Page 1

LAKESHORE

Shuswap Vol. 29 No. 3 January 19, 2018

Market News

Wa App rrant rov y ed!

No nt me int ry o p Ap cessa Ne

It’s Our Duty to Your Car! Since 1978

HOURS: Mon. to Sat. 8 a.m. - 6 p.m.

Helping the Environment! all used oil & filters are sent out for recycling

1291 TCH SW Salmon Arm salmonarm.gcocltd.com • 250-832-1040

Inside Shuswap

A3 Thrift store find

Salmon Arm woman returns Bible. Plus Opinion A6 South Shuswap A8-9

Chase

A24

Adams Lake election

New chief acclaimed, Paul Michel doesn’t run. Plus What’s On A24 Chase Heat A25

Flyers ❚ Askew’s* ❚ Blind Bay Village Grocer* ❚ Best Buy* ❚ Canadian Tire* ❚ Home Hardware* ❚ JYSK* ❚ Maritime Travel* ❚ Pharmachoice* ❚ Real Estate ❚ Superstore* ❚ Safety Mart* ❚ Save On Foods* ❚ Shoppers* ❚ Sobeys-Safeway* ❚ Source* ❚ Staples* ❚ Visions ❚ Walmart* *Limited distribution

Ken Brown, the driver of this houseboat, was killed on July 3, 2010, when Leon Reinbrecht drove his speedboat into the vessel.

FILE PHOTO

Man convicted in crash awaits appeal Tim Petruk Kamloops This Week

The driver of a speedboat involved in a fatal nighttime collision with a houseboat on Shuswap Lake more than seven years ago is set to make his next appearance in B.C.’s highest court, though a date for the appeal of his 2015 conviction has not been set. Leon Reinbrecht, now 55, was at the helm of his speedboat on the evening of July 3, 2010, on Magna Bay following a post-Canada Day fireworks display. Reinbrecht was driving recklessly – witnesses described him doing donuts and speeding near shore on the busy waters –when his vessel collided with a slow-moving

houseboat. Reinbrecht’s speedboat ended up inside the houseboat. Ken Brown, the houseboat’s operator, was killed. Other passengers suffered a variety of injuries. At trial, Reinbrecht’s lawyers argued Brown’s houseboat was not properly lit. Reinbrecht stood trial and was convicted in October 2015. Following a series of lengthy constitutional challenges by his lawyers, he was sentenced the following year to three-and-a-half years in federal prison. It took 17 months from the time of the crash for the Crown to bring charges against Reinbrecht, but that delay did not form part of the defence’s argument. Defence

lawyer Joe Doyle argued the 46 months of delay from the time of the charge to conviction was not the fault of his client, a delay he pinned on the courts and Crown. The case had seen one Crown lawyer retire and hand over responsibility to another, while Reinbrecht used three lawyers. Delays were also caused by Reinbrecht’s fight to obtain legal-aid funding and a key Crown witness’s pregnancy. However, B.C. Supreme Court Justice Sheri Donegal, who found Reinbrecht guilty, spent two hours in explaining why she was dismissing the constitutional challenges based on delays. “There is a societal interest in ensuring accused are tried on their

merits,” Donegal said in her decision. “The societal interest in the completion of this trial is high, so when I weigh and balance all these factors, I am satisfied Mr. Reinbrecht’s right to a fair trial has not been infringed in this case.” An appeal was filed on Reinbrecht’s behalf almost immediately and he was granted bail by the B.C. Court of Appeal four days later. The appeal filed argues Donegal erred when she ruled Reinbrecht’s Charter rights were not breached by delays in prosecution and the trial itself. A case-management hearing in the B.C. Court of Appeal is scheduled for Jan. 29. An appeal date has not yet been set.


Page A2 Friday, January 19, 2018

Royal Canadian Legion #62

Super Bowl COMING EVENTS Monday Night Crib

7:00 pm sharp

Tuesday Nights Drop in Fun Darts & Pool - 7 pm

Next General Meeting

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

News

Sunday, Feb. 4th Open 1:00 pm

It’s electric

Members and Guests welcome.

Parkview Elementary students Noah Handley and Dillon Whiting and Eagle River Secondary student Brandon Greenlaw work together at assembling electrical cords during a Find Your Fit career opportunities session at Eagle River Secondary.

Jan. 28 @ 1:00 pm

Burger & Beer Feb. 2

◆ Darts ◆ Shuffleboard ◆ Pool – Anytime! ◆ Meat Draws Saturdays at 2 pm ◆ Members & bonafide guests welcome OPEN 11:00 A.M. • legion62sa@gmail.com

Royal Canadian Legion Branch #62 ~ 141 Hudson St. NW, Salmon Arm ~ 832-3687

We have picked up Grandpa’s neighbours Navel Oranges. …yes 10,000 lbs, Tree ripened.

LachLan Labere/eagLe VaLLey news

10 lbs for only $8.99 They are so fresh you will want to slap them!

Apples…..What a deal! Mac’s 30lbs........................................... only $9.99 Gala 20lbs...................................................... $9.99

For advertising information call the

Christian returns as chief Roger Knox Black Press

and

We will ALWAYS have a $10 box of apples!

250.832.2131

Wayne Christian remains Chief of the

Splatsin band, which is based in the Enderby area. Christian more than doubled his competi-

Salmon Arm Win a Twin Anchors Houseboat Vacation with every Citrus purchase your name will be entered in the draw. Draw Date February 28th, 2018.

Mon.-Sat. 8am-6:30pm Sun. 9am-5:30pm PUBLIC SKATING $1.00 When the weather gets cold again.

demillesfarmmarket.com

3710 TC Hwy., West Salmon Arm • 250-832-7550

YOUR LOCAL PHARMACY

Close to the Hospital, Walk in Clinic & Physician Ofces

“The Pharmacy For All Of You”

581 B Hudson Avenue NE. Salmon Arm

(Across from McGuire Lake)

250-804-0700

tor, former councillor Dan Joe, in Wednesday’s band elections for Chief and council. Christian picked up 151 of the 227 votes cast while Joe collected 72 votes. Four ballots were rejected. Two of four incumbent councillors – George William, Edna Felix – retained their seats but Lawrence Williams and George Dennis III narrowly missed out. Theresa William topped the polls with 105 votes. Shawn

Tronson and Douglas (Doug) Thomas tied for second with 96 votes. Felix had 90 votes and William had 89 ballots marked, which was one more than Dennis III and four more than Williams. Dennis III and Williams have not asked for a recount. There were 14 candidates for council though one was disqualified. A total of 227 ballots were cast for councillor.


Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Community

Friday, January 19, 2018 Page A3

Thrift store volunteer returns Bible to church Salmon Arm woman came across 93-year-old book and contacted parish. that he was survived by his wife, one son; Jack Tarbuck, three daughters; Mary Lowen, Fanny Clark and Olive McKinnon, and six grandchildren; Kenneth Lowen, Ralph Lowen, Jack Lowen, Tom Lowen, Hugh McKinnon and Ray Burgess. “I’m very thrilled with this Bible that’s found its way back home,”

Terri Huxley Drumheller Mail

to say ‘This has value’ and it does.” Wade plans to take the Bible to the next church meeting to decide what to do with it. “I suspect that it will go to the Calgary Anglican Cathedral,” said Wade. Editor’s note: Thanks to the Drummheller Mail and reporter Terri Huxley for allowing this story to be re-printed.

Photo by terri huxley

Doug Wade, a member of the St. Magloire’s Anglican Church, holds a recently returned Bible dating back as early as 1928 based on notes found as bookmarks. The Bible was found in a Salmon Arm church thrift store by volunteer Jeanetta Zorn, who decided to keep the book to send back to the Drumheller church. Wade, an active member of the St. Magloire’s Anglican Church in Drumheller. He has also acted as the deputy warden and participated in the church choir over the years. “We don’t often have that opportunity you know,” continued Zorn. “We’re hucking out old books and putting stuff out on the shelf, so this was kind of a really neat thing to have happen as a volunteer and just being able to do that because it could have just as easily fallen into somebody’s hands that would have heaved it.” The Bible’s detailed notes are of what is

most likely from a Bishop who was preparing sermons during Sunday mass many years ago. As a way to keep the speech pure, no written speeches were made so the Bishop would conduct an impromptu speech only guided by these tiny notes. A few names have been identified from the assortment of bookmarks that line its pages; A. MacPhail, Canon W.P. Griffins (Rector), and Mr. John Henry Tarbuck. It is believed that the Bible was Tarbuck’s based on a leaflet that has his name addressed as well as a stamp with the date Sept. 21, 1938.

Tarbuck lived in the Dunphy area where his grave is located in the Homelands Cemetery. The Mail looked through direct archives and found Tarbuck’s name in the January 31, 1946 issue as his obituary was printed on the front page. The obituary stated

BUYING COINS Collector Coins, Old Coins, Rare Coins, Gold, Silver, Coin Collections, & Old Paper Money

HOUSECALLS!

250-864-3521

UP Y GN R SI NUA EE JA FR OR F

An Alberta church is one Bible richer after a Salmon Arm thrift store volunteer stumbled upon the 93-yearold artifact. Salmon Arm’s Jeanetta Zorn found the Bible while sorting through donated books and decided to keep it because she felt it held value. Zorn examined it at home and discovered a newsletter inside. “It was through that Bible that I knew where the Bible had to at least, at some point, come from,” said Zorn. “I thought, ‘I’m going to see if this Bible wants to go back home.’” The 1925 Bible contains old flyer’s and receipts that are scribbled with notes that act as bookmarks. One weekly newsletter in particular was originally from the Drumheller-based church, with an interesting saying on it; ‘Pessimism sees a difficulty in every opportunity. Optimism sees an opportunity in every difficulty.’ Zorn contacted The Drumheller Mail to find a person to speak with about returning the artifact. She eventually mailed it to Doug

said Wade. “For somebody to carry that around… It’s so neat that it was saved,” continued Wade. “Obviously, he has been gone from ’46, so that’s 70 years ago that his family packed it around as well. It’s so neat by everybody, for his family to carry that around for 70 years and then for the lady in B.C.

We l l n e s s Through We i g h t L o s s You can do this!

www.dropzoneweightloss.com #104 - 650 Trans Canada Hwy. • 250-833-1448

ONE DAY ONLY!

16th Anniversary Celebration 2 for $16

Carlee-Ann Clingwall

Bianca Dewitt

BDO CONGRATULATES OUR SUCCESSFUL CFE WRITERS We are pleased to recognize Carlee-Ann Clingwall and Bianca Dewitt who passed the 2017 Common Final Evaluation (CFE). This is the final step towards becoming a Chartered Professional Accountant in Canada. We congratulate you for all your hard work and determination, and look forward to your further achievements as valuable members of our team. BDO is one of the largest national accounting and advisory partnerships in Canada with offices nationwide. Our professionals have the expertise to serve owner-managed businesses, large enterprises, mid-market public companies, communities and non-profit organizations in a broad range of industries. People who know, know BDO. SM Assurance | Accounting | Tax | Advisory 201 – 571 6th St NE, Salmon Arm BC 250-832-7171 www.bdo.ca

3-Pack Microfibre Roller Sleeves Reg. $13.99 ea.

Surprise Specials throughout the store!

$16 OFF

gallons of Benjamin Moore Regal Select Paint

$16.00/3.79 L

$80.00

Enter your name for a chance to WIN a door prize!

FREE Donuts & Coffee!

Best Prices of the Year on custom made designer window coverings. Pleated, Verticals, 2” Wood, Cellular, Roller Shades

Coronado Primer Sealer 18.9L

50% OFF

Asst. Brushes, Rollers & Extension Poles

Four Finishes. Ulti-Matte, Eggshell, Pearl & Semi-Gloss. Paint purchased on Saturday may be picked up at a later date.

Graber Free top down/bottom up, on Cellular or Pleated blinds. Shade-o-Matic Free cordless on Cellular, Wood or Faux Wood. Bring in your window measurements for a quote!

SATURDAY, JANUARY 20th, 8:30 - 5:00 pm

HARDIE HOME DECORATING 303 - 251 Trans Canada Hwy NW (Lakeshore Village) 250-833-1410


Page A4 Friday, January 19, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

News

BUYING COINS Sterling Silver, Antique Silver, Silverware, Coins, Bars, Jewellery & Ingots Paying $117 /lb.

250.832.2131

WILL PICKUP!

Email newsroom@saobserver.net

1-250-864-3521

kEDITORk

Over 10,000 ads - updated daily bcclassified.com

www.saobserver.net

New Year 2018!! HOW EXCITING! New beginnings in a NEW YEAR! The earth moved into 2018 right on schedule! We have never been here before! Awesome! No one knows how today will end. Who even has a clue what April will look like? Will we be here to ring in 2019? It takes courage to face each day. We TRUST that life as we know it will continue. It takes FAITH to live. We are certain that when an elevator door opens, we will step onto a platform. Not so in Vancouver a few years ago. There was no elevator, just a black hole! Every time we get on a plane we believe we will reach our destination and return safely. We trust the car we bought will perform as the salesman promised. What

would life be like without FAITH? FAITH is a choice. No one can force us to believe whatever. We resist such attempts with our own ‘reasons’. Intellectual choices are done by FAITH. We believe the philosopher knows truth. We trust the scientist has done honest research. We trust the food we buy is safe. We live 2018 by FAITH. We believe we will have health to work and pay the mortgage! We believe our kids will become law abiding citizens. We trust drivers to use common sense and not be impaired by alcohol or drugs. This is a broken world. Sin infects commerce, justice and relationships. Sin destroys hope. There is enough blame to go around. Does God notice and care about disappointments and failure and hurts? At Mountainview, we believe and know, that each day has already been planned by our Heavenly Father. He is in every tomorrow BEFORE we get there. Like light from distant stars that travels hundreds of years before we see them twinkle in the night sky, so God sees our whole life in the same picture! Our God is outside the limitations of time and space. FAITH in God is our anchor for life. FAITH is a necessity in death – the door to His Home, a peaceful and brilliant Place. How can we be sure? The Ancient Book Of Wisdom says so. Copies of the Bible that are 2500 years old, exist. Check out the DEAD SEA SCROLLS on the internet. He loves you! Trust the living and loving God! FAITH makes His guidance and His best available throughout 2018. Prayer is FAITH expressed! Prayer is instant connect with God. Here is a suggested prayer. Caution: don’t confuse FAITH with feelings. “Heavenly Father, I have heard about You, but I am skeptical. I want to know so help me. You see whether I am sincere or not. Make Yourself known to me in the days ahead. So here goes: I have lots of baggage in my life. I have failed others. Forgive me all these sins – make me clean on the inside. I’m tired of my past and all my fears. I heard that Jesus died for my sins on a cross. Thanks for forgiving me. Amen.” “Without FAITH it is impossible to please God.” Can anyone really do enough good to pass? Mountainview is open on Sunday. You can strengthen your FAITH and worship God!

BLIZZARD BLOWOUT www.centenoka.com • 250-832-9731

Additional

10-30% Off

50-70% OFF

Pyjamas, Sweaters & Slippers! www.ardene.com

1-877-606-4233 Ext. 355

Sale and Clearance Items!! www.nutters.com Phone: 250-833-0144

Additional

50% off

Sale & Clearance Items! www.warehouseone.com Phone: 250.833-4747

Great Sales throughout the entire Mall! Scooters & Vacuum

Fashion Jewellery

on sale for

www.randolphdavid.com Phone: 250.832.6405

King Cobra Scooter

4800!

$

www.t-cycle.ca 250-804-0113

10

$

00

Fall Fashion Clearance

50-70% OFF!

New Spring Arrivals Jan. 24

250.832.2218

www.suzannes.biz

LachLan Labere/eagLe VaLLey news

Sicamous Fire Chief Brett Ogino maps where different emergency responders should be in the event of an ammonia leak at the Sicamous and District Recreation Centre.

