleak assessment the Purchase Potential Indexes give of the Study Area, the Kings Road Corridor has been recognized by a recent study as having retail market potential. The Assessment of the Core City Study Areai, completed in 1999, identified the Corridor and Myrtle Avenue/Kings Road intersection as two of five areas in the Core City Study Area with the most potential for commercial retail development. The Study reported census-based data that showed a $27,455,652 gap between estimated retail potential and estimated sales in 1998 for the Core City Study Area.

This gap indicates that Core City

residents are travelling outside of the area for retail needs, or simply not indulging their retail potential because of the lack of commercial opportunities.

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While the purchasing power of lower income residents is not as great as the purchasing power of more affluent families that typically reside in the suburbs, studies are now indicating that inner city markets are untapped sources for businesses, largely because the suburb markets are saturated.ii The Core City Study also argued that the Census Bureau and other related sources could be underestimating household income by as much as twelve (12) percent. This is largely due to the unreported, but legitimate, income people often receive from other sources (i.e. housekeeping, lawn care, and child care). Therefore, the buying power of the Zip Code area could be misrepresented in the Purchase Potential Indexes. The complete lack of commercial and retail opportunities along the Corridor and around the Study Area, with the exception of small grocery stores and beauty shops, show a definite need for commercial activity. The data outlined above describe an untapped retail market within the City. It is also the intention of this plan to increase homeownership in the Study Area with an infill housing program and a rehabilitation program, as well as promote the growth and development of Edward Waters College. These efforts will likely increase the population and median income level of the area significantly. Therefore, the development of the Kings Road Corridor as a commercial retail center will be necessary to serve the existing and future residents. As a component of the Neighborhood Action Planning process, the Citizens Advisory Committee was surveyed to find out what types of businesses they felt were missing from their neighborhood. The most common responses for needed commercial businesses were supermarkets, drug stores, and clothing stores. These responses are similar to the Core City Studyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s argument that multi-cultural households are more likely to spend more on apparel, groceries, entertainment, personal care products, and education than whites. Additionally, inner city residents spend less at discount department stores because they are not located in inner city neighborhoods.

Therefore, commercial development projects

should focus on attracting these types of businesses into the area. Since Edward Waters College is a stable presence along the Corridor, commercial activity should be focused near the College.

The proposed zoning district along the Corridor,

Commercial Neighborhood should be the target area for commercial revitalization.

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Streetscape Improvements The physical appearance of Kings Road is deteriorating, and with the exception of the two newer buildings (a liquor store and an auto parts store) and Edward Waters College, most of the buildings are in dilapidated condition. The expansion of Edward Waters College will also create more of need for the improvement of the Corridor, since there is only one crosswalk, and little or no right-of-way between the roadway and the sidewalks. The Corridor, as it exists now, does not give a pedestrian a perception of safety, and the roadway is not aesthetically pleasing. Since the Study Area has a large percentage of transit users (approximately 20% compared to 6% for Duval County), and EWC is located along the Corridor, creating a safe pedestrian environment is important to the success of the Corridor. sidewalks, a median, landscaping, and parking facilities.

The Corridor needs large However, many of the older

building along the roadway have two to four feet setbacks from the sidewalks. Additionally, many of the existing businesses lack formal parking facilities, and use adjacent vacant lots for parking. On-street parking is currently not an option since the traffic lanes directly abut the sidewalk. The lack of right-of-way leaves the City with two options: either reduce the amount of lanes from four (4) to two (2) and use the additional space for sidewalks, median, curb and gutter, and landscaping; or acquire property to obtain easements for the needed right-of-way. The first option would require that the traffic along the Corridor be at a sufficient Level of Service (LOS) after the lane reduction. Currently, the Corridor is at an LOS C, with an average daily traffic count of 19,500 trips. The Transportation Division of the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Planning and Development Department estimated the LOS for the year 2020 at two lanes, and determined that this would not be possible (refer to Appendix I). Therefore, the City may need to consider the acquisition of right-of-way to complete any improvements. Edward Waters College, with the assistance of the Transportation Division of the Jacksonville Planning and Development Department, has applied for road enhancement funds from the Florida Department of Transportation (refer to Appendix I). The request is for $475,372 for construction and engineering along the Corridor. However, the funds will most likely not be dispersed for approximately five (5) years.

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Kings Road Corridor Study A corridor study is recommended for the Kings Road Corridor, and should include all properties bordering the roadway from Myrtle Avenue to Farifax Street. The purpose of the Study would be to provide solutions to three primary concerns that currently exist along Kings Road: ♦ Economic decline of business and adjacent residential areas along the corridor as expressed by local businesses, residents, and institutions participating in the Citizens Advisory Committee; ♦ The current existing land uses and building conditions that have created an uninviting appearance to the roadway, which serves as the entrance to Edward Waters College and the neighborhood; and ♦ Blight along the Corridor that has created a negative atmosphere that repels commercial investment and circumvents the growth and development of Edward Waters College. At a minimum, the Corridor Study should include the preparation of the following: Analysis of the key issues adversely affecting the Kings Road Corridor Issues would include right-of-way acquisition for improvements, parking solutions for businesses currently lacking parking facilities, pedestrian movement, streetscape design, and the College expansion. Development of alternative strategies for the Corridor Preliminary and final plan development Through the creation of a Kings Road Corridor Study, detailed engineering, architectural, and development analysis should be created that should enable drawings, site plans, diagrams, and design sketches to be created as part of specific recommendations for the Corridor’s development.

Community Redevelopment Area The need to acquire property along King Road for commercial development, as well as for streetscape improvements, would require a mechanism that would reduce the time and cost of acquisition efforts.

Therefore, it is recommended that the City create a Community

Redevelopment Area (CRA), pursuant to the guidelines established by Chapter 163, Part III, of the Florida Statutes. Creating a CRA district would give the City the option of using

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condemnation to acquire property, as well as financing incentives, such as tax increment financing, for development projects. The CRA boundaries should include the EWC Development Area, and every property zoned Commercial Neighborhood or Community Commercial General-2 that is within the Study Area (refer to Map 1). The creation of CRA would require a Community Redevelopment Plan, which would include recommendations for the commercial development and the EWC expansion. The documentation of “slum and blight” provided through the Neighborhood Action Plan should facilitate the work associated with completing a Community Redevelopment Plan. Summary of Recommendations ♦ Complete a detailed corridor study for the roadway and all properties bordering the road from Myrtle Avenue to Fairfax Street. ♦ Create a Community Redevelopment Area for the Kings Road Corridor which would include the EWC Development Area, as well as all parcels along the roadway that are within a commercial zoning district. ♦ Focus on attracting businesses that the residents are lacking and are more likely to frequent, such as grocery stores, drug stores, and apparel stores. New commercial activity should be concentrated in the proposed Commercial Neighborhood zoning district that is close to Edward Waters College.

