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CULINARY SHOWCASE

ANSWERING

THE CALL WITH HEARD DAT KITCHEN

F.A.R.M.S.

IS SAVING OUR FARMLANDS NEW ORLEANS EDITION 2018

DRINK RECIPES FROM TOP MIXOLOGISTS

NEW ORLEANS CULINARY DIRECTORY

BLACK RESTAURANT WEEK


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Contents 07

ANSWERING THE CALL C he f J e ff Heard s tr ikes th e r ight tone with Heard D at Kitch en

10

SUMMER SIPS... Featured Co cktail Recip es f rom Houston an d Ph ilad elp h ia Power o f t he Palate B arten d er Co mp etitio n winners

15 COCKTAIL RECIPES

15

NEW ORLEANS CULINARY DIRECTORY B lack Res tau ran t Week 2018 Par ticipan ts

18

10 GIVING BACK

PROTECTING OUR FARMLANDS J illian His h aw wo r king to Pro tect M in o r ity Farm s

18


BLACK RESTAURANT WEEK, LLC FOUNDER

WARREN LUCKETT OPERATIONS

FALAYN FERRELL MARKETING

DEREK ROBINSON LEGAL

THE GUESS FIRM, P.L.L.C. EVENTS

LIAH JOHNSON NEW ORLEANS BRW CHAIR

LATOYA BULLARD-FRANKLIN PUBLIC RELATIONS

THE SPEARS GROUP DESIGN

FADE MEDIA PRINTING

GOOD LOOK CREATIVE STAFF WRITERS

JADA F. SMITH

RECIPE CONTRIBUTERS JAZMON MILLER JOE VINCENT ANDREW CALLIS, JR SHANELL VERANDEZ-WILLIAMS NEW ORLEANS BLACK RESTAURANT WEEK 2018 SPONSORS & SUPPORTERS VERIZON HYATT REGENCY NEW ORLEANS TOURISM MARKETING THE BERGER GROUP JACK DANIELS BRANWAR WINES FADE MEDIA OOH LA LA EXPRESS MASSAGE WARNER WILLIAMS FOUNDATION NEW ORLEANS JAZZ ORCHESTRA

WWW.NO LA B RW.CO M


EDITORS

LETTER

Friendship & food

We are celebrating our inaugural New Orleans Black Restaurant Week campaign and are still in awe of the love and support of the New Orleans community. We never envisioned our idea in Houston would ignite a Black Culinary Movement that has spanned across the United States into other cities such as Atlanta and Philadelphia. We will continue our mission of highlighting excellence in the Black Culinary Community around the country later this year as we introduce Los Angeles and Dallas.

In response to numerous requests to provide a resource to connect communities and businesses throughout the year; we are excited to present you our new Black Culinary Publication. This publication highlights our participants in Black Restaurant Week and includes a full participant directory. It serves as bridge between Black culinary businesses and the New Orleans Community. Behind every successful venture are people who work behind the scenes to support the vision. There aren’t enough words to express our gratitude to those who have helped us reach our third year. We recognize and honor

our core team of Liah Johnson, Mark Martin, Shakti Baum, and Carol Guess for working with us and believing in the project since 2015. This journey is also a testament to the dedication and work of countless others that have believed in our vision. We send a special thank you to Latoya Bullard-Franklin for leading the charge to introduce New Orleans to Black Restaurant Week. We are extremely grateful for the support of our sponsors, Verizon, Hyatt, New Orleans Tourism Marketing, The Berger Group, Jack Daniels, Warner Williams Foundation, Good Look Creative, Branwar Wines, and Fade Media who have been generous with multiple resources. In closing, we express our heartfelt love for our families who have supported us as we worked countless hours to make this vision a reality. We give the biggest thank you of all to God, for trusting us with his vision and walking by our side on this journey. As you Follow Your Fork this week, remember to make a special toast to: “Food, Family, and Friends!” Cheers, Warren Luckett , Falayn Ferrell, Derek Robinson


– Since 1941

Dooky Chase’s Restaurant fed the Civil Rights Movement. In the late ‘50s, a humble, family-run restaurant in Treme opened its upstairs room to Civil Rights leaders. Famed Creole chef Leah Chase fed Thurgood Marshall, Dutch Morial, Revs. A.L. Davis and Avery Alexander, Oretha Castle Haley, and others as they planned peaceful protests like the 1963 Freedom March (right).