Training exercise prepares for the worst Officials plan for ammonia leak. Lachlan Labere Salmon Arm Observer

What begins as a small ammonia leak in the ice plant at the Sicamous arena has taken a turn for the worse; there’s a man down inside and the toxic, corrosive gas is escaping the building. To make matters worse, a semi has collided with a hydro pole nearby on the highway, knocking out power to the arena, including the emergency systems that controls ventilation at the Sicamous and District Recreation Centre. The gas is slowly billowing out of the arena and towards nearby neighbouring properties, an elementary school and local businesses among them. This was the situation facing the different emergency response organizations involved in a training exercise held Thursday, Jan. 11. “We had this ammonia scenario here today due to what happened in Fernie,” said Sicamous and District Recreation Centre manager Wayne March, referring to the ammonia leak at the Fernie Memorial Arena that left three people dead and prompted the city to declare a state of emergency, forcing the evacuation of 55 neighbouring homes and businesses. “We just want to let all services know what their roles are, what their jobs are if we ever had a major leak in our system.”

Sicamous Fire Chief Brett Ogino co-ordinated and oversaw the exercise that involved the Sicamous, Malakwa and Swansea Point fire departments, recreation centre staff, Sicamous RCMP, the Columbia Shuswap Regional District/Shuswap Emergency Program, the District of Sicamous, Eagle Valley Rescue Society, BC Emergency Health Services and local media. Also involved was arena contractor, Complete Climate Control, which maintains the refrigeration system in the plant. While going over the details of the training exercise, Ogino emphasized the importance of sticking to protocol. “We’ve all learned over the years, especially on the responder side, is that people who run in generally become victims,” said Ogino. “That isn’t what’s going to work. We have to do what’s proper and what’s according to your protocol. Slow down and stay calm. That’s the best thing you can be doing. Make the right decisions, you’ll be more efficient. You make the better decisions and you make fewer mistakes.” The group was divided by their respective agencies, with the Malakwa and Swansea Point firefighters joining the police, to determine what their priorities would be

and how they would respond. These were later shared with the group as a whole. For example, Complete Climate Control manager Jamie Nicol advised that if there should be a wind blowing ammonia gas toward the school, it was better to keep the children in the lockeddown building and only evacuate when it’s determined to be safe. Nicol also advised if victim is covered in liquid ammonia, removal of clothing should not occur right away during decontamination. “You cover someone in liquid ammonia, those clothes are now frozen to them,” said Nicol. “You try to take their clothes off, you’re going to be taking skin off like a sleeve. Not good. If you cover them in water for a long time, that water will slowly get that ammonia out of their clothing, out of their skin. When their clothes are no longer frozen, then you can move them somewhere else.” After the training exercise, the “victim,” – arena head engineer Cal Franson – took fellow participants for a tour of the plant. In the three decades Franson’s been working at the rec centre, it has never had a leak. “We are more than up to standard and our plant is, I feel, one of the best in the area,” said Franson.


Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Community

A

Sicamous-to-Armstrong rail trail moves ahead

BUYING SILVER 999+ Coins, Bars & Ingots Paying $16 /oz., $80 /5 oz., $ 160/ 10 oz., $320 /20 oz., $ 1600 /100 oz., $1250 /oz. Gold

WILL PICKUP!

1-250-864-3521

quiries on how to contribute funding toward Rail-Trail development, which will be unrolled formally over the next few months - but early contributions to the Sicamous-to-Armstrong Rail-Trail have already been coming in. To respond, the STA has a Rail-Trail Reserve Fund in place to hold early contributions ready to transfer over, and is able to issue charitable tax receipts. For more information visit www.shuswaptrails.com and click on the Donate button. As well, the STA will continue to act as a liaison point with community leadership and organizations. They have been privileged to grow relationships with the Armstrong-Spallumcheen Trails Society and Vernon’s Ribbonsof-Green thanks to the Rail-Trail initiative, as well as the North Okanagan Historical Society. We hope to host a joint support meeting shortly, and would welcome hearing from interested organizations that have not yet been in touch. The STA has also

been working behind the scenes to build relationships with inter-regional partners toward linking the Sicamous-to-Armstrong Rail-Trail initiative with the Central Okanagan Rail Trail and the Southern Trails-tothe-Okanagans initiative. The Thompson Okanagan Tourism Association has also taken a proactive role in supporting this effort. The STA looks forward to growing these relationships in 2018. Watch for further updates to come as leadership throughout the region work together to establish this unprecedented recreational greenway trail for the Shuswap. For an overview of the Rail-Trail vision, including the link with the Central and South Okanagan Rail-Trail initiatives, check out the presentation posted at www. shuswaptrails.com. Imagine: riding a bicycle from Sicamous to Osoyoos…not so crazy an idea anymore! -Submitted by Phil McIntyre-Paul of the Shuswap Trail Alliance.

VALENTINE’S EVENT: You & your sweetheart are invited to: “TOGETHER FOR GOOD” DVD couples workshop. Saturday Feb 17th 9am-4:30 p.m At Living Waters Church Salmon Arm. To register/any questions call

250-832-3433

Registration deadline: Fri., Feb. 2, 2018.

p wa Salmon Arm and the Shus

Worship

Photo contributed

An image of the route of the rail trail as viewed from the Hyde Mountain lookout.

The Regional District of North Okanagan and the Columbia Shuswap Regional District have successfully concluded the purchase of the the CP Rail Corridor between Sicamous and Armstrong. Working in partnership, Splatsin and the regional municipal governments issued a recent news release announcing the corridor will be “used for recreational opportunities, including walking and cycling, while retaining it for future transportation and economic development needs. There is also longterm potential to connect this corridor to the Okanagan Rail Trail, which is currently under development, connecting the City of Kelowna to the District of Coldstream.” The Shuswap Trail Alliance is pleased to continue supporting the efforts of the Splatsin and local RDNO/CSRD regional and municipal governments in the next phases of planning and development. It is an unprecedented opportunity to realize what Splatsin Chief Wayne Christian and council have described as “unfolding the true story of this place within Secwepemc territory.” There have been in-

he churches of e to t d i u g

Friday, January 19, 2018 Page A5

together

®

Pastors Major Carolyn Doonan Martin Ketteringham SUNDAY SERVICE 10:30 a.m. 191 - 2nd Ave. NE ~ 832-9196 Everyone Welcome!

Emmanuel Free Lutheran Church Salmon Arm Elks Community Hall 3690 30th Street N.E.

Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m. 250 832-6859

www.aflccanada.org

Joyfully centered on the word of God and led by the Spirit.

Salmon Arm Mennonite Church 4590-10 Ave. SW Sunday Worship ............ 10:00 am Sunday School ................10-11 am Message ...................... 11-11:45 am Every 4th Sunday evening Hymn Singing 5:30-6:30 pm Every other Thursday Prayer Service & Bible Study 7:30-8:30 pm

Pastor James Baer 250 832-3615

Shepherd of the Valley Lutheran Church (LCC)

10:30 am Sunday Worship SASCU Rec Center, Rm. 101 (west side) Phone for Information

250 675-3841 or 250 832-5908

Little Mountain Bible Chapel

3481 - 10th Ave. S.E. 250 803-0161 ~ Salmon Arm

• Sunday ~ Worship & Remembrance - 9:30 a.m. • Family Bible Hour/Sunday School - 11 a.m. • Thursday ~ Prayer & Bible Study 7:00 p.m.

Co-sponsor of Morning Star Bible Camp, Westbank, B.C.

Seventh-day Adventist Church Join us each Saturday ~ All ages

9:15 am - Sabbath School 10:45 am - Worship Service Wednesday Prayer and Bible Study - 7:00 pm

New Life Outreach

Sunday Service: 10:30 a.m. Pastor Mel Janzen 250 675-3839 or 250 803-5247 4409 Trans Can. Hwy., Tappen www.newlifeoutreach.ca

Cornerstone Christian Reformed Church Pastor Clarence Witten

10:30 a.m. Worship

Nursery Care & Children’s Programs 1191 - 22nd Street NE

250 832-8452

Church of Christ If your church would

like to advertise their services and 11:00 am Worship & Communion 10:00 am Classes for all Ages location, or special sa4Christ.com events happening at 250 833-0927 your church, please River of Life Community Church call The Salmon We meet at 490 - 5th Avenue SW

Pastor Reuben Pauls - 250 675-3636

Sunday Worship - 10 a.m. Nursery and Childrens Program (up to age 12) 2405 Centennial Drive, Shuswap Lake Estates Lodge, downstairs

CHURCH ~ ELCIC

450 OKANAGAN AVE. 250 832-3860 www.firstunitedsalmonarm.ca

Rev. Jenny Carter Joanne Koster, Children & Youth ALL ARE WELCOME!

Living Waters Church WORSHIP SERVICE Sundays 10:30 a.m. Everyone Welcome! TUESDAY NIGHT PRAYER 7-8 p.m. every week #180 Lakeshore Dr. NW Right behind Boston Pizza www.livingwaterschurch.ca

250 832-3433

St. Mary’s Anglican/ United Church 1188 Trans Canada Hwy., Sorrento Ph. 250-675-2294 www.stmarysorrento.ca Tuesday Eucharist 10 a.m.

saintmary@shaw.ca The Rev. Marcus Germaine SUNDAY WORSHIP - 10 am

3270 60th Avenue NE • 250 832-8936

Web: www.facebook.com/salmonsda Study Online: www.bibleinfo.com

10:30 a.m. Sunday Service

For the Whole Family!

plus weekly

SUNDAY WORSHIP 9 a.m. (St. Andrew’s Presbyterian) 1981 - 9th Ave. NE

Care Groups

SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30 a.m. Ministry Center 4480 - 30th St. NE 250.833.5636

3160 - 10 Ave. SE, Salmon Arm 250 832-3121

for every age!

www.fivecornerschurch.ca

for advertising here.

DEO LUTHERAN

First United Church

Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m.

Arm Observer, 250-832-2131

THE SHUSWAP’S MULTI-SITE CHURCH

SALMON ARM

Saturday Night Service at 6:00 pm Sundays at 9:00 am & 10:45 am 3151 - 6th Ave. NE

Children’s Ministry & Childcare for all ages, all services

SICAMOUS

10:30 AM • WORSHIP & SUNDAY SCHOOL deolutheran.org Pastor: Rev. Erik Bjorgan 1801 - 30th St. NE ~ 250 832-6160

Crossroads Free Methodist Church

Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m. Rev. L. J. Dixon

Sundays at 10:30 am Parkview School, 605 Parksville St. Children’s Ministry for kids up to 12 yrs Weekly Ministries for all ages

250 832-8068 121 Shuswap Street SW

SORRENTO

St. John the Evangelist Anglican Church

Sundays at 10:30 am Sorrento Memorial Hall, TCH Children’s Ministry for kids up to 12 yrs

Visit us at: aplacetobelong.ca Contact: 250 832-4004, email scc@aplacetobelong.ca

CATHOLIC CHURCHES Shuswap Lake Area Mass Time: SALMON ARM: St. Joseph’s 60 First Street SE Sat., 5 pm & Sun., 9 am SICAMOUS: Our Lady of Fatima Saturday at 2:30 pm BLIND BAY: Our Lady of the Lake 2385 Golf Course Drive Blind Bay Sunday, 11:15 am

10:00 a.m. Services Sundays & Thursdays 170 Shuswap Street SE, Salmon Arm

Tel: 250 832-2828

st.johnsalmonarm.tripod.com

St. Andrew’s Presbyterian T.C.Hwy. across from RCMP

Rev. Shirley Cochrane Worship service 11:00 am Email: standrews-salmonarm.com 250 832-7282

Broadview Evangelical Free Church Kenny Toews Student Ministries Pastor Rudy Evans - Children’s Ministries Pastor

Worship Service at 9:45 Nursery Care for ages 2 & under Sunday School for ages 3 - Gr. 5 350 - 30th Street NE 250 832-6366


Opinion

Page A6 Friday, January 19, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

get off the screen

Drivers attempting to operate a 3,000-pound motor vehicle while reading text messages on a cell phone, young children glued to a screen, people sitting in a waiting room perusing their phones or tablets but not speaking to each other. It’s no secret that cell phones, tablets and laptops are a huge part of many people’s lives. There are, no doubt, many advantages to the vast and immediate distribution of communication, information, entertainment and more. But, there are downsides. A study on the Canadian Pediatric Society website makes some recommendations regarding children. They include: screen time for children younger than two years is not recommended; for children two to five years, routine screen time should be less than one hour per day; screen time should not be a routine part of child care for children younger than five; screens should be avoided for at least one hour before bedtime given the potential for melatonin-suppressing effects, and daily ‘screenfree’ times should be part of a family’s routine, especially for family meals and book sharing. The society lists some ways to reduce risks associated with screen time include: being present and engaged when screens are in use and, whenever possible, watching with kids. Also being aware of content and prioritizing age-appropriate, interactive and educational programming. There’s no doubt screen time is extremely useful for harried, overworked parents who just need a half-hour to make dinner or simply steal away for a little down time. But the issue is, kids using screens routinely. In the Shuswap, there’s a great annual reminder of ways to get out and enjoy some screen-less fun with your favourite young people. Unplug and Play, the Literacy of Alliance of the Shuswap Society’s (LASS) Family Literacy Week, is coming up from Jan. 20 to 27. It starts with ‘Jam the GM’ on Friday, Jan. 19, the kick-off to the children’s book drive at the Sicamous Health Centre, the arena and the resource centre. Free events throughout the week include Bring a Book to Work all week, many activities in Shuswap libraries, Unplug & Play Family Swim at the Salmon Arm rec centre from 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday, Winter Fun Play in the Park in Sorrento’s Blind Bay Park on Monday from 4 to 5:30 p.m., Skating and Books with the ‘Backs at the Shaw Centre from 2:45 to 4:15 p.m. – and much more. You can find full details of the many free events at shuswapliteracy.ca or see page 17 of the Jan. 19 edition of the Shuswap Market News.