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Figure Figure49

Purchase Potential Indexes: Zip Code 32209

Investments

28

Loans

36

Used ATM

57

Credit Cards

56

Home Improvements

39

Lawn & Garden

29

Furniture

60

Pet Owner

50

Audio/Video

70

Owns PC

38

Auto After-Market

61

Apparel

50

Mail/Phone Order

49

Child's Toys & Apparel

78

Bought Lottery Tickets

99

Health Insurance

84

Dining Out

43

Fast Food

85

Sporting Goods

67

Travel

38

0

20

40

60

80

100

120

Endnotes

i ii

Lockwood Greaen (March 1999) An Assessment of Jacksonville’s Core City Study Area Cuomo, Andrew (July 1999) New Markets: The Untapped Retail Buying Power In America’s Inner Cities

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SECTION 12 ξ

Industrial Areas South of Kings Road SUMMARY

The Study Area is unique in that it contains industrial employment centers as well as residential and commercial areas. The industrial areas of the Study Area are located south of Kings Road. While this area provides significant opportunities for the creation of jobs, it presents numerous challenges as well. Such challenges include high vacancy rates and obsolete buildings, inadequate infrastructure, and potential environmental issues. On the other hand, the desire of several area employers to expand their present facilities presents considerable opportunities for the Study Area. This section presents discussion of these issues and provides recommendations for addressing them. Industrial uses dominate the portion of the Study Area south of Kings Road, with roughly one-third of this area in industrial use. Industrial uses are concentrated in the areas south of Beaver Street and East of Myrtle Avenue, though there is one block at the northwest corner of the Beaver Street – Myrtle Avenue intersection that contains light industrial uses. The majority of these uses are light industrial and manufacturing, though a section south of Church Street is zoned for heavy industrial use; this site contains a rail yard. There are several key issues with the industrial sections of the Study Area: ♦ Vacant warehouses and obsolete facilities; ♦ Non-conforming residential uses are scattered throughout areas zoned for industrial use; ♦ Inadequate infrastructure, including roads and stormwater drainage; ♦ Potential environmental concerns; and ♦ The expansion needs of area businesses. An Assessment of Jacksonville’s Core City Study Area identified several industrial areas in Jacksonville’s Urban Core that should be targeted for redevelopment. Three of these areas are located within the Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood Action Plan Study Area. The Assessment identified the presence of vacant and obsolete warehouses and industrial

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facilities as a key asset of this area since they provide opportunities for adaptive reuse or infill development. The presence of residential uses within industrial areas is another area of concern. At the time this area developed, it was not uncommon to have factory workers living in very close proximity to their places of employment.

In the case of the Study Area, industrial and

residential areas developed at approximately the same time, consequently, in many instances there are residences located adjacent to industrial uses. In the present day, however, these are not considered compatible land uses; this is reflected in the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s zoning code. Infrastructure is another key concern in this area. Several businesses in the area have noted that the narrow right-of-way along Beaver Street is problematic for tractor-trailers attempting to make turns. Additionally, this is an area that is prone to flooding in heavy rains.

These are two concerns that must be addressed prior to any new development

activities. The very nature of industrial areas presents potential environmental issues. especially true in older industrial areas such as this one.

This is

These concerns must be

addressed since environmental contamination can present considerable obstacles for redevelopment. The Study Area is at a considerable advantage since it is located in a State Brownfields Designated Area. This is advantageous since such a designation limits liability for lenders to Brownfield sites and provides protection for potential purchasers who enter into Brownfield rehabilitation agreements. Additionally, legislation provides more flexible clean-up standards and a more flexible review process for Brownfield sites. In order to gain a more clear picture of the environmental conditions in the Study Area, a preliminary environmental assessment is being conducted. A final issue in the industrial portion of the Study Area are the expansion needs of local businesses. Load King Manufacturing is one such enterprise. Load King is a closed site manufacturing facility that employs over one-hundred (100) people. They have approached the City regarding expansion of the plant and are seeking assistance with these efforts.

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Community Redevelopment Area Economic development is key to the revitalization of a neighborhood. The Study Area is unique in that it contains both commercial and industrial areas that provide opportunities for economic development. A widely used mechanism for such development is the Community Redevelopment Area. Designation of such an area pursuant to Chapter 163, Part III, Florida Statutes, gives a municipality greater opportunities to guide economic growth. The recommendation of this Community Redevelopment Plan (CRP) arose from discussions between the Jacksonville Economic Development Commission (JEDC) and Load King Manufacturing, Inc., regarding expansion of the Load King facility on Beaver Street. These discussions resulted in the identification of an area for potential expansion of Load King and other manufacturing facilities in the area, and suitable for attracting new light industrial and manufacturing facilities. The proposed Community Redevelopment Area (CRA) is generally bound by Interstate 95 to the east, Kings Road and 1st Street to the North, Rushing Street to the west, and the CSX Railroad tracks to the south (refer to Map 1). These boundaries were selected for the following reasons: •

An Assessment of Jacksonville’s Core City Study Area identified a number of potential industrial sites in the Core City.

The proposed CRA boundaries

encompass three of these areas; and •

Includes area suggested by JEDC for Load King Manufacturing expansion and a Community Redevelopment Plan.

Summary of Recommendations ♦ A Community Redevelopment Area should be established and bound by Interstate 95 to the east, Kings Road and 1st Street to the North, Rushing Street to the west, and the CSX Railroad tracks to the south.

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SECTION 13 ξ

Infill Housing and Rehabilitation SUMMARY

The Study Area has experienced population loss and decreases in viable housing. There are also numerous vacant structures that have been used as havens for illegal activity, as well as created visual blight for surrounding residents. This sections outlines programs for infill new construction of single-family homes, the rehabilitation of vacant and condemned single-family homes, the rehabilitation of owner-occupied single-family homes, and the rehabilitation of multi-family structures. The section also recommends specific steps to encourage developers to participate.

Introduction In an effort to increase homeownership opportunities and reverse the trend of a declining inventory of single-family homes within the Study Area, the City of Jacksonville should consider providing incentives, in the form of technical and financial assistance to developers interested in building new infill housing and rehabilitating vacant houses. Consideration should also be given to providing incentives to first-time, low-to-moderate income homebuyers in an effort to encourage affordable homeownership. The Neighborhood Action Plan will propose an infill new construction and housing rehabilitation strategy that can begin to transform the vacant lots and deteriorating house stock into a viable community resource. The proposed program will address the following: •

New Construction of Single-Family Homes

Rehabilitation of Vacant Single-Family Homes

Rehabilitation of Sub-standard, Deteriorated, & Dilapidated Single-Family Homes

Rehabilitation of Existing Vacant Multi-Family Buildings

Currently, there is very little private investment for the construction of new single-family homes occurring within the Study Area. New construction development has been limited to the efforts of the Community Alliance Development Corporation (CADC), who have built two new homes in the Study Area in the past twelve months; as well the efforts of Habitat for

