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Lakeshore

Shuswap Vol. 28 No. 10 March 9, 2018

Market News

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Inside Shuswap

A11 Ice circles

Lake formations raise questions. Plus Opinion A6 South Shuswap A9

Chase

A18

Out in the sun

As the snow melts, people move outside. Plus Election result A28 Squatter arrest A28

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Teri Gordon and Victoria Skofteby’s dog Stella search at Sun Peaks. Skofteby, who is from Salmon Arm, volunteered to help with the search effort on Monday, March 5. (Victoria Skofteby photo)

Search for Ryan Shtuka goes on

Professional search dog teams at Sun Peaks Resort until Friday. Martha Wickett salmon arm observer

Salmon Arm’s Victoria Skofteby was at Sun Peaks Resort the day Ryan Shtuka went missing. She was attending a wedding there that Saturday so the weather was on everyone’s minds. It was to be an outdoor wedding and the temperature was hovering around -18 C. They woke up to snow that morning. The outdoor wedding went ahead as planned and it wasn’t until Monday that Skofteby learned of Ryan’s disappearance.

The 20-year-old had moved to Sun Peaks from Beaumont, Alta. on Dec. 1 to work at the ski hill and pursue his love of snowboarding. He left a small get-together at a residence on Burfield Drive just below the ski hill at 2:10 a.m. that Saturday, Feb. 17, heading to his home about a 10- to 15-minute walk away. He has not been seen since. Skofteby contacted Heather Shtuka, Ryan’s mom, to provide information about the weather and has been in touch the last while. The family was seeking volunteers,

dogs and snowshoes to help with the search so, on Monday, March 6, Skofteby headed to the resort with her black lab Stella. “I’m the type of person who loves to help,” she says. Stella, who sniffs constantly but has no training as a search dog, would find spots where volunteers with shovels would come and dig, or a backhoe would dig, or she and Stella would search an area where the backhoe had just dug. Many volunteers were there using poles to poke in the snow. Continued on A3

Heather Shtuka, Ryan’s mom. (Photo contributed)

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Page A2 Friday, March 9, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

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Using your noodle

Eagle River Secondary student Garrett Dale applies weight to his team’s spaghetti bridge at the Skills Canada Cariboo Skills Competition on Friday, March 2. (Justin Moore Photo)

open house

the district of sicamous is updating its development cost charges (dccs) Development Cost Charges are generally paid by developers at subdivision for single detached lots or at building permit for new commercial, industrial, institutional, or multiple unit residential buildings. DCCs pay for Roads, Sewer and Water Systems, and Parks infrastructure required to service future growth. The charges were last updated in 2008, and projects and costs have changed since then. Please come to the Open House: • See the proposed revisions to the Development Cost Charges

Date:

March 15, 2018

• See the list of Transportation, Sewer, Water, and Parks projects that service future growth

Time:

4:30pm - 6:30pm

• Gain a better understanding of who pays and when they pay • See how the proposed charges compare to neighbouring communities

Location:

446 Main Street Council Chambers

For more information contact Melinda Smyrl, Planner at msmyrl@sicamous.ca or call 250-836-2477 www.sicamous.ca

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Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

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News

Friday, March 9, 2018 Page A3

Family says they will stay until snow gone Continued from A1 Ryan’s dad Scott was digging around the house where Ryan lives, she says. “There’s a lot of snow– it’s so deep up there, there’s so much.” A command centre is set up in Hearthstone Lodge where volunteers sign in. Ryan’s mom stays there from morning until night, Skofteby says. “It was very emotionally hard, seeing the two parents in pain. I’m very sensitive to people and pain and that’s why I wanted to help,” she says. Skofteby’s emotions were also tinged with fear of discovering a body at the same time as wanting to help the family find closure. Ryan’s mom Heather told the Salmon Arm Observer that Wednesday through Friday, the Alberta chapter of the Canadian Search and Disaster Dogs Association will be on site with their search dogs. No one else will be searching so the dogs can focus. “We will be regrouping on Friday depending on what is found

and coming up with a plan starting Saturday,” Heather says. She suggests that people wanting to help should watch the Missing: Ryan Shtuka Facebook site. If more volunteers are needed to continue searching come Saturday, it will be posted there. Heather says Kamloops Search and Rescue have come up twice but won’t be back unless tips point to a change of location or the environment changes. People have been overwhelmingly supportive, she says. Not only the family’s Alberta community and hometown of Beaumont, but the community of Kamloops and Sun Peaks Resort. Heather describes Ryan as a “perfectly imperfect” person with lots of wonderful qualities who was loved by friends and family. He was at Sun Peaks so he could board a lot and work at a ski resort for a season. She says she and her husband Scott filmed the walk from the residence Ryan was visiting to his home.

“It took us about 18 minutes. If he was walking, it would have taken him 10 to 15 minutes on the path side.” He could have gone right or left or, more unlikely, behind the building. She says he would have had some alcohol that night. “He’s 20 years old, in a ski resort, surrounded by a group of people here for like-minded reasons. They’d gone to an event at a bar… It’s safe to say he did consume alcohol.” Heather says there’s no reason to think he’s not in the area. He has never missed work; it would be completely out of character for him to do so. And he would never leave without being in touch with his family. “Given the environment and the terrain up here, nothing suggests he’s left this area.” Ryan’s 12-year-old sister Julianna has been with her parents at Sun Peaks and 17-year-old Jordyn was to arrive Wednesday night. At this time Heather says she is taking

Scott Shtuka, Ryan’s dad, has been driving bobcats, searching for his son at Sun Peaks Resort. (Photo contributed) things moment by moment. “Some moments are better than others.” Right now, she says, they’re between hope and feeling grief, but can’t claim either one completely. “It’s good to be surrounded by friends and family who give us strength when we don’t have enough to go on. We just want to thank the communities for their support and their continuation of prayers.”

How long will they search? “Scott and I will stay until the last bit of snow has left. At this point in time we will put our lives on hold if only for a little bit to focus on Ryan and to make sure he can come home with us. We will wait until there is a 100 per cent sign that he is not here at Sun Peaks and then we can go home. We won’t leave until he comes with us.”

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Page A4 Friday, March 9, 2018

News

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Trades programs help fill gaps in the job market Jodi Brak Salmon Arm Observer

A renewed focus on engaging young people, and particularly women, in trades and technology as early as high-school is among the initiatives being championed by industry and educators alike. It is hoped that introducing someone to these kinds of skillsbased work early can give them a head start on building a successful career. Steven Moores, dean of trades and technology at Okanagan College, says “one of the focuses of the Industry Training Authority (ITA) is to introduce and expose high school

students at an earlier age to the trades. We’ve done that very successfully in pretty much every region throughout the Okanagan.” Engaging students in high school allows them to begin exploring their options and building useful skills early on, helping them make an informed choice about what to pursue. In addition, students who are particularly keen on the trades can work towards college credit while still in Grade 12. In most cases, the tuition is fully sponsored and requires no financial investment. “We have high school students in all of our

trades programs, that is called a dual-credit program, where students enrol in Grade 12 and they can get a real good start towards that first year of an apprenticeship program,” Moores says. “It gives them high school credits plus it gives them a start in the trades. It’s very successful, we have an excess of 200 students who come through our programs from all regions each year.” Dwayne Geiger, partnership and transitions coordinator for the schools of trades and technology at TRU, believes an introduction to skills-based training can give students a

competitive advantage, even if the trades are not their end-game. Geiger says “they really get a strong sense of that program or that trade, but at the end of a foundation program really what they get is a certificate for a foundation in a trade. They can end their career in trades right there, but they have skills that they are certified in that they can then go out and make money with. They’re already three bucks an hour ahead of everybody else as far as skill sets.” In comparison with other provinces, he feels confident in saying “as far as structured pro-

Aidan Miege-Moffat works on an electrical panel on a power pole. Miege-Moffat completed an electrician apprenticeship program in high school and now works for All Phase Electric in Salmon Arm. gramming, I would dustry and educators as place. “In addition to skills put B.C. up against any a way to help students province in the country build employable skills training, we’re giving in terms of what we can at a young age. Moores them confidence in this offer to young people.” also notes that Okana- environment. Once they Interestingly, he notes gan College is work- get their hands on the that many students use ing to offer all-female tools, they gain confitrades education as a Gateway to the Trades dence to take that next stepping stone to move programs in the future. step,” Darling says. onto other academic This goes hand-in- “We know that diverpursuits, taking advan- hand with other ini- sity makes us stronger, tage of a TRU policy tiatives the ITA is sup- women have natural that allows students porting at TRU and skills that are different who have completed Okanagan College: than men, and it’s nice a Red Seal program the Women in Trades to have a complete mix to transfer credits into Training and Gate- of everybody on a job other programs at the way to the Trades for site, it brings different university. Women programs. perspectives to a fin“If you finish your Nancy Darling, ished product.” Red Seal program, spokesperson for the When asked for a which is approximate- Women in Trades suggestion on what ly four to five years, if Training program at trades might be curyou want you can then Okanagan College, says rently in-demand and get two-year’s credit “what we do is bring looking to hire, Moores towards any bachelors women who haven’t had notes that the construcprogram in technol- previous experience, or tion and building trades ogy or tech leader- haven’t had a chance to have seen explosive ship at TRU,” Geiger get their hands on the growth in recent years says. “Many students, tools of the trade, into across the province. when they finish their a classroom and shop If you are looking for a Red Seal, they will get where they get to try new start through educatheir two year’s credit out six or seven differ- tion or employment visit towards an education ent trades.” the Black Press Extreme degree for example Aside from simply Education and Career and then they go and teaching these women Fair, which takes places do their masters and the mechanical skills on Monday, March 12 further.” required to work in the at Okanagan College in These dual-credit trades, Darling hopes Kelowna (1000 K.L.O. programs, offered by they come out of the Road), from 11:30 a.m. both Okanagan Col- program with a sense to 6 p.m. For more info: lege and Thompson that they belong in the facebook.com/BlackRivers University, have trades and have equal PressExtremeEducareceived praise from in- footing in the work- tionandCareerFair

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Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

News

Friday, March 9, 2018 Page A5

Flyers offend pro-bridge group Jim Elliot Eagle Valley News

A group in support of the proposed Main Street bridge project are left feeling insulted after finding flyers featuring images of them altered in a way they say misrepresents their views and cause. The flyers feature the photograph of the yes to the Main Street bridge campaigners which ran on the front page of the Eagle Valley News on Feb. 21, but with the text on the sandwich board in front of them altered to read: “Say yes to the destruction of the park we are standing in. Yes to our self serving vision for your community. Yes to us here that hope to profit from our community. Say yes to us and no to the residents of Sicamous.” The Eagle Valley News did not consent to the use of the image. Tia Lemieux, a local business owner and proponent of the Main Street bridge project, who is one of the people depicted in the doctored photograph said she is disappointed the dispute has sunk to this level. Lemieux said she first heard of the posters from a friend who spotted one of them while he was out walking his dog. After hearing of the posters she said she was able to locate at least three of them. She said she realizes that everybody has their own ideas about the proposed bridge but she wasn’t sure if altering and posting a photo of them was even legal. Lemieux asked the police to remove the flyers; they said they couldn’t but said it would be legal for her to do so; she also contacted District of Sicamous maintenance staff who, along with a member of the

A

he churches of e to t d i u g

p wa Salmon Arm and the Shus

Worship together

An altered version of this photo, which ran on the front page of the Feb. 21 edition of the Eagle Valley News, was used as a flyer attacking the pro Main Street bridge group assembled in the photo. (File photo) ®

pro-bridge group featured in the photo, took down the flyers. “They were not factually accurate unfortunately and seemed to be poking fun at a certain group. Although we don’t have a standpoint on it as such, we wouldn’t allow people to post things that are inciting upset or inciting actions,” said Joe McCulloch, the district’s operations manager. “If somebody intentionally puts something up that is very obviously either intimidating or aggravating then we would take it down no matter what it was; we wouldn’t allow that in the District of Sicamous.” The issue of the posters was brought up at the Sicamous council meeting on Feb. 28 by Coun. Colleen Anderson. Anderson stressed she is impartial on the issue of the bridge itself, but said the flyers are unprofessional and immature. Brenda Dalzell, another Main Street bridge advocate who appeared in the altered photograph, said the posters are not factual and so serve no purpose. “It’s disappointing that some individuals feel the need to stoop

to such an immature level, their actions speak volumes to their character,” she said. Speaking on behalf of those opposed to the bridge, Ken Bateman said they cannot control what individuals decide to do with their displeasure, but the flyers are counterproductive to what those who oppose the bridge are trying to accomplish. “I have talked to those involved with our opposition of the bridge and although we oppose the Main Street Bridge option, we do not support a personal campaign against other’s support of a bridge. It is totally within their rights to support as ours is to oppose,” Bateman said. Lemiuex said she has lived in Sicamous for 30 years and has never encountered a situation like this in the past. She said Sicamous has always been a community that has pulled together, but feels that spirit has been lost with the posters. “I think I’m hurt more about that than anything and seeing our community is changing towards this negativity that is present now.”

Pastors Major Carolyn Doonan Martin Ketteringham SUNDAY SERVICE 10:30 a.m. 191 - 2nd Ave. NE ~ 832-9196 Everyone Welcome!

Emmanuel Free Lutheran Church Salmon Arm Elks Community Hall 3690 30th Street N.E.

Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m. 250 832-6859

www.aflccanada.org

Joyfully centered on the word of God and led by the Spirit.

Salmon Arm Mennonite Church 4590-10 Ave. SW Sunday Worship ............ 10:00 am Sunday School ................10-11 am Message ...................... 11-11:45 am Every 4th Sunday evening Hymn Singing 5:30-6:30 pm Every other Thursday Prayer Service & Bible Study 7:30-8:30 pm

Pastor James Baer 250 832-3615

Shepherd of the Valley Lutheran Church (LCC)

10:30 am Sunday Worship SASCU Rec Center, Rm. 101 (west side) Phone for Information

250 675-3841 or 250 832-5908

Little Mountain Bible Chapel

3481 - 10th Ave. S.E. 250 803-0161 ~ Salmon Arm www.littlemountainbiblechapel.com

• Sunday ~ Worship & Remembrance - 9:30 a.m. • Family Bible Hour/Sunday School - 11 a.m. • Thursday ~ Prayer & Bible Study 7:00 p.m.

Co-sponsor of Morning Star Bible Camp, Westbank, B.C.

Seventh-day Adventist Church Join us each Saturday ~ All ages

9:15 am - Sabbath School 10:45 am - Worship Service Wednesday Prayer and Bible Study - 7:00 pm 3270 60th Avenue NE • 250 832-8936

Web: www.facebook.com/salmonsda Study Online: www.bibleinfo.com

New Life Outreach

Sunday Service: 10:30 a.m. Pastor Mel Janzen 250 675-3839 or 250 803-5247 4409 Trans Can. Hwy., Tappen www.newlifeoutreach.ca

Cornerstone Christian Reformed Church Pastor Clarence Witten

10:30 a.m. Worship

Nursery Care & Children’s Programs 1191 - 22nd Street NE

250 832-8452

First United Church

450 OKANAGAN AVE. 250 832-3860 www.firstunitedsalmonarm.ca

Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m. Rev. Jenny Carter Joanne Koster, Children & Youth ALL ARE WELCOME!