searching for the right pair of socks the great outdoors James Murray

If there is no such thing as made of both natural and a bargain, then it only fol- synthetic materials, designed lows that you get what you for various types of specific pay for. activities. Needless to say, over the Having said that, wool still years I have learned the comprises a significant persignificance of both adages centage (25 to 85 per cent) the hard way. Which sort of of the fabric used in making brings me to my point. For many of these socks. Most several weeks now I have sock manufacturers list the been looking for a good percentage of materials used pair of hiking boots and, right on the packaging. Silk in the process of searching is another natural fibre comfor the right boots, I’ve also monly found in socks. Silk found myself searching for wicks moisture and provides the right outdoor socks. a smooth feel, which also I learned a long time ago makes it ideal for outdoor that a pair of good quality, walking wear. Not all natural materials, comfortable, properly fitting President: 171 Shuswap Street NW pair of socks is probably one however, are good fibres for Dave Hamilton Box 550 of the most important piec- socks. Avoid socks containDirector of Sales: Salmon Arm, British Columbia es of outdoor gear you can ing large quantities of cotKaren material Hill V1E 4N7 vertising and editorial appearing in the to reproduce inEditor: any form must be obtained in have when venturing into the ton as it is a poor insulator Phone: 250-832-2131 subscription $44.50; Seniors $39 including GST. Tracy Hughes wilds. Take my word for it, and retains moisture. The Fax: 250-832-5140 nothing can ruin a walk in latter trait is what leads to This Shuswap Market News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council the woods or an extended hotspots (friction areas on considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, the input from both the newsoutdoor adventure more your feet) when you’re walkof the British Columbia Council,holder. a self-regulatory paper andPress the complaint If talking with the editor or publisher does not Copyright subsists in all display advertising and editorial material appearing in the industry. The council complaints from theorpublic resolveconsiders your complaint about coverage story treatment, you may contact the than blisters – and all for Permission ing that can Salmon Arm Observer. to reproduce in anyultimately form must be obtainedlead in B.C.the Press Council.Your written concern, documentation, should be sent writing from the publisher. Annual subscription $44.50; Seniors $39 including GST. s. Directors oversee mediation of complaints, withwith input to blistering. Cotton socks the want of a good pair of within 45 days, to B.C. Press Council, P.O. Box 1356, Ladysmith, B.C. V9G 1A9. int holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org. are a recipe for disaster. socks. r story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. If you did not receive the Shuswap Market News, call circulation for re-delivery: on, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, P.O. Box 1356, The Salmon Arm Observer is a member of the British Columbiathan Press Council, a self-regulatory 250 832-2131. Over the last two decades, More often not, synbody governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public tion, phone 888-687-2213 or go to 2010 about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee theand mediation of complaints, with input modern ‘sock technology’ thetic fibres materials from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not 2010 WINNER resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Rick Proznick Tracy Hughes Jennifer has Bertram Catherine Dillon evolved to the point are added toto enhance Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent B.C. Press Council, a P.O.sock’s Box 1356, PUBLISHER EDITOR CIRCULATION CREATIVE SERVICES Ladysmith, B.C. V9G 1A9. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to Salmon Arm, BC V1E 4N7 where one can now purcomfort, as well as increase www.bcpresscouncil.org 2007 MANAGER MANAGER chase multitude socks, insulation, www.saobserver.net • newsroom@saobserver.net • advertising@saobserver.net • 250-832-2131 • Fax a 250-832-5140 • 171of Shuswap St. NW, Box 550, Salmon Arm, moisture-wickBC V1E 4N7

ing ability and cushioning. Some of the more common synthetic fibres used in socks are polyester, which has both moisture wicking and quick-drying properties; acrylics, which provide good insulation, feel soft next to the skin and wick moisture well; and nylon, which gives elasticity as well as strength to socks. When selecting socks, a good rule of thumb is to match the weight of the sock to the type of walking/hiking you will be doing and the weight of your walking shoe or hiking boot. For example, a lightweight sock will compliment lighter walking shoes on easy trails for a few hours of walking or hiking. Harder trail types require mid-weight socks, while heavy socks are what’s wanted for rough and difficult terrain when hiking for several hours. When buying a pair of socks, look for extra cushioning in the areas where your feet tend to get sore such as the heel or toe. If your feet rub against the tongue of your boot, causing discomfort, look for extra padding on the instep of a sock. Matching socks and boots can also reduce the chance of twisting an ankle. Quite simply, you only

get what you pay for when it comes to walking/hiking/ outdoor socks. They can be expensive though. Specialized outdoor activity socks can run anywhere from $20 to $50 and up. I know that a pair of good quality, well-knitted, comfortable, properly fitting socks made of alpaca wool will run me at least $30 or more, but the way I look at it, either I pay the price now for the right socks or I pay the price later by having to cope with blisters. Having said all this about high end, high quality outdoor socks, there are some socks that you can get by with that cost less. I have a thing for plush, high bulk yarn socks. You know the ones that feel like they have a soft fleece inside. They cost about $10 a pair and are absolutely amazing to walk in when they are new. The problem is the plush feeling doesn’t last all that long and they wear out in a short amount of time. After that they are garbage. There are no bargains. All I know for sure is that I’ve had to save up for new boots, which will probably cost a couple of hundred dollars if not more, so I don’t really see any point in scrimping when it comes to the socks.


Viewpoint

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Friday, January 19, 2018 Page A7

Everything Shuswap getting exposure with wide audience

Proud Supporters of the Shuswap S.P.C.A

Salmon Arm RONA 2430 - 10th Ave. SW • 250-832-7044 Mon. to Fri. • 7 am to 5:30 pm Sat. • 8 am to 5:30 pm Sun. • 9 am to 5 pm

20

%

SHUSWAP PASSION Jim Cooperman The Tyee is an independent online magazine known for its lively, informative news and views. In mid-December, it published a feature about my book Everything Shuswap, with an interview and excerpts from chapter four. Tyee editor, Barry Link, prefaced the interview by noting, “It is colourful and accessible and reveals the Shuswap has much of what Tyee readers adore: clean lakes, green forests, farmers markets and folk music.” Here are some excerpts from the interview: 1. How do you define bioregionalism and how did that influence how you created this book? Bioregionalism, or fostering a sense of place, is a way of life that focuses on regional self-sufficiency, sustainability and local decision-making. As a retired, back-to-thelander who has lived on the same property for 48 years and who spent the “turnaround-decade” working as an activist and environmental journal editor, I considered two projects back in 2005; either write a book about B.C.’s forests or about the Shuswap. Both were needed, but I chose the latter, because I am a bioregionalist who wants to tell the story of where I live to enrich my neighbours and the world. Ideally, the book will improve the knowledge base and thus foster greater appreciation and respect for the Shuswap. 2. It’s an enormous amount of work. What

prompted you to take on the task? It is my deep commitment to help my community that prompts me to take on projects that fill gaps, such as helping protect 25,000 hectares of new parkland in the Shuswap. Much of what I have done and continue to do, beginning with helping to initiate a local history journal in 1988, involves research and writing. I love our region and it continues to irritate me when I hear the Shuswap mislabeled as the North Okanagan, or simply lumped in as part of the Thompson. Most other regions of the province are well known and have books written about them. There had never been a book written about the Shuswap region. I took on the task because I have a passion for the Shuswap, which I want to share with others. The better people understand where they live, the more likely they will want to protect it. 3. Who is the book for? People in the Shuswap or those from outside the area? As Mark Hume wrote in the blurb on the back of the book, “it should be mandatory reading for anyone who lives in or visits the Shuswap.” It is also enjoyable reading for anyone who loves to learn about new places and perhaps after reading the book, they will decide to visit or move to the Shuswap. Given that Dr. David Suzuki wrote after receiving a copy, “Every part of the country should have something like

Expires Feb. 1, 2018

Off

All in stock Electric Fireplaces

Like us on Facebook

www.facebook.com/SalmonArmRona

Find out about our exclusive Facebook offers!

B.C.S.P.C.A. (Shuswap)

AD PT-A-PET

832-7376 • 5850 AUTO ROAD SE V1E 1X2 www.shuswapspca.com Hours for Adoptions - Tuesday to Saturday Noon - 4 p.m.

This little character is Vinny . He is a happy, active, young dog looking for an active , friendly home. Vinny is a Beagle and true to their spirit he is an on the go kind of dog. He needs lots of physical and mental stimulation to keep him at his finest. Please look up the breed to familiarize yourself with the special needs this little guy has. He is a very verbal guy, both barking and howling so neighbours should be considered. A fenced yard is a good idea as once he gets a fun scent or hears a neat sound, he will be gone...gone...gone. However , if you like to stay near the home and just walk a lot then Vinny may be the companion you are looking for.

Jim Cooperman photo

Kathi Cooperman enjoys the spectacular view from the top of the Blind Bay Bluffs. This photo by Jim Cooperman appears in the beginning of Everything Shuswap. Everything Shuswap,” the book can also serve as a template for other communities. 4. Are you surprised about what you discovered about your own part of B.C.? When we travelled throughout the region gathering stories and photos, our discoveries always impressed us. We found gorgeous waterfalls, giant trees, stunning vistas, old decaying cabins and homesteads, and sadly, disgraceful damage to sensitive soils and flora by motorized “wreckreation.” There were more discoveries in archives and the photo quest, which took endless hours searching and dealing with the acquisition paperwork. Some of the “ah” moments go back to first visits to what are now parks, such as the mystical moss covered boulders adjacent to English Creek above Three-Valley Gap, or our first glimpse of Tum Tum Lake, the Shuswap’s own Lake Louise. Perhaps the best part about the Shuswap is that there are many more discoveries yet to be made.

The region is vast and while there is a network of logging roads nearly everywhere, there are many areas where no one has ventured. 5. Notwithstanding that you just created a book about a specific area, but are we too isolated in our own individual regions of B.C. compared to the rest of the province? Isolation is not the problem, unless it is isolation from each other and our surroundings. Books like Everything Shuswap can help connect people together and connect people to nature as they learn more about where they live. We all face a looming environmental crisis as the temperature escalates. While we need to continue pressing for mitigation, we also need to work on adaptation, which includes understanding more about where one lives and whom one lives with. One of the key messages included in the draft teacher’s guide to Everything Shuswap is that the book can inspire students to

discover more about where they live and use their experiences and what they have learned to write, do a presentation, film or create art.

Parkland Dental Centre A Beautiful Smile starts with Healthy Teeth. Call Parkland Dental to schedule an appointment today.

250-836-6665

Dr. Bruce Prokopetz DDS

We Accept New Patients!

4-1133 Eagle Pass Way, Sicamous

tory Clearanc e Inve

Sale!!

Mary Anne says “Don’t make me count it”

Frames Starting at…

49

$

•Kliik •Ice Cream • Lightec •Spine •Nat & Cocoa •Takumi •Menrad •Mizyake •Fysh • Bloomdale •You’s

• Licensed Sight Test • Contact Lenses Available

Evelyn’s

Sale ends January 31, 2018

EYEWEAR

*Some conditions apply see store for details.

evelynseyewear.com

102 - 231 TCHwy. NE • 250 832-1156 • Salmon Arm


Page A8 Friday, January 19, 2018

South Shuswap GPS assists in White Lake rescue Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Indian and Nepalese Cuisine

Friday Noon Buffet

Starting Jan. 19

Saturday Night Buffet Hours: Mon. - Fri. 11:30 am to 9 pm Sat. 12 (noon) to 9 pm • Sun. 4 - 9 pm 111 Lakeshore Drive, Salmon Arm • 250-832-2423 (Next to Downtown Askew’s) www.bombaygrillsalmonarm.com

LINDA Linda is a Special Olympics BC athlete in the Salmon Arm Local. She competes in bocce and enjoys the help that she gets there. She is looking forward to participating in more tournaments in the future. Linda was born in Toronto but has lived mostly in BC, first on the Coast and now in Salmon Arm. She works at the Salmon Arm Kindale Thrift Store. Her hobbies include walking, swimming, knitting, playing tablet, and she enjoys bowling.

Lachlan Labere Salmon Arm Observer

A successful afternoon rescue effort above White Lake kept two men from having to spend the night outside in the cold. Shuswap Search and Rescue (SAR) search manager John Schut said the volunteer organization received a call at 3 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 12, explaining a local company was out doing some service work and one of their party got stuck in the snow about 25 kilometres above White Lake. “Our team, because it has to go through all the proper channels, through the emergency co-ordination centre and whatnot… was actually sent out

at 4 p.m. and we had 10 people on that callout,” said Schut. The team, headed by search manager Gordon Bose, assembled at White Lake with six sleds and one side-byside on tracks and then headed up. “It was quite bad snow conditions, people were getting stuck and what have you, and it was not easygoing to get to these people,” said Schut. “So we got there and there were two subjects there, or guys, who were pretty happy to see us.” The men had been on a side-by-side that had got stuck in snow after going off the main track. “It’s really deep

snow, deep tree wells, and they were, I’m going to say, way over their heads… The two of them just didn’t have the resources to get out,” said Schut. Finding the men was a relatively simple, said Schut, owed to the men being able to provide GPS co-ordinates and a little good luck. “It’s interesting, there’s a whole network of logging roads to get to this area,” Schut explained. “Our team happened to take all the right turns in the appropriate areas to get to them. None of our team got lost trying to find them which can easily happen if you’re following GPS.” After finding the

www.saobserver.net

File photo

Members of the Shuswap Search and Rescue Society’s winter team hone their avalanche skills during a training exercise. missing men, the SAR team got them onboard and were back at White Lake by around midnight. “It was a long night,” said Schut. Prior to Fridays outing and every winter call-out, Schut said the SAR team will check

avalanche conditions in advance to make sure a search can be safely conducted. “If it’s not safe, then our members aren’t going. We can maybe, the following day, come in with a helicopter or something,” said Schut.

Unplug and play in the South Shuswap The Unplug and Play Family Literacy Week

Customer Appreciation Day! Sat., Jan 20 8 am - 6 pm

On Janu ar get you y 20 only, r coupo n for

10

% off

SERVIC ES U END OF NTIL THE FEBRUA RY

kicks off on Jan. 20 in the Shuswap.

Events that promote turning off screens and

putting down devices to spend time with family

SUNDAY, JANUARY 21 ONLY! GET A

FREE

SHOPPERS DRUG MART GIFT CARD worth $20 when you spend $75 or more* on almost anything in the store.

20

$

How will you spend it? THURSDAY, JANUARY 25 IS

It’s Our Duty to Your Car! - Since 1978

6 ½ years in Salmon Arm and over 50,000 vehicles serviced! Heather and Wade want to thank all of their loyal local customers by offering…. • • • •

10% off that day Prizes, goodies, giveaways Balloons for the kids Donuts, Coffee & Hot Chocolate!

• Join our Ambassador Club – buy 5 oil changes at regular price & get a free Valvoline oil change

SENIORS DAY! % 55+ SAVE 20 EoEod! FeR els g F

with a Shopper’s Optimum Card on regular priced merchandise* PLUS Receive a $10 SHOPPERS DRUG MART BONUS CARD on a purchase of $50 or more*

BUYING GOLD

Nuggets, Gold Dust, Scrap Gold, Wafers, Old Gold, Jewelery, Gold Concentrate & Broken Gold

1291 Trans Canada Highway SW

250-832-1040

salmonarm.gcocltd.com

and friends run Jan. 20 to 27. In the South Shuswap, events are as follows: Saturday, Jan. 20, family games, South Shuswap library, 1 to 4 p.m., and Steam Punk Art, 9:30 a.m. to noon, Arts Council for the South Shuswap/ FACES, lower Carlin Hall, ages 6 to 10, pre-registration required; Monday, Jan. 22, Winter Fun Play in the Park, Sorrento Blind Bay Park, 4 to 5:30 p.m.; Jan. 23, Carlin Winter Party, Carlin Elementary-Middle School, 6 to 7:30 p.m.; Thursday, Jan. 25, Bubble Wonders, South Shuswap library, 3 p.m.; Saturday, Jan. 27, Steam Punk Art, 9:30 a.m. to noon, Arts Council for the South Shuswap/ FACES, lower Carlin Hall, ages 10 and up, pre-registration required, and Family Games, South Shuswap Library, 1 to 4 p.m. See page 17 for more Unplug and Play events around the Shuswap.

The Mall at Piccadilly

OPEN 9 am - 10 pm • 7 Days a Week * Some restrictions. See store for details.

250 832-2181

WILL PICKUP!