Today, Mrs. Chase, 95, still cooks in the restaurant named for her husband, its walls lined with photographs of the visionaries and leaders who’ve eaten there. Visit New Orleans and start your story with #OneTimeInNOLA.

OneTimeInNOLA.com

Image courtesy of Loyola University New Orleans.


Answering THE CALL

Chef Jeff Strikes the right tone with Heard Dat Kitchen

CHEF JEFFREY HEARD SR

BY: JADA F. SMITH It hasn’t even been five years since Chef Jeffrey Heard Sr. left his job as a banquet manager to open Heard Dat Kitchen, but already it’s become one of the most popular chicken joints on the New Orleans food scene. Locals who live near the Felicity Street location have embraced it for it’s unique offerings that remain authentic to traditional New Orleans cuisine. Tourists have flocked to it after a glowing write-up in the Times-Picayune. Foodies from an array of backgrounds have fallen in love. When organizers for the New Orleans Fried Chicken Festival noticed that Heard Dat Kitchen, which won the festival’s fried chicken contest in 2017, hadn’t signed up to vend in the 2018 festival, they called up Heard personally to ask him to attend. “They called looking for us to see why we weren’t participating,”

Tia’Nesha Heard-Dorest, Chef Jeffrey’s daughter and personal assistant, said. “It’s meant to be if they’re calling you.” The whirlwind rise that Heard Dat has experienced over the past few years could be dizzying for others, but the Heards have embraced it with a steady hand, pacing themselves before each next step. Less than one year after Ann Maloney of the TimesPicayune described it as “a modest take-out restaurant with just four tables, three on the sidewalk in front, and a pick-up window where orders are served in Styrofoam boxes,” Heard Dat is opening a remodeled sub-compartment to make room for a much bigger crowd. The addition could potentially help to take the endeavor from “a modest takeout restaurant” to the New Orleans chicken behemoth it is primed to become.

Heard Dat Kitchen has been family owned and operated since 2015. The restaurant adds vibrant flavors to traditional New Orleans cuisine.

And just in time for Black Restaurant Week. The newly opened space seats up to 40 guests, “which is a huge thing for us,” Tia said. The theme is best described as barnyard-chic, with lots of wood accents and framed sayings espousing the joy of good food. Expressions like “let’s cook!”, “let’s eat!” and “food makes me happy.” All of the new interior designing was done by Tia’s sister-in-law, who runs an event planning business called Nyce Events. In addition to consistently good cuisine and hospitality, relying on family seems 7


to be another part to the restaurant’s success. Jeffrey Heard Sr. runs the kitchen with his son, Jeffrey Heard Jr. -- who is also the brains behind many of the creative names on the menu. Tia handles events and serves as a de-facto personal assistant, her 16-year-old sister waits tables and handles the register, and their mom does all the “pot” foods. The red beans, the mustard greens, the smothered cabbage. The most popular dish on the menu is one called Dat Superdome, which is composed of blackened catfish fillet topped with mashed potatoes under a tower of fried onion rings. The dish is finished off with a corn in lobster and fennel cream sauce. It was born from Chef Jeffrey just playing around with a lobster 8

bisque soup that he thought would make for a good sauce on top of something. His son, Jeffrey Jr., gave it the name Superdome because of its 3D composition on the plate. “Everybody says it looks just like the pictures,” Tia said. “It’s not like McDonald’s where the bread will be sliding off in person.” In addition to their recent remodel, the business is also expanding its catering wing, Audre Mae Catering, with private upscale dinner parties coming up in the fall. But you can still plan to find Heard Dat right there in the neighborhood off Claiborne Ave. “This is where God placed us,” she said. “You have to start somewhere and make the best of where you are.”