Living Waters Church WORSHIP SERVICE Sundays 10:30 a.m. Everyone Welcome! TUESDAY NIGHT PRAYER 7-8 p.m. every week #180 Lakeshore Dr. NW Right behind Boston Pizza www.livingwaterschurch.ca

250 832-3433

St. Mary’s Anglican/ United Church 1188 Trans Canada Hwy., Sorrento Ph. 250-675-2294 www.stmarysorrento.ca Tuesday Eucharist 10 a.m.

saintmary@shaw.ca The Rev. Marcus Germaine SUNDAY WORSHIP - 10 am

Church of Christ We meet at 490 - 5th Avenue SW

11:00 am Worship & Communion 10:00 am Classes for all Ages www.sa4Christ.com 250 833-0927

SUNDAY WORSHIP 9 a.m. (St. Andrew’s Presbyterian) 1981 - 9th Ave. NE SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30 a.m. Ministry Center 4480 - 30th St. NE 250.833.5636

River of Life Community Church

Pastor Reuben Pauls - 250 675-3636 Sunday Worship - 10 a.m. Nursery and Childrens Program (up to age 12) 2405 Centennial Drive, Shuswap Lake Estates Lodge, downstairs www.riveroflife.ca

THE SHUSWAP’S MULTI-SITE CHURCH

SALMON ARM

Saturday Night Service at 6:00 pm Sundays at 9:00 am & 10:45 am 3151 - 6th Ave. NE

Crossroads Free Methodist Church

Children’s Ministry & Childcare for all ages, all services

Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m. Rev. L. J. Dixon

SICAMOUS

Sundays at 10:30 am Parkview School, 605 Parksville St. Children’s Ministry for kids up to 12 yrs Weekly Ministries for all ages

SORRENTO

Sundays at 10:30 am Sorrento Memorial Hall, TCH Children’s Ministry for kids up to 12 yrs Visit us at: aplacetobelong.ca Contact: 250 832-4004, email scc@aplacetobelong.ca www.aplacetobelong.ca

CATHOLIC CHURCHES Shuswap Lake Area Mass Time:

SALMON ARM: St. Joseph’s 60 First Street SE Sat., 5 pm & Sun., 9 am www.stjosephssalmonarm.com SICAMOUS: Our Lady of Fatima Saturday at 2:30 pm BLIND BAY: Our Lady of the Lake 2385 Golf Course Drive Blind Bay Sunday, 11:15 am

250 832-8068 121 Shuswap Street SW

St. John the Evangelist Anglican Church 10:00 a.m. Services Sundays & Thursdays 170 Shuswap Street SE, Salmon Arm

Tel: 250 832-2828

www.st.johnsalmonarm.tripod.com

St. Andrew’s Presbyterian T.C.Hwy. across from RCMP

Rev. Shirley Cochrane Worship service 11:00 am Email: www.standrews-salmonarm.com 250 832-7282

Broadview Evangelical Free Church Worship Service at 9:45 Nursery Care for ages 2 & under Sunday School for ages 3 - Gr. 5 350 - 30th Street NE 250 832-6366 www.broadviewchurch.ca

If your church would like to advertise their services and location, or special events happening at your church, please call The Salmon Arm Observer, 250-832-2131 (Ext. 9207) for advertising here.


Opinion

Page A6 Friday, March 9, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Tide turning to equality

International Women’s Day is celebrated this week and it’s the most important one yet. We say that because it feels like the voices calling for equality are louder than ever, and so it’s imperative to take the momentum that exists and call for change now. International Women’s Day is recognized on Thursday, March 8, and the United Nations’ theme this year is ‘Time is Now,’ recognizing the activism that is changing women’s lives and the activism that is still needed. Something has changed since this time last year. The Me Too and Time’s Up movements resonated and empowered women to speak up and forced people to listen. Women who have been abused and who have faced inequality are being believed. It’s sent a message that women don’t have to accept unacceptable treatment. Of course we’ve all valued equality, always – it’s just that we might not have spent enough time thinking about what that means. Well, women are telling us. Across the province and around the world, women are marching. So are those who support, love, value and respect women, which is to say reasonable people. This week, we might consider supporting causes such as the various local agencies that work to support and empower women. That should come alongside a commitment to modern attitudes about gender equality and women’s rights. There will be times when we see injustice, and we should speak out against it, in our day-to-day lives, and particularly on International Women’s Day. -Vernon Morning Star

President: 171 Shuswap Street NW Dave Hamilton Box 550 Director of Sales: Salmon Arm, British Columbia Karen material Hill V1E 4N7 vertising and editorial appearing in the to reproduce inEditor: any form must be obtained in Phone: 250-832-2131 subscription $44.50; Seniors $39 including GST. Tracy Hughes Fax: 250-832-5140

This Shuswap Market News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, the input from both the newsof the British Columbia Council,holder. a self-regulatory paper andPress the complaint If talking with the editor or publisher does not industry. The council complaints from theorpublic resolveconsiders your complaint about coverage story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council.Your written concern, documentation, should be sent s. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, withwith input within 45 days, to B.C. Press Council, P.O. Box 1356, Ladysmith, B.C. V9G 1A9. int holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org.

story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. If you did not receive the Shuswap Market News, call circulation for re-delivery: n, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, P.O. Box 1356, 250 832-2131. ion, phone 888-687-2213 or go to 2010 2010 WINNER

Salmon Arm, BC V1E 4N7

Rick Proznick

Tracy Hughes

PUBLISHER

EDITOR

A favourite of fish and anglers alike and, if you like to eat some of the fish you catch, you will notice that fish which have been feeding on James Murray shrimp seem to taste better. Shrimp are a So you know how Maine shrimp, brown calorie rich and presometimes you have shrimp, rock shrimp ferred food source for those nights where and fresh water trout. This is especialit’s two o’clock in shrimp, not to mention ly true in early spring the morning, you are banana prawns and and late fall. Trout are asleep and you hear the ever popular giant often dependent on a noise, or you think tiger prawn. Actually shrimp for their caloyou heard a noise, or shrimp and prawns are rie intake in the spring, you dreamt you heard different creatures, al- prior to chironomid a noise, or something though they do have a hatches coming off, in a dream wakes you lot in common. Both and in the fall, when upset. Anyways, you are crustaceans, they most insect hatches are are suddenly wide both have 10 legs, both all but over. awake and you can’t can be found in salt Freshwater shrimp seem to get back to and fresh waters and or scuds, as they are sleep. That’s what both live on or near the sometimes referred to, happened to me last floor of whatever body can range considerably week, so after a while of water they inhabit. in size and colour acI got up and turned on Prawns have claws on cording to the nutrient the television. Nothing three of their five pairs levels and chemical on the Space channel, of legs while shrimp composition of the nothing worth watch- only have claws on water in which they ing on TCM. I found two of their five pairs live. Shrimp require myself aimlessly flick- of legs. Their gills and high levels of calciing through the chan- body shape are differ- um to form the hard nel and came upon a ent too. However, as plastic like shell along program on the one far as cooking them, their back. Generally, of the food channels, they are virtually iden- productive lakes are where a guy was cook- tical and interchange- also calcium rich waCopyright subsists in all display advertising and editorial material appearing in the ing up shrimp. I love Salmon Arm able. Observer. Permission to reproduce in any form must ters be obtained in and consequently writing from the publisher. Annual subscription $44.50; Seniors $39 including GST. shrimp. Trout like to eat tend to support large I didn’t know there shrimp too. Also, fish numbers of shrimp as The Salmon Arm is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory were so many differinObserver lakes where there are wellfromas other healthy body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input ent types of shrimp healthy shrimp popu- or publisher does notpopulations. from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editorinsect resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Jennifer or Bertram Catherine prawns asDillon he kept lations tend should to be Your written concern, with documentation, be sentfairly to B.C. Press Council, P.O. Box 1356, seldom venShrimp CIRCULATION CREATIVE SERVICES Ladysmith, B.C. V9G 1A9. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to referringMANAGER to them - plump www.bcpresscouncil.org 2007 for their length, MANAGER ture far from the shel-

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ter of the sub-aquatic flora growing on the shoals and along the drop-off of many of our interior lakes. They can live in waters that are less than a foot deep to water that is up to twenty five feet deep, as long as there are plants or debris to provide shelter. Gammarus shrimp are the most common species of shrimp in BC lakes and are the most commonly imitated by fly tyers. There are literally hundreds of different shrimp patterns tied with a multitude of materials on hook sizes ranging from #8’s to as small as #16’s and #18’s. Many shrimp patterns are lake specific. My favourite pattern is a pale olive Pregnant Shrimp. Which brings me to the Skukomish Sunrise, a shrimp imitation steelhead fly pattern originally tied by Seattle angler George McLeod back in 1938 who was inspired by the bright colours of sunrise of the Skykomish River in Washington. I have a whole whack of Skykomish

Sunrise patterns in my steelhead fly box, although I do have to admit that I’ve never actual caught a steelhead on one of them. Not that it isn’t a tried and true pattern that a lot of anglers swear by, it’s just that I have other patterns that I’ve had success with and I’m one of those anglers that tends to use what has worked in the past. Now having said that, I recently read somewhere that carp like to eat freshwater shrimp and crayfish. So I think I’m going to transfer those Skykomish patterns into my carp fly box. Who knows, I just might have a bit more success. In the meantime, I’m also going to head over to the seafood counter at the one grocery store in town that sells fresh seafood and see if they have any giant tiger prawns. Ah yes, tiger prawns fried with garlic, ginger, lime juice and parsley in butter, served with linguine in a white wine cream sauce. Food that rich will probably keep me up at night.


Sports

www.saobserver.net

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Friday, March 9, 2018 Page A7

Natalie Wilkie set to compete at Paralympics

Jodi Brak Salmon Arm Observer

Far from allowing an accident to sap her spirit to succeed, Natalie Wilkie of Salmon Arm has solidified her place as one of the most talented skiers in Canada and earned a spot on Team Canada for the 2018 Paralympics in Pyeongchang. The outstanding young skier, who lost most of the fingers on her left hand in 2016 after an accident in shop class, never gave up on her passion for skiing. She still competes in both standard and para-skiing events, earning top placings in national competitions despite whatever odds might be against her. The Paralympic

Games begin March 8. Wilkie will be competing in the 15km endurance race March 12 at 8:15 p.m., the 1.5km sprint race on March 14 at 7 p.m. and the 7.5km race on March 17 at 7:45 p.m. All times listed for the races are Pacific Standard Time, not the time in Korea. In the wake of her qualifying for the Paralympics, the community has been behind her. Well-wishers organized a letter-writing campaign on her behalf to collect notes of encouragement for her to take to Korea. There is also a plan in the works to schedule a viewing party to watch her event in the Paralympics. “I’ve been really surprised by how involved

the community is in my journey and sending me off,” Wilkie says. “The community is really into this, it’s pretty exciting for me.” After just one race in the qualifiers for the Paralympics, Wilkie came within 70 per cent of the winner’s time. This stellar showing proved to be enough to land her a spot on Team Canada and an invite to the Pyeonchang Paralympics. “I was pretty excited, it’s not every day you get to go to the Paralympics,” Wilkie says. “I found out after my first race… my coach came up to me and told me I qualified… That was pretty exciting.” Wilkie says she

has been training exceptionally hard in preparation for the Paralympics, practicing her single-pole skiing technique and building endurance by skiing nearly every day. The trip to Korea will be Wilkie’s second time travelling outside of Canada and her first visit to Asia. She is excited at the prospect of exploring somewhere new, though she will be taking along something special to remind her of home while she is across the ocean. “My sister actually just made this clay medal in school that I’m going to take along,” she says. “I thought that was really nice of her, it’s going to be like my

good-luck charm.” Wilkie began her journey to Korea on March 4, accompanied by her mother, Karin Huster, and her coach Kate Boyd. In advance of this opportunity, the young skier would like to extend a heartfelt thank you to her hometown for the immense support and good vibes sent her way after news broke that she would be representing Canada at the Paralympic Games. “Thanks for being so involved in helping me on my way, I don’t think I would be as excited to do this if I didn’t know I had everyone behind me cheering me on and watching me on TV,” she says. “It makes a big difference.”

Natalie Wilkie of Salmon Arm makes the trip to Pyeongchang, South Korea this week to represent Team Canada in the Para Nordic Skiing event at the Paralympics. (Image credit: Karin Huster)

SICAMOUS Business Directory Profile of the week: Shuswap Better At Home

Shuswap Shuswap Better Better at at Home Home Seniors Program

“A “A little little extra extra help help for for seniors seniors to to remain remain confidently in their own homes”

Housekeeping • Yardwork • Transportation Home Repair Repair •• Snow Snow Shoveling Shoveling Home Friendly Visiting • Grocery Shopping Friendly Visiting • Grocery Shopping

Staff, Volunteers and Contractors have been Staff, Volunteers and Contractors have been carefully vetted and trained for your security carefully vetted and trained for your security SBAH Central Intake (250)253-2749

SBAH Central Intake (250)253-2749 Wysteria Sholtz Wysteria Sholtz www.betterathome.ca

mixture of trained volunteers, vetted professional contractors, employees and staff. Wysteria Sholtz is our regional Coordinator, Lorna Joy Pawluk is our North Shuswap Outreach Coordinator, Heather O’Brien is our South Shuswap Outreach Coordinator and Tara Wilson is our Enderby Outreach Coordinator. The Shuswap Better at Home program’s regional office is located at 1214 Shuswap Avenue in Sicamous. To contact the program, call the central intake number at 250-253-2749 or you can find more information by going to www.shuswapbetterathome. ca.

Locally owned business give back to communities Locally owned business give communities unique character Independent shops contribute to the fabric of a community and what makes it special and unique. Tourists and other visitors will be much more inclined to remember a local shop rather than a big chain in a particular neighborhood. When travelers want to get a feel for a community, they seek out small, local stores that are much more likely to stock a high percentage of locally-sourced goods

Sawmills

Advertise in the Sicamous Business Directory & your ad runs in the Eagle Valley News and Shuswap Market News. For information call Jeff 250-832-2131 or cell 250-833-9120 jeff.morrison@saobserver.net

Better at Home is a program that helps seniors with day-to-day tasks by coordinating simple, nonmedical services so that they can continue to live independently in their own homes and remain connected to their communities. Serving the communities of Salmon Arm, Sicamous, the CSRD communities/rural areas, Enderby and its surrounding rural areas, and Shuswap and Enderby area Secwepemc communities. Shuswap Better at Home is managed by the Eagle Valley Community Support Society. All Better at Home services are delivered by a

Firewood For Sale Fir Fire wood For sale

call for more info 250-836-0004

For Eagle Valley News advertising information call 250-832-2131 or email jeff.morrison@saobserver.net


Page A8 Friday, March 9, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

OurRotary.com Rotary Supports BRAIN BIKES!