250-864-3521


Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

South Shuswap

Friday, January 19, 2018 Page A9

Dates to Remember

Legendary country breakfast, Sunnybrae Seniors Hall, Saturday, Jan. 20, 8 to 11 a.m. pancakes, french toast, hash browns, sausage and fixings. Coffee, tea or juice. Cost $8, $4 for ages 12 and under. For info, contact Gail Burkitt at gburkittt@ gmail.com. 250-4633889. Jack Marks and special guests, live at the Sunnybrae Community Hall, Friday Jan. 26. Doors open at 7 p.m., showtime 7:30. Tickets at $15 available a: Acorn Music, Shuswap Pie Co, Hudson Vintage, Eco Treats and at the door. Sorrento Lions Club, hosts their first Valentine’s Dance on Saturday, Feb. 10, 7 p.m. to midnight at the Sorrento Memorial Hall, 1150 Passchendaele Rd., Sorrento. Tickets are $20/person and include a light supper and dancing to the music of local entertainer Al Weldon. There will be a 50/50 draw as well as door prizes. All proceeds go to the Sorrento Food Bank. Tickets available at Lighthouse Foods in

Sorrento and the Blind Bay Village Grocer in Blind Bay, or call 250675-2616. Blind Bay Blues Club,join the club for a jam session on at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 23 at the Blind Bay Hall, 2510 Blind Bay Rd. Cost is $3 for BB Hall members and $5 drop in fee. For info, contact Chris Emery at 250-675-2865. Gleneden Hall dance takes place on the first Saturday of the month, 7 to 11 p.m., 50/50 draw, door prizes. For information, call Roger at 250-832-1599. The Writer’s Nook at the South Shuswap Library is open Wednesdays, Jan. 9 and 23 from 10 a.m. to noon. For more, go to www. thethirdhouse.ca. South Shuswap Library hosts knitters and crocheters from 10 a.m. to noon on the first and third Fridays of the month. Sorrento Beach Walkers walk on the foreshore on the third Saturday of the month. For information, call Dan McKerracher at 250-319-5121. The South Shuswap Library presents Baby Talk at 10:15 a.m. Fri-

day, Jan 5. Join Health Nurse Shannon for a casual, informative gathering for children 18 months and younger with caregiver. For more information, call 250-675-4818. Shuswap Lake Estates, Boot Scootin’ Line Dancing, intermediate, Mondays, 1 to 3 p.m. beginner, Wednesdays, 10 to 11:30 p.m., and advanced, Wednesdays, 1:30 to 3 p.m.; Spongeball, every Monday, Tuesday and Friday, 9 a.m. to noon; Good Time Quilters, every 1, 3 & 5th Tuesday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Ladies Bridge, Tuesdays, 1 to 4 p.m.; Lego Club, every second Wednesday, 6:30 to 8 p.m., Ballroom Dancing, Wednesdays, 7 to 9 p.m.; Play Group, Thursdays, 9 a.m. to noon; Shuswap Pipers, Thursdays, 1 to 4 p.m.; Scrappy Quilt Chicks, Fridays 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Youth Group, Grades 5-7, Fridays, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.. Grade 8 and up, Fridays, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. For more information, contact Lori at 250-675-2523.

ONLINE SAFETY BEGINS AT HOME. Talk to your kids about staying safe on the internet.

Volunteer Computer Tutors Needed The Literacy Alliance of the Shuswap Society (LASS) wants to help seniors in Salmon Arm and area gain the computer skills needed to connect with their families and to participate safely in the computer literate world of 2018. If you are computer user you can help no need to be a computer expert! Commitment is one hour per week for 6 to 8 week sessions. Tutoring sessions run at the: Senior Citizens Drop-In Centre in Salmon Arm

Copper Island Seniors Resource Center in Blind Bay

Contact Darcy Calkins 250-463-4555 or admin@shuswapliteracy.ca

Growing connections

photo contributed

More than 60 people participate in a land lease workshop held at the Mt. Ida Hall on Saturday, Jan. 13. Hosted by the Young Agrarians and the Shuswap Food Action Co-op, the event was an opportunity for owners of agricultural land to learn about the procedures, legalities and benefits of leasing some of their land to others for farming purposes, of which there was much interest. Organizers will be following up over the next few months by helping to match young farmers to land owners over the next few months.

WE NEED YOUR HELP!

To convince the Columbia Shuswap Regional District (CSRD) and the City of Salmon Arm that the members of this community expect them to follow British Columbia Ministry of Environment LANDFILL CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE. Quote from the BC Ministry of Environment “Landfill Criteria” document: “The “Criteria” provide guidance to landfill owners and operators, Qualified Professionals and Ministry staff on environmentally sound landfilling practices and procedures that are consistent with legislated requirements and desirable environmental outcomes.” Section 3.0 Siting Criteria states: “Proper siting of a landfill site is one of the most important aspects of environmental protection.” Section 3.1 LAND USE states: “The landfill footprint must not be located within 500 m of an existing or planned sensitive land use.” “Sensitive land uses include, but are not limited to: schools, residences” etc. The CSRD has made an offer to purchase a 20 acre parcel of property adjacent to the current Salmon Arm Landfill, for the purpose of expanding the Salmon Arm landfill site. We have identified 17 residences that are 500m or less from this proposed lateral expansion of the Salmon Arm landfill site. These 17 residences all have humans living in them, men, women, children, grandchildren. There are numerous environmental, social, economic, health and safety reasons for the 500m BC Ministry of Environment recommended “buffer zone” from Municipal Solid Waste sites. We have pointed this out to CSRD and City of Salmon Arm, yet they continue to think that they don’t need to follow these “criteria.” If you believe, as we do, that CSRD and City of Salmon Arm need to follow these BC Ministry of Environment Landfill Criteria of 500m from a residence, please phone or write to the following and let them know it; CSRD Directors: Phone: 250-832-8194 Email: rmartin@csrd.bc.ca, rtalbot@csrd.bc.ca, pdemenok@csrd.bc.ca, lparker@csrd.bc.ca, kcathcart@csrd. bc.ca, lmorgan@csrd.bc.ca , kflynn@csrd.bc.ca, celiason@csrd.bc.ca, trysz@csrd.bc.ca, mmckee@csrd.bc.ca and cmoss@csrd.bc.ca City of Salmon Arm: Mayor and Council Phone: 250-803-4000 Email: ncooper@salmonarm.ca, celiason@salmonarm.ca, kflynn@salmonarm.ca, aharrison@salmonarm.ca, kjamieson@salmonarm.ca, tlavery@salmonarm.ca, lwallacerichmond@salmonarm.ca BC Minister of Environment: Honorable George Heyman ENV.Minister@gov.bc.ca The full “LANDFILL CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE” document is available on line at: https://www2.gov. bc.ca/assets/gov/environment/waste-management/garbage/landfill_criteria.pdf 4 public hearings are scheduled re: this issue Salmon Arm: Monday, January 22, 7-9 PM • Prestige Harbourfront Resort, 251 Harbourfront Dr. Sicamous: Thursday, January 25, 7-9 PM • Red Barn – 1226 Riverside Avenue Revelstoke: Monday, January 29, 7-9 PM • Community Centre – 600 Campbell Ave. Golden: Thursday, February 1 – 7-9 PM • Golden Arena Lounge – 1410 – 9th Street South. If you care about this issue, please attend one or all of these meetings and tell CSRD and City of Salmon Arm that you expect them to follow the BC Ministry of Environment “recommended practices” for “desirable environmental outcomes.” Please sign our petition at: https://www.gopetition.com/petitions/stop-csrd-city-of-salmon-arm-landfill-expansionocp-changes-and-rezoning.html Paid for by 40th Street SE Neighbourhood Alliance


Page A10 Friday, January 19, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Friday, January 19, 2018 Page A23

JANUARY 19 - 25 playing at THE GRAND 100 Hudson Avenue

CROSSWORD

JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE

Nightly 6:40PM & 9:00PM Sat-Sun Matinees 2:10PM

INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY

Nightly 6:50PM & 9:00PM Sat-Sun Matinees 2:00PM

CLUES ACROSS

1. Emperor of Russia 5. Abounding in rocks PADDINGTON 2 11. Increase in speed Nightly 6:30PM & 8:30PM Sat-Sun Matinees 2:10PM 14. Music app FOREVER MY GIRL 15. Not nice Nightly 6:40PM & 9:00PM 18. Tables (Span.) Sat-Sun Matinees 2:00PM 19. Decomposes playing at THE CLASSIC 360 Alexander Street 21. __ student: learns Shuswap Film Society healing POP AYE 23. Nursemaid Saturday, Jan. 20th, 5:00PM 24. Joke-teller Bolshoi Ballet 28. Male parent 3 BILLBOARDS outside ROMEO & JULIET 29. Group of countries (abbr.) EBBING, MISSOURI Sunday, Jan. 21st, 1:00PM Nightly 7:30PM 30. “Rambling Rose” actor Lukas 32. Midway between south and southwest 33. Cartoon Network (abbr.) 35. Peacock network 36. Principal ethnic group of China 39. Made of fermented honey and water Shuswap Community Foundation, in partnership withofthe 41. surprise City of Salmon Arm, provides a permanentExclamation place for your Evaluates Walkway. skill or memorable moments at the McGuire Lake42.Memorial knowledge swap Community Foundation, in partnership Purchase a brick onwith thethe Memorial44. Walkway Stage in to ecological of Salmon Arm, provides a permanent place for your able moments at the McGuire Lake Memorial Walkway. succession  Shuswap Welcome a Foundation, child thethe Recognize a volunteer with ShuswapCommunity Community Foundation,ininpartnership partnership with group of SE Asia City of Salmon aWalkway your Purchase abrick theArm, Memorial toplaceforfor City ofon Salmon Arm,provides provides apermanent permanentplace your Congratulate a grad  Thank46. anEthnic employee memorable Walkway. memorable moments momentsatatthe theMcGuire McGuireLake LakeMemorial Memorial Walkway. Not small lcome a child brick Recognize a volunteer  Remember aononbeloved  Mark47. a business milestone Purchaseaabrick theMemorial MemorialWalkway Walkway Purchase the toto 49. A cat is one ngratulate a  grad  Thank an employee Welcome child an anniversary Recognizea volunteer a volunteer Celebrate  Commemorate an event  Welcome aachild Recognize member a beloved  Mark abusiness milestone 52. Broken piece Congratulateaagrad grad Thank Thankananemployee employee  Congratulate Rememberaabeloved Marka abusiness business milestone ebrate an anniversary deductible Commemorate an event  Remember Mark 56.permanent French president With a taxbeloved donation ofmilestone $1,500, this gesture  Celebrate Celebrate an anniversary  Commemorate an event anaanniversary  Commemorate an event ones and special moments. creates lasting legacy for your loved 58. Artist’s workroom h a tax deductibleWith donation of $1,500, this permanent gesture a tax deductible donation of $1,500, this permanent gesture With a tax deductible donation of $1,500, thisand permanent gesture tes a lasting legacy for loved ones and special moments. creates ayour lasting legacy for your loved ones special moments. 60. Ability to apply www.shuswapfoundation.ca creates a lasting legacy for your loved ones and special moments. www.shuswapfoundation.ca www.shuswapfoundation.ca knowledge and skills Office: 250-832-5428 info@shuswapfoundation.ca www.shuswapfoundation.ca Office: 250-832-5428 info@shuswapfoundation.ca ffice: 250-832-5428 info@shuswapfoundation.ca Office: 250-832-5428 info@shuswapfoundation.ca 62. Visually stunning 63. Ancient region south of Dead Sea

Dec. 22-Jan. 20

Capricorn Jan. 21-Feb. 18

AQUARIUS

Aquarius

Find more time to explore an important relationship, Aquarius. Don’t overlook the importance of date night. Make time for this important person even if it requires sacrifices.

Feb. 19-Mar. 20

PISCES

Mar. 21-Apr. 20

Aries

Apr. 21-May 21

Taurus

CLUES DOWN

1. Used to pour beer 2. Con game 3. Skin disorder 4. Communists (slang) 5. Subjects to hostility 6. A major division of geological time 7. Hitting statistic (abbr.) 8. British thermal unit 9. Influential envoy to Woodrow Wilson 10. Fits on neck of animal 12. Fertile soil 13. Type of battery 16. Khoikhoin peoples 17. Consist of two parts 20. Small group of trees 22. Execute or perform 25. Millihenry 26. 007’s creator 27. Associated with esoteric doctrine

29. Electronic countermeasures 31. Schenectady County Airport 34. No (Scottish) 36. Position of leadership 37. Statement 38. Raccoons belong to this genus 40. One who diagnoses 43. True mosses 45. Blood type 48. Albanian 50. Emergency response notification system 51. College reservists 53. Away from wind 54. Tough outer layer 55. Art __, around 1920 57. Born of 58. The greatest of all time 59. Georgia rockers 61. Natural logarithm

If you would like to advertise your business here, please call 250-832-2131.

CAPRICORN

Take certain things with a grain of salt, Capricorn. Until you can flush out the facts, there is no point in worrying or passing judgement. Be patient and things will come to light.

Pisces

WORD SCRAMBLE

PUZZLE NO. CW182310

HOROSCOPES

CRYPTO FUN

Aries, if a special opportunity or circumstance comes your way, jump at the chance to be a part of it. Such opportunities might not come along too often, so enjoy the ride.

TAURUS

Taurus, a newfound devotion to exercise may improve your life in many different ways. If you have been vacillating on whether or not to embrace a new lifestyle, just do it.

Gemini

An unexpected situation has put you out of your element, Gemini. For now you can simply go with the flow and see how things work out. Don’t let this get the better of you.

June 22- July 22

CANCER

Cancer

Cancer, dabbling in a few different projects may give you a unique perspective and the inspiration to take things in a new direction. Keep putting out those feelers.

July 23-Aug. 23

LEO

Leo

Leo, you have just about sold one of your ideas and now it’s just a matter of being patient. Soon the results will support your vision, and you can enjoy the fruits of your labors.

Aug. 24-Sept. 22

VIRGO

Virgo

Let other people’s perceptions roll off you like water off of a duck’s back, Virgo. To get the full picture, you need to immerse yourself and make up your own mind.

Sept. 23-Oct. 23

LIBRA

Oct. 24-Nov. 22

SCORPIO

Nov. 23-Dec. 21

SAGITTARIUS

Sagittarius

Top of the Hill Salmon Arm 250-832-9991

ARIES

May 22-June 21

Scorpio

Daily Features Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner Come Celebrate our New Menu!

Pisces, do something unexpected this week and watch as those around you are inspired by your willingness to try new things.

GEMINI

Libra

WORD SEARCH

ABDOMINAL ABDUCTION AGONIST ANAEROBIC ATROPHY BALANCE BAR BENCHES BODYBUILDING BULK BURN CALORIES CHINNING CLEAN COMPOSITION CRUNCHES DEFINITION DELTOIDS

ENDURANCE EXTENSION GLUTEALS HYDRATE INTENSITY ISOLATION ISOMETRIC MUSCLES OBLIQUES REPETITIONS RESISTANCE SETS SPOTTER TRAINER TRAINING WEIGHT WORKOUT

For all your Advertising Needs... TAMMY HOWKINS Advertising Sales

250.832.2131 tammy@saobserver.net

SUDOKU

Libra, take a few steps back and think about whether or not a new approach is needed regarding a specific situation. Thinking logically instead of emotionally may help. Scorpio, take a day to recharge your batteries if you feel your energy stores are running low. You may not need an extended vacation to do so, just a day to relax. Sagittarius, looking within yourself can help you get a grasp on your situation and your future. Make the most of this introspection and use it as a catalyst for positive change.

WS181300

PUZZLE NO. SU181170


Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Viewpoint

Friday, January 19, 2018 Page A11

Province’s public school ‘crisis’ doesn’t exist BC VIEWS Tom Fletcher As school districts around B.C. hire and train every qualified teacher they can find to fill an allegedly drastic shortage, the education ministry has put out the latest low-key update showing that the actual performance of the B.C. school system has no relationship to the hysterical political and media narrative that surrounds it.