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Humanity who have built approximately ninety (90) homes in the southern section of the Study Area in the past twelve months. The windshield survey did not identify any new construction of single-family homes built by for-profit developers. Generally, a for-profit developer, and some non-profit developers will simply view neighborhoods comparable to the Study Area as “risky.” The risk associated with development within the Study Area is primarily because development cost often exceed market value, and the target market of purchasers have difficulty qualifying for a conventional first mortgage in an amount sufficient to purchase a new or rehabilitated home. The recommended infill housing and rehabilitation program is design to reduce the risk of investing in the Study Area by creating a subsidy program that will compensate developers and builders for the difference between development costs and the fair market value or sale price of the home. Additionally, financing subsidies would be provided to qualified owner-occupant purchasers through the City’s Head Start to Homeownership or similarly designed program. Multi-family housing rehabilitation will be encouraged through an expanded use of the City’s Rental Housing Program. Research of existing conditions in the Study Area has delineated two distinct residential sections on the basis of land use and existing conditions: north of 8th Street and south of 8th Street. The northern section is the least affected by deterioration and decline, and the southern section has the most vacant lots and vacant buildings. The housing infill and rehabilitation program recommended for this Plan will encourage the development of infill housing efforts in the southern section, and rehabilitation efforts throughout the Study Area. Additionally, all infill efforts will only include single-family housing, and most rehabilitation efforts will include single-family homes, with the exception of the Rental Rehab Program. New Construction The development of new homes is designed to encourage small developers and builders to invest in the Study Area by providing development subsidies through qualified owneroccupant purchasers. Development subsidies would fund the difference between the construction costs and the actual selling price of the new homes through a “soft” second mortgage to a qualified purchaser. In some instances, the City may be required to assist in assembling vacant lots as a form of subsidy to the builder’s overall project cost. Vacant lots assembled by the City and subsequently passed on the developer/builder would take the

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form a subsidy through a “write-down” of the vacant lot’s market value to an amount needed to help make the project cost more affordable to the purchaser. Recently, the Jacksonville Housing Authority developed Phase I of a HOPE VI project immediately adjacent to the eastern boundary (Myrtle Avenue) of the northern portion of the Study Area. Initial project work has recently begun on Phase II of the HOPE VI project, which is located between 6th Street on the north and Kings Road on the South. Phase II of the HOPE VI project also shares Myrtle Avenue as a boundary. On the basis of the sociodemographic data and housing characteristics, both Phase I and II provide a reasonable comparison for development cost and sale price estimations that would occur in the Study Area. The new construction is architecturally compatible with the existing housing, and the lot sizes are similar in size to the lots in the Study Area. Therefore, these estimates are used to demonstrate the proposed new construction model to be used for infill housing development in the Study Area (refer to Table 16). Table 16

Example Project Costs Using Proposed New Construction Model Average Per Unit Land Acquistion Costs Land Costs* Hard Construction/Development Costs Average 1250 sq.ft. @ $55.00 per sq.ft.** Subtotal Contingency @ 4% Total Development Costs Sale Price Estimated First Mortgage Financing Subsidy H2H Program Subsidy Maximum***

$4,000

Phase I 15 Units

Total Project Cost $204,000

$68,750 $72,750 $2,910

$1,031,250 $1,031,250 $1,375,000 $1,091,250 $1,091,250 $1,455,000 $43,650 $43,650 $58,200

$3,506,250 $3,710,250 $148,410

$75,660

$1,134,900 $1,134,900 $1,513,200

$3,858,660

$1,134,900 $1,134,900 $1,513,200 $1,213,220 $909,915 $909,915

$3,858,660 $3,093,711

$14,999

$224,985

$60,000

Phase III 20 Units $80,000

$75,660 $60,661

$60,000

Phase II 15 Units

$224,985

$299,980

$764,949

*Average land costs for all vacant lots actually $3,382. The $4,000 land cost is used as the average due to the likelihood that some lots must be combined, and to stay consistent with the HOPE IV estimates. **These averages were obtained from the Jacksonville Housing Authority's HOPE IV Project ***The maximum is used due to the inabilitity to estimate the incomes of the potential buyers.

The HOPE VI new construction costs averaged approximately $55.00 per square foot. The average size single-family home will most likely be approximately 1250 square feet, since

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the lots in the Study Area are very small.

The average cost of land in the area is

approximately $4,000. Although the average price for the vacant lots in the southern section is $3,382, there are usually more title costs associated with these properties because of the additional liens (demolition liens, lot clearing liens, etc.). Therefore, the average land cost was increased to $4,000, which is consistent with the HOPE IV estimates.

With an

additional contingency at four percent (4%), the total development costs are estimated to average at $75,660 per unit. The actual sale price and market value in this model is estimated to be equal to the development cost, based on the fact that the staff of the HOPE IV project report that they were able to sell their new homes at a price that equaled their overall development cost. As a result of these sales the new homes built and sold in HOPE VI Oaks of Durkeeville project establishes comparable market values for the Study Area. However, there is an important development component to the Oaks of Durkeeville project that should followed if comparable market values are to be realized with new homes developed within the Study Area. The development approach to the HOPE VI project created a “new” neighborhood setting and provided a “holistic” approach to the quality of life for purchasers of the new homes.

A similar approach to development activities within the Study Area should net

similar development success. Although the recommended development subsidy model should include developer/builder participation, it is believed that the target market of first-time, low-to-moderate income purchasers will require some form of financing subsidy to afford the new homes. Buyer subsidies will be needed to provide low to moderate-income homebuyers the opportunities of affordable homeownership.

The City Head Start to Homeownership (H2H) program

subsidizes loans to persons with a household income that is at or below eighty percent (80%) of the median income. The largest subsidy of this program allows is $14, 999. Since the potential mortgage purchasing power of potential homebuyers is difficult to estimate without income to debt ratio information, the largest subsidy per unit is estimated in the example given in Table 16. It is, however, predicted that the amount of low-income homebuyers requiring the maximum subsidy will decrease as the inventory of new construction increases.

Assuming a

comprehensive approach is followed, property values are likely to increase, but the target

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market of purchasers are more likely to include moderate income buyers with higher incomes that require less subsidy. Vacant Single-Family Rehabilitation There are approximately 128 vacant and abandoned single-family properties in the Study Area, with 47 of the properties in the northern section and 81 of the properties in the southern section. The program initiative recommended through the Neighborhood Action Plan is designed to encourage the reuse of the vacant and abandoned single-family homes, for the purpose of protecting the historical and architectural integrity of the neighborhood and increase opportunities for affordable homeownership. Additionally, the reuse of these buildings can help curb the crime problems, since vacant buildings are often havens for illegal activities.

Although there will likely be some buildings that ultimately cannot be

rehabilitated, the windshield survey suggests that as many as 90% of the vacant single family houses could be rehabilitated. The reuse of these properties will greatly improve the appearance of the neighborhood, as well as provide additional affordable housing opportunities for potential homebuyers. Since the acquisition of the properties includes land and improvements, the overall cost of the initial acquisitions are more expensive. The estimated average cost for building and lot acquisition is $12, 500. In addition, the complexities common to renovating older houses will increase development and construction cost, estimated construction cost at $57.50 per square foot (refer to Table 17).