Have you heard about Brain Bikes? Thirteen Brain Bikes are in our local classrooms now, with another 40 projected for inclusion in schools wishing to participate in this beneficial program. Support for our children’s education in the Salmon Arm/Shuswap area educational system is a primary focus of Shuswap Rotary in our community. Of the many projects we contribute to financially, and as volunteers supporting education for our children, BRAIN BIKES is at the top of our list!

Rotary Member Club: Rotary Club of Salmon Arm Occupation: Vice President & Investment Advisor Employer: Sterling Land Wealth Advisory Group Sterling Land Ph: 250-832-9394 • Toll Free: 1-866-335-3398 sterling.land@rbc.com • www.sterlingland.ca

salmonarmrotary.org salmonarmrotary.org

Rotary Member Club: Daybreak Rotary Club Occupation: Certified Applied Nutritionist

Isabelle, David Woolliams, Pierce, Fred Goodman, Micah and John Hansen check out the new “Brain Bikes” which Shuswap Rotary Club has cost-shared with Bastion Elementary School. Hansen, Goodman and Woolliams put bikes together, and along with students, test them out!

Students requiring a movement break, will at times go on a bike, located in hallways in three different parts of the school, for two to five minutes. “This helps them self-regulate and makes it easier to focus in class upon their return; for some students, this may be a break once or twice a day, for others it may be a bit more frequent,” comments Isabelle Gervaise, principal at Bastion Elementary school. Shuswap Rotary has also cost-shared with South Broadview, M.V. Beattie, Sliver Creek, Shuswap Middle School and Pleasant Valley Secondary who each have one bike. Two bikes are also located at the District Resource Centre for other schools to sign out for three week periods.

250-804-2854

sadaybreakrotary.org sadaybreakrotary.com salmonarmrotary.org

Rotary Member Club: Shuswap Rotary Club Occupation: Realtor Employer: Homelife Realty Youth Exchange Officer 2014-2015 Past President

250-804-6288

BIGRob McKibbon shuswaprotary.org salmonarmrotary.org

Club: Chase Rotary Club

Through Rotary Clubs, people from all professions and cultures come together to exchange ideas, and form friendships and professional connections while making a difference in their community and around the world. Exercise helps to keep the chemicals in the brain in balance:

Brain Bikes are a tool to enable children to SELF REGULATE

• Even a few minutes of exercise can have an immediate effect on the brain • Improves memory, concentration, and attention • Positive impact on mood, self esteem, social skills • Helps the brain to grow • Exercise produces proteins that feed and build the brain infrastructure, known as “Miracle Grow for the Brain”.

• The 100 billion brain cells interact in harmony when the brain regulators are in balance • A chemical imbalance can result in ADHD, depression, anxiety, stress • Exercise elevates and balances chemicals such as serotonin and dopamine to keep the brain in balance • These “feel good” chemicals help us feel alert, motivated, and satisfied

• When children realize that physical activity reduces the negative effects of hyperactivity, depression, stress, or anxiety they will choose to use exercise as a tool to self regulate.

Physical Activity optimizes the brain function (for people of all ages)

Exercise helps balance our feel good chemicals in our brain and body

When children learn to self regulate the habit and benefits last a lifetime

• When children realize that physical activity helps them to learn and remember they will choose to exercise.

Occupation: Recreation Coordinator in Kamloops President: 2017 - 2018

Ph: 250-819-0428

Terri Mindel

Chase Rotary Club

Rotary Member Club: Daybreak Rotary Club Occupation: Advertising Sales Employer: Black Press Past President 2011 - 2012 Penny Brown

250 832-2131

Call one of our Club members and arrange to come to a meeting. Noon Club - Maureen 250 832-9143 Tuesday Evening Club - Doug 250 832-2850 Thursday Morning Club - Marie 250 804-2854 Chase Club Thursday Evening - Terri 250 819-0428

Marie Kolenosky

Rotary Member

Shuswap Rotary Calendar of Events for March, 2018 Guest Speakers: March 6 - RCMP Victim Services - Jane Shirley March 27 - Adams River Salmon Society

Physical Activity helps children with learning

What’s New in Health & Wellness

sadaybreakrotary.com salmonarmrotary.org

Rotary Member

Rotary Member Club: Shuswap Rotary Club Occupation: Dentist

Club: Daybreak Rotary Club Charter Member 1996 Past President 1997-98 Occupation: Owner

johnsondental.ca

250-832-2264

Lloyd Nakagawa

Robert Johnson shuswaprotary.org salmonarmrotary.org

Bookingham Palace Bookstore 832-3948 • Mall at Piccadilly

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South Shuswap Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Friday, March 9, 2018 Page A9

Doctors still wanted for Sorrento, Blind Bay very good practice in this community. But he retired. And when he retired he was able to attract a physician who was from South Africa via the UK, who came and took over his practice. And about a year and a half later… he moved to Salmon Arm.” Clark said various efforts have been made by the centre to acquire doctors, including a recent application for an international medical graduate (Canadian citizens who studied outside of the country) who would do a twoyear return of service in Sorrento. “There was three from Kamloops and we thought we might get one of them because there was only two opportunities for placement after their residency in Kamloops…,” Clark explained. “At the very last minute, Interior Health added another location in Kamloops. So the three that were in Kamloops stayed in Kamloops. It was so last-minute-ish and we really felt we’d been kicked in the butt.” Clark suggests if the centre were an Interior Health-run facility, it might have more success at acquiring a physician. In nearby Blind Bay, the South Shuswap Health Services Society

(SSHSS) has been busy with its own community-driven recruitment effort. “We need physicians, community care, public health nurses, we need to have full care available to our communities,” said SSHSS director Sue McCrae. Like Sorrento, the SSHSS has a facility but no existing practice. “Therefore, (doctors) are building their practice and that makes a difference,” said McCrae. Though the SSHSS has met with physicians, they too have yet to find one for whom the South Shuswap is

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Sicamous may have found a doctor. South Shuswap communities are still looking. (File Photo) the right fit. “It is discouraging but we’re not giving up,” said McCrae. “We’re going to keep going, we’re going to keep trying. We’ve got two examination rooms

almost ready to go for physicians and those have been done with a lot of hard work from within the community and the support of the community. So when one comes, then we’ll be

almost ready for them. And I think that that’s a lot of the incentive, is that we are going to be ready to help them, we have volunteers that will be ready to step in and help.”

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One Shuswap community’s efforts to attract doctors may soon pay off. District of Sicamous councillor, Malcolm Makayev, is cautiously optimistic when he explains a number of discussions are currently underway with medical professionals who have expressed an interest in relocating to the community. “I can say we are in discussions with one doctor from Saskatchewan that has visited our community on a couple of occasions and has expressed interest in practicing in our community,” said Makayev. “And we’re also in discussions with a younger female doctor from the Lower Mainland that has also visited… and is interested in practicing in our community. “We’ve also had an expression of interest, or somebody who has called expressing some interest from Ontario, who has some family ties in the local community who is also interested in maybe practicing in Sicamous.” Makayev believes Sicamous could easily support up to three doctors, adding the Saskatchewan doctor’s partner is a nurse practitioner, which would also be a good fit. For several years now,

Sicamous has been part of an regional effort to attract doctors. The district has been able to stand out, however, by being able to offer different incentives. The District of Sicamous recently purchased the medical and dental building at 217 Finlayson, further showing its commitment to the provision of community health and wellness. Where Sicamous has a municipal council stepping up to attract doctors, elsewhere in the Shuswap that work is being done by community groups – with varying degrees of success. For example, the Sorrento and Area Community Health Centre – a community-run facility – currently has a nurse practitioner employed by Interior Health. The centre’s chair, Marilyn Clark, says the care provided by the NP is excellent, but adds the area’s population of approximately 8,000 could benefit from having a full-time doctor. “As a general statement, rural communities have more difficulty recruiting physicians than urban communities,” said Clark. “We had a doctor here for 35 years who raised his family here, had a very good practice, so it’s possible to have a

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Page A10 Friday, March 9, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Friday, March 9, 2018 Page A27

Don Cherry’s & Sandbar Restaurant SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK

Chicken or Beef

3 for $5.95

Tuesday

Wednesday All Day Wings $6.95

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Don Cherry’s Sports Grill 250-833-1154

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WORD SCRAMBLE

&

CROSSWORD

HOROSCOPES

CLUES ACROSS 1. Unpleasant substance 5. Oil group 10. One-time Yankees rookie sensation 14. Ireland 15. Less easily found 16. Southeast Nigeria people 17. Bridgeline Digital stock designation 18. Play loudly 19. Elegantly fashionable 20. Open sore 22. Frozen water 23. Sacred Islamic site 24. “Kokomo” rockers 27. Follows sigma 30. Cease to exist 31. Cool 32. Doctors’ group 35. Less attractive 37. Swiss river 38. Greek sophist 39. Grandmothers 40. Afflict 41. Russian pancake of buckwheat flour and yeast 42. Actress __ Rachel Wood 43. Not bright 44. Western Asia peninsula 45. Baseball speedster Gordon 46. Golf score 47. Transmits genetic information from DNA to the cytoplasm 48. Diego, Francisco, Anselmo 49. Songs to one’s lover 52. Cattle’s mammary gland 55. Having ten 56. Fencing sword 60. Scarlett’s home 61. Hold valuables 63. Italian Seaport 64. Cain and __ 65. Bad places to live 66. Large, wading bird 67. Witches 68. Cover with drops 69. Props up the head

171 Shuswap Street NW. • 250 832-2131

Dec. 22-Jan. 20

Capricorn

You may want to lighten up your mood, Capricorn. Figure out how to express your fun-loving side. Take some cues from friends who can get you to relax.

Jan. 21-Feb. 18

AQUARIUS

Aquarius

Aquarius, people want to share in your current success, but you don’t share the same views — especially when you think your accomplishments aren’t that big a deal.

Feb. 19-Mar. 20

PISCES

Pisces

1. Philippine province 2. Shallow channel 3. Type of acid 4. Cygnus’ brightest star 5. One who buys and sells securities (abbr.) 6. Ill will 7. Plant of the goosefoot family 8. Intellectual 9. Mineral 10. Shiny silicate minerals 11. Ottoman civilian title 12. What you wear when eating BBQ (2 words) 13. Soul and calypso song 21. Advises 23. “The Spanish Tragedy” playwright 25. Surrounds the earth 26. Paddle 27. Adjusted 28. Succulent plant 29. Forearm bones 32. Belonging to Egyptian ascetic Apollo’s colleague 33. Type of mental illness 34. One from Asia 36. 007’s creator

37. Direct toward 38. Pie _ __ mode 40. Large terrier 41. Hillsides 43. Patriotic women (abbr.) 44. Connects words 46. For each 47. Flower cluster 49. Closes a deal 50. Arabian desert 51. Vaccine against poliomyelitis 52. American state 53. Religion practiced in China 54. Type of sediment 57. Hall of Famer Ruth 58. “Layla” singer Clapton 59. Gamble 61. Sino-Soviet block (abbr.) 62. Midway between south and southwest

ARIES

Aries

A voice of reason may be telling you to slow down, Aries. Listen to this voice and take a breather. You will be glad you did when you get a chance to sit back and relax.

Apr. 21-May 21

TAURUS

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GEMINI

Gemini

Gemini, communication is your strong suit this week. You may find yourself in a position to convey difficult directions to others or serve as the mouthpiece of the company.

June 22- July 22

CANCER

Cancer

Cancer, it may seem like people are judging you, even before they get to know you or your intentions. Be patient and give new relationships time to develop.

July 23-Aug. 23

LEO

Leo

Your friendly demeanor puts others at ease, Leo. However, they may be so enamored with your personality that they overlook your accomplishments this week.

Aug. 24-Sept. 22

VIRGO

Virgo

See if you can go unseen for the next few days, Virgo. Now is not your time to bask in the spotlight. You might get more done if you sit back and give others a chance to shine.

Sept. 23-Oct. 23

LIBRA

Libra

Your relationships mean a lot to you, Libra. You want to do everything possible to solidify those close friendships. Be sure to network whenever possible.

Oct. 24-Nov. 22

SCORPIO

Scorpio

Scorpio, you can use a little personal recognition this week, even if you have to encourage others to give you some words of praise. Use those positive words as inspiration.

Nov. 23-Dec. 21

SAGITTARIUS

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Taurus, it can be challenging to measure progress right now, but rest assured you’re on the right track. Trust your instincts and let the results speak for themselves.

May 22-June 21

Sagittarius

ROSSINI

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Try to escape into a fantasy world for a little while, Pisces. You don’t have to focus on serious tasks all of the time and will enjoy this respite.

Mar. 21-Apr. 20

Taurus

CLUES DOWN

CAPRICORN

WORD SEARCH

The ups and downs that have defined a romantic relationship are about to become a little more complex, Sagittarius. These plot twists can be exciting.

Carol Creasy • 250-833-3544

171 Shuswap Ave., Salmon Arm

250 832-2131

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Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

South Shuswap

Friday, March 9, 2018 Page A11

Any time. Any place. Any device.

When you want it, How you want it. www.saobserver.net

IT’S ALL ABOUT JESUS. WHY? An image of circular designs on Shuswap Lake taken by Shuswap resident Grace Edwards. They were taken between Herald Park and Wittner Road in Tappen. (Photo contributed)

Circles raise questions Patterns puzzle Tappen resident. Tracy Hughes Salmon Arm Observer

They are not crop circles, since they have appeared on Shuswap Lake, rather than in a farm field. But just what are these circular formations on Shuswap Lake? Grace Edwards spotted the designs on Sunday, March 4 between Herald Park and Wit-

tner Road in Tappen and stopped to take photos. When she checked the next day, Monday, March 5, the designs had been covered with snow and were no longer visible. While there was some speculation the circles may have been made by snowmobiles, there was no other obvious

indicators of motorized track on the ice. This left Edwards unsure of just what made the circular designs and she is wondering if anyone might know. “Or maybe they have landed?” Edwards teased. If you have an explanation, contact the Observer at newsroom@ saobserver.net.

Dates to Remember

Keg, Barrel and Plate, come and enjoy tastings and sips from many fine Shuswap area wineries, breweries, distilleries, sausage and cheese makers on St. Patrick’s Day, March 17, from noon to 4 p.m. at the Blind Bay Memorial Hall, 2510 Blind Bay Road, Blind Bay. Tickets: $10 each (no minors). For more information, visit the Blind Bay Memorial Hall and Reedman Gallery Facebook page or www.blindbaymemorialhall.ca. Join the Blind Bay Blues Club for the Tuesday Night Jam Session at the Blind Bay Hall, 2510 Blind Bay Road, Blind Bay every 3rd Tuesday of the month, 7 p.m. Cost is $30 for hall members and $5 drop in fee.