The latest data released by the ministry show the slow but steady improvement in high school completion rates is continuing. The average for B.C.’s 60 school districts reached 84 per cent last year, rising by more than five per cent in the past 10 years. The improvement for students designated as having special needs is

even more impressive. High school completion within six years for special needs students was up 2.4 per cent last year alone, and up 25 per cent in the past decade. Similar results have come in for Indigenous students, closing the gap between those groups and the general student population. Note that the latest high school completion results are for the 2016-17 school year, before the B.C. government began pouring money in to hire 3,500 new teachers to meet the terms

Your Local Business Professional Directory

be seen. Perhaps the school completion rates will increase even faster, or the already impressive gains in Indigenous students making it to Grade 12 will accelerate. (This seems unlikely, since that rate is almost 90 per cent now.) Perhaps B.C.’s already world-leading academic performance will improve, surpassing even the famously rigorous schools of Japan. Testing will continue to determine this. One of Premier John Horgan’s post-election statements on the sub-

MINUTE MUFFLER & MAINTENANCE

Mufflers Brakes Shocks Complete Automotive Repairs

Mon.-Fri. 8:30-5:00

ARRO

Wood Heat Services

• Fully Insured • Chimney Sweep • Stove Installs & Maintenance • WETT Inspections Call Robert Babakaiff 250-803-2168 Salmon Arm

ject was to carry on the long assault on the tests of student performance in B.C.’s elementary schools. The Foundation Skills Assessment (FSA) has been a target of the BCTF since its inception, which is easier to understand when you know the annual results can be used to track individual teacher performance as student cohorts move from grade to grade.

just click www.saobserver.net

Com mu n ity!

CHIMNEY

Bart’s

250-832-8064

Canada ruling in favour of the Hospital Employees’ Union. Essentially, in 2007 the high court invented a constitutional right to collective bargaining, overturning decades of case law. It ruled that the B.C. government had failed to meet its new standard, in legislative action that occurred five years before this judge-made standard was created. So what will be the effect of these 3,500 new teachers, many in non-classroom roles such as librarians? That remains to

H i re Lo c al • Support ou r

AUTOMOTIVE

DISPOSAL

Winkler Ph. 250.832.6295 Disposal Systems 2014 info@winklerdisposal.com 4211 Auto Road SE Salmon Arm BC

locally owned and operated

Check Engine light on?

We have the equipment & expertise to accurately identify & repair the cause of your vehicle trouble

WOOD & PELLET STOVE SALES

BEST PRICES • Certified chimney sweeping • W.E.T.T. Certified Inspections • 25 years Experience • Installations • Chimney Liners & Repairs 250.833.6256

CUSTOM WOODWORKING centerpointauto.ca

#2 - 320 3rd Ave. SW • 250-833-0132

42nd Street SW Ben’s Fischer’s Towing Funeral Home

Trans Canada Highway

4130 - 1st Avenue SW

SHUSWAP MILLWORK & FINISHING

250-832-8947

Shop Local Hire Local Support our Community!

EXCAVATING DAN DEGLAN EXCAVATING Professionally Beautifying Properties for Over 27 Years. • Rock Walls • Utility Services • Site Prep • Terracing • Drainage • Pools 250-832-0707

FARM SERVICES

5500 48th Ave. SE, Unit #3

Mark Pennell owner

www.winklerdisposal.com

981 - 16th Street N.E., Salmon Arm V1E 2V2

(Next to Natural Choice Instore Garden Centre)

250-832-9556

Refuse containers to 40 cu. yd. Water delivery - potable & bulk • Spray bar Compacting units • Firewood sales • Sea cans • Demolition

www.dandeglan.com

• Stairs • Custom Doors • Furniture • Mouldings • Kitchens

• ICBC Repairs • Glass Replacement • Painting • Sand Blasting • Private Insurance Repairs • Frame Straightening 1st Ave. SW

AT YOUR SERVICE

Sh op Lo c al

of a Supreme Court of Canada decision last year. Was this decade-long court battle about improving performance, or hours available for one-on-one instruction time with students, or individual learning plans, or integrating special needs? No, it was not. None of that is mentioned in the reams of legalese produced by three levels of courts. Instead, it was a narrowly focused attack by the B.C. Teachers’ Federation to capitalize on an earlier Supreme Court of

shuswapmillwork.bc.ca

Advertise in our Business Directory and receive both

& 250-832-2131

REIMER’S FARM SERVICE LTD.

We Deliver

• Bark Mulch • Shavings • Sawdust

250-838-0111 or 1-855-737-0110


Page A12 Friday, January 19, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Community

www.saobserver.net

Poetry preserves indigenous experiences Barb Brouwer Salmon Arm Observer

A small group of people celebrated a significant event at the District Education Support Centre last week. A powerful book of “historical collage poetry” created by School District #83 Storefront School students was launched on Jan. 9. The book, The Drums of Hope: Knowledge Keepers’ Words, is the culmination of a collaboration between former teacher and published B.C. poet Wendy Morton, Indigenous elders and students. The project originated in 2008 when Morton

was commissioned by the Alberni Valley Museum to write poems from archival photos and journals for display in the museum. She soon realized an entire First Nations population was being ignored and began interviewing Indigenous people, learning about their rich culture and the tragedy of the residential school experience. That segued into Elder Project books, since produced in several B.C. schools and a conversation last year with Irene Laboucane, district principal Aboriginal education, who fully supported

the project. Morton brought her heart and the project to the school district in October. On the first of two days, Storefront students learned the mechanics of writing what Morton calls “collage poetry,” says Mishel Quaal, Indigenous education resource teacher. Students were given a selection of magnetized words and photos and asked to combine what they were seeing into a sentence. On the second day, 13 local knowledge keepers were paired with 10 students, who were encouraged to hear

BarB Brouwer photo

SD83 District Principal of Aboriginal Education Irene LaBoucane (left), Neskonlith elder Louis Thomas and poet Wendy Morton look at one of the books created through the Elder Project: A Way Toward Knowledge. project was powerful students,” she said. “I for both elders and hope it’s the beginning, students. that we keep bringing “It was a magical in the knowledge keepexperience and incred- ers and having the kids ibly powerful for the share the stories.”

H i re Lo c al • Support ou r

HYDRO EXCAVATING 24 Hour Service Rob Stunzi cell: 250-253-2829

Salmon Arm Fireplace is your local source for “all things FIRE”. Fireplaces, BBQ’s, Smokers, Firepits and more! Titus and Graham bring over 25 years of fireplace and BBQ experience to help you with your purchase, project or problem. We source our products from Canadian manufacturers and suppliers to facilitate installations and repairs and with over 40 units on display in our showroom, you can be sure to find the fire-feature or BBQ you want.

• Utility locating - Hydro/gas/water/fibre optics • Catch basins/sumps/drains • Line flushing (storm/sani/culverts) • Hot Water Boiler • Slot trenching • Street flushing/Lot washing

www.bigironhydrovac.ca OVERHEAD DOOR

Com mu n ity!

PLUMBING

J’s PumPs & Plumbing • water systems • water well testing • crane for pump pulling • plumbing • service work • BC Certified Pump Installer

Call Jerry Jones Ph: 832-7922

• Fax: 832-7699

BEST SERVICE!

Need to repair that old BBQ? We offer a wide range of OEM and after-market replacement BBQ parts to get you cookin’ again! And we’ll even do the work. Salmon Arm Fireplace – We’re here to help!

Call Brad Reimer

250-253-2244 ultimateenclosures@gmail.com

SALES-INSTALLATION-SERVICE

PAINTING www.trustedpros.ca

GAS • WOOD • PELLET

WETT CERTIFIED Graham Dudfield

Your Local Business Professional Directory

gleaned many values and morals from his Scottish grandmother and Métis grandfather. Sayers was an Aboriginal education worker in the district for more than 20 years. “They’d never heard our stories; 99 per cent knew only of teepees and totem poles,” he said, noting his pride and pleasure in seeing the growing importance placed on Indigenous stories, language and culture in the curriculum. Dianne Balance, School District #83 director of instruction and Storefront School principal, noted the

STAFF & INSTALLERS

Ave SW Salmon Arm • 250-804-0333

PET SITTING

Claws ‘n’ Paws Pet Sits ‘n’ Walks

Serving Salmon Arm and area

250-253-SITS (7487) Patrice Le Blanc

PET SITTER AND DOG WALKER

Walks, dog sitting right in our home, pet taxi, visits to your home, pet waste clean-up. 4650 72 Ave. NE, P.O. Box 535, Canoe, BC V0E 1K0 clawsnpawspet@mail.com

Your German Painter

-

M More than 35 as Experience in Years te of Painting & Wall kinds allpaper hanging

r

AT YOUR SERVICE

Sh op Lo c al

and see the poetry in the elders’ stories, adds Quaal. The result is a selection of moving poems. Accompanied by photos of the elders and students, several of the poems speak to the joy of the elders’ early days among their own people and the terror, punishment and eventual brokenness that resulted from their residential school experiences. Among the knowledge keepers was John Sayers, whose poem written by Eiton Davila details how he went to 11 schools before Grade 3, never learned to read or write, but

Phone: Cell:

250 675-0025 778-220-2776

Norbert Lazarus • Email: norbertlazarus@gmail.com

Shop Local Hire Local Support our Community!

TAPPEN | SORRENTO | CHASE Gerry Thomson is the owner of Gerry’s Plumbing & Heating and has been in this business for over 40 years. His goal is to more than satisfy his customers’ expectations.

Here are just a few of the reasons homeowners rely on

GERRY’S Plumbing & Heating

1. 100% Customer Satisfaction Guarantee 2. Phones staffed 24/7 3. Scheduled appointments 4. No invoice shock: Upfront price before the work starts 5. Fully stocked Truck 6. Very clean gentleman plumber Gerry Thomson

250-463-5000


Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Business

Friday, January 19, 2018 Page A13

Mayor to give state of the city address BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT Leah Blain Mayor Nancy Cooper will be the guest speaker at the January Salmon Arm Chamber of Commerce luncheon and give the annual State of the City Address. The mayor will discuss 2017 achievements and her vision for Salmon Arm in 2018. Cost is $25 per person. It takes place Wednesday, January 24 at Comfort Inn & Suites. Seating is limited, RSVP as soon as possible to admin@sachamber.bc.ca or call 250-832-6247.

Try for a bird’s eye view The New Balmoral Store is offering a unique exciting contest. Customers who spend $50 or more at the new Balmoral store can enter a chance to win a local sight seeking tour over Blind Bay. The winner can choose from three planes and have one to two people as guests. Owner Jordie Weins, who has over 25 years experience as a pilot, will be taking up the lucky winner up in the

air to tour Blind Bay. The store is located at 3107 Trans-Canada Highway by Sorrento. To contact them phone 250-835-4335 or visit their Facebook page, the New Balmoral Store.

Launch-aPreneur Enactus will host a a Launch-a-Preneur start up weekend at the newly established Innovation Centre on February 17 and 18 from 9 am - 5 pm. Registration is $20 and includes lunch on Saturday and dinner on Sunday. There will be five workshops focusing on the business model canvas from the existing Shuswap Launch-aPreneur business development program. This

weekend accelerator program is for participants that have not already established an existing business.

Milestone The Great Canadian Oil Change is celebrating six and a half years in Salmon Arm, and over 50,000 vehicles serviced, by hosting a customer appreciation day this Saturday, January 20. Heather and Wade are thanking all of their loyal local customers by offering 10 per cent off all day, and a coupon for 10 per cent off services good until the end of February. In addition, there will be prizes, giveaways, goodie bags, donuts and more! For more

information contact them at (250) 832-1040.

Radon test The Salmon Arm Chamber of Commerce is taking the Radon Workplace Challenge and they’re encouraging all Chamber members to do the same. Interested workplaces are invited to take the pledge and participate in the challenge by sharing information about radon and encouraging their employees and networks to take action and test for radon. All participating workplaces will receive educational materials and two radon test kits at no cost. Radon is an odorless, naturally occur-

ring radioactive gas that comes from the ground. Radon can enter any home or workplace through openings where the building is in contact with the ground. Exposure to high radon levels is the leading cause of lung cancer in non-smokers. The only way to know how much radon is indoors is to test for it. If the radon level is found to be high, it’s easy to fix. The best time to start a radon test is during the colder months of the year. To find out more information and register your workplace for the Radon Workplace Challenge, please visit www.RadonWorkplaceChallenge.ca or contact: Connie

ChoyProgram Manager at cchoy@scoutenvironmental.com

Youth-worker subsidies Employers can apply for wage-subsidies for secondary and post-secondary students until February 2. The Canada Summer Jobs (CSJ), sponsored by the federal government, is available to small businesses, not-for-profit employers, public sectors, and faith-based organizations that provide quality jobs for students. For more go to the Government of Canada website and see the Canada Summer Jobs page. Other programs include: Canada BC Job Grant and Get Youth Working.

SICAMOUS Business Directory Bill Walker

CERTIFIED TREE ASSESSOR

Serving Sicamous & the Shuswap FULLY INSURED, REFERENCES

TREE SERVICE We Cut Trees and More!! Stump Grinder - Bobcat - Excavator Residential & Commercial Properties 250-836-4147

All Better at Home services are delivered by a mixture of trained volunteers, vetted professional contractors, employees and staff. Wysteria Sholtz is our Regional Coordinator, Carol MacLean-Angus is our North Shuswap Outreach Coordinator, Heather O’Brien is our South Shuswap Outreach Coordinator and Tracey Lehr is our Enderby Outreach Coordinator. Better at Home is located at 1214 Shuswap Avenue in Sicamous. To contact them call Central Intake at 250253-2749

Advertise in the Sicamous Business Directory & your ad runs in the Eagle Valley News and Shuswap Market News. For information call Jeff 250-832-2131 or cell 250-833-9120 • jeff.morrison@saobserver.net.

call for more info 250-836-0004

Shuswap Better at Home “A little extra help for seniors to remain confidently in their own homes”

Housekeeping • Yardwork • Transportation Home Repair • Snow Shoveling Friendly Visiting • Grocery Shopping Staff, Volunteers and Contractors have been carefully vetted and trained for your security SBAH Central Intake (250)253-2749 Wysteria Sholtz

Need Help? KEYSTROKE COMPUTER SERVICE

250-836-5300

MALMAR MARKET

• Repairs & Sales • Upgrades & Accessories • Virus and Malware Removal

John Schlosar • Serving A+ Certified Sicamous computer@cablelan.net since 2002

Markets

Firewood For Sale Fir Fire wood For sale

Seniors Program

Better At Home is a program that helps seniors with day-to-day tasks by coordinating simple, non-medical services so that they can continue to live independently in their own homes and remain connected to their communities. Serving the communities and rural areas, including First Nations communities, within the Columbia Shuswap Regional District area, as well as Enderby and surrounding area. Shuswap Better at Home is managed by the Eagle Valley Community Support Society.

Computer Service

Sawmills

TREE SERVICES

Profile of the week: Shuswap Better At Home

Gas & Convenience Store Fresh Baked Goods, Gifts & Ice

• We now carry • Sure Crop Feed and Wood Pellets for pellet stoves with competitive prices

Open 7 days a week 250-836-2928 Trans Canada Hwy, Malakwa, BC

For Eagle Valley News advertising information call 250-832-2131 or email jeff.morrison@saobserver.net


Page A14 Friday, January 19, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Community

bread price fixing means a payout back to consumers HealtHy bites Serena Caner Are you going to redeem your $25 Loblaws Gift card? With all the gift cards flying around, it’s a good month to be out of money for food. Grocery giant Loblaws, who run a number of grocery stores including No

PRIZE INCLUDES: • Round-trip air travel for two on Alaska Airlines • THE MODERN HONOLULU 5 nights in an Ocean View room Daily breakfast for two • 6-day Rental Car from Enterprise

Celebrating 10 years in the Islands, Alaska offers low fares and the most nonstop flights to Hawai‘i from the West Coast. Learn more at alaskaair.com.

• Ko Olina Oahu Circle Island Experience tour by helicopter for two • Twin Islands Guided Kayak Tour for two with Kailua Beach Adventures • Two Adult Passes to Hawaii’s Finest Canoe Sailing Adventure Tour with Holokino Hawaii

Your complete source for island travel.