The construction estimate is taken from the recent

rehabilitation efforts in the Springfield neighborhood, and is factored down to account for the less ornate building architecture found within the Study Area. Development cost, using a contingency of four percent (4%), is expected to generate an estimated development cost of approximately $101,205. The existing vacant single family houses in the Study Area are slightly larger than the proposed new homes that will be built. Even though the estimated fair market value for the rehabbed homes are estimated at $57.71 per square foot (same as the estimate used for new construction), the existing homes are larger- approximately 1475 square feet.

Using the market value of new

construction, at $57.71 per square foot, and the size of the existing buildings, the sale price will be $85,122 per unit. Therefore, an estimated $16,083 per unit in development subsidy are estimated. In addition, a financing subsidy of up to $14, 999 per purchaser may also be

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required (Financing subsidies should be granted on the basis of income guidelines and purchasers-debt to income ratio). Table 17

Example Project Costs Using Proposed Vacant Single-Family Rehabilitation Model Average Per Unit

Phase I 15 Units

Phase II 15 Units

Phase III 20 Units

Total Project Cost

Acquistion Costs Property Costs*

$12,500

$187,500

$187,500

$250,000

$637,500

Hard Construction/Development Costs Average 1475 sq.ft**. @ $57.50 per sq.ft.*** Subtotal Contigency @ 4%

$84,813 $97,313 $3,893

$1,272,188 $1,459,688 $58,388

$1,272,188 $1,459,688 $58,388

$1,696,250 $1,946,250 $77,850

$4,325,438 $4,962,938 $198,518

Total Development Costs

$101,205

$1,518,075

$1,518,075

$2,024,100

$5,161,455

Sale Price**** Estimated First Mortgage Development Subsidy

$85,122 $69,039 $16,083

$1,276,834 $1,035,585 $241,241

$1,276,834 $1,035,585 $241,241

$1,702,445 $1,380,780 $321,655

Financing Subsidy H2H Program Subsidy Maximum

$14,999

$224,985

$224,985

$299,980

$4,341,235 $3,520,989 $820,220

$764,949

*Property costs are an estimated average cost to acquire vacant and abandoned properties. **Average unit size was determined by the average size of dilapidated units in the Study Area.

*** Development per square foot is an estimated measure using Springfield data and factoring for the smaller, less ornate units. ****Sale Price is estimated using the HOPE IV averages for the new construction at market value, which is $57.71 per square foot.

Rehabilitation of Owner-Occupied Single-Family Homes The Study Area currently has 401 substandard, 289 deteriorating, and 23 dilapidated singlefamily homes that are occupied by homeowners. Elderly persons occupy many of these homes, as well as low-income families, and need help in making some of the more major repairs that affect their health and safety.

The HOPE IV Phase II project is currently

developing a rehab program for qualified owner-occupied homes needing rehabilitation, and is projected to provide a maximum of $25,000 pr unit for rehabilitation work. These program limits would be approximately $10,000 per unit higher than the maximum amount permitted under the Housing Services Division Emergency Repair Program.

The rehab work

completed through the Mayorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Historic Springfield Initiative has provided fairly reliable cost estimate for moderate rehabilitation, and a discounting factor has been applied to take into

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consideration the less ornate building architecture of the houses in the Study Area (refer to Table 18). Table 18

Example Project Costs Using Proposed Occupied Single-Family Rehabilitation Model Average Per Unit

Phase I 15 Units

Phase II 15 Units

Phase III 20 Units

Total Project Cost

Hard Construction/Development Costs Average 1475 sq.ft*. @ $27.50 per sq.ft.** Subtotal Contingency @ 4%

$40,563 $40,563 $1,623

$608,438 $608,438 $24,338

$608,438 $608,438 $24,338

$811,250 $811,250 $32,450

$2,028,125 $2,028,125 $81,125

Total Development Costs

$42,185

$632,775

$632,775

$843,700

$2,109,250

Maximum Subsidy Additional Financing Required***

$25,000 $17,185

$375,000 $257,775

$375,000 $257,775

$500,000 $343,700

$1,250,000 $859,250

*Average unit size was determined by the average size of dilapidated units in the Study Area. **Development per square foot is an estimated measure using Springfield data and factoring for the smaller, less ornate units. ***Offered as a Due-on-Sale loan, paid at the death of the owner-occupant or whenever the property is transferred.

While extensive rehabilitation of an occupied home will likely exceed the maximum amount allowed through the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Emergency Repair Program, it is recommended that the maximum of $25,000 be used on a pilot basis as part of the comprehensive development approach to owner-occupied single-family homes located within the Study Area (refer to Appendix F for an example work order). Even though the rehabilitation of owner-occupied homes are critically important to the overall redevelopment of the Study Area, it is recommended that priority should be given to the allocation of resources that specifically addresses developing vacant lots and houses located in the Study Area.

Dramatic

increases in the population of the Study Area that reflect increased household incomes and increases homeownership should be priorities within any development strategy launched through the Neighborhood Action Plan. Rehabilitation of Vacant Multi-Family Buildings There are approximately twenty-five vacant multi-family buildings within the Study Area. The vacant multi-family buildings within the Study Area are numerous, and the proposed zoning changes have created a regulatory atmosphere that will allow for the renovation of 17 of these properties as four-family structures. However, there should be incentives for private and non-profit developers to buy and renovate these properties. The City currently

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has a Rental Rehab Program that provides below-market rate loans (3% amortized for a 15 year period) to investors for the purpose of renovating multi-family housing and renting the units to very low and low-income families or persons.

There are many rehabilitation

opportunities within the Study Area (refer to Appendix H). Table 19 gives a model of the rental rehab loans and the average cost per square foot to rehabilitate a multi-family structure. Conventional financing will be needed, since the loan does not provide for all of the development costs. Table 19

Example Project Costs Using Proposed Rental Rehab Program Average Per Phase I Phase II Phase III Structure 5 Bldgs. 5 Bldgs 7 Bldgs Acquistion Costs Property Costs*

Total Project Cost

$28,633

$143,165

$143,165

$200,431

$515,394

Hard Construction/Development Costs Average 2130 sq.ft**. @ $53.50 per sq.ft.*** Subtotal Contigency @ 4%

$113,955 $142,588 $4,558

$569,775 $712,940

$569,775 $712,940

$797,685 $998,116

$2,051,190 $2,566,584

Total Development Costs

$147,146

$712,940

$712,940

$998,116

$2,566,584

Rental Rehab Program, Maximum Loan

$90,000

$450,000

$450,000

$630,000

$1,620,000

Conventional Financing

$57,146

$262,940

$262,940

$368,116

$946,584

*Property costs are an estimated average cost to acquire vacant and abandoned properties. **Average unit size was determined by the average size of dilapidated & vacant units in the Study Area.

*** Development per square foot is an estimated measure using the single-family rehab estimate and factored to account for the less expensive renovations for multi-family dwellings.

This program should be marketed effectively to all private investors showing interest in the neighborhood, as well as non-profit organizations. Non-profit organizations can typically get a deferred loan if the organization intends to rent to seniors or the handicapped.

The

program has been very successful in the Intensive Care Neighborhoods, and should be marketed for the Study Area, as well.