FYI, contact Chris Emery at 250-6752865, or ccemery@ hotmail.com. Blind Bay Garden Club, discuss your love of gardening; learn, share, or just enjoy friendship with fellow gardeners every 3rd Wednesday of the month from 10 a.m. to noon, 2510 Blind Bay Road, Blind Bay. For information,e email blindbayhall@gmail. com, visit www.blindbaymemorialhall.ca or call 250-675-3139. Gleneden Hall dance takes place on the first Saturday of the month, 7 to 11 p.m., 50/50 draw, door prizes. For information, call Roger at 250-8321599. South Shuswap Library hosts knitters and crocheters from

10 a.m. to noon on the first and third Fridays of the month. Sorrento Beach Walkers walk on the foreshore on the third Saturday of the month. For information, call Dan McKerracher at 250-319-5121. The South Shuswap Library presents Baby Talk at 10:15 a.m. Friday, Jan 5. Join Health Nurse Shannon for a casual, informative gathering for children 18 months and younger with caregiver. For more information, call 250-675-4818. Shuswap Lake Estates, Boot Scootin’ Line Dancing, intermediate, Mondays, 1 to 3 p.m. beginner, Wednesdays, 10 to 11:30 p.m., and advanced, Wednesdays, 1:30 to 3 p.m.

It seems everybody knows the word ‘Jesus’. The Bible tells His story. He is called Issa in the Koran. In some countries Jesus is a popular name for boys. Most people probably have said ‘Jesus’ or thought about Him at one time or another. WHY? Every Sunday around the world, people praise and worship Him. For 2000 years, many have served Him. Today Christians are brutally assaulted and murdered because they believe in Him. He is in the hearts and minds of educated and uneducated around the world. WHY? The name ‘Jesus’ is used in swearing. (Why not ‘Rumpelstiltskin’?) Politicians avoid any reference to Him. Often in a University classroom His followers are mocked. He is dissed and resented and hated by folks who never met Him nor read the historic documents about His life. WHY? He lived on this earth. We know Jesus was born in Bethlehem. He loved children and the poor; He affirmed all women and men. Hundreds of blind, mute, crippled, lepers, epileptics and demon-possessed were healed by Him. WHY? He suffered extreme abuse. In Jerusalem, religious leaders arrested Him, then spit in his face, struck Him with their fists and taunted Him. The governor had Him flogged with a metal-laced whip. The soldiers beat a crown of thorns onto His head, spit on him and, with a staff, struck Him on the head again and again. Can you imagine what He looked like when they finally nailed Him to a cross? He died in great agony. WHY? Love for people moved Him to act. He still loves each person! He paid the price for every sin ever committed by any and all peoples of the world. For our sins, too. How else could sin and guilt be dealt with? “For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in Him shall not perish, but have eternal life. For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but to save the world through him.” (Gospel of John) All can benefit from His death – it’s a choice. Would it not be a good thing to tell Him you love Him and ask Him to forgive your sins? This Sunday, March 11, 9:00 a.m. Theme: THE SUFFERING KING.

Beginning with Bee’s Beekeeping Seminar with

BILL STAGG

from Sweet Acre Apiaries

Thursday, March 15th 6 pm Please pre-register at the store as seating will be limited to 50 people. Cost $20 per person and is due upon registration FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @Bucksalmonarm, INSTAGRAM AND FACEBOOK

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1771-10th Ave SW, Salmon Arm • 250-832-8424 www.buckerfields.org Open 8 am to 6 pm everyday • Friday until 7 pm


Page A12 Friday, March 9, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

South Shuswap

www.saobserver.net

Notch Hill’s Lena Johnston celebrates 109 years

Lachlan Labere Salmon Arm Observer

On March 6, longtime Notch Hill resident Lena Johnston celebrated her 109th birthday, becoming one of the region’s

longest-lived residents. Actually, the celebrating began over the weekend with a dinner out with family, friends, acquaintances and birthday cake. It will continue into this

week, with a few more outings and recognition in the B.C. legislature from Shuswap MLA Greg Kyllo. Asked if she made a 109th birthday wish, Johnston replied,

Columbia Shuswap Regional District NOTICE OF PUBLIC CONSULTATION FIVE YEAR (2018 - 2022) FINANCIAL PLAN Sections 374 & 375 of the Local Government Act require that all Regional Districts prepare and adopt, by bylaw, a Five Year Financial Plan on an annual basis. It also requires that the Board undertake a process of public consultation regarding the Five Year Financial Plan before it is adopted. Interested members of the public are invited to attend the Columbia Shuswap Regional District offices located at 555 Harbourfront Drive NE, Salmon Arm, BC on Friday, March 16, 2018, at 9:30am local time for an opportunity to speak directly to the Manager, Financial Services and the Board of Directors regarding the proposed Five Year (2018 – 2022) Financial Plan. The Five Year Financial Plan will be considered for adoption at the Thursday, March 29, 2018 Regular Board meeting.

Visit our website at www.csrd.bc.ca

555 Harbourfront Dr. NE, Salmon Arm, BC | PO Box 978 V1E 4P1 | 250.832.8194 | Toll Free 1.888.248.2773

Saturday, March 10

South Shuswap residents have not been impressed with this year’s snow clearing effort. For much of the season, the roughly two-feet of remaining highway shoulder not covered in snow, ice and

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debris has served as a Melinda Plato’s “sidewalk” from Blind Bay Road into Sorrento. Plato said plows haven’t been cleaning the shoulder, leaving herself and other pedestrians with this precarious pathway into town.

SHUSWAP

That’s a

25

one, and we had him for Christmas, our first Christmas in B.C.” From a farming family of 14, Johnston, the oldest child, learned the value of hard work as her family farmed in Saskatchewan and Alberta. While her younger sister Ella helped in the house, Johnston was her father’s “right-hand man” on the farm, riding horses, milking cows and taking care of pigs. She also worked with the threshing crew, in charge of feeding the fire that generated steam to run the machinery. Johnston says life on the farm was a lot of hard work, which may have contributed to her health and longevity. “My mother had a brother who lived to 102, so maybe that rubbed off on me. Who knows? That’s a mystery,” said Johnston.

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Lena Johnston, a longtime resident of Notch Hill now living at Arbor House, turned 109 on Tuesday, March 6. (Lachlan Labere/Salmon Arm Observer) Along with the water, that’s an amazdays of farm labour, ing sight to see.” Johnston also fondly These days Johnston remembers her days enjoys doing puzzles of leisure and trav- – with help from her els across Canada, fellow Arbor Lodge through the U.S. and residents, watching to South America. the news and visiting “I’ve been across with family, including Canada to Nova Scotia her grandson. The annual birthday and seen the reversing hill. And that beauti- celebrations are also a ful Annapolis Valley, joy. that’s a few of my trav“I’ve had parties, I els. I’ve been through don’t know if there’s the Panama Canal and another party coming that took all day, and or not. That’s a surif you’ve ever seen the prise,” said Johnston. sun come up out of the

Snow clearance disappointing Lachlan Labere Salmon Arm Observer

Get

$

“That everybody will be happy, happy and enjoy it. Because life is too short to be angry. You better be happy and accept what the future brings to you.” Johnston, now a resident of Salmon Arm’s Arbor Lodge, remembers well the day she stepped from a boxcar to begin a new life in the Shuswap. On Aug. 6, 1937, Johnston, her late husband Johnny and son Roy arrived at the train station in Notch Hill with their belongings, including various animals, packed inside a railway car. “That was an adventure… We had furniture, we had a little bit of machinery, we had four horses, a cow and a calf, and this crate with the chickens… and one or two turkeys,” said Johnston. “When we got to B.C. we only ended up with

Join Us For Our Monthly Meeting Monday, March 19th @ 11:45 am at The Prestige Inn If you have time to socialize, doors open at 11:30. Lunch is noon.

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shuswapwomeninbusiness.com or email susan@sunbiz.ca or phone 250-515-2630

Guest Speaker - Diana Walker, Holistic Health Practitioner, Swiss Bionic Lifestyle Consultant The following members will be making presentations on their businesses: Donna Peters – Essentials Wellness, products & services Tina Cosman, Century 21 Realtor – house sales stats in Salmon Arm

“The snow hasn’t been cleared off there at all this year, so pretty much all winter long we’ve had to walk on the highway to go in one direction,” said Plato. “There are seniors that live out here because they don’t drive anymore… so they walk into town every day and they’re having to do the same thing and it’s just not safe.” Plato said she’s contacted the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure and was told the matter would be tabled in a discussion with the ministry’s contractor, JPW Road and Bridge Inc. Electoral Area C South Shuswap director Area C told the Columbia Shuswap Regional District board at its Feb. 15 meeting that he too has contacted MOTI and JPW regarding numerous complaints he’s received about snow clearing throughout winter. “I’ve sort of reached the end of my string with this issue with respect to snow removal in Area C – this winter it’s been abysmal. I’ve

never seen it like this…,” said Demenok. “It does not seem to be getting any better as time goes on and each and every snow fall we’re increasingly buried.” Demenok acknowledged this has been an unusual winter, but said this has been an ongoing issue involving what he called “substandard service” as well as contractual issues where MOTI gives priority to getting the lowest price. “You want to keep prices down, but you also get what you pay for, and this price is now coming at a cost of safety, I think, to the community, and I think we’ve cut the cost too far,” said Demenok. Director Rene Talbot shared similar concerns for Electoral Area D, including Silver Creek. “The biggest thing is those school bus routes aren’t being treated in a fast enough manner,” said Talbot. The board agreed to submit a letter to MOTI sharing the directors’ concerns, as well as an invitation to MOTI to come and speak with them.


$ Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

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77

! SALE EXTENDED Friday, March 9, 2018 Page A13

Vernon

Sicamous wants share of pot tax revenue The mayor of Sicamous wants support from Kamloops city council in asking the province to give half of its share of the cannabis tax formula to municipalities when the drug is legalized by the federal government this summer. “This is an adequate and equitable share to help support costs and services incurred by local governments,” said Sicamous mayor Terry Rysz in a letter, noting discussions have involved federal and provincial governments, with no inclusion of municipalities.

The letter, which is addressed to the Minister of Municipal Affairs and Housing in Victoria, states legalization will add social and policing costs for local governments. “The District of Sicamous is requesting your support, by agreeing to 50 per cent of the provincial share of the cannabis tax sharing formula be provided to local governments,” the letter states. The District of Sicamous has also approached other municipalities around B.C. to ask for similar support. -Kamloops This Week

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Page A14 Friday, March 9, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Community

www.saobserver.net

Syrian refugee at home in Salmon Arm WELCOME Shuswap Immigrant Services Shuswap, located at 371 Hudson St., N.E., would like to introduce more of our recent immigrants to the people of Salmon Arm. Our non-profit, non-governmental society has a mission to support and include all immigrants in the Shuswap . We hope that you will join us in welcoming these new members of our community. My name is Lina Alhamad. I am from Syria. I have been living in Salmon Arm since February 13, 2016. I have four children, Barakat, Moammar, Rimas, and Lynda. My husband’s name

is Hussam. I keep very busy with my family, my studies, and my cooking classes. I like to continue my education and I hope that next year I can be an assistant teacher. I would also like to write a Syrian cookbook. I want my husband and my children to be happy and to continue their education and have a good life in Canada. I like Salmon Arm because the people are kind and like to help the refugee families. The people respect us and our religion and we can live freely. Every week I go to four English classes. When I came here I didn’t speak any English. After a lot of

work and studying, I now speak, understand, and write in English. Before the Syrian War my life was very nice and very safe. But after the war started it was very hard. We didn’t have any food for days. Sometimes we only had bread. I lost one of my sons, as he was very sick after he was born. There was fighting and it was unsafe to take him to the hospital. After our daughter Rimas was born, we left Syria and went to Lebanon. We stayed there for one and a half years. Women are able to drive in Syria. I am very happy to say that I have just passed my Canadian driver’s license. I have been teaching Syrian cooking for four months. I have cooked auction dinners for the Salmon Arm Rotary

essential

Hussam and Lina Alhamad moved to Salmon Arm after fleeing the war in Syria. The couple have now both earned their driver’s licences. (File photo) Club and will cook for of fun in the classes. I ing as a custodian at the ing license, my English, the Hospital Founda- am so happy to be here School District and has and cooking classes. Our life is good here tion. in Salmon Arm. My also passed his driving I really enjoy teach- husband and children license. in Salmon Arm. My ing cooking Syrian are doing very well. I have my Food Safe- dreams are coming food and we have lots My husband is work- ty Certificate, my driv- true.

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Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

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Community

Baby shifts business to breakfast

Salmon Arm Minor Hockey Association Wed., April 4 at 6:00 pm

FRIENDS & NEIGHBOURS

at the Community Church

315 1B 6th Ave. NE (Across from South Broadview School)

Leah Blain As Lily Anne Kathleen Bradbury sleeps soundly in her car seat, customers can’t resist coming over to take a look. Her father, Andrew, points out the writing on her shirt - ‘daddy’s little girl’ - and tells them, “It’s just like the shirt says.” Lily doesn’t know it yet, but her coming didn’t only change her parents’ world, but it has also affected Bradbury’s customers’ eating schedule. Andrew posted on the restaurant’s Facebook page: “We are extremely happy and excited to start this new adventure. Bradbury’s will no longer be open for dinner service. We have decided that new hours and all new menus is the way to go. We will be serving fresh home cooked style breakfast and a larger lunch menu to accommodate our customers.” Misty and Andrew opened Bradbury’s in Devon, Alberta a decade ago. Misty says when their lease was up they decided they would like to move “somewhere bigger and warmer,” so they went on a road trip.

Friday, March 9, 2018 Page A15

AWARDS NIGHT

“We looked in different areas and at different restaurants but nothing turned out. We were on our way home and we stopped in Salmon Arm for the night. We both fell in love with the town, it was so friendly. I remember walking down this street we’re on, we were on this side and some stranger from the other side waved and said, ‘hello.’” They opened their doors in 2013, and soon became a popular downtown lunch and dinner restaurant. Misty says it was a surprise to them both when they found out she was pregnant. They discussed how to work this in with their restaurant schedule. “Andrew works from 8:30 in the morning until 10 at night. I said, ‘You’re not going to see your daughter.’” Their solution was to change focus and open for breakfast instead of dinner. Andrew has been a chef for over 20 years but it had been several years since he was cooking breakfasts. “I’m getting into the groove,” he says while he spends most of his time looking at Lily who is still sleeping

(all players & parents welcome) Annual General Meeting to follow: Agenda: -Society Act and Board Structure changes in our bylaws and constitution -Election of 2018-19 board members If any members of SAMHA wishes to put their name forward and require more info, please contact SAMHA administrator.

Bradbury’s Restaurant owners Andrew and Misty Bradbury, with their newborn daughter, Lily. (Leah Blain photo) peacefully. Unlike many women who might feel overwhelmed at being a mother, Misty feels somewhat underwhelmed. Besides serving at their restaurant and doing all the bookwork, Misty had two other part time jobs, at the law courts and the Prestige. Now much of her day is spent at home, something she isn’t used to doing. “It’s easier than I thought it would be; I feel like I’m on a holiday,” she says smiling. But she was overwhelmed at the outpouring of the caring and generosity from

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their regular customers and community in general. “The customers are so sweet. Even before I had her people were excited and asking me how I was feeling. And the amount of gifts people brought in – so many people were bringing gifts. It actually made me cry. We have a lot of regular

customers but they’re more like family and friends.” Misty isn’t sure when she’ll be back to work but she jokes about having Lily trained to help by the age of four. In the meantime, they’re making it work. “I’ll be able to enjoy the family life and I’ll look forward to that,” says Andrew.