RULES:For complete contest details visit Hawaii.com. No purchase necessary. Must be 21+ years old to enter. Entries accepted at Hawaii.com through Jan 31, 2018, at 11:59 PM HST. Multiple participants are not permitted to share the same email address. Any use of robotic, repetitive, automatic, programmed or similar entry methods or agents will void all entries by you. Employees (and their immediate families) of Oahu Publications, Inc. (Hawaii.com) and all participating sponsors are not eligible. Winner will be responsible for all taxes applicable to the total value of the prize(s) received. Prize(s) are non-transferable, not redeemable for cash and must not be used for resale. Prize(s) are for travel, accommodations, and tickets during specified dates only. Winner will refer to the prize vouchers for complete details, terms, and restrictions. If the winner has any issues with the prize(s) or is not able to redeem the prize(s) as specified they must forfeit the prize(s) and another winner will be drawn. Changes or extensions will not be made by Hawaii.com. Winner authorizes OPI to use their name and likeness for promotion at no additional compensation. Winner will be contacted. No phone calls, please.

Need a newer truck? Check out the Classifieds! & 250-832-2131

Frills and the Real Canadian Superstore, admitted to participating in a bread price-fixing arrangement from 2001 until 2015. Essentially, some of the biggest companies that make or sell bread conspired together to increase prices. Last week, registration opened for a free $25 gift card, but it requires consumers to waive their rights to the first $25 of any future financial settlement that may arise. While several class action lawsuits have started and the Competition Bureau investigation continues, we are left wondering what other

retailers may have been involved or what other prices have been fixed. The troubling reality of this event is that our food supply is being controlled by fewer and fewer sources. The five largest food retailers in Canada — Loblaws, Sobeys, Metro, Walmart and Costco —control about 80 per cent of the market. This problem is being replicated on the shelves, where only 10 companies control almost every large food and beverage brand in the world: Nestle, Pepsi-Co, Coca-cola, Unilever, Danone, GeneralMills, Kelloggs, Mars, Associated British Foods, Mondelez. When so few companies have control over all the food, the potential for corruption and price

control is huge. One solution to reclaiming food sovereignty is to walk away from the industrial food system. Whether we like it or not, grocery shopping has become a highly political act, and you need to put your money towards a food system that you trust. We hope to discover that price fixing is not common practice in our trusted food chains. However, the best way to get your point across is not by accepting bribes, but by spending your food dollars elsewhere, such as local, independent grocery stores and farmer’s markets. -Serena Caner is a registered dietitian who works at Shuswap Lake General Hospital.

Your Black Press Okanagan Leadership Team Dave Hamilton

President, BC Interior South

Ian Jensen

Dave will oversee the operations of nine newspapers and related digital platforms in his role as President of the BC Interior South Division, including the Kelowna Capital News, Vernon Morning Star, Salmon Arm Observer, Sicamous Eagle Valley News, Lake Country Calendar, Summerland Review, Penticton Western News, Keremeos Review and Princeton Similkameen Spotlight. Dave will also be responsible for the Vernon Press Centre and the mailroom operations in the Okanagan market, plus he will oversee three newspapers on North Vancouver Island including the North Island Gazette, Campbell River Mirror, and Comox Valley Record. Dave has worked with Black Press since 2007 beginning his career in sales at the Comox Valley Record, then taking on multiple Black Press Publisher and Group Publisher roles including the Fernie Free Press, Invermere Valley Echo, Golden Star, Campbell River Mirror, Comox Valley Record, Comox Valley Echo and the North Island Gazette. Dave is pleased to take on his expanded role with Black Press and looks forward to working with the Okanagan and North Island communities.

Ian started his newspaper career in 1985 at the Nanaimo Daily Free Press as a Circulation Representative. In 1987 he became the Circulation Manager of the Prince Albert Daily Herald and held the same positions at the Vernon Daily News, Prince George Citizen and also had a stop at the Victoria Times Colonist. In 2003, Ian was promoted to Publisher of the Prince Albert Daily Herald and in the spring of 2012 moved to Vernon to become publisher of the Vernon Morning Star. Ian will oversee the Distribution and Manufacturing teams of nine newspapers in his role as Director of Distribution and Manufacturing Operations, BC Interior South, including the Kelowna Capital News, Vernon Morning Star, Salmon Arm Observer, Sicamous Eagle Valley News, Lake Country Calendar, Summerland Review, Penticton Western News, Keremeos Review and Princeton Similkameen Spotlight.

Karen Hill

Director of Sales, BC Interior South

In October of 1989 Karen began her career in the classified department at the Kelowna Capital News. Most of her tenure in Kelowna was spent in the accounting department where she worked her way to Group Controller for the Interior with Lower Mainland Publishing and then West Partners Publishing when they bought the newspaper in 2001. In 2003 Black Press purchased the Capital News and Karen integrated into the accounting department working with the President on all the Southern divisions until she took on the position of Publisher at the Vernon Morning Star in 2006. In September 2010 she made her way back to Kelowna as Publisher of the Capital News and Lake Country Calendar as well as our specialty products Food & Wine Trails and Grapes to Wine. Karen will oversee the sales, creative teams and the advertising support teams of nine newspapers and related digital platforms in her role as Director of Sales of the BC Interior South Division, including the Kelowna Capital News, Vernon Morning Star, Salmon Arm Observer, Sicamous Eagle Valley News, Lake Country Calendar, Summerland Review, Penticton Western News, Keremeos Review and Princeton Similkameen Spotlight.

Director of Distribution and Manufacturing Operations, BC Interior South

www.blackpress.ca


$

Arts & Events

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

77

! SALE EXTENDED Friday, January 19, 2018 Page A15

Vernon

Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram

THE FUN STORE

Elephant’s performance makes movie

LIQUIDATION

JOANNE SARGENT

SALE!!

Cinemaphile In his midlife, Thana, a once pre-eminent Bangkok architect, finds himself being squeezed out by the new young guns in his office. Questioning his existence, and equally disillusioned with his home life, he mindlessly wanders the streets of his city looking for direction or meaning. In a chance encounter, he stumbles upon his childhood friend, the elephant Pop Aye. Seeing the forsaken elephant as a kindred spirit, Thana buys Pop Aye from his handler and decides to take him to their childhood home in the country 300 miles away. Travelling with his elephant makes for an interesting road trip as they make their way from bustling Bangkok into the backroads of

rural Thailand. No longer having a place in the world as it changes around you is true of both Thana and his elephant and the many characters they meet on their travels. Karmic connections, unforeseen circumstances, and a colourful cast of human misfits including police officers, a transgender sex worker and a lonely transient help Thana reclaim a portion of his wounded pride. As he makes his way home to his village, we see him grow into a different man, one more at ease with the disappointments of his life. Pop Aye is a heartwarming story about going home and making peace with the world. The performances by mostly amateur ac-

25 CUSTOM PICS @ WWW.VERNONDODGE.COM

2014 RAM 1500 SLT 4X4 Back Up Camera Eco Diesel

PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

Pop Aye plays at the Salmar Classic Saturday, Jan. 20 at 5 p.m. It is rated 14A. tors are authentic, but, make no mistake, the elephant is the star of this film, as the camera captures his every nuance and emotion. Roger Ebert says the elephant is worth the price of admission.

Pop Aye was written and directed by Singaporean Kirsten Tan and was the first film from Singapore selected to the Sundance Film Festival where it won the screen writing award and a special

jury prize. It was also selected as Singapore’s entry for Foreign Language Oscar although it wasn’t short-listed. Playing at the Salmar Classic Saturday, Jan. 20 at 5 p.m. It is rated 14A.

34,777

$

170561A

2016 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING Winter & Summer Tires Loaded WAS

25,995

$

LIQUID SALE!

23,777

$

P6528

Crew Only 100 Kms WAS

24,995

$

LIQUID SALE!

22,777

$

P6497A

2009 DODGE DAKOTA CREW SXT 4X4 Auto Only 86 Kms WAS

17,995

$

with 18-inch works no idea what to expect with an open exhibition that anyone can enter, only that with a precise format, we can be creative in how we group the works,” says Director/Curator Tracey Kutschker. Each year, the art gallery offers an opportunity for artists to experiment, challenge themselves and perhaps try something completely different. Last year, the Red & White Do-It exhibition saw 107 artists participate, with about 25 per cent of them being first-time exhibitors. The 18 exhibition will run from Jan. 20 to Feb. 24. Gallery hours are Tuesday to Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is by donation. Coffee Break and Artist Talk is on Thursday, Feb. 15 beginning at 2 p.m.

LIQUID SALE!

2010 FORD F-150 XLT 4X4

Gallery flooded Salmon Arm Art Gallery is presenting another open exhibition opportunity for creative people in the visual arts. To launch the 2018 year, the exhibition “18” will feature all media in the dimensions of 18x18 inches or 18x18x18 inches. Artists of all media have been creating their 18-inch works for the past few months and delivery day saw a total of 231 works of art submitted. Now gallery staff will be frantically hanging the paintings in preparation for the show’s opening Friday, Jan. 19 at 7 p.m. The opening reception will feature live music, refreshments and admission is by donation. “The exhibition will be installed like a gigantic pixelated image, with works right next to each other. We have

WAS

36,995

$

LIQUID SALE!

14,777

$

A1136A

2007 LEXUS RX 350 Only 156 Kms Loaded WAS

17,995

$

LIQUID SALE!

14,777

$

170443A

2012 RAM 1500 ST

Start the conversation today Download our guide at chartwell.com/guide CHARTWELL RIDGEPOINTE 1789 Primrose Court Kamloops • 778-376-2003 CHARTWELL.COM

Auto A/C WAS

16,995

$

LIQUID SALE!

13,777

$

170594B

2008 FORD RANGER XL 5 Spd. Only 131 Kms WAS

10,995

$

LIQUID SALE!

8 777

$ ,

Vernon

Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram

180167A

250-545-2261 DLR #5204

4607 27 STREET

WWW.VERNONDODGE.COM All prices $495 documentation fee and taxes. *On approved credit.


Page A16 Friday, January 19, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Thanks a million, B.C. One million homes and businesses are now using FortisBC’s natural gas. And they’re also saving money: natural gas is about one third the cost of electricity for space heating.* Thanks B.C. — we’re proud to be serving all of you. fortisbc.com/naturalgas.

*Based on FortisBC and BC Hydro rates as of January 2018. fortisbc.com/rates

FortisBC uses the FortisBC name and logo under license from Fortis Inc. (17-306.2 12/2017)

www.saobserver.net


Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Unplug and

Friday, January 19, 2018 Page A17

Family Literacy Week

January 20 to 27, 2018 a

.c y c a r e t li p a w s u h s : visit s il a t e d Week Literacy Family t n e v e ll u f For All Week

Winter Fun Play in the Park

StrongStart Fun Unplug & Play Activities

Readers Theatre (Mo Willems)

“Jam the GM” Children’s Book Drive

Salmon Arm Early Years Fair

Salmon Arm Toddler Storytime

Preschool Storytime

Enderby Family Skate

Bubble Wonders

Enderby Youth (ages 8-11) Shinny

Salmon Arm Family Fitness

> SORRENTO BLIND BAY PARK 4PM - 5:30PM

> SALMON ARM GM and PICCADILLY MALL > SICAMOUS HEALTH UNIT, ARENA & RESOURCE CENTRE > ENDERBY LIBRARY BRANCH > SOUTH SHUSWAP LIBRARY BRANCH

Bring a Book to Work Week

> DISTRICT EDUCATION SUPPORT CENTRE 4:30PM - 6:30PM

Tuesday, January 23 Preschool Storytime

> ALL COMMUNITIES

> ARMSTRONG LIBRARY BRANCH 10:30AM

Drop-In Story Walk™

Sicamous Creating Music

> ARMSTRONG VISITOR CENTRE

> SICAMOUS LIBRARY BRANCH 2:30PM - 3:30PM

Saturday, January 20

Enderby Puzzles & Board Games

Armstrong Have Fun With Dance

Sicamous Crazy Hat Skate

> ENDERBY LIBRARY BRANCH 2:30PM

> FALKLAND ELEMENTARY 10AM

> SALMON ARM LIBRARY BRANCH 10:30AM > ENDERBY ARENA 11:15PM - 12:15PM > ENDERBY ARENA 2:30PM - 3:30PM

Skating and Books with the ‘Backs > SHAW CENTRE 2:45PM - 4:15PM

Salmon Arm S.T.E.A.M Adventures > SALMON ARM LIBRARY BRANCH 3PM

Bubble Wonders

> SOUTH SHUSWAP LIBRARY BRANCH 3PM

Enderby Youth Shinny

> SICAMOUS LIBRARY BRANCH 2:30PM - 3:30PM > ARMSTRONG LIBRARY BRANCH 6PM > SALMON ARM LIBRARY BRANCH 6PM > HILLCREST SCHOOL 6:45PM - 7:30PM

Saturday, January 27 Steam Punk Art

> 9:30AM - 12NOON Arts Council FACES lower Carlin Hall 10+ years old, pre-registration required.

Ozobots & Code & Go

> ENDERBY ARENA 3:30PM - 4:45PM

> ENDERBY BRANCH LIBRARY 10:30AM - 12NOON Pre-registeration required.

Under the Lights Family Snowshoe Night

“Art of Books” Project at Family Saturdays

> ARMSTRONG DANCE ACADEMY >CREATIVE MOVEMENT (AGES 3-4) 9:30AM - 10AM >PRE-BALLET (AGES 5-6) 10AM - 10:30AM >DANCE SAMPLER (AGES 7-8) 10:30AM - 11:15AM >DANCE SAMPLER (AGES 9-12) 11:15AM - 12NOON Pre-registration required, contact Armstrong Dance Academy at 250-5460308.

> OUTDOOR RINK AT THE HUB 2:30PM - 3:30PM

Sicamous Family Paint Night

> LITTLE MOUNTAIN SPORTS FIELDS 5PM - 7PM Bring snowshoes and headlamps if you have them. Some snowshoes will be available.

Steam Punk Art

Carlin Winter Party

Friday, January 26

Snowflake Craft

Enderby Magic Show with Leif David

Armstrong Recharge & Reconnect Brain Gym & Physical Literacy Fun Enderby Family Dance PL3Y

> SOUTH SHUSWAP LIBRARY BRANCH 1PM - 4PM

Sicamous Parents & Tots Snow Play Day

> SALMON ARM LIBRARY BRANCH 3:30PM

> 9:30AM - 12NOON Arts Council FACES lower Carlin Hall 6 - 10 years old. Pre-registration required.

Storytime Unplugged

> ENDERBY LIBRARY BRANCH 10:30AM

Enderby Family Skate

> ENDERBY ARENA 3:30PM - 4:30PM

Magic Show with Leif David

> SALMON ARM LIBRARY BRANCH 4PM > 217 FINLAYSON ST. (KIDS CLUB) 5:30PM > CARLIN ELEMENTARY-MIDDLE SCHOOL 6PM - 7:30PM Sledding if there’s snow! > ENDERBY MV BEATTIE GYM 6:30PM

Goldieblox

Wednesday, January 24

> SICAMOUS LIBRARY BRANCH 1PM - 2PM

Family Games

> SOUTH SHUSWAP LIBRARY BRANCH 1PM - 4PM

Puppet Play

Sicamous Eagles Gym Fun at StrongStart > PARKVIEW ELEMENTARY 9:45AM - 10:15AM

> SALMON ARM LIBRARY BRANCH 3PM

Family Storytime

Sunday, January 21

Armstrong Mother Goose Visits StrongStart

> SALMON ARM LIBRARY BRANCH 10:30AM

Unplug & Play Family Swim

> HIGHLAND PARK ELEMENTARY 10:45AM

> SALMON ARM RECREATION CENTRE 1PM - 4PM

Enderby Public Ice Skate

> SALMON ARM INDOOR SOCCER ARENA 1PM - 3PM Bring indoor cleats or clean running shoes. > SICAMOUS LIBRARY BRANCH 1PM - 2PM

Family Games

Family Storytime

> EAGLE VALLEY RESOURCE CENTRE 10AM - 12NOON

Family Yoga

> PARKVIEW ELEMENTARY SICAMOUS 10AM - 10:30AM

Ozobots & Code & Go

> ENDERBY BRANCH LIBRARY 2:30PM - 3:30PM Pre-registeration required.