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Marketing The Study Area must be marketed to developers and prospective homeowners since the area is typically seen as risky to both investors and owner-occupant purchasers. The Study Area has three major assets that could be used as marketing tools: ♦ The housing stock; ♦ The historical quality of the neighborhood; and ♦ The proximity to downtown Funding Summary Project

Annual Budget

Year 3 Budget

Possible Funding Sources

New Construction

$224,985

Vacant Single-Family Rehab Occupied Single-Family Rehab Rental Rehab Program

$466,226

$764,949 CBDG,HOME, Conventional Financing $1,585,169 HOME, SHIP

$375,000

$1,275,000 HOME, SHIP

$450,000

$630,000 HOME, SHIP

Total

$1,516,211.00

$4,255,121.00 ---

Summary of Recommendations ♦ The City should attract small developers and builders to the neighborhood for new construction and vacant rehab properties through development subsidies and land write-downs, which would help offset investment risks. ♦ The City should provide financing subsidy to owner-occupied prospective purchasers to improve the homeownership opportunities to low-to-moderate income families. ♦ The City should provide financial incentives to encourage the rehabilitation of owner-occupied single-family homes within the Study Area that are in deteriorating to dilapidated condition by providing a below-market rate loan to a maximum of $25,000 per unit. ♦ The City should heavily market the City’s Rental Rehab Program within the Study Area.

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SECTION 14 Ξ

Recreation and Open Space SUMMARY

Recreation and Open Space are vital amenities to any neighborhood. This section explores the existing recreational opportunities available to the residents of the Study Area, as well as the future park and community center improvements that are scheduled on the Department of Parks, Recreation, and Entertainmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Project Status Report. Recommendations for additions of specific park improvement features are provided, in addition to creating a process to include residents in any design decisions.

Introduction Parks and open space are important elements of a viable community. Community centers, parks, and playgrounds provide formal and social meeting places for residents. Additionally, athletic clubs and programs provide important recreational opportunities for both youth and adults. Green space adds aesthetic and visual quality to a neighborhood, especially to an urban neighborhood where green space is usually limited or non-existent. This plan intends to provide strategies for infill housing and rehabilitation.

Therefore, recreational

opportunities will be necessary to attract new families into the neighborhood. The recreational opportunities for the Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood seem to be numerous.

There are five parks within and around the Study Area: the Emmett Reed

Center/Park, the James P. Small Park, Grunthal Park, La Villa Park/Florida C. Dwight Community Center, and Mitchell Park. Four of these parks, La Villa Park, the Emmett Reed Center, Grunthal Park, and Mitchell Park, have community buildings. Another community building, the Rutledge Pearson Center, is located in the southern portion of the Study Area and functions as a full service Head Start Center. A public pool is located in the Emmett Reed Center, and three of the parks have basketball and tennis courts.

Softball and

baseball fields are located at La Villa Park (softball), James P. Small Park (baseball), and Emmett Reed Park (softball).

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A portion of the future “S-Line,” a recreational trail extending from Myrtle Avenue to the CSX railroad behind Norwood Plaza, has been constructed by the Jacksonville Housing Authority as part of the HOPE IV projecti. The S-Line is an urban rail-to-trail project planned for Jacksonville.

This trail is sited on an abandoned stretch of CSX railroad Right-of-Way

(ROW). The width of this 4.3 mile trail will be sufficient for pedestrian and bicycle traffic. The intention of this trail is not to create a “destination” recreational trail, but rather to offer residents of the surrounding neighborhoods an alternative to vehicle-dominated streets. Within the Study Area, the S-Line will run northeast from the intersection of Myrtle Avenue and Union Street to the intersection of Kings Road and Blanche Street. Construction of the remaining portions of the trail is planned for fiscal years 2002 and 2003. While the opportunities are available, a visual survey of the parks and community centers located within the Study Area shows that these facilities are lacking in quality. Additionally, the City of Jacksonville Master Recreation Improvement Plan also gives insight into the poor condition of these facilities. Quality of Recreational Opportunities Grunthal Park and La Villa Park are the only parks actually located within the Study Area. Grunthal Park has two basketball courts with nine hoops. Most of the basketball hoops are torn or missing. The park has only two benches, and no water fountain. Additionally, the play equipment, one swing set and a jungle gym, only has one swing left, and the jungle gym is rusting. The park has a large green space, but no trees or

Grunthal Park: Torn basketball hoop

landscaping. There is no parking available at the park. The Community Center associated with Grunthal Park, the Joe James Center, is a deteriorating cinder block structure, with a small room inside with some fosse ball tables. This is the Center that holds the summer lunch program. The summer lunch program staff indicated that a park director worked at the center everyday, but Grunthal Park: Open space lacking landscaping or infrastructure.

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only from 4pm to 8pm. There is no parking available at the Center. La Villa Park was the second public park developed for use by the African-American community in Jacksonville. In addition to a small community center, this 3.4 acre facility contains two basketball courts, one tennis court, one softball field, and an assortment of playground equipment.

Florida C. Dwight Community Center/ La Villa Park

The Rutledge Pearson Center is located at the corner of Union Street and Myrtle Avenue.

This city-owned

building is leased to the Jacksonville Urban League, who operate it as a full service Head Start center serving sixty (60) children and their families. The City of Jacksonville Master Recreation Improvement Plan, created in 1992, surveyed all parks and community centers and rated them on a “good,” “fair,” and “poor” basis.

Joe James Center was rated as “poor, and

Grunthal Park was rated as ”fair.” All other parks were rated in “good” condition. La Villa Park/Florida C. Dwight

Rutledge Pearson Center on Union Street

Community Center is rated poor and in need of repair and maintenance. Since this plan was created in 1992, the condition of these facilities has likely worsened. According to the Department of Parks, Recreation, and Entertainment’s Project Status Report, nearly all of the parks and centers associated with the Study Area are due for improvements.

Grunthal Park is scheduled for

$45,000 of lighting and landscaping. It is in the design stage, and 50% of the design is due August 21, 2000.

Interior of the Joe James Center.

The Joe James Center is scheduled for $70,000 worth of playscape and sign improvements, as well as a new water heater. Half the design will also be due on August 21, 2000.

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The Emmett Reed Center (Durkeeville Community Center) is scheduled for $100,000 worth of additional improvements, and the Pool is scheduled for rehabilitation, as well as a new water playground. All Emmett Reed improvements are in design stages. James P. Small Park is also slated for development improvements, and is allotted $115,000. The Mitchell Center, La Villa Park/Florida C. Dwight Community Center, and the Rutledge Pearson Center are not listed in the Project Status Report.

Recommendations Although the Department of Parks, Recreation, and Entertainment has begun the design stages of improving the parks and centers surrounding the Study Area, the specific improvements for Grunthal Park are not available.

Therefore, it is

recommended that coordination with the Department of Parks, Recreation, and Entertainment and community based organizations begin to ensure certain park features are included in the proposed improvements. These recommended improvements should include the following: ♦ Water Fountain; ♦ Benches surrounding the basketball courts; ♦ Landscaping with shade trees; and ♦ Equipment lending, such as basketballs or tennis rackets. Since coordinated recreational opportunities have historically been organized by many of the residents, it is recommended that the residents review the designs in an organized public participation process.