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Page A16 Friday, March 9, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

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Page A16 Friday, March 9, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

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Page A22 Friday, March 9, 2018

News

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Getting the message out to as many people as possible prompted city council to fund a communications strategy. In the latter part of 2017, $25,000 was earmarked for reaching the people, with another $10,000 for this year. The $10,000 is being used to hire a parttime contract social media person. “Obviously we want to move more in that direction considering more and more of the population is using that means to communicate,” said Carl Bannister, the city’s chief administrative officer. The $25,000 in 2017 was divided up into three projects. One portion, $14,000, went towards a communications tool kit to be used by staff

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The City of Salmon Arm plans to modernize its communication strategies. (File photo)

Another $5,000 was for a communications plan for the Ross Street Underpass project, with the purpose of setting out the steps the city will take to inform the public in preparation for a referendum in October 2018. And the third,

$6,000, went to making the budget process more friendly. All three projects were undertaken by Urban Systems consultants. At the beginning of budget day deliberations in November last year, Thérèse Zulinick of Urban Systems gave

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what she called a ‘Finance 101’ presentation. She said the intent was to have the information made available to the public more regularly. “How does all of this work? What’s the mystery between the big binders and all of the numbers…? Where the money gets spent, where it comes from and how do you try to merge those together for everybody.” About a dozen people were present in the gallery, mostly those who are in charge of different areas of the city’s budget. Couns. Tim Lavery and Kevin Flynn had

championed the idea of making the budget process more transparent and accessible. At the close of the presentation, Flynn termed it a great first step for financial literacy, and said he hopes next year the information provided will reach more people. When the communications strategy was passed last year, Mayor Nancy Cooper said all of council was happy to approve it. “We realized in order to get the right information and timely information out, we need some help,” she said. “We don’t have a communications person.”

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Friday, March 9, 2018 Page A23

Your Health &

Wellness

Marla Beblow

INFORMATION DESIGNED TO PROMOTE AND ENHANCE YOUR WELLBEING

DENTURIST LTD.

Save Those Tonsils FAMILY CHIROPRACTIC Dr. Warren Gage Another one of the speakers that we were forturnate enought to see in California was Dr. Suzanne Humphries. She presented her latest research on the Haemophilus Type B (Hib) vaccine which was extremely interesting. As part of her presentation she also discussed the importance of the tonsils and adenoids as a first line of defense of the immune system. This week I would like to pass on some of this information about the importance of the tonsils and adenoids. The tonsils and adenoids are immune tissues that are located in the back of the mouth and throat and make up part of what is called Waldeyer’s ring. Many people think of

the tonsils as just an organ with which some people have recurring troubles and need to surgically removed. In fact, tonsil surgery, called a tonsillectomy continues to be a very common practice as 530,000 of these operations are still done annually in the USA. Tonsils are larger in early childhood and will often greatly shrink in size by the teenage years. The role of the tonsils is to trap invading viruses and bacteria before they are able to enter the lungs and digestive tract. Standard thinking is that they are not an essential part of the body thus when they become chronically inflamed, they can be surgically removed so

they no longer cause pain and problems. However, there is research that shows they play an important role in proper immune function. In a report published by the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, tonsillar B cells (a type of tonsil cells) mature to produce five classes of antibodies. They produce specific antibodies against staphylococcus aureus, haemophilus influenzae, streptococcus pneumoniae, poliovirus and diptheria toxoid. Other research has shown that tonsillectomy leads to a 6-16x increased rate of bulbar polio in the 12 years following surgery. I would suggest that if a child (or adult) is having chronically inflamed tonsils they most likely have an underlying weakened immune system that is allowing chronic infections to reoccur. There

are many strategies to support the immune system including reducing stress and increasing the amount of sleep. Improving your diet is especially important for a strong immune system. Eats plenty of dark green oraganic vegetable, consume organic berries, ensure you are getting adequate omega-3 fatty acids, and eat lots of nuts and seeds. Finally do some research into herbs and spices as they are some of the most potent and healthiest immune boosters. The foods to avoid are ones that are overly processed and it is very important to avoid sugar, pesticides, and refined vegetable oils. If a sore throat has already occurred, gargle warm salt water and suck on licorice and fennel lozenges for their numbing effects to help reduce pain. Raw honey mixed with cinnamon and/or fresh

grated ginger and fresh squeezed lemon juice with hot water makes a warm soothing drink for an inflamed throat. Finally, another strategy to support a healthy immune system is to be under regualr Chiropractic care. There are a number of studies that suggest Chiropractic care supports proper functioning in the nervous system and the immune system. There are no extra parts in the body, including the tonsils. However, if they are not functioning properly there always has to be a reason. Once that reason is discovered, chances are they will settle back down and not be a source of ongoing pain and discomfort. Dr. Warren Gage is a family wellness Chiropractor who can be reached at Harbourfront Family Chiropractic at (250) 803-0224.

Did you know? The next time symptoms of a cold appear could be well worth it to reach for elderberry syrup, lozenges or supplements. According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, elderberry, or

elder, has been used for centuries to treat various ailments. Elderberry can be applied to the skin to relieve wounds, and it also is effective when taken orally to treat respiratory illnesses like

cold and flu. Some evidence suggests that elderberry may help reduce swelling in the mucus membranes and sinuses to help relieve nasal congestion. WebMD says elderberry may help boost

the immune system and reduce inflammation to relieve pain throughout the body. Some people also rely on elderberry for allergic rhinitis (hay fever) and as a laxative. Even though elderberry is

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Page A24 Friday, March 9, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Community

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is there a way to make a better burger? HealtHy bites Serena Caner My children will tell you: there are many disadvantages of having a dietitian for a mother. One of them is that I have a fundamental curiosity about trying recipes in a new way. Somehow, despite several experiences proving otherwise, I believe there is a healthier way to make a recipe that will still taste delicious.

By healthier, I am relating to the current, scientific, perspective that trains our registered dietitians: lowering salt, saturated fat and sugar; increasing fiber. Consequently, I have made cookies that taste like muffins, mac and cheese enhanced with pureed squash or cauliflower, cake so dry it can only be eaten with a generous spread of butter.

I like to blame my children, but part of their food grievances is related to their learned distrust; tampering with conventionally understood recipes. Burgers are one of those foods I love to play with. For some reason, I cannot make a 100% beef patty. In fairness, I am thinking about the ecological footprint of the meal. I am thinking about cost. I am thinking about grams of saturated fat and lack of fiber. Last week, I devel-

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he saw the burgers. I waited for the enthusiastic head nod that usually accompanies burger eating. But after a few bites my husband turned his head and politely asked, “What did you put in these? They taste…different.” Busted. That night, I felt like I let my family down, crossing the line between moderation and fanaticism. It is important to be open-minded about changing eating habits, but sometimes, with favourite foods,

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oped a recipe that was sure to fool the family. And so I took a can of red kidney beans and pureed it with my hand blender, before mixing it into the hamburger. To be fair, my opinion was that the burgers were pretty good. Who can argue with adding 12 grams of fiber, along with magnesium and vitamin B6? Besides, to the untrained eye, they looked exactly like burgers. When my husband got home, the house smelled of beef and his eyes lit up when

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Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Viewpoint

Friday, March 9, 2018 Page A25

thoughts on grizzly bears and orcas ShuSwap OutdOOrS Hank Shelley There are two species of animal, dear to the heart of B.C. folks. Those being the grizzly bear and the Orca, also known as the killer whale. Both species are recently the subject of concern. For the great bears, emotion and politics have finally shut down the hunting of these animals through out the province. Although there is

a healthy population, trophy hunting was what got folks riled up, and for good reason. In this day and age, trophy hunting possibly in Africa for rich hunters though safari International, under conservation ethics of too many animals of one species is understandable. But with a shrinking environment and climate change, hunters no longer need to harvest

a grizzly bear. However, bears being bears, there will be more issues down the road, in dealing with problem animals in rural settings, ranch concerns on losing cattle and hunters having to deal with the big bears when harvesting game come hunting seasons. These animals are expanding their territory, even swimming across to Vancouver Island where sightings have occurred. A bear was shot walking down the main street of a Native reserve near Port Hardy. Locally, there is a big

AT YOUR SERVICE

Salmon anglers on the Coast, will feel the brunt of some specific closures for conservation, to help a pod of killer whales that feed exclusively on salmon. These include the mouth of the Fraser River, the west side of Pender Island, Saturna Island and parts of the Straight of Juan de Fuca. The main diet of this group is Fraser chinook salmon, although they forage on sockeye and pinks. The main focus in sustaining this population, (76 down from 96) is trying to improve prey availability, with

an increase chinook stocks. Also to reduce ship noise, so the animals can forage better. Misty McDuffee of the Raincoast Conservation Foundation showed maps recently, of foraging refuges for keeping whale watchers and fishermen, out of these zones. DFO has similar concerns and is spending $7.2 million on digital hydrophone, oceanographic technologies to monitor underwater sound. Once again emotion, politics and saving a specific species play a large part in what is transpiring.

H i re Lo c al • Support ou r

Sh op Lo c al

Your Local Business Professional Directory

bear enjoying his winter snooze in a den on Mt. Ida. Other locations for grizzly sightings for the past few seasons has been in the Malakwa area. One resident having a big bear walk across her front yard last summer. It will mean more work, removing problem grizzlies in rural settings for conservation officers. Residents across B.C. have spoken, and the government acted. Hopefully it will work out for the grizzlies, as they need lots of room in the wilderness to roam.

HEATING

It is also a small part in the decline of salmon stocks, from warming temperatures, smolt survival, a large abundance of sea lions (30,000 to 150,000 seals) and the all eat fish. There’s also a growing population of sea otters enjoying crab, prawn, clams and oysters. Each species are protected, some since 1974. It will be interesting to see how it all plays out. After all, our grizzly bears and orcas are a wonderful presence in our small part of the planet. Next week, some great take down tales on poachers!

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Page A26 Friday, March 9, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

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The migrant ‘flood’ continues in Italy GLOBAL VIEWS Gwynne Dyer Lucky old Italy just got two Donald Trumps for the price of one. One of the big winners in last Sunday’s Italian election was the Five-Star Movement, whose 31-year-old leader Luigi di Maio has

promised to stop sending out rescue boats to save migrants from drowning when their flimsy craft sink halfway across the Mediterranean. A “sea taxi service”, he calls it, and promises to send all the survivng illegal

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immigrants home. So does Matteo Salvini, the leader of the League (formerly the Northern League), the other big winner in the election. “I’m sick of seeing immigrants in hotels and Italians who sleep in cars,” Salvini told supporters at a recent rally in Milan. He pledges to send 150,000 illegal migrants home in his first year in government. It is not yet clear whether Salvini and/or di Maio will actually be in government. A coalition between the Five-Star Movement and the League would command a majority in parliament and is one possibility, but other combinations are also possible. However, it’s already clear that these two populists won more than half the votes on open-

ly racist platforms. ‘Openly racist’? Di Maio and Salvini generally stop just a millimetre short of that, but Attilio Fontana, the senior League member who has just won the governorship of Lombardy, Italy’s richest region, has no such qualms. “We have to decide if our ethnicity, if our white race, if our society continues to exist or if it will be canceled out,” he said recently. Now it’s true that 600,000 illegal migrants, mostly from Africa and the Middle East, mostly Muslim, and mostly young men, have arrived on Italy’s shores in the past four years, which was bound to startle the older residents. On the other hand, there are 60 million people in Italy, so that’s just one percent of the

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population. Why is that such a big deal? You might as well ask why it’s such a big deal that an estimated half-million illegal migrants enter the United States each year. That is only one illegal immigrant per year for every 600 people who are already in the country. Half of those illegals aren’t even Mexicans, and yet Donald Trump won a lot of votes by promising to build a Wall on the Mexican border to stop them. Both in the United States and in Italy, the real fuel behind the populist surge is high unemployment (the official US figure is a fantasy) and long-term stagnation in the incomes of the lower-paid half of the population. The immigration issue just serves as a visible symbol of the displacement so many feel as the economy pushes them to the margins. The popular discontent and the political malaise cannot be cured by sending a few hundred thousand migrants home, even if that were easily done. In many cases, it is practically impossible. The Mexican government currently cooperates with the US, so at the moment it is relatively easy to send illegal immigrants back across that border. The illegal migrants in Italy and other European Union countries are a quite different story, because their countries of origin will generally not want them back,

and EU human rights laws make it hard to just give them parachutes and push them out of planes. What we are seeing now, however, is a foretaste of the time when the migrant flows grow very large and the politics gets really brutal. In the not too distant future the Mediterranean Sea and the Mexican border will separate the temperate world, where the climate is still tolerable and there is still enough food, from the sub-tropical and tropical worlds of killer heat and dwindling food. This is a regular subject of confidential discussions in various strategic planning cells in European governments, and also in the grown-up parts of the US government.Ten years ago a senior officer in the intelligence section of the US Joint Chiefs of Staff told me that the US army expected to be ordered by Congress to close the Mexican border down completely within the next twenty years. And he was quite explicit: that meant shooting to kill. This was many years before Donald Trump came up with the Wall, and even today it’s still not needed. But one day it will be, because global warming will hit the countries closer to the equator far harder than the fortunate countries of the temperate zone, and the main casualty will be food production in the tropics and the

sub-tropics. So the hungry millions will start to move, and the borders of the richer countries in the temperate parts of the world will slam shut to keep them out: the United States, the European Union, Russia, South Africa, Australia. If you think the politics is ugly now, just wait Of course, a miracle could happen. There could be early and very deep cuts in greenhouse gas emissions worldwide, so that most of the catastrophe never arrives. But I’m having trouble even believing in the Easter Bunny any more. This is harder. -Gwynne Dyer is an independent journalist whose articles are published in 45 countries.

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Page A10 Friday, March 9, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Friday, March 9, 2018 Page A27

Don Cherry’s & Sandbar Restaurant SPECIALS FOR THE WEEK

Chicken or Beef

3 for $5.95

Tuesday

Wednesday All Day Wings $6.95

Thursday

All Day Cheap Appies $7.95

Steak Sandwich

Saturday Prime Rib

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Monday

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Sandbar Sonics $4.95 • Sandbar Ice Tea $4.95 Sangrias $5.95 • Daily Beer Specials $4.95 “Enter to Win a Waterways Houseboat trip!” Draw: May 5th at Don Cherry’s Grand Opening

Don Cherry’s Sports Grill 250-833-1154

Located at Prestige Harbourfront Resort

WORD SCRAMBLE

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CROSSWORD

HOROSCOPES

CLUES ACROSS 1. Unpleasant substance 5. Oil group 10. One-time Yankees rookie sensation 14. Ireland 15. Less easily found 16. Southeast Nigeria people 17. Bridgeline Digital stock designation 18. Play loudly 19. Elegantly fashionable 20. Open sore 22. Frozen water 23. Sacred Islamic site 24. “Kokomo” rockers 27. Follows sigma 30. Cease to exist 31. Cool 32. Doctors’ group 35. Less attractive 37. Swiss river 38. Greek sophist 39. Grandmothers 40. Afflict 41. Russian pancake of buckwheat flour and yeast 42. Actress __ Rachel Wood 43. Not bright 44. Western Asia peninsula 45. Baseball speedster Gordon 46. Golf score 47. Transmits genetic information from DNA to the cytoplasm 48. Diego, Francisco, Anselmo 49. Songs to one’s lover 52. Cattle’s mammary gland 55. Having ten 56. Fencing sword 60. Scarlett’s home 61. Hold valuables 63. Italian Seaport 64. Cain and __ 65. Bad places to live 66. Large, wading bird 67. Witches 68. Cover with drops 69. Props up the head

171 Shuswap Street NW. • 250 832-2131

Dec. 22-Jan. 20

Capricorn

You may want to lighten up your mood, Capricorn. Figure out how to express your fun-loving side. Take some cues from friends who can get you to relax.