HEARD DAT KITCHEN 2520 FELICITY ST NEW ORLEANS, LA 70113 HOURS:

Monday 11AM–7PM Tuesday 11AM–7PM Wednesday 11AM–7PM Thursday 11AM–7PM Friday 11AM–7PM Saturday 11AM–7PM Sunday Closed


SUMMER SIPS...

B L ACK RE STAURANT WEEK 2018 B ART E NDE R WINNE RS 10

COMPILED BY: FALAYN FERRELL

10


SOUTHERN

Herbal peach MARTELL COGNAC DOMAIN CANTON GINGER LIQUEUR LEMON JUICE HONEY THYME FROZEN PEACHES FRESH GINGER GINGER BEER

Jazmon Miller ABOUT

Laid back country girl living a city girl life

BARTENDING EXPERIENCE 5 years

FAVORITE COCKTAIL TO PREPARE Old Fashion, simply put its a modest cocktail with a lot of flavor. Short, sweet, and to the point, kinda like me minus the short part.

11


THE Bullock 17 1.5 oz HENNESSY 1 oz JALAPEÑO STAR FRUIT SYRUP .5 oz LIME JUICE SMOKED CINNAMON STICK ATOMIZED ROSE WATER SERVE CHILLED IN A COUPE GLASS

12

Joe Vincent ABOUT Cocktail creator on the wild side with a touch of class.

BARTENDING EXPERIENCE 14 years

FAVORITE COCKTAIL TO PREPARE The Caprinhnia is my favorite cocktail to make because it’s a very simple cocktail and it’s rich in flavor. I love cachaca which is a Brazilian spirit that has a bold sugar cane flavor. Once the favors of lime juice meet with the cachaca its nothing less than spectacular


HOUSTON PEOPLE’S CHOICE

THE

Sugar Bear BY: ANDREW CALLIS JR

PHILADELPHIA PEOPLE’S CHOICE

THE

Honey Kiss

BY: SHANELL VERANDEZ-WILLIAMS

1.5OZ MARTELL VSSD

2 oz. CHAMOMILE INFUSED

1OZ ROSEMARY INFUSED HONEY

HENNESSY VS

2OZ FRESH LEMON JUICE IN MIXING TIN WITH ICE SHAKE UNTIL TIN IS LIGHTLY FROSTED AND POUR OVER ICE IN 8.5 OUNCE GLASS GARNISH HONEY CUBES AND GOLDEN CRISP CEREAL ON A COCKTAIL PICK

.5 oz. LEMON JUICE .5 oz. CINNAMON HONEY SYRUP 1 DASH OF DRY SHERRY ALL INGREDIENTS ARE TO BE SHAKEN TOGETHER AND SERVED EITHER STRAIGHT IN A COUP GLASS OR ON ICE IN A ROCKS GLASS WITH A LEMON PEEL GARNISH.

13


NEW ORLEANS

CULINARY DIRECTORY B L ACK RE STAU RANT WE E K 2018 PART ICIPANTS COMPILED BY: LIAH JOHNSON

15


RESTAURANT SHOWCASE BEAUCOUP EATS 3911 Washington Ave. New Orleans, LA 70125 (713) 528-0020 Cuisine: Creole, Vegetarian, Vegan BLAZE BISTRO 5941 Bullard Ave suite 6 New Orleans, LA 70128 (713) 874-0722 Cuisine: Barbecue HEARD DAT KITCHEN 2520 Felicity Street New Orleans, LA 70113 (281) 969-8626 Cuisine: Creole