A design charette would create an

opportunity for residents to get involved in the planning process, as well as an opportunity to inform the Department of Parks, Recreation, and Entertainment the recreational needs of the neighborhood.

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Endnotes

i

Landers-Atkins Planners, Inc. (May 2000) The Jacksonville S-Line: An Urban Rails-to-Trails Project. Prepared for Th City of Jacksonville, Department of Parks, Recreation, and Entertainment & the Department of Public Works.

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SECTION 15 ξ

Crime

SUMMARY The Study Area is experiencing problems with crime, and Kings Road has become more infected with crime since the HOPE VI Oaks at Durkeeville project pressured many of the criminals to move south. While the police data indicate that rapes and residential burglaries are the most common crimes, the Citizens Advisory Committee indicated that drugs and prostitution were the most visible crimes. The Sheriff’s Office has reported recent police operations in the area. Therefore, this section recommends that efforts to increase citizen participation in issues of neighborhood crime be made to curb the increasing incidences of burglaries, prostitution, and drug sales that are affecting the neighborhood.

Crime Statistics The Study Area is within the subsectors M1 and M3, which are two of fifty-two (52) subsectors in the City (refer to Appendix B). Subsectors M1 and M3 have contributed to a steady five (5) percent of the City’s crime since 1996 (refer to Table 20). The crime rates fluctuate very little, with the exception of an overall decrease in 1999. The two subsectors account for a disproportionate share of Jacksonville’s reported violent criminal offences, given their geographical area and population. In 1997, these two subsectors accounted for nearly eighteen (18) percent of reported homicides in the City. In 1999, the subsectors accounted for eight (8) percent of homicides and nine (9) percent of rapes in the City. Therefore, crime continues to be a significant problem in the Study Area. Crime is an important issue for the Citizens Advisory Committee. The Committee listed crime second when asked about the five things that they liked least about the neighborhood. Additionally, the Committee reported that drugs and prostitution were the most prevalent crimes. The officers that staff the Zone 5 sector also agree that drugs and prostitution are the most prevalent crimes. Discussions with the officers have revealed that the criminals previously affecting the Durkeeville neighborhood have moved towards Kings Road due to the recent housing development and infrastructure improvements.

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Table 20

Report of Offense by Type for Subsector M3 1996 1997 1998 1999 Sectors Sectors Sectors Sectors M1 & M3 % of City M1 & M3 % of City M1 & M3 % of City M1 & M3 % of City All Offences

5121

5%

5561

5%

4773

5%

4503

5%

Homicide

8

12%

13

18%

7

10%

6

8%

Rape

43

7%

42

7%

43

9%

40

9%

Other sex offences

17

4%

22

5%

21

6%

15

5%

Robbery

215

8%

193

8%

170

8%

108

6%

Aggrevated Assalt

457

10%

556

11%

456

10%

333

8%

Residential Burglary

510

6%

572

7%

426

6%

455

7%

Other Burglary

293

8%

256

7%

183

5%

205

7%

Theft (less than $300)

817

4%

853

4%

804

4%

775

4%

Theft (greater than $300)

248

3%

240

3%

198

3%

199

3%

Auto Theft

398

6%

434

6%

353

5%

302

6%

Arson

27

7%

37

9%

29

8%

30

10%

Kidnapping

26

10%

19

7%

20

8%

17

8%

Simple Assalt

737

6%

890

7%

737

6%

714

6%

Criminal Mischief

515

5%

545

5%

494

5%

498

5%

All Other

810

4%

943

4%

822

4%

806

4%

Source: Office of the Sheriff, City of Jacksonville

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Additionally, the officers indicated that the vacant and condemned buildings within the Study Area create places for the criminals to hide and conduct criminal activities. Prevention Measures The Sheriff’s Office reported that a recent “sting” operation in June/July had resulted in close to 200 or more arrests. Most of these arrests were drug related, and approximately 100 officers were involved in the operation. The Sheriff’s Office also has a monthly advisory meeting, in which the public is invited to come and inform the Sector M3 officers of their concerns. However, the August meeting attracted a small turnout. Most of the attendees were the officers of the Sector. The organization is well-organized, including a recent election of officers from the community to run the meetings. Beyond the measures of the police and the community, crime will most likely decrease as conditions of the neighborhood improve. Since vacant buildings are havens for criminals, the renovation and eventual occupation of these buildings would significantly decrease the crime activity. Additionally, the participation of the community would greatly enhance the efforts of the officers in the area. Recommendations ♦ Actively advertise the Sheriffs Advisory Council (SHADCO) meetings and encourage all residents to attend. ♦ Create “block” captains to report crimes immediately to the Sheriff’s Office. ♦ Cooperate with code enforcement to secure vacant structures until renovations begin.

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SECTION 16 Ξ

Infrastructure

SUMMARY Adequate infrastructure is a critical element of neighborhood revitalization. The industrial sector is in need of road and drainage improvements, the Kings Road Corridor is in need of road and streetscape improvements, and the smaller neighborhood streets are in need of repair. While there are only a few scheduled improvements in the Study Area, the Better Jacksonville Plan can provide the needed funding for many of the infrastructure improvements.

The Study Area is not devoid of infrastructure, but the quality of the roads, water and sewer, and curb and gutter are low. Many of the businesses in the industrial sector often report that the traffic lanes of Beaver Street are too narrow for large trucks, and the turn radii of many of the intersections are too shallow. Kings Road is a major transportation corridor for both automobiles and pedestrians, though the sidewalks are too narrow for the heavy pedestrian traffic. Many of the streets in the Study Area are littered with potholes, and lack curb and gutter. Additionally, the southern section of the Study Area often floods, creating difficulty for the nearby businesses. The Study Area has complete water and sewer coverage, though there are planned improvements. A Jacksonville Electric Authority (JEA) water groundworks project for the southern portion of the Study Area is in the design phases. Construction for this project will occur from West 2nd Street from Tyler Street to Rushing Street, West 1st Street from Tyler Street to Barnett Street, West State Street from Tyler Street to Brady Street, Tyler Street from West 2nd Street to State Street, and Rushing Street from West 2nd Street to State Street. A drainage improvement to the industrial section south of Beaver Street, near the intersection of Church Street and Myrtle Avenue, has been constructed.

This culvert

provides outfall to Mycoyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Creek. Road improvements are also scheduled for 13th Street and 10th Street.

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Other than the few projects listed above, there are not any scheduled infrastructures improvements for the Study Area.

However, the Better Jacksonville Plan, which was

approved by voter referendum on September 5, 2000. This plan is a growth management plan that addresses environmental concerns, transportation needs, as well as economic development initiatives.