Jan. 21-Feb. 18

AQUARIUS

Aquarius

Aquarius, people want to share in your current success, but you don’t share the same views — especially when you think your accomplishments aren’t that big a deal.

Feb. 19-Mar. 20

PISCES

Pisces

1. Philippine province 2. Shallow channel 3. Type of acid 4. Cygnus’ brightest star 5. One who buys and sells securities (abbr.) 6. Ill will 7. Plant of the goosefoot family 8. Intellectual 9. Mineral 10. Shiny silicate minerals 11. Ottoman civilian title 12. What you wear when eating BBQ (2 words) 13. Soul and calypso song 21. Advises 23. “The Spanish Tragedy” playwright 25. Surrounds the earth 26. Paddle 27. Adjusted 28. Succulent plant 29. Forearm bones 32. Belonging to Egyptian ascetic Apollo’s colleague 33. Type of mental illness 34. One from Asia 36. 007’s creator

37. Direct toward 38. Pie _ __ mode 40. Large terrier 41. Hillsides 43. Patriotic women (abbr.) 44. Connects words 46. For each 47. Flower cluster 49. Closes a deal 50. Arabian desert 51. Vaccine against poliomyelitis 52. American state 53. Religion practiced in China 54. Type of sediment 57. Hall of Famer Ruth 58. “Layla” singer Clapton 59. Gamble 61. Sino-Soviet block (abbr.) 62. Midway between south and southwest

ARIES

Aries

A voice of reason may be telling you to slow down, Aries. Listen to this voice and take a breather. You will be glad you did when you get a chance to sit back and relax.

Apr. 21-May 21

TAURUS

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GEMINI

Gemini

Gemini, communication is your strong suit this week. You may find yourself in a position to convey difficult directions to others or serve as the mouthpiece of the company.

June 22- July 22

CANCER

Cancer

Cancer, it may seem like people are judging you, even before they get to know you or your intentions. Be patient and give new relationships time to develop.

July 23-Aug. 23

LEO

Leo

Your friendly demeanor puts others at ease, Leo. However, they may be so enamored with your personality that they overlook your accomplishments this week.

Aug. 24-Sept. 22

VIRGO

Virgo

See if you can go unseen for the next few days, Virgo. Now is not your time to bask in the spotlight. You might get more done if you sit back and give others a chance to shine.

Sept. 23-Oct. 23

LIBRA

Libra

Your relationships mean a lot to you, Libra. You want to do everything possible to solidify those close friendships. Be sure to network whenever possible.

Oct. 24-Nov. 22

SCORPIO

Scorpio

Scorpio, you can use a little personal recognition this week, even if you have to encourage others to give you some words of praise. Use those positive words as inspiration.

Nov. 23-Dec. 21

SAGITTARIUS

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Taurus, it can be challenging to measure progress right now, but rest assured you’re on the right track. Trust your instincts and let the results speak for themselves.

May 22-June 21

Sagittarius

ROSSINI

Saturday, March 10th, 9:55AM

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80’S FILM NIGHT

Thursday, March 29th

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Try to escape into a fantasy world for a little while, Pisces. You don’t have to focus on serious tasks all of the time and will enjoy this respite.

Mar. 21-Apr. 20

Taurus

CLUES DOWN

CAPRICORN

WORD SEARCH

The ups and downs that have defined a romantic relationship are about to become a little more complex, Sagittarius. These plot twists can be exciting.

Carol Creasy • 250-833-3544

171 Shuswap Ave., Salmon Arm

250 832-2131

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Chase

Page A28 Friday, March 9, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Squatter arrested

Police find suspect hiding inside seasonal home in Seymour Arm. Martha Wickett Salmon Arm Observer

A house fire led Chase RCMP to a suspected squatter in a seasonal home in the North Shuswap. Sgt. Barry Kennedy of Chase RCMP reports that on Sunday night, Feb. 25, police were notified of a house on fire in a remote area of Seymour Arm. The house was a seasonal home in a group of seasonal homes. A caretaker for the area went to the fire and noted that a neighbouring home had lights on and a generator running. The caretaker knew no

one should be at the house, so he went over and spoke with a man who was staying there, noting that the home had been damaged. He then notified the homeowner who confirmed someone must have broken into the house. Due to remoteness and accessibility issues, police elected to wait until daylight to respond. The following day, officers flew via police helicopter to the scene of the burnt home. While there, they examined the residence next door and located a man hiding under blankets in one of the

living rooms. He was arrested and police determined he had outstanding warrants from Vancouver. Kennedy says police believe the man had been staying in the home for several weeks and other break and enters may have happened in the area. Chase RCMP are continuing to investigate. Kennedy points out that the involvement of the community greatly assisted police in apprehending this fugitive and he says Chase RCMP recognize that community assistance is vital in creating safe neighbourhoods.

Village of Chase NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PROPOSED VILLAGE of CHASE ZONING AMENDMENT BYLAW NO. 847-2018 The Village of Chase Council will be holding a Public Hearing pursuant to Section 464 of the Local Government Act, to consider amendments to the Village of Chase Zoning Bylaw No. 683 consisting of inserting new definitions regarding recreational cannabis: That Section 2.1, Definitions, be amended by adding the following definitions: ”CANNABIS means cannabis as defined in the Controlled Drugs and Substances Act and includes any products containing cannabis. CANNABIS RETAIL means premises where cannabis is sold, dispensed or otherwise provided to a person who attends at the premises. RETAIL means premises where goods, wares, merchandise, substances, articles or things are offered or kept for sale, including storage of limited quantities of such goods, wares, merchandise, substances, articles or things, sufficient only to service such store and includes but is not limited to: appliance stores, furniture stores, hardware stores, clothing stores, sporting goods, and second-hand stores. Retail does not include CANNABIS RETAIL.” The Council will consider amending the zoning bylaw to include these new definitions. If you feel your property interests may be affected by the proposed amendment and you wish to address Village Council on any matters pertaining to this bylaw, please attend the Public Hearing at the Village Office on: Tuesday, March 13, 2018 at 4:00 pm Your comments/concerns may also be submitted in writing more than 7 days in advance of the meeting by addressing them to the undersigned, or at the public hearing in person, by petition or by attorney. Please know that all submissions may become part of the public record. Sean O’Flaherty, RPP Corporate Officer Village of Chase

With the snow finally melted off the red wharf in Chase, resident John Brown, led by his dog Riley, enjoys a beautiful Tuesday afternoon stroll in the sunshine. (Image credit: Rick Koch photo)

New chief, council at helm Two Adams Lake incumbents re-elected. Martha Wickett Salmon Arm Observer

The Adams Lake Indian Band now has a new chief and council. Although Cliff Arnouse was acclaimed as chief when nominations closed on Jan. 18, he is now joined by the five councillors who ran in the election decided Saturday, March. 3.

Eight people ran for council, two of them incumbents. Both incumbents – Brandy Jules and Gina Johnny – were re-elected. It was a tight race. Topping the polls was Steven Teed with 123 votes. Next was Shelley Witzky with 116, Elaine Jules with 114, Brandy Jules with 113, and Gina Johnny with

A call to prayer!

Thy Kingdom Come The Churches of Salmon Arm invite you to join us in prayer for our community.

Friday, March 16th 2018 @ 6:30 pm

Note: This is the second of two consecutive Public Notices. Dated this 8th day of March, 2018 at Chase, BC

chasebc.ca

Spring in his step

250-679-3238

Living Waters Church 180 Lakeshore Dr. N.W., Salmon Arm, BC (behind Boston Pizza)

sponsored by Salmon

Arm Ministerial Association

109. Those who ran for council but weren’t elected were Joyce Kenoras with 102, Doreen Kenoras with 96 and Talitha Wispinski with 70. The total number of electors was 609, with 217 ballots cast for council. Neither incumbent chief Paul Michel nor

incumbent councillors Greg Witzky, Norma Manuel or Ronnie Jules sought re-election. A swearing-in ceremony and signing of oath will be held on Friday, March 9 from 5 to 7:30 p.m. at the Adams Lake band gymnasium, with dinner at 5 and swearing-in at 6 p.m.

The next meeting of the

Shuswap Watershed Council will be held March 14th 2018 at the Columbia Shuswap Regional District office. Observers are welcome to attend. The agenda is available at www.shuswapwater.ca


Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Community

Friday, March 9, 2018 Page A29

WHY SHOULD I FILE MY TAXES? TO GET MORE BACK WITH BENEFITS & CREDITS.

Filing your taxes on time could put money back in your pocket. Owe money on your taxes? Legally, you have to file on time to avoid penalties or interest. No matter what your income is, you could qualify for tax benefits and credits like these: • Monthly Canada Child Benefit • GST/HST Credit • Guaranteed Income Supplement

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250-679-4440

www.HRBLOCK.CA At participating offices. Instant Refund™ valid only on the federal portion of tax returns filed in Quebec. Some restrictions apply. Not everyone gets a refund. Not everyone is eligible for Instant Refund™.

Newspaper Delivery Routes Available for

Play the pothole dodge game on Shuswap Avenue in Chase which has some major potholes like this one near Coburn Street. (Rick Koch photo)

What’s On in Chase Fun Spiel at Chase Curling Club, March 10, with annual general meeting to follow. For info, call Norm at 250-463-1753 or email admin@chasecurling. ca Pancake Breakfast at Chase Curling Club on Sunday, March 11, 9 to 11 a.m. Kids can eat for less. All-you-caneat pancakes, eggs, sausage served with coffee, tea and juice. Everyone welcome. Chase Curling Club is hosting the Nifty Fifty from March 15 to 18, the longest-running ladies senior bonspiel in B.C. Concession open for breakfast and lunch. Bar open from 11 a.m. to close. Daily curling draws start at 7 a.m., last draw at 4:30 p.m. and noon on Sunday. Spectators welcome and encouraged to drop by and watch provincial class curling.

Neskonlith Indian Band Community Information Session IR1 & IR2 – to provide updates on Ministry of Transportation and Highway four-laning, CPR and BC Hydro has been rescheduled to Saturday, March 17 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Quaaout Lodge in Chase, lunch provided. From Head to Toe, Chase Excellence Program fundraiser, March 24, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., sell your gently used clothing, shoes, purses and accessories, rent a table $20. Con-

tact Jacquie Everett at 250-675-2574. The North Shuswap Players present Always a Bridesmaid at historical Celista Hall, 5456 Squilax Anglemont Hwy. April 7, 13 and 14 at 7 p.m. Matinees 1:30 p.m. on April 8 and 15. Tickets: Ross Creek Store & Supervalu. Reservations: Lorrie at 250-9550835. Haldane Elementary needs volunteers to help cook hot lunches for students about once a month. For more information,

Okanagan Historical Society ~ Salmon Arm Branch ~

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING Sunday, April 8, 2018 2 pm - 4 pm

Sr. Drop-In Centre, 31 Hudson Ave. NE Election of Officers Jamieson Family featured guest speakers Everyone Welcome!

www.okanaganhistoricalsociety.org

Paper Amount

166 234 258

44 67 100

5 Ave. SE & 5 St. SE 15 Ave. NE & 18 St. NE 4 Ave. SE & 17 St. NE Evergreen MHP (3350 10th Ave. NE) 6 Ave. SE & 28 St. SE 2 Ave. SE & 20 St. SE 15 Ave. NE & 30 St. NE

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57 78

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106 130 134 145

Spring into pothole season

SALMON ARM

Route #

69 59 119 150

Area Description

Deliver in your neighbourhood!

contact the Haldane Parent Advisory Council at haldanepac@sd73.bc.ca. Public Skating at Art Holding memorial Arena, Mondays 5 to 6 p.m., Fridays 3:30 to 4:30 p.m., Sunday 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Arena is also open some Saturdays when there are no tournaments. Bingo Days, Mondays at North Shuswap

Community Hall. Movie Night at Chase Community Hall, every Thursday, minimal admission, concession available. Call 250-319-6302.

For advertising information call the

250.832.2131

ARMSTRONG REGIONAL COOPERATIVE

Help chart the course for the Armstrong Regional Cooperative by serving as a member of the Board of Directors! The Armstrong Regional Cooperative (ARC) is seeking Directors for our active board. The Board meets monthly to ensure the financial health of the organization as well as community awareness, and quality assurance. Board members serve on committees that best suit their talents and interests including: Member relations, Finance, Nominating, and various ad hoc committees. Requirements: • Must be a member in good standing • Attend meetings and show commitment to board activities • Be well-informed on issues and agenda items in advance of meetings • Contribute skills, knowledge and experience when appropriate • Listen respectfully to other points of view • Participate in organizational decision-making • Represent the organization to the public and to the private sector • Legal, financial, marketing, real estate and interpersonal skills are highly desired. Interested members should contact the ARC by April 9, 2018 to be considered an eligible candidate at our May 9th Annual General Meeting. Application forms can be found on our website armstrong.coop under documents tab.

Contact Circulation • 250-832-2131 circulation@saobserver.net

JANIE Janie, as a board member, holds the position of Parent liason for SOBC – Salmon Arm. She talks about the athletes as a lively group of people, each with their own sense of humor and sport abilities. “It never fails to surprise us what they are able to accomplish,” she said. “Hearing over the phone that our daughter had won a gold medal in the Provincial games this summer was so inspiring!! Envision yourself with a group of lovely, individual people that will make you laugh and that you will become very proud of — this is why we volunteer.”


Page Friday, March 9, 2018 A30 A30 www.lakeshorenews.bc.ca

Remembering Loved Ones

Place your condolences online. Visit your local newspaper website, obituary page)

Anna Kenny

March 10, 1970 - February 23, 2018 At 6:00 pm on February 23rd Anna went to be with her “Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ�, at the age of 47. She is survived by her loving husband Vincent, parents Alfred and Eloisia Egerer (Sicamous), sisters Eva (Austria), Salbina (Quesnel) and Christine (Kelowna). Anna will be greatly missed by all who knew her! A “Celebration of Life� will be announce at a later date!