16 27

MEALS FROM THE HEART 1100 N Peters St #13 New Orleans, LA 70116 (832) 964-4012 Cuisine: Wine Bar

SASSAFRAS CREOLE KITCHEN 2501 Leon C Simon Blvd. New Orleans, LA 70128 (713) 699-1212 Cuisine: Creole

NEYOW’S CREOLE CAFÉ 3340 Bienville St New Orleans, LA 70119 (713) 344-1569 Cuisine: Creole

TASTY TREAT RESTAURANT 5000 Old Gentilly Road New Orleans, LA 70126 (713) 522-5015 Cuisine: Brunch, Soul

PRA_LEES 3600 St. Bernard ave New Orleans, LA 70122 (832) 427-1526 Cuisine: American

WE DAT’S CHICKEN & SHRIMP 1407 Canal St New Orleans, LA 70112 (832) 203-5883 Cuisine: American


CULINARY SHOWCASE BARE COOKING LLC Charles Bell Bare.cooking.cate@gmail.com (504) 435-4462 Service: Catering, Dessert

CHEF SYRENA JOHNSON

BIGEASY PRALINE CONNECTION Eric Jones bigeasypralineconnectionllc@ gmail.com (504) 214-9453 Service: Catering, Dessert

info@cocoaandcreamcatering.com

PELICAN ON DECK ROSÉ ICED TEA

HUMBLE HANDZ PRALINES Ayanna Newell

Service: Beverage

CAJUN FIRE BREWING COMPANY info@drinkcajunfire.com www.DrinkCajunFire.com

Service: Beverage

CHEF KENNETH TEMPLE

chefkennethtemple@gmail.com

Service: Executive Chef

CHEF MARLON ALEXANDER chef.mea@gmail.com www.crunola.com

Service: Executive Chef

chefsyrenajohnson@gmail.com

Service: Executive Chef

COCOA & CREAM CATERING, LLC Ethel Williams (504)377-7046 Service: Dessert

ayanna.newell01@gmail.com

(504) 941-9349 Service: Dessert

I-TAL GARDEN Joseph Robinson jorobinson4701@gmail.com

(504) 205-3393 Service: Catering, Vegetarian

KD’S NOLA TREATS Kimberly Dejan Kdsnolatreats@gmail.com

(504) 345-4555 Service: Catering, Dessert

www.pelicanondeck.com

THEAUDRIC’S REAL CLEVER CUISINE Theaudric Davis theaudricdavis@mac.com (504) 289-5772 Cuisine: Food Truck TOTALLY BAKED BY CHRISSY Christine Harris tbbychrissy@yahoo.com (504) 235-9779 Service: Catering, Dessert


B Y J A D A F. S M I T H

PROTECTING OUR FARMLAND

We’re losing 30,000 acres of black land ownership per year due to lack of estate planning Maintaining a farm in 21st century America is not easy for anybody. Climate change threatens crops and optimal growing conditions, consumer demands for organically grown foods requires a shift in operations, and the rapid about-face from being a resource-based economy to an information-based economy has marginalized many rural farmers and ensured that the number of young people who are interested in cultivating careers in the field remain low. But for many black farmers, simply holding on to their land can be the hardest thing. It is estimated that black farmers owned roughly 15 million acres of land in the early 1900s, offering not only physical, but economic sustenance for untold numbers of black families and 19


STATE OF BLACK FARMERS in Louisiana

A snapshot of Louisiana Black Farmers portray the alarming need to support our farming community. In 2012, black farmers made up less than 2 percent of America’s farming population, operating just 0.4 percent of the country’s farmland and accounting for 0.2 percent of total agricultural sales.

Percentage of African-American farm operators

.03%

Percentage of land owned by African-American farm operators

59

Average age of African-American farm operators

.04%

Percentage of government assistance to African-American operators in Louisiana

94

Average size of acres by African-American farm operators compared to 281 acres in all farms.