This plan will provide the funding needed, approximately $105

million, for transportation improvements. With this funding, any roadway that has not been resurfaced in the last fifteen (15) years, will be resurfaced. The plan also includes funding to accelerate drainage projects ($70 million) and to build infrastructure. Additionally, sidewalks and bike paths ($20 million) will be laid throughout the County. Recommendations ♦ The City should prioritize the Study Area south of Kings Road for curb and gutter improvements. ♦ The City should coordinate with FDOT for Kings Road improvements, including streetscape improvements. ♦ The City should focus efforts to widen Beaver Street to accommodate trucks from the industrial sector of the Study Area.

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SECTION 17 Summary of Recommendations SUMMARY The purpose of this plan is to provide an analysis of the neighborhood, and to recommend specific strategies in which the City of Jacksonville and neighborhood organizations can use to preserve the historical character of the neighborhood, and to revitalize the deteriorating residential and commercial sectors. The plan will also link potential financial sources to those strategies. Strategies are recommended for the growth and development of Edward Waters College, zoning, neighborhood conservation, recreation and open space, crime, the commercial investment and streetscape opportunities along the Kings Road Corridor, the development activities within industrial sector, the rehabilitation of occupied and vacant homes, and infill housing on the vacant lots. This section provides a summary of the recommendations for each section.

Overall Visions and Strategies â&#x2122;Ś There should be a historical preservation and neighborhood conservation emphasis in rehabilitation efforts, as well as in guidelines for new construction. â&#x2122;Ś The northern section should be targeted for stabilization efforts, which could include rehabilitation of homes occupied by seniors and rehabilitation of homes for sale to moderate to middle income families. New construction on vacant lots could also be marketed toward moderate to middle income families and should be architecturally compatible with the existing housing stock. â&#x2122;Ś The southern planning section should be targeted for redevelopment efforts, which could include infill development of single-family housing and rehabilitation of multi-family housing. Rehabilitation of single-family homes would also help increase the housing stock and improve the housing conditions. All housing south of 8th street should be marketed to low to moderate income families, since the lots and houses are generally smaller than the lots and houses in the northern planning section.

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♦ Edward Waters College expansion should be planned and guided to limit the negative impact students and commercial intrusions can have on single-family residential areas. Two area designations are proposed: the EWC Development Area (designated for physical expansion of the college and student housing accommodations) and the EWC Impact Area (the area surrounding the college that will be influenced by the expansion). ♦ Kings Road should be the hub of commercial activity for both the college and the surrounding residential neighborhoods.

Retail and services uses that serve the

residents, rather than the region, should line the Corridor. Land should be assembled to create a neighborhood scale commercial center. Additionally, Kings Road should be the location of any social services that locate within the neighborhood.

The City should

work closely with the local community organizations to attract and locate businesses and social services along the Corridor. ♦ Kings Road should serve as a main transportation corridor for pedestrians, cyclists, and buses, as well as the automobile. Since the Corridor is the location of a college, and a commercial area, the roadway should be safe for cyclists and pedestrians. The Corridor should have landscaping and signage that would create a visually pleasing entrance into the neighborhood, and provide a campus-oriented atmosphere for the College. ♦ The industrial section should continue as a central location of light industrial and manufacturing activities in the core city. Efforts should focus on expanding existing businesses and attracting new employers to this area through a variety of mechanisms, such as infrastructure improvements and financial incentives. Adaptive reuse of vacant buildings should be employed where possible in this area. Edward Waters College Growth & Expansion ♦ The EWC Development Area should guide the physical development of Edward Waters College; ♦ The EWC Impact Area should absorb the impacts of the EWC growth. ♦ The City should help coordinate and facilitate a master planning process for the growth and development of EWC.

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Zoning & Land Use ♦ The section of Kings Road, east of Whitner Street, that is currently zoned CCG-2 should rezoned Commercial Neighborhood. ♦ The residential section currently zoned RMD-E should be rezoned RMD-B. ♦ The residential section south of Kings Road that is currently zoned RMD-A, with the exclusion of the EWC Development Area, should be rezoned to RMD-B. ♦ The residential section north of Kings Road, and in the EWC Impact Area that is currently zoned RMD-A should be rezoned RMD-B. ♦ The EWC Development Area should be rezoned from RMD-A and RMD-E to CRO. ♦ The industrial sites that are erroneously zoned for residential use should be rezoned to IL. ♦ All new construction should apply for setback changes to be consistent with existing development through the administrative deviation process. Neighborhood Conservation ♦ The City should implement the Neighborhood Conservation Pilot Program outlined in this Plan, limited to the EWC Impact area, which combines elements of historical preservation and code enforcement to curb the deterioration of the buildings while protecting the historical integrity of the neighborhood. ♦ The Planning and Development Department should develop a partnership program with the Neighborhood Department’s Code Enforcement Division. The program would link targeted housing inspections with HOME and SHIP funded rehabilitation programs for occupied/vacant single family and multi-family properties within the EWC Impact Area. The Kings Road Commercial Corridor ♦ Complete a detailed corridor study for the roadway and all properties bordering the road from Myrtle Avenue to Farifax Street. ♦ Create a Community Redevelopment Area for the Kings Road Corridor which would include the EWC Development Area, as well as all parcels along the roadway that are within a commercial zoning district.

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♦ Focus on attracting businesses that the residents are lacking and are more likely to frequent, such as grocery stores, drug stores, and apparel stores. New commercial activity should be concentrated in the proposed Commercial Neighborhood zoning district that is close to Edward Waters College. Industrial Areas South of Kings Road ♦ A Community Redevelopment Area should be established and bound by Interstate 95 to the east, Kings Road and 1st Street to the North, Rushing Street to the west, and the CSX Railroad tracks to the south. Infill Housing and Rehabilitation ♦ The City should attract small developers and builders to the neighborhood for new construction and vacant rehab through development subsidies and write-downs, which would offset the any investment risks. ♦ The City should provide financing subsidy to owner-occupied prospective purchasers to improve the homeownership opportunities to low-to-moderate income families. ♦ The City should rehabilitate the owner-occupied single-family homes within the Study Area that are in deteriorating to dilapidated condition by providing a maximum of $25,000 per unit. ♦ The City should heavily market the City’s Rental Rehab Program within the Study Area. ♦ The City should use the outline provided in Section 13 as a basis for working with developers/builders on the infill and rehab program. Recreation and Open Space ♦ Although the Department of Parks, Recreation, and Entertainment has begun the design stages of improving the parks and centers surrounding the Study Area, the specific improvements for Grunthal Park are not available. Therefore, it is recommended that coordination with the Department of Parks, Recreation, and Entertainment and community based organizations begin to ensure certain park features are included in the proposed improvements. These recommended improvements should include the following:

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♦ Water Fountain; ♦ Benches surrounding the basketball courts; ♦ Landscaping with shade trees; and ♦ Equipment lending, such as basketballs or tennis rackets. ♦ Since coordinated recreational opportunities have historically been organized by many of the residents, it is recommended that the residents review the designs in an organized public participation process. A design charette would create an opportunity for residents to get involved in the planning process, as well as an opportunity to inform the Department of Parks, Recreation, and Entertainment the recreational needs of the neighborhood. Crime ♦ Actively advertise the Sheriffs Advisory Council (SHADCO) meetings and encourage all residents to attend. ♦ Create “block” captains to report crimes immediately to the Sheriff’s Office. ♦ Cooperate with code enforcement to secure vacant structures until renovations begin. Infrastructure ♦ The City should prioritize the Study Area south of Kings Road for curb and gutter improvements. ♦ The City should coordinate with FDOT for Kings Road improvements, including streetscape improvements. ♦ The City should focus efforts to widen Beaver Street to accommodate trucks from the industrial sector of the Study Area.