CHEVELDAVE (STRELIOFF), Mabel

March 16, 1933 – March 3, 2018 Mabel passed away peacefully early on the morning of March 3rd after a short battle with cancer. She was predeceased by her husband Peter and her siblings Andy, Tim and Doris. Mabel is survived by her sisters Agnes and Polly; her children Gail (John), Leonard (Carol), Bob (Colleen), Tom (Diane) and Kevin; 11 grandchildren; and 8 great-grandchildren. Mabel was born in Pass Creek, BC, raised her five children in Slocan Park, BC, and moved to Sicamous in 1981. Mabel will be remembered for her delicious food and her insistence on feeding everyone who came through her home. Her signature dishes were borscht and pancakes, which she cooked so often the recipes were ingrained in her memory. Mabel was known for feeding entire hockey teams on occasion, and never sitting for a meal until everyone had eaten. She prepared her famous borscht and pies at a restaurant in Salmon Arm for many years. Mabel’s husband Peter founded a sports store in Salmon Arm called The Jock Shop in 1986, which she helped him and her son Kevin with for 30 years. The family would like to thank Dr. Jack Beech and the Shuswap Lake Hospital staff for all their care. A funeral service will be held on Friday, March 9 at 1 p.m. at Sicamous Bible Church at 326 Kappel Street. Online condolences may be sent to the family through Mabel’s obituary at www. bowersfuneralservice.com.

Larry Paul Kaszas

It is with great sadness we announce the passing of Larry Paul Kaszas at the age of 67. Larry will be greatly missed by his loving wife of 45 years Maxine, children Larry, Kevin & Warren, Dion & Jayne, Kristine & Wes, grandchildren Sebastien, Janessa & Tyler.  Siblings Joyce, Joan, Sue, Joe, Allan, Clifford, Ali & Delwin, and far too many nieces and nephews to name.  He was predeceased by his parents Joe & Alice.  Larry was a hardworking and dependable employee at Canoe Forest Products for the last 48 years.  He was greatly respected by his co-workers and will be greatly missed.  The service for Larry took place Wednesday March 7 @ 2pm at the Silver Creek Community Hall.  In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the BC Cancer Agency. Arrangements entrusted to Fischer’s Funeral Services & Crematorium Ltd. (250) 833-1129. Share condolences and memories online through Larry’s obituary at www. fischersfuneralservices.com.

Honesty Makes a Difference

We accept all Memorial Society and Pre-Need Funeral Policies Making final arrangements for a loved one is not easy. That’s why compassion goes into everything we do. We are prepared to arrange any special request you may have. t5SBEJUJPOBM4FSWJDFT t$SFNBUJPO4FSWJDFT t1SFBSSBOHFNFOU1MBOOJOH t"MMJORVJSJFTXFMDPNFIST.

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• become a member • become a volunteer • make a donation • leave a bequest #4-781 Marine Park Drive

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Friday, March 9, 2018 www.saobserver.net Lakeshore News

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Carlee Nora De Boer

December 1,1995 - March 6,2016 We your family miss you In the home where you used to be We wanted so much to keep you But that was not meant to be We wrote your name in the sand But the waves washed it away We wrote your name in the sky But the wind blew it away We wrote your name on our hearts And forever it will stay Miss you forever, love you for always. Mom and Dad, Cory (Hayley), Colton (Reanne), Carson (Julia)

Donations and bequests are requested for equipment to help care for patients and residents of the Hospital and Bastion Place. Tax receipts will be issued.

Phone: 250-803-4546 Mail to: Shuswap Hospital Foundation Box 265, Salmon Arm, BC V1E 4N3 Donate Online (secure site): www.shuswaphospitalfoundation.org

LAZZAROTTO, GEORGINA

1940 - 2018 Georgina Lazzarotto (nee Godwin) was born August 3, 1940, the last of three girls to George & Agatha Godwin of Rhydyfelin, Glamorgan, S. Wales UK She left to be with the Lord on March 1, 2018 after a short stay of 5 days in hospital at Salmon Arm, B.C. Georgina came to Canada as a young nurse in 1964 along with 3 others to seek adventure after answering an ad for nurses in the Province of Saskatchewan.  She started her career in Paradise Hill a small town in NW Sask, She spent a short time in Calgary at the TB San. and in the early 1970’s started work with the Federal Department of Indian Affairs as it was called then. Her duties took her to remote First Nation villages in Northern, Sask, These included La Ronge, Stanley Mission, South End and Co-op Point. She developed a wonderful relationship with the Cree First Nation who honored her with Moose hide jacket. She worked with community elders who accompanied her to translate. Often her patients had to be flown to a large community centers for treatment. It was while flying around the North that she met Lorne who was also flying in the North with the RCMP.  Lorne was transfered from La Ronge to Morse, Sask prior to their marriage in Saskatoon on February 3,1973.  After the birth of their first son Ryan they moved to Regina where Lorne continued with the RCMP. During these years in Regina Georgina stayed at home to raise Ryan and their chosen son Christian. It was while in Regina she started to develop her love for music by taking on the request of the priest to direct the church choir. At one point Georgina was directing three choirs in that parish.  Regular choir, children’s choir and a choir that sang at funerals. Together they moved to Williams Lake in 1986 after ten years in Regina. In Williams Lake she again took on the challenge of directing the church choir, working with 7 different priests over a period of 27 years. In addition to regular duties on Sundays she played at weddings, funerals and special occasions.  The first special one involved fund raising for a brand new church organ. This was used the whole time and was played by several special pianists while she lived there. In addition to church involvement Georgina volunteered on the children’s Festival Committee for many years and taught voice lessons to as many as 18 students on the go at one time. Her greatest individual musical achievement was to obtain her Licentiate in Voice with the highest mark in Western Canada from the Western Board of Music.  In addition to all this she continued her nursing career at Cariboo Memorial Hospital, working in the operating room, day care and recovery. After being on call for many years and with age creeping up she retired from active nursing in 2002. She then took an instructor position with Thompson Rivers University in Williams Lake teaching several courses in the Home Support Resident Care Aid Program to finish off her nursing career.  One class was specially designed for First Nation Women. In order to be closer to family in Revelstoke the last move was made to Salmon Arm in 2013. While in Salmon Arm she again was involved with the church choir but in a lesser capacity as her  directing arm was getting worn out after 37 plus years of standing out front of a choir. Georgina continued her association in volunteering with the local Music Festival. Other volunteer work involved visiting the sick in the hospital as an outreach with the Catholic Church. Special thanks to Dr’s. Main & Wilson for their considerate care and excellent liaison with the family during Georgina’s latter days. Also, a loving hug to the nurses in ICU who guided her through a rough time with all the medical attachments. Blessings to you all. The Funeral Service for Georgina will be held on Monday March 12th @ 11 AM at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church in Salmon Arm. Reception to follow in Church Hall.    Donations in Georgina’s name to The BC Lung Association, PO Box 34009 Stn. D, Vancouver, B.C. would be welcome to further research Pulmonary Fibrosis. Arrangements entrusted to Fischer’s Funeral Services & Crematorium Ltd. (250) 8331129. Share condolences and memories online through Georgina’s obituary at www. fischersfuneralservices.com

Serving and caring for families in our community since 1947. Whether you’re considering pre-planning or have lost a loved one, you can trust our professional and friendly team to support you with meaningful grief services. We provide individualized funeral, memorial and celebration of life services, as well as grief counselling

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www.saobserver.net Lakeshore News Friday, March 9, 2018

Friday, March 9, 2018 PageA31 A31 www.lakeshorenews.bc.ca

MCGUIRE, COL (Ret.) William George. Died December 10, 2016 in Saanich, BC in his 101st year.

Carol Elizabeth Pringle (nee Jones)

Place your condolences online. (Visit your local newspaper website, obituary page)

Remembering Loved Ones

November 8, 1938 – February 18, 2018 It is with great sadness we announce the passing of Carol Elizabeth Pringle on Sunday, February 18, 2018 in Salmon Arm, BC, at the age of 79 years. Mom was born on November 8, 1938 to Roderic and Kathleen Jones. A lifelong resident of the Westwold Community, she spoke fondly of many childhood memories she shared with her siblings, cousins and friends, including her exceptional ice hockey and baseball skills, and spending endless summer days exploring the hills of Westwold. A highlight of her youth was the Kamloops High School Band trip to Europe in 1954. As a farmer, Mom understood the definition of work, always without complaint. If it needed to be done, she did it – from milking the cows, raising poultry and pigs, birthing lambs, harvesting alfalfa and grain, tending two separate gardens, hauling household water, to sewing her children’s clothing. Her door was always open, the kettle was always ready to boil and there was an extra coffee cup and dinner plate in the cupboard for anyone who might be in need. When she welcomed you to the family dinner table, you would have enjoyed homemade bread, butter, jam, garden vegetables and produce, farm raised beef, poultry and pork, canned fruit, pickles, ice cream and doughnuts. After many years of dedication to Pringle Creek Farm and her family, she treasured her retirement and Yuma winters. Her yearly goal was to escape to her Yuma family before the first snowfall and bask in the Arizona sun until the hummingbird feeders hung in her window in the Spring. Upon her return, stocked with Mexican vanilla, American cigarettes and the orange drink, Tampico, she would share tales of her quiet days and gambling adventures. By far the most important thing to Mom was her family. She was proud of all her “kids” including her natural children, step-children, and those she took under her wing. She adored her grandchildren and would have been thrilled that her first great grandchild, Margaret Anne Pringle, arrived on February 20, 2018. If you ever crossed her path, you would remember her piercing blue eyes, striking hair (blue-black in her youth and white later in life) and warm smile. When she struck up a conversation with you, you would see her optimistic outlook and her remarkable ability to listen empathetically and without judgment. Mom, dementia may have taken your mind and cancer may have claimed your body, but your remarkable strength and true spirit will live on in those who were blessed to be loved by you. At Mom’s request, there will be no service. In lieu, we ask that you remember her with an act of kindness, spend time with your family, play a game of cards, whistle while you work, complete that crossword puzzle and never, ever say no to dessert. Arrangements entrusted to Fischer’s Funeral Services & Crematorium Ltd. (250) 8331129. Share memories and condolences online through Carol’s obituary at www. fischersfuneralservices.com.

George was born October 14, 1915 at Salmon Arm, BC, the third and youngest son of John David and Ella (Carson) McGuire, early settlers in Salmon Arm. He was the last surviving grandson of Sarah Agnes McGuire. Preceded in death by his wife Mary (Sabourin) 1920 2011, and brothers: John Carson, 1910-1969, (Irene, Sally) and Robert Alexander, 1913-1992, (Gertrude). He leaves three daughters, Pat, Jane, Teresa (Tom), son Peter, and granddaughter Sarin. He joined the Rocky Mountain Rangers militia in 1935, was commissioned in 1937 and served with the unit in 1939 guarding railway bridges in the Cariboo. Transferring as reinforcement to Seaforth Highlanders of Canada, he trained at Calgary and Toronto, and joined the unit in England in August 1940. After appointments with HQ Fourth Cdn Infantry Brigade, he rejoined the unit in Italy in December 1943. Wounded in March 1944, he was invalided back to Canada, and later served at Army HQ. After Cdn Army Staff College in 1949, he served in postings at Ottawa, Washington DC, London ON, Vietnam and Colorado Springs CO, retiring in 1969. George and Mary returned to BC and found a hilltop paradise in Saanich. There George built onto the original cottage, indulged in ham radio pursuits and battled tree roots that invaded his garden beds. Raised on a farm, he appreciated growing food and was an early seed saver. He took great pride in the hundreds of pounds of tomatoes and lots of lettuce and onions he grew every year. For many years he enjoyed visiting Salmon Arm in the summertime, usually staying with his cousin, Ronny Turner. Each day as the side arm approached, the two would head out for some late sun and comraderie at the Turner family cabin. Although he never returned to live in his hometown he always commented on how fortunate he was to have spent his childhood growing up on a farm there during the Depression. Up until a few years ago, George would challenge us younger folk to think by slyly provoking stimulating conversation and debate during dinners with friends and family on the Hill. A lifelong learner, he read voraciously, did crosswords and played scrabble until his memory started failing the last year; he even took up the computer and online investing in his early 90s. He loved food, yet remonstrated that he ate too much while requesting a bowl of ice cream. He kept up the treadmill until his last year and always extolled the virtues of arm windmilling. His life was enhanced with Tom and Teresa joining him on the Hill 20 years ago, invigorated by a steady parade of their visiting friends. When his only grandchild came along, he learned how to relate to a youngster and derived great pleasure and pride seeing Sarin grow and evolve. She was glad he lived so long that she had an adult relationship with her grandpère. Shortly before passing in his own home, George complained that his life was boring; he wasn’t afraid of dying. The last morning, unable to continue counting backwards or reciting the alphabet, he said “I can’t do it anymore”. Teresa and Pat were present when he moved peacefully on. He didn’t want us to miss him, but remember him instead. We do.

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BULK SALE. 1,500 Metric/SAE 11 piece wrench sets plus 12,000 single size wrenches. Sale $12,000.00. Forward interest by email to tkachukr@shaw.ca

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Journeyman Automotive Technician Braby Motors in Salmon Arm, BC, is searching for a Journeyman Automotive Technician. We are looking for team player who is hardworking and reliable. Chrysler/Jeep/Dodge experience is preferred. This individual must be able to diagnose and repair a wide range of mechanical concerns including engine performance, transmission, driveline, chassis, diesel, HVAC and A/C, electrical and body systems on a variety of makes and models. Salmon Arm is in the heart of the Shuswap and is a great community to be a part of. It is an ideal location for a minimal commute to work and enjoy the best of what all seasons have to oer. Our shop is a busy and growing location which could be ideal for the right candidate. Our shop oers a variety of all maintenance and repairs, a clean and organized work environment, and overall an excellent atmosphere to work in. Braby Motors oers: t&YDFMMFOU8BHF CPOVTJODFOUJWFTBOECFOFmUTQBDLBHF t.PEFSOTIPQBOEFRVJQNFOU t$POTJTUFOU TUBCMFBOEEFNBOEJOHXPSLMPBE t%PEHF +FFQ BOE$ISZTMFSTQFDJBMJ[FEUSBJOJOH Requirements: t8JMMJOHUPUSBJOPOBOEPþTJUFBTXFMMBTPOMJOF t7BMJE#$%SJWFST-JDFOTFBTXFMMBTQSPWJEFDVSSFOU%SJWFST"CTUSBDU t.VTUIBWFPXOUPPMT Preferred requirements: t'JBU$ISZTMFSBVUPNPCJMFUSBJOJOH t(PWFSONFOU*OTQFDUPSUJDLFU Please email your resume to brandon@brabymotors.com call 250-832-8053, fax to 250-832-4545, or come see us in person. 1250 Trans Canada Highway, Salmon Arm, BC V1E 4N9

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Salmon Arm For Sale Yamaha Electronic New Piano $500, Grand Father clock $200, New chesterfield $150, New Christmas Decorations must sell, Duncan Fife dining room table and chairs $250. 250-832-3342

Subsidized Independent Living for individuals 55 & older Manor is located in Sorrento with a view of the lake. 1 Bedroom - 1 Bath Includes: Stove, Fridge & Storage Room Water, sewer, garbage are paid. Common area room & laundry room Contact the Manor for more information:

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Duplex/4 Plex Vancouver Island 17 - 3110 Cook Street. Vancouver Island Patio Home for sale in the charming seaside town of Chemainus, BC just 1/2 hour south of Nanaimo. Spacious 2 br/2 full bath 1,294 sq ft duplex in adult only Applewood Estates. Main level living and entry, open concept kitchen, dining and living room with gas fireplace and cathedral ceiling. Central vac, stainless steel Maytag appliances, laminate flooring with carpet in master, walk-thru closet, 2 full bathrooms, natural gas water heater and forced air furnace, attached garage and crawl space, patio in back, gorgeous landscaping. Like new home in much sought after community. $359,900. For sale by owner, no agents please. 250-246-2698.