Enderby Family Skate

All activities are

FREE!

Sicamous Puppet Theatre

Armstrong Family Ice Skate

> SICAMOUS BRANCH LIBRARY 2:30PM - 3:30PM

> NORVAL RECREATION CENTRE 3:45PM - 5:45PM

Sicamous Eagles Community Skate

Monday, January 22

> SICAMOUS RECREATION CENTRE 3PM - 4PM

Enderby Family Dance PL3Y

> ENDERBY CURLING CLUB 3PM - 4:30PM

Salmon Arm Bowling

> BASTION ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 6:30PM - 7:30PM

> ENDERBY DRILL HALL 2:45PM - 3:30PM

Enderby Come Try Curling PJ Storytelling Event

> LAKESIDE BOWLING 3PM - 6PM Kids under 18 bowl free! Lane reservations recommended, call 250-832-3946.

Armstrong Chamber of Commerce Armstrong Dance Academy Armstrong/Spall Parks & Rec Arts Council for the South Shuswap Bastion PAC Carlin PAC CCRR

SYSA Family Footy (Soccer)

> ENDERBY LIBRARY BRANCH 2:30PM

> HASSEN ARENA ARMSTRONG 3PM - 4:30PM

Supported by:

> SHUSWAP THEATRE 12NOON - 1:30PM

Enderby Lego Challenges

Armstrong Family Rollerskating

> SALMON ARM CURLING CLUB 4PM - 6PM Bring clean indoor shoes.

> ENDERBY DRILL HALL 9:45AM - 10:30AM

Theatre Fun

> ENDERBY ARENA 11:15AM - 12:15PM

> ENDERBY ARENA 2:30PM - 4PM

Family Curling Night

> 3185 BECKER ST. IN THE GYM 9:30AM - 11:30AM

> SALMON ARM ARTS CENTRE 11AM - 3:30PM

Thursday, January 25 Enderby Kids & Company Hand Prints on Canvas > ENDERBY DRILL HALL 9:30AM - 11:30AM

City of Salmon Arm Enderby & Area Early Years Comittee Enderby Curling Club Enderby Recreation Services EVCSS EZ Rock 91.5FM Hillcrest PAC I Am Yoga Shuswap

Kids & Company Lakeside Bowling LASS North Okanagan Early Years Council NSSCR Okanagan Boys & Girls Club Okanagan Regional Library Piccadilly Mall

Salmon Arm Curling Club Salmon Arm ECD Salmon Arm GM Salmon Arm Observer Salmon Arm Recreation Salmon Arm Silverbacks School District No. 83 School District No. 83 District PAC

Shuswap District Arts Council Shuswap Events Shuswap Theatre Society Shuswap Youth Soccer Assoc. Sicamous & Malakwa ECD Sicamous Eagles Sicamous Recreation Sicamous Health Unit


Page A18 Friday, January 19, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Arts & Events

DOES YOUR BUSINESS STAND OUT? We can help. Digital marketing solutions designed specifically for you.

250.832.2131 w w w. s a o b s e r v e r. n e t a d v e r t i s i n g @ s a o b s e r v e r. n e t

Let us show you how — contact us today!

24/7 access to your local news wherever you are

Tosca a feast for the senses The Met’s ravishing new production of Puccini’s Tosca by Sir David McVicar offers a splendid backdrop for one of opera’s most dramatic and popular works. ‘Tosca’ HD Live from the Met will show Saturday, Jan. 27, at 9:55 a.m. at the Salmar Classic Theatre. Puccini’s melodrama about a volatile diva, a sadistic police chief, and an idealistic artist has offended and thrilled audiences for more than a century. Puccini’s direct and intense score starts with the brazen thunderous chords of Tosca’s first measures. MacVicar says they are “one of the most wonderful openings of any opera ever written” “They raise an expectation, even to a newcomer who’s never seen Tosca, that there’s a certain grandeur that needs to be on stage”.

Scarpia and Tosca in palazzo Farnese. ‘Tosca’ HD Live from the Met plays Saturday, Jan. 27 at 9:55 a.m. at the Salmar Classic. Set and costume designer John Macfarlane has created a romantic production with a painterly, luscious, grand quality to all the sets that allow the audience to experience the musical and dramatic emotions. The three historical settings are: the opulent Baroque Church of Sant’Andrea della Valle; the Sala d’Er-

cole in the Renaissance palazzo Farnese, and the Angel Terrace of the towering Castel Sant’Angelo which provides a final spectacular view of the Eternal City. Tosca premiered in Rome in 1900 and is based on an 1887 play by French dramatist Victorien Sardou who sets the rather intimate, private struggles

Sail into your midlife crisis. Deals that float your boat.

sellit. findit. loveit. Visit your local community Black Press Media newspaper website & click on the E-EDITIONS button at the top of the page.

saobserver.net/findit

of its main characters against a sweeping backdrop of political conflict. 1800’s Rome was a place of warring empires, radical ideologies, and the inescapable influence of the Catholic Church. While Puccini and his librettists – Guiseppe Giacosa and Luigi Illica – were very specific about the dates and times of the opera’s three acts, they favoured dramatic emphasis over factual accuracy. Certain historical events are accurate (the references to the battle of Marengo) while others serve the unfolding drama. Puccini’s characters embody the dominant ideals of the age. The painter Mario Cavaradossi believes fervently in the liberal values of the recent French Revolution. Baron Scarpia, the malevolent chief of police, represents the opposite extreme. Floria Tosca is an artist who lives passionately, experiencing every emotion to its fullest—jealousy, love, horror, vengeance. This role requires a soprano who can combine vocal intensity, theatrical instinct, and fearless commitment. Bulgarian soprano Sonya Yoncheva sings Tosca, tenor Vittorio Grigolo is her lover Cavaradossi, bass/ baritone Zeljko Lucic is the depraved police chief Scarpia and Emmanuel Villaume conducts.


Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Friday, January 19, 2018 Page A19

Come in and see our great selection of Lorna Vanderhaeghe Vitamins and Supplements! AdrenaSmart Reduces symptoms of fatigue, sleeplessness and lowers /c-reactive protein.

$

26

99

(Reg. $34.99)

90 veg. capsules

ImmunoSmart Reduces the duration of colds and flu. Balances immune system, reduces allergies and controls autoimmune responses as well as calms inflammation.

Bone Booster Vitamin K2 MK7 is the best form of Vitamin K! For Osteopenia and Osteoporosis. Promotes heart health, helps immune system, keeps calcium and other minerals in bones. Use in conjunction with Collagen Plus for strong bones.

$

2299

(Reg. $32.79)

Don’t wait a week or more for your compounded medication

Salmon Arm Pharmasave is your local onsite compounding pharmacy. What can we compound? • Bio-identical hormones • Pain medication • Veterinary medicines • Discontinued medication • Pediatric formulations • Customized flavouring • and much more…

• Our compounds are made using quality chemicals from a trusted source. • Our trained compounding staff is available to answer all your compounding questions.

270 Hudson Avenue, Salmon Arm • 250-832-2111


Page A20 Friday, January 19, 2018

Viewpoint

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Shithole countries in the wake of Trump GLOBAL VIEWS Gwynne Dyer Poor Donald Trump. He was simply asking for information, and they’re all over him as if he were a racist thug. His choice of words was unfortunate, but the angels rejoice when an ignorant person seeks enlightenment. We should take his question seriously and answer it for him. What Trump asked last Thursday was: “Why are we having all these people from shithole countries come here?” From the context – he was meeting with congressmen and senators who were working on immigration issues – it’s clear that by ‘shithole countries’ he meant Central American and African countries. El Salvador

and Haiti came in for special mention. What marks these countries out is that many of them are very poor, and some of them are plagued by war, crime and/or massive corruption. But most of the immigrants to the US have always come from countries like that: people who are safe and prosperous generally don’t abandon the countries they grew up in. The first wave of Irish who went to the United States in the mid-19th century were driven by famine at home. The German, Polish and Italian immigrants of the same period were fleeing both poverty and political repression; the Russian Jews were

Marla Beblow DENTURIST LTD.

■ Complete Dentures ■ Partial Dentures ■ Repairs or Relines ■ Personalized Denture Services

832-7204

Monday to Thursday

#1 - 480 Harbourfront Drive, N.E., Salmon Arm

Silver Creek Community Association

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING February 6, 2018 • 6:30 pm

also fleeing anti-Semitic violence. They would all have been ‘shithole countries’ at the time. They are all safer, more prosperous places now, and the sources of the migrant flows have changed – but the motives of the migrants have not. Donald Trump should already have known that, since he grew up in New York City, but maybe he was just too privileged and isolated. At any rate, I’m glad to have cleared it up for him – and now that he understands the process all he has to do is clean up his language. No, wait a moment. Trump had another question, too. He wanted to know why the United States couldn’t bring in immigrants from non-shithole places like Norway instead. This is a little harder to answer, because it’s a question of definition: the whole concept of a

shithole depends heavily on your perspective. Fom the point of view of Mexicans or Cubans, for example, El Salvador and Haiti are indeed shitholes (although they are far too polite ever to say that out loud). And from the viewpoint of a Norwegian, the United States is….Well, let me leave that question to Dr Christian Christensen, a Norwegian-American currently living and working in Sweden, who tweeted as follows: “Of course people from #Norway would love to move to a country where people are far more likely to get shot, live in poverty, get no healthcare because they are poor, get no paid parental leave or subsidised daycare, and see fewer women in political power. #Shithole.” A bit heavy on the sarcasm, but you get the point. Trump will

have to make do with immigrants who are – how shall we put this? – darker in hue. And this brings us to the heart of the matter. Trump is a racist: such a dyed-in-thewool racist that he is virtually unconscious of it. He openly says that he prefers immigrants from nice, white countries like Norway to brown or black immigrants from ‘shithole countries’. He was so confident that every American who had ever voted for him or ever might shared his views that he didn’t even deny what he had said right away. It was reported as soon as the meeting finished on Thursday, but the first White House statement just defended his remarks: “Certain Washington politicians choose to fight for foreign countries, but President Trump will always

fight for the American people.” It was more than 24 hours later, with the outrage still growing both at home and abroad, that Trump finally put out the usual statement (we’ve heard it on dozens of other occasions) denying that he had said what many people – senior members of Congress, in this case – had heard him saying. It’s the kind of damage control that doesn’t really control the damage. Fox News host Tucker Carlson told his audience that Trump’s ‘shithole’ comments were “something that almost every single person in America actually agrees with.” Wrong. What he should have said was “almost every single American who watches Fox News.” Very few non-white Americans agree with this kind of talk, and a

large number of white Americans, maybe as many as half, don’t either. That adds up to a 65-70 percent majority who don’t agree. Trump will not win this argument, and Michael Steele, the former chairman of the Republican National Committee, knows it. “There are, I have to say, a growing number of white Americans who are afraid of and do not want to see the browning of America. They have a picture-perfect 1950s view of mother wearing an apron as dad, in a hat, goes off to work. It looks a lot more like them than it does me, but America is starting to look more like me.” Michael Steele is an African-American. - Gwynne Dyer is an independent journalist whose articles are published in 45 countries.

Pie bakers wanted for annual contest Calling all pies for the “22nd Annual Best of the Shuswap Pie Baking Contest” sponsored by R.J. Haney Heritage Village, The Mall at Piccadilly and Save on Foods. If you’ve got the best pie baking skills in the Shuswap, you are invited to enter your homemade pie in the 22nd Annual Best of the Shuswap Pie Baking Contest at the Heritage Week Celebration on Saturday, Feb. 24. Judged by appearance, authenticity, tex-

ture and taste, apple, fruit or berry pies must be made the old fashioned way, from scratch. Winners will walk away with this year’s title, an engraved trophy and dinner theatre tickets for two to the 2018 “Villain and Vittles” Summer Dinner Theatre Production. Winners also get to enter a pie to next year’s Best of the Shuswap Pie Auction! Simply drop off your pies Saturday February 24 between 10 a.m. and 11 a.m. at

The Mall at Piccadilly, centre court. For official pie contest rules call the Village at 250-832-5243 or email info@salmonarmmuseum.org. This popular pie contest promises to be lip-smacking tasty and everyone is welcome to participate! After the judging, slices of the pies may be purchased for $2.50 each with the proceeds going towards extraordinary projects at the Heritage Village and Museum. Would you like to

volunteer at Heritage Week? Please call 250832-5243. R.J. Haney Heritage Village and Museum is situated on 40 acres of farmland on the east side of Salmon Arm. The site is owned by the City of Salmon Arm and managed by the Salmon Arm Museum and Heritage Association. The mandate of the organization is to preserve the heritage of the area and develop a Village depicting life in the era of 1911 to 1930. The association is a

non-profit, registered charity and operates the facility independent of municipal government. The facility offers a unique cultural heritage experience for the traveling and local public from mid May to the end of September, and welcomes over 15,000 visitors each year. The Village, Museum and Marjorie’s Tea Room also hosts special events, and Villains and Vittles Dinner Theatre three nights per week during July and August.

“All Out, All Game, UPCOMING HOME GAMES: Fri., Jan. 19 @ 7:00 pm All Season!” vs Chilliwack Chiefs JAM THE GM BOOKS FOR KIDS

Bring a book to the game.

Fri., Jan. 26 @ 7:00 pm

vs Alberni Valley Bulldogs Cash accepted

Ticket Office Mon-Fri 9-4 ~ Sat 4-8 pm & Sun noon-4 pm ~ 8 pm on Game Nights - Shaw Centre 250-832-3856 ext. 108 • www.sasilverbacks.com • Blog: backstalk.wordpress.com

THEMED JERSEYS FOR MADD AUCTION On line and at the game

@SASilverbacks


Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Community

Public Hearing

Masons contribute

BYLAW NO. 931,2017

Bob Bagg, District Deputy Grand Master of District 9 Masons of British Columbia & Yukon with Tony Cox, at back, and Daniel Rothlisberger of District 9 present a cheque of $2000 to Jane Shirley executive director for the SAFE Society. The money, together with more than 120 pounds of food, was donated by the Lodges of District 9 from Revelstoke to Kelowna. Photo contributed

Electronics – a new era ShuSwap OutdOOrS Hank Shelley It’s 5:45 a.m., and guests are awakened by the smell of freshbrewed coffee from the fishing lodge’s kitchen. My son Steve, is on his office computer apping the Coast Guard’s information. He can access the buoy out in the ocean, 12 kilometres away down the channel. The buoy, working off satellites, gives wind direction, water temperatures and wave action. Later, while halibut/ ling cod fishing, we head out to the halibut grounds called Low Rocks, where he had landed three fish two days before with guests. He backs the boat, watching his sonar and GPS map right over the exact spot the bottom showed the hump, then rocky slope on the ocean floor. Ideal halibut habitat. Bridge Lake, B.C. It’s

7:15 a.m. on frozen kokanee rich Deka Lake. Kentucky Bill, Coyote Bob, bushy bearded Trapper John from Horse lake are all in a 17 ft circle, flasher spoons wiggling, pink maggots for bait. Each angler has a fish finder, transducer showing bottom and a shoal of kokanee at 34 feet. All quickly reel up and down and the fishing begins in earnest. Other anglers on Bridge and Sulphurous lakes, using the same methods as described, put more kokanee or trout on the ice or a good feed for the family or the freezer. Many hunters and anglers have now gone high tech in their sport, and thanks to the companies like Eagle, Hummingbird and Lowrance, who are competing to a

new generation of savvy young guys and gals who love the outdoors, and their sport with ultra new gizmo’s and gadgets, connected to the smart phone, iPad or App, computer, that instantly connects them, (and the old guys, too) to hunting and fishing made easier than ever before. On the ice of Bridge Lake where we head to the lake trout grounds off Cottonwood Bay, my buddy Steve, uses a cordless drill, attached to his ice auger to drill four to seven holes for buddies, then sets up his expensive finder/transducer. He watches the lure reach bottom, at 93 ft, then on his screen sees lakers swimming about with it coming at his lure. Another fish on the ice. For those who love watching fish in action or feeding, there’s the Aqua-view underwater camera first introduced in 1997. Go to: www.aquavu. com for more information. I have a friend who

has one, saying they are hard on batteries. Yes, gone are the days of sittin’ on a bucket hoping for a fish to bite, freezin’ your butt off unless you have your little heater by you or your honey inside a nice warm fishin’ hut. The consolation in all this is, the beauty and winter wonderland around you. Get out when you can and enjoy!