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SECTION 18 Ξ

Edward Waters College Implementation SUMMARY

The recommendations within this Plan are all interrelated to create a comprehensive revitalization strategy. This Plan recommends that the Edward Waters College expansion and related HUD grant award, as well as the Load King expansion proposal, be used as the focal points for the implementation of the Neighborhood Action Plan. Since the Load King Manufacturing expansion plan is detailed in the attached Community Redevelopment Plan (refer to Appendix J), this Section will provide an implementation strategy that focuses on the Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s growth and its community development efforts.

Introduction The Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood Action Plan is designed to provide action steps for revitalization.

All recommendations given in the previous sections, and

summarized in Section 17, should be considered as interrelated and connected. Each recommendation shares the common denominator of facilitating a strategically planned growth and development pattern that can be applied to Edward Waters College and the surrounding neighborhoods.

Many of the recommendations are linked to other

recommendations and form the foundations for future specific implementation actions that are outlined in this Section of the Plan. Taken together, the recommendations can be used to design a comprehensive strategy for economic and residential growth and development within the EWC Development Area and surrounding neighborhoods. Therefore, this Section provides a work plan outline for designing and implementing the recommendations included in the Plan. This Section also encourages citizen and institutional participation as part of the implementation process, and proposes the tasks needed to transform the Plan into an action-oriented document to be used by the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Planning and Development Department to allocate resources and technical assistance.

Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood Action Plan

18-1


Implementation Start-up Given the complexity of the revitalization strategy and the large number of stakeholders involved in the process, it is recommended that the recent U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development grant award of $250,000 to EWC, and the Load King expansion proposal (outlined in the Community Redevelopment Plan given in Appendix J), become the focal points in beginning the implementation process. The City’s strong partnership with the College, as well as the College’s plans to form a Community Development Corporation to implement the grant award will give the City and the College a structure and administrative organization to implement many of the recommendations within this plan. The HUD grant boundaries are the boundaries of the EWC Development Area, and the grant’s goals and objectives are consistent with the Plan’s recommendations. Additionally, the growth and development of EWC and the expansion of Load King Manufacturing would greatly impact the residential section of the Study Area south of Kings Road. While these projects would produce a great amount of change for the neighborhood, these projects will also be catalysts for future growth and investment. The Planning and Development Department’s Community Development Division will lead the City’s efforts in working with the College to administer the grant, and has dedicated funding property acquistion and development and for the creation of an EWC Development Area Master Plan Outline that will be use as a “footprint” for EWC’s and the neighborhood’s development efforts. zoning

changes

and

the

Therefore, in addition to implementing the

Neighborhood

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District

program,

this

implementation strategy will focus on the leadership and project coordination provided by both the City and College during the two-year HBCU grant period. Since the implementation strategy for the Load King Manufacturing expansion is detailed in the attached Community Redevelopment Area (refer to Appendix J), this EWCoriented implementation strategy will include the public participation component of both initiatives to demonstrate the interrelated efforts that the Planning and Development Department should coordinate. Continued involvement by the Planning and Development Department in the implementation phase of the Neighborhood Action Plan is important. It is recommended that the PDD’s Community Development Division be tasked with the overall coordination

Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood Action Plan

18-2


and management of EWC Development Area Implementation Strategy. The following Task List is suggested as the basis for a more detailed work plan that would be developed after the proposed â&#x20AC;&#x153;Visioningâ&#x20AC;? work session is completed: Implementation Flow Chart Adopt Plan by Resolution

Zoning Changes

Adopt Zoning Changes by Ordinance

Neighborhood Conservation Pilot District

Create the Design Guidelines

Community Redevelopment

Growth & Development of EWC

Expansion of Load King Manufacturing

Form Subcommittees to CAC for Each Initiative Establish Staff for the Administrative Review Process

Create an Appeal Process for the District

City & EWC Efforts

EWC Efforts

Economic Development & Housing Visioning Process

Form CDC Board

Hire CDC Director

Create Policies for Development Priorities & Visions

Project Development

Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood Action Plan

18-3


Recommended Action Steps Task #1

Regulatory Framework

Adopt Plan by Resolution Introduced to Council by Councilpersons Fullwood and Yates Implement zoning changes by ordinance Introduced to Council by Councilpersons Fullwood and Yates Task #2

Citizen Participation

Create subcommittees of the Community Advisory Committee One subcommittee for the Load King Expansion, and one for the EWC expansion Task #3

Analysis and Planning

Begin the Corridor Study Draft Community Redevelopment Plan for the Edward Waters College Development Area, and all properties fronting King Road Task #4

Design and Vision

Begin the public participation process for the Neighborhood Conservation District design guidelines Organize and implement a visioning session for the EWC economic development and housing goals Create a common vision for the development of Kings Road, the expansion of EWC, and the community development projects. Draft a policy guideline for the Community Development Corporation, the City and all stakeholders involved in the process Policies should incorporate selection criteria for properties Policies should include priorities for acquired properties, and reflect the common vision developed in the visioning session Policies should include a mechanism for citizen participation Begin master planning process for EWC

Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood Action Plan

18-4


Task #5

Administrative Procedures

Create an administrative review process for the Neighborhood Conservation District Assign staff to conduct reviews Create appropriate forms and checklists for applications Form the Community Development Corporation Board Create an appeals process for the Neighborhood Conservation District Adopt the Neighborhood Conservation District by ordinance Create job description for CDC, and begin hiring process Adopt Community Redevelopment Area for Kings Road Task #6

Project Development

Using policies with selection criteria, begin to identify property for acquisition Residential Commercial Identify funding opportunities for the Kings Road Corridor, i.e. The Main Street Program Incorporate citizen concerns in the project development Incorporate recommendations from the Kings Road Corridor Study Finalize the â&#x20AC;&#x153;footprintâ&#x20AC;? for master planning Conclusions Although many of the tasks will be completed by a variety of stakeholders, this recommended action steps list would allow the process to be more organized and fluid. The recommended action steps list gives the community organizations, the College, and City a focus and a schedule.

Beginning with the regulatory environment, since

residential rehabilitation on vacant properties cannot begin without the necessary zoning changes, the List incorporates citizen participation, visioning workshops, and policy making as prerequisites to project development.

This creates an environment of

cohesion between the many stakeholders to implement the various recommendations of the Plan.

Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood Action Plan

18-5


Kings Road/Beaver Street Neighborhood Action Plan

18-6


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Multi-family Vacant EET Single Family Church Commercial Parking Industrial Public Buildings and Facilities

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