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Halls/Auditoriums GLENEDEN COMMUNITY HALL for rent. Banquets, meetings, weddings, reunions or ? 250-832-9806 www.glenedencommunity.com

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NOTICE OF INTENT RE: LIQUOR CONTROL AND LICENSING ACT APPLICATION FOR A LIQUOR PRIMARY LIQUOR LICENCE

Application for a liquor primary licence has been received by the Liquor Control and Licensing Branch from Tanto Latte Ltd. located at 1481 10 Ave SW in Salmon Arm BC V1E 1T2. Proposed licensed hours are: 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM daily. Person capacity for the proposed establishment will be limited to 36 persons interior. Residents located within a 0.8 km (0.5 mile) radius of the proposed site may comment on this proposal by writing to: THE GENERAL MANAGER C/O SENIOR LICENSING ANALYST LIQUOR CONTROL AND LICENSING BRANCH PO BOX 9292 VICTORIA, BC V8W 9J8 2) Email to: lclb.lclb@gov.bc.ca PETITIONS AND FORM LETTERS WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED To ensure the consideration of your views, your comments, name and address must be received on or before April 9, 2018. Please note that your comments PD\EHPDGHDYDLODEOHWRWKHDSSOLFDQWRUORFDOJRYHUQPHQWRIÂżFLDOVZKHUH disclosure is necessary to administer the licensing process.

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Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

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Friday, March 9, 2018 Page A33

A tense journey into terrorism JOANNE SARGENT

Made Fresh Daily

enraged as the police instead focus on Nuri’s drug-dealing past and his Islamist affiliations. Frustrated and grief-stricken, with the unimaginable horror of planning a funeral for her husband and child, Katja falls into deep despair. When all seems lost, the bombers are caught—a neo-Nazi couple with a long history of activism. Part 2: “Justice” (The Trial) The case against the couple goes to trial, and on the surface it’s an open-and-shut case. But it becomes quickly evident that bringing justice to this guilty couple will be hard fought. Katja endures the excruciatingly painful and lengthy trial that even details how the bomb killed her family. There are twists on the way to a verdict, with the defence attorney employing an outrageous strategy to create doubt about the couple’s guilt, and the

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two are acquitted. Part 3: “The Sea” (The Aftermath) The police and the courts have failed her and, in her rage, Katja now contemplates confronting, or taking vengeance on, the people who murdered her loved ones. With so much anguish and so little to live for, she plans her revenge. Katja is determined to get some measure of justice by whatever means possible. Says Peter Sobczynski of rogerebert.com: “The film tries to starkly illustrate the notion that the real

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victims of terrorism are not the dead, but the survivors who find their love and grief curdling into the kind of hate that can inspire the same kind of violence that took the lives of their loved ones.” In the Fade is pretty depressing, but a tense and impactful ride with believable honest performances, with an especially stellar Diane Kruger in

the role of the mother and wife who has lost everything. She is so good and convincing in her grief, you can almost feel her pain. For her performance, she won Best Actress at Cannes and at the Golden Globes. In The Fade is rated R and plays at 5 p.m. at the Salmar Classic Theatre on Saturday, March 10. It is subtitled.

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Shuswap Pipes ‘N Drums Shuswap Barbershop Project – Men’s A Cappella Chorus Richard Good, songster & Timothy Weicker, pianist Outstanding Invoices Quartet Rich Daniels: M.C. Special Guest: Shuswap Lake’s Leprechaun

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In the Fade features Diane Kruger in the role of the mother and wife who has lost everything. (Photo contributed)

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Cinemaphile A fatal terrorist bomb blast, an emotional and frustrating trial of the perpetrators, and the devastating aftermath of both – this is the intense drama, In The Fade, from acclaimed director Fatih Akin. This is his fictional rendering based on a series of bombings in his native Germany from 2000 to 2007. He tells the story in three parts as follows: Part 1: “Family” (The Crime) A German family happily goes about their normal day. Katja, the wife, drops their 6-year-old son off at her Kurdish husband Nuri’s office so she can meet a friend at a spa. A short time later, a bomb blast rocks the immigrant neighbourhood where his business is located, killing her husband and son. Absolutely gutted by the news, Katja believes it’s a hate crime committed by neo-Nazis targeting immigrants, and is

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Page A34 Friday, March 9, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

FREE SPAY AND NEUTER

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Arts & Events

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Warm wishes

Salmon Arm’s New Year’s Baby Elias Rhys Alexander Gulfan along with his mother Lindsy and big sister Noelle pose for a photo with the handmade quilt made for them by Blanche Hartnett of the Shuswap Quilters’ Guild on Wednesday, Feb. 28. (Jim Elliot/Salmon Arm Observer)

Choir focuses on nature Jodi Brak Salmon Arm Observer

SPRING CLEAN SPECIAL

The Northern Lights Chamber Choir is setting out to examine human nature through the lens of musical notes in their series of concerts this weekend in the Shuswap.

“Each selection in this year’s concert is a facet of the crazy, wonderful complex called human nature,” reads a description of the choir’s 2018 concert on their website. “It is human to love – to thrive and sometimes fail in relationships. It

is human to dream, to make music, to sing to energize our physical labour. It is human to immerse ourselves in the natural world, or to find images from nature to express our human experience. And it is human to play.”

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Steve Guidone, founder of the Northern Lights Chamber Choir, teased a few of the concert’s themes in a phone call to the Observer, saying that time will be a major focus. For example, the idea people all have ‘alarm bells’ in their lives, significant moments that suddenly snap one back to reality. One arrangement, according to Guidone, asks the question: Where has the summer gone? The concerts will feature original songs as well as performances of classical arrangements, cello solos, latin dance music and poetry readings in the choir’s own style. There will be at least one song from popular culture, a Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young tune, performed as part of a choral arrangement. The Northern Lights Chamber Choir will hold concerts in Salmon Arm on Friday, March 9 at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, March 11 at 2:30 p.m. at St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church.


Around Town

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Friday, March 9, 2018 Page A35

FRIDAY, MARCH 9

THURSDAY, MARCH 15

VOICES IN SONG - Northern Lights Choir performs at 7:30 p.m. at St. Andrews Presbyterian Church in Salmon Arm. Tickets at Acorn Music.

COFFEE BREAK AND ARTIST TALK - 2 p.m. at Salmon Arm Arts Centre

SATURDAY, MARCH 10

FRIDAY, MARCH 16

trick dog demo. There will be treats and freebies. CELEBRATE IRISH STYLE - A St. Patrick’s Day Ceilidh will be held at the St. Andrews Presbyterian Church, located at 1981-9th Ave. NE, at 7 p.m. Sing along to rousing and romantic melodies, which will include the Shuswap Pipes N’ Drums, Shuswap Barbershop Project, and many other singers. Admission is a donation to the Shuswap Lake Health Care Auxiliary Society. FLEA MARKET - The Shuswap Society for the Arts and Culture hosts a monthly indoor flea market from 12:30 to 3:30 p.m. in the gymnasium at the Downtown Activity Centre, 451 Shuswap Street, S.W. Third Saturday of every month. Admission by $2 donation. Table rental is $10. Call 250-832-2300 to reserve a space. LEGENDARY COUNTRY BREAKFAST - The Sunnybrae Seniors Hall hosts a community family breakfast from 8 a.m. to 11 a.m. It is located at 3585 Sunnybrae Canoe Pt. Rd. STROLL LAKESIDE - Sorrento Beach Walkers walk on the foreshore on the third Saturday of the month. For information, call Dan McKerracher at 250-319-5121.

SHUSWAP JAMMERS – Take an instrument or your OPERA - Rossini’s Semiramide Live from the Met will dancing shoes to the new school district building on run at 9:55 a.m. at the Salmar Classic Theatre. Shuswap Street every Friday for music, dancing and singCHILI AND COFFEEHOUSE - The Sunnybrae Seniors ing, featuring door prizes, a 50/50 draw and lunch from 7 to Hall hosts a supper with regular or vegetarian chili from 10 p.m. For more information, call Dean at 250-804-9219. PRAYER SERVICE - The churches of Salmon Arm 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. It is located at 3585 Sunnybrae Canoe invite you to participate in a corporate time of prayer on Pt. Rd. Come for the supper and stay for the coffeehouse Friday, March 16th, 2018 at 6:30 pm to pray for our comafterwards. munities and churches. “Thy Kingdom Come” is held at COFFEEHOUSE - The Sunnybrae Community AssoLiving Waters Community Church, 180 Lakeshore Drive ciation welcomes musician Maggie Davis at Sunnybrae NW (behind Boston Pizza). Everyone welcome. Light Community Hall, 3595 Sunnybrae Canoe Point Road, refreshments will be served. 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. SAFE SOCIETY’S TRANSITION HOUSE FUND- SATURDAY, MARCH 17 RAISER - Shuswap Total Fitness, 2450 10 Ave NE, 20-minute demo classes back-to-back starting at 9 a.m. and a silent auction that will close at 11:15 a.m. Please bring new unopened diapers or a minimum $10 cash donation. If you cant make it and still want to help, we are collecting all donations/silent auction contributions at the front desk until SERVICE INCLUDES: CONVENTIONAL OIL March 10. All proceeds will go to the ✓ Mopar, Oil Filter Women’s Shelter. ✓ Rotation of 4 tires ✓ Peace-Of-Mind InspecSYNTHETIC OIL ROBIN HOOD - a ballet protion of cooling system, all duction by Just For Kicks Dance $ 95 Regular Price fluid levels, electronic battery Up to 5 litres Studio at 1 and 6 p.m., tickets availMoplar Exclusives* of Genuine test, front and rear brake $ 00 Coupon able at Match Box in Centenoka Mopar Motor Oil systems, exhaust system and Park Mall.

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SUNDAY, MARCH 11 COME FOR PANCAKES - A breakfast will be held at the Seniors Activity Centre from 8 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. at 170-5th Ave. SE. Tickets at the door. Everyone welcome. VOICES IN SONG - Northern Lights Choir performs at 2:30 p.m. at St. Andrews Presbyterian Church in Salmon Arm. Tickets at Acorn Music.

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MONDAY, MARCH 19 OKANAGAN HISTORICAL SOCIETY - Salmon Arm Branch meets the third Monday of the month in the board room at the Mall at Piccadilly at 7 p.m. For more information, contact Dorothy at 250-832-3537. WALKING MEDITATION - Labyrinth walks at 10 a.m. at the First United Church Hall. PAINTING - The Mount Ida Painters meet from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Seniors Drop-In Centre at 31 Hudson Ave.

TUESDAY, MARCH 20

WATCH THE BIRDIE - Badminton at the Gleneden Community Hall at 9:30 on Tuesdays. For more, contact Roger at 250-832-1599.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21

FOOD CONVERSATIONS - Toward a Local Food System, talk by 250-832-8053 Wolf Wesle, Green Croft Gardens * see dealer for details and president of the Okanagan Food Co-op, Wednesday, 7 to 9 p.m. MONDAY, MARCH 12 www.brabymotors com 1-888-832-8053 Hub at Okanagan College, Salmon Arm. RESISTANCE AND REVOLUFor info, call Call Shelley Corbin or TION - The festival continues at 5 Ronn Boeur at 250-832-1956. p.m. at the Salmar Classic with Migrant Dreams, a powerful recent Canadian documentary exploring the exploitation CONCERT WITH GREEN ROOM - A little bit of FRIDAY, MARCH 23 of temporary foreign agricultural workers in Ontario. St. Patrick’s Day and a whole lot of fun. March 17 at FEEDING OURSELVES - A documentary on the moveIt’s Handmade, 7 p.m. Food and beverages available, ment towards regional food sovereignty, hosted by Shuswap TUESDAY, MARCH 13 $8 at the door. Food Action Co-Op, 7 p.m. at the Salmar Classic ST. PATRICK’S DAY DINNER AND DANCE- at OPTIMIST U18 PROVINCIAL CURLING CHAMPIAFTERNOON WRITER’S AND READER’S COFFEE ONSHIPS - March 13 to 18, Salmon Arm Curling Centre Shuswap Lake Estates Community Centre in Blind Bay. HOUSE - Blue Canoe Bakery on Hudson Street, 3 to 5 hosts event showcasing the talents of B.C.’s curling youth Doors open for cocktails at 5 p.m., dinner at 6. Dance to p.m., featuring publisher, Louise Wallace Richmond, who (boys and girls). These young curlers will compete for the live music by the Sultans. Fundraiser for the South Shuswap will cover The Ins and Outs of Publishing. Presented by the opportunity to represent B.C. at the Canadian Champi- Health Services Society. Tickets are $45. Call Doug at 250- Shuswap Writers’ Group. onships. Come out to watch and support these athletes. 803-8930 for tickets. SPRING SEATS FOR REVIEW - a fundraiser for SATURDAY, MARCH 24 Free admission. For info, call 250-832-8700. Shuswap Theatre’s Comfy Bottoms, a project to replace ARTIST TRADING CARDS - 3 p.m. at Salmon Arm KICK START YOUR HEART - Peace Unity Family all the seats and flooring in the theatre. Shuswap Theatre Fun Entertainment concert featuring Spun Logic, Te-Top Arts Centre members will entertain with sketches – comedy, tragedy, and Dominick Soth, Seniors Fifth Ave. Activity Centre, improv, music and just plain fun. A great way to celebrate 170 5th Ave SE, 8 p.m. to 1 a.m. WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14 SUFFERING CHRONIC PAIN? - Registration open St. Patrick’s Day! Saturday, March 17 at 7:30 p.m., no for free six-week workshops to better self-manage pain. host bar, and Sunday, March 18 at 1:30 p.m. Admission MONDAY, MARCH 26 RESISTANCE AND REVOLUTION - The film series Wednesday mornings, April 4 to May 9, from 10 a.m. to by donation, at Shuswap Theatre, 41 Hudson Ave. NW. MEET THE BREEDS The Vernon & District Kennel concludes at 7 p.m. with The East, about an operative for a 12:30 p.m. at the Shuswap Lake Hospital Education Room. Club will be at Centenoka Park Mall from 10 a.m. to 2 private intelligence firm’s attempts to infiltrate and subvert For info and to register: call UVIC’s Centre on Aging 1-866p.m., with an anticipated 12 to 15 different dog breeds will a group of anarchists carrying out acts of terror against 902-3767 or online www.selfmanagementbc.ca. be set up for the pubic to meet, a nose work demo and a powerful corporations. Film shows at the Salmar Classic.

1250 Trans Can Hwy SW, Salmon Arm

Call us at 250-832-2131, drop in to our office, or use our new, easy to use calendar online. You can now upload your own events on our website…AND IT’S EASY!! Simply go to www.saobserver.net, go to CALENDAR, and click on Add Your Event.


Page A36 Friday, March 9, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

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Shuswap Market News, March 09, 2018  

March 09, 2018 edition of the Shuswap Market News

Shuswap Market News, March 09, 2018  

March 09, 2018 edition of the Shuswap Market News