1-9 10-49 50-179 180-499 500+ 0

250

500

750

1,000

FARMS BY ECONOMIC SIZE Less than $1,000 $1,000 to $2,499 $2,500 to $4,999

Dollars

7.5%

FARMS BY SIZE Acres

BY THE NUMBERS

$5,000 to $9,999 $10,000 to $24,499 $25,000 to $49,999 $50,000+

0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900

SOURCE: CENSUS OF AGRICULTURE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

communities. In 1920, there were 925,000 black owned farms, but due to a massive effort to push farmers off their land, there were only 45,000 by 1975. The numbers kept dwindling from there. In 2012, black farmers made up less than 2 percent of America’s farming population, operating just 0.4 percent of the country’s farmland and accounting for 0.2 percent of total agricultural sales. F.A.R.M.S., an organization that advocates for black farmers, says that today, black farmers are losing 30,000 acres of land ownership per year. The United States Department of Agriculture was forced to acknowledge that much of this loss was due to discriminatory practices in its allocation of farm loans and assistance in the landmark case, Pigford v. Glickman, which resulted in what was reportedly the largest federal settlement for civil rights violations. But those payouts still weren’t enough to fully right the wrongs that had been inflicted on generations of black farmers. They are still missing access to many of the basic things that are 20

necessary for farmers to survive and maintain longevity. And that’s where Jillian Hishaw and her F.A.R.M.S. initiative has stepped in. An acronym for Family Agricultural Resource Management Services, the nonprofit organization aims to protect the aging family farmer from abuse by providing legal, education and hunger relief services. In addition to helping them increase revenue and feed food insecure residents in their communities, they provide crucial services like access to direct legal counsel and -- most importantly, Hishaw says -- eldercare and estate planning. Hishaw experienced similar issues in her own family, when her relatives lost farmland due to trusting a dishonest professional, giving her a birdseye view of the dangers that lie in a lack of proper estate planning. She earned a legal masters in agricultural law, held jobs at the USDA and the Environmental Protection Agency, then started F.A.R.M.S. to help families like hers retain their land and to help the aging farming population create plans for succession.


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“We’re losing [30,000 acres of black land ownership per year] due to lack of estate planning,” Hishaw said. “But it’s also foreclosures and tax liens, and of course discrimination. So it’s just various reasons, but the number one reason, I believe, based on my experience, is estate planning. Not having a will and dying without a will creates a lot of problems.”

Hishaw and her crew endeavor to make sure that there are plenty of resources, opportunities and retail markets available to them once they enter the profession. She works to get them into farmers markets, restaurants and grocery stores, and also helps them to link up with hunger relief organizations that can make good use of any excess food crops.

Additionally, the children of some farmers do not want to take on the responsibility of maintaining a working farm, though not knowing, Hishaw says, that there are lots of other options for them out there, from less highmaintenance solar farms to timber farms and even erecting cell towers.

But still, she says, one of the most important aspects of their survival is for communities to support their local farmers.

“There’s several ways to make money without farming the land and being a produce farmer or a livestock farmer,” she said. But, there has been a burgeoning interest amongst millennials and younger generations to get involved with farming, as exhibited by the scholarships that F.A.R.M.S. gives out every year to a child or grandchild of a farmer who is majoring in agricultural science at Tuskegee University.

“Go buy from the farmer’s markets,” she says. “Often times I get questions from people on social media who say, ‘well I don’t buy from the farmer because their price is a little bit higher than at Wal-Mart.’ Well the farmer has a lot of input. They have labor, they have to pay for seed, they have to pay for fertilizer, the land, the taxes. And so a lot of these farmers make very little and they’re barely breaking even, but they do it because they love it, and so having people not to haggle over the price, but to support, is definitely something that I implore everybody to do.” SUPPORT F.A.R.M.S: Visit https://www.30000acres.org/donate to support Hishaw's efforts to support the farming community.


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Profile for Black Restaurant Week

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