250 832-2131

circ@saobserver.net

District of Sicamous 446 Main Street. Box 219 Sicamous B.C. V0E 2V0

T: 250-836-2477 E: info@sicamous.ca sicamous.ca

Our throwaway society contributes mounting waste to our local landfills which have space limitations. What is the future of waste management and are we prepared? A recent opportunity to expand the Salmon Arm landfill has arisen. Should the CSRD take advantage of this opportunity? Join leading experts in a compelling conversation about these waste management questions and issues. Come and take part in the development of solutions to waste management issues in your community. Your input is valuable and important.

Salmon Arm Sicamous Golden

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

Pursuant to the provisions of the Local Government Act, NOTICE is hereby given that the Council of the District of Sicamous will hold a PUBLIC HEARING in Council Chambers, District of Sicamous Municipal Office, 446 Main Street, Sicamous, BC, V0E 2V0 on Wednesday, January 24, 2018 at 6:00 pm to consider the application to amend the District of Sicamous Zoning Bylaw No. 101, 1993 as follows: a. By amending Schedule “A” of the Zoning Bylaw No. 101, 1993, as amended, rezoning Lot B, District lot 497, KDYD, Plan KAP54019 (1225 Eagle Pass Way) from C1 – Town Centre Commercial to R4 – Mobile Home Residential as shown hatched below: A copy of the proposed Bylaw No. 931, 2017 to amend zoning of the subject property may be viewed between 8:30 am and 4:30 pm, Monday to Friday, excluding holidays, until January 24, 2018 inclusive, at the District Office, 446 Main Street, Sicamous, BC, V0E 2V0. Please send written submissions to the District Office by 12 pm (Noon), Wednesday, January 24, 2018. At the Public Hearing, all persons who believe that their interest in property is affected by the proposed Bylaw will be afforded the opportunity to be heard or to present written submissions respecting matters contained in the Bylaw. Council is not permitted to receive submissions after the close of the Public Hearing. The District of Sicamous assumes no responsibility for correspondence not received by the District Office prior to the Public Hearing. Julia Payne Deputy Corporate Officer District of Sicamous, PO Box 219, Sicamous, BC V0E 2V0 Email: DCO@sicamous.ca

Come Join the Conversation

Revelstoke

CARRIERS WANTED

Friday, January 19, 2018 Page A21

Monday, January 22 7:00PM - 9:00PM

Prestige Harbourfront Resort 251 Harbourfront Drive NE

Thursday, January 25 7:00PM - 9:00PM

Red Barn 1226 Riverside Avenue

Monday, January 29 7:00PM – 9:00PM

Community Centre 600 Campbell Avenue

Thursday, February 1 7:00PM - 9:00PM

Golden Arena Lounge 1410 - 9th Street South

For more information, please contact: Ben Van Nostrand Team Leader, Environmental Health Services T: 250.833.5940 E: bvannostrand@csrd.bc.ca Visit our website at www.csrd.bc.ca 555 Harbourfront Drive, NE  PO Box 978 Salmon Arm V1E 4P1 T: 250.833.5950  TF: 1.888.248.2773


Page A22 Friday, January 19, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

For all your Advertising Needs... TAMMY HOWKINS Advertising Sales

250.832.2131 tammy@saobserver.net

Thank You!

to the Shuswap Rotary Club (The Evening Club) for your generous support. Through your kindness, SHS continues to provide much-needed support to those living with life-limiting illnesses and for those who are experiencing the loss of someone they love and care for. Your dontions and support shows our Community Caring for Community.

Your Health &

Wellness

INFORMATION DESIGNED TO PROMOTE AND ENHANCE YOUR WELLBEING

Canada’s health care crisis FAMILY CHIROPRACTIC

Stay Healthy GET ADJUSTED! New patients welcome. • Infants to Adults • On Site Digital X-Ray • Instrument Adjusting • Spinal Decompression Table • Custom Orthotics

#1 - 661 ROSS STREET, SALMON ARM, BC APPOINTMENTS

250.803.0224 www.wellnesschiro.net Shuswap Optometric Centre

www.saobserver.net

Dr. Warren Gage It seems that not a day passes that we don’t hear in the media something about Canada’a health care crisis. What one must realize is that this financial crisis has occurred because the system we currently have in Canada is a “sick care” system, not a health care system. It is true that we have amazing technologies and hospitals – but they are designed to treat the person who has already become sick or injured. Usually, the stories we see on the nightly news about “health care” are describing heroic efforts by medical doctors to save a person’s life using medications or a dramatic surgery. It is extremely im-

portant to understand true health care involves what we do on a regular, every day basis in order to stay healthy and avoid requiring the services of our sick care system. True health is state of optimal physical, mental and social well-being, not merely the absence of disease. Lifestyle decisions we make on a daily basis are what depicts one’s health, or lack of it. It is also very important to understand that the presence, or lack of symptoms, does not indicate whether a person is healthy or not. In a sick-care model, people are trained to believe that as long as you have no symptoms everything is just

fine and to carry on with their same habits. Nothing could be farther from the truth. The majority of diseases, including cancer and cardiovascular disease, initially silently develop over long periods of time before they ever present any physical symptoms. And on the other side, your body can be expressing severe symptoms and be functioning perfectly and in fact be totally healthy. The example of this is when a person consumes food that has spoiled. Within hours, the body will correctly recognize the potentially life threatening toxins that have been consumed, and the adventure of severe vomiting and diarrhea will begin. It may feel (and smell) like you are sick and dying, but your body is working perfectly to eliminate these poisons. The

process is not fun, but it will pass and is very necessary for your survival. So, with the current sick care system in Canada, the responsibility of maintaining your health falls upon each individual both financially and behaviorally. To gain and maintain our health there are a number of actions we all must take on a regular basis. -Eat well – In order to maintain our health we need to supply our body with organic, pesticide free, non processed foods. While consuming the right foods is important, everyone must also do everything possible to avoid the wrong foods that are ladened with toxins, chemicals, GMO’s, and preservatives. -Exercise every day – from your musculoskeletal structure, our digestive system, to

our brain and nervous system, every part of the body requires movement in order to maintain health and proper function. -Rest and Relax – due to the stresses we all face on a daily basis, our bodies and minds require adequate rest, relaxation, and stress management. -Regular Chiropractic Care – Chiropractic adjustments help reduce interference on the nervous system. Without 100% nerve flow, there cannot be 100% life. When one has a clear functioning nervous system, a healthy lifestyle will lead to even better results. Dr. Warren Gage is a family wellness Chiropractor who can be reached at Harbourfront Family Chiropractic at (250) 8030224.

Did you know?

#3 - 160 Trans Canada Highway • www.shuswapoptometric.ca

250-832-6206

Testosterone is a hormone that is produced in the human body. Although testosterone is largely associated with males, females produce it as well. Testosterone is responsible for stimulating sperm production and giving men their reproductive drive. Testosterone also helps build bone and muscle mass and causes hair to grow on a man’s chest and elsewhere.

WebMD says that, after age 30, most men begin to experience a gradual decline in testosterone production. Some men may even exhibit symptoms that suggest that their testosterone levels have dropped considerably. The American Urological Association says roughly two out of every 10 men older than 60 have low testosterone, often referred to as “low T.” Signs

of low T include reduced sex drive, difficulty achieving or maintaining an erection, low semen volume, hair loss, fatigue, and increased body fat. Men can have their testosterone levels checked by taking a blood test to see if their levels are normal. MT182757

ARBOR LODGE RETIREMENT LIVING AFFORDABLE Call Christina for your personal tour and complimentary lunch with us!

Boutique Retirement • meals • housekeeping • activities • and more Home!

group home living for independent seniors

Shuttle Car Available

Call 250.833.3583 for more details or visit www.aborlodge.ca. 331 8th Street SE Salmon Arm


Page A10 Friday, January 19, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Friday, January 19, 2018 Page A23

JANUARY 19 - 25 playing at THE GRAND 100 Hudson Avenue

CROSSWORD

JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE

Nightly 6:40PM & 9:00PM Sat-Sun Matinees 2:10PM

INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY

Nightly 6:50PM & 9:00PM Sat-Sun Matinees 2:00PM

CLUES ACROSS

1. Emperor of Russia 5. Abounding in rocks PADDINGTON 2 11. Increase in speed Nightly 6:30PM & 8:30PM Sat-Sun Matinees 2:10PM 14. Music app FOREVER MY GIRL 15. Not nice Nightly 6:40PM & 9:00PM 18. Tables (Span.) Sat-Sun Matinees 2:00PM 19. Decomposes playing at THE CLASSIC 360 Alexander Street 21. __ student: learns Shuswap Film Society healing POP AYE 23. Nursemaid Saturday, Jan. 20th, 5:00PM 24. Joke-teller Bolshoi Ballet 28. Male parent 3 BILLBOARDS outside ROMEO & JULIET 29. Group of countries (abbr.) EBBING, MISSOURI Sunday, Jan. 21st, 1:00PM Nightly 7:30PM 30. “Rambling Rose” actor Lukas 32. Midway between south and southwest 33. Cartoon Network (abbr.) 35. Peacock network 36. Principal ethnic group of China 39. Made of fermented honey and water Shuswap Community Foundation, in partnership withofthe 41. surprise City of Salmon Arm, provides a permanentExclamation place for your Evaluates Walkway. skill or memorable moments at the McGuire Lake42.Memorial knowledge swap Community Foundation, in partnership Purchase a brick onwith thethe Memorial44. Walkway Stage in to ecological of Salmon Arm, provides a permanent place for your able moments at the McGuire Lake Memorial Walkway. succession  Shuswap Welcome a Foundation, child thethe Recognize a volunteer with ShuswapCommunity Community Foundation,ininpartnership partnership with group of SE Asia City of Salmon aWalkway your Purchase abrick theArm, Memorial toplaceforfor City ofon Salmon Arm,provides provides apermanent permanentplace your Congratulate a grad  Thank46. anEthnic employee memorable Walkway. memorable moments momentsatatthe theMcGuire McGuireLake LakeMemorial Memorial Walkway. Not small lcome a child brick Recognize a volunteer  Remember aononbeloved  Mark47. a business milestone Purchaseaabrick theMemorial MemorialWalkway Walkway Purchase the toto 49. A cat is one ngratulate a  grad  Thank an employee Welcome child an anniversary Recognizea volunteer a volunteer Celebrate  Commemorate an event  Welcome aachild Recognize member a beloved  Mark abusiness milestone 52. Broken piece Congratulateaagrad grad Thank Thankananemployee employee  Congratulate Rememberaabeloved Marka abusiness business milestone ebrate an anniversary deductible Commemorate an event  Remember Mark 56.permanent French president With a taxbeloved donation ofmilestone $1,500, this gesture  Celebrate Celebrate an anniversary  Commemorate an event anaanniversary  Commemorate an event ones and special moments. creates lasting legacy for your loved 58. Artist’s workroom h a tax deductibleWith donation of $1,500, this permanent gesture a tax deductible donation of $1,500, this permanent gesture With a tax deductible donation of $1,500, thisand permanent gesture tes a lasting legacy for loved ones and special moments. creates ayour lasting legacy for your loved ones special moments. 60. Ability to apply www.shuswapfoundation.ca creates a lasting legacy for your loved ones and special moments. www.shuswapfoundation.ca www.shuswapfoundation.ca knowledge and skills Office: 250-832-5428 info@shuswapfoundation.ca www.shuswapfoundation.ca Office: 250-832-5428 info@shuswapfoundation.ca ffice: 250-832-5428 info@shuswapfoundation.ca Office: 250-832-5428 info@shuswapfoundation.ca 62. Visually stunning 63. Ancient region south of Dead Sea

Dec. 22-Jan. 20

Capricorn Jan. 21-Feb. 18

AQUARIUS

Aquarius

Find more time to explore an important relationship, Aquarius. Don’t overlook the importance of date night. Make time for this important person even if it requires sacrifices.

Feb. 19-Mar. 20

PISCES

Mar. 21-Apr. 20

Aries

Apr. 21-May 21

Taurus

CLUES DOWN

1. Used to pour beer 2. Con game 3. Skin disorder 4. Communists (slang) 5. Subjects to hostility 6. A major division of geological time 7. Hitting statistic (abbr.) 8. British thermal unit 9. Influential envoy to Woodrow Wilson 10. Fits on neck of animal 12. Fertile soil 13. Type of battery 16. Khoikhoin peoples 17. Consist of two parts 20. Small group of trees 22. Execute or perform 25. Millihenry 26. 007’s creator 27. Associated with esoteric doctrine

29. Electronic countermeasures 31. Schenectady County Airport 34. No (Scottish) 36. Position of leadership 37. Statement 38. Raccoons belong to this genus 40. One who diagnoses 43. True mosses 45. Blood type 48. Albanian 50. Emergency response notification system 51. College reservists 53. Away from wind 54. Tough outer layer 55. Art __, around 1920 57. Born of 58. The greatest of all time 59. Georgia rockers 61. Natural logarithm

If you would like to advertise your business here, please call 250-832-2131.

CAPRICORN

Take certain things with a grain of salt, Capricorn. Until you can flush out the facts, there is no point in worrying or passing judgement. Be patient and things will come to light.

Pisces

WORD SCRAMBLE

PUZZLE NO. CW182310

HOROSCOPES

CRYPTO FUN

Aries, if a special opportunity or circumstance comes your way, jump at the chance to be a part of it. Such opportunities might not come along too often, so enjoy the ride.

TAURUS

Taurus, a newfound devotion to exercise may improve your life in many different ways. If you have been vacillating on whether or not to embrace a new lifestyle, just do it.

Gemini

An unexpected situation has put you out of your element, Gemini. For now you can simply go with the flow and see how things work out. Don’t let this get the better of you.

June 22- July 22

CANCER

Cancer

Cancer, dabbling in a few different projects may give you a unique perspective and the inspiration to take things in a new direction. Keep putting out those feelers.

July 23-Aug. 23

LEO

Leo

Leo, you have just about sold one of your ideas and now it’s just a matter of being patient. Soon the results will support your vision, and you can enjoy the fruits of your labors.

Aug. 24-Sept. 22

VIRGO

Virgo

Let other people’s perceptions roll off you like water off of a duck’s back, Virgo. To get the full picture, you need to immerse yourself and make up your own mind.

Sept. 23-Oct. 23

LIBRA

Oct. 24-Nov. 22

SCORPIO

Nov. 23-Dec. 21

SAGITTARIUS

Sagittarius

Top of the Hill Salmon Arm 250-832-9991

ARIES

May 22-June 21

Scorpio

Daily Features Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner Come Celebrate our New Menu!

Pisces, do something unexpected this week and watch as those around you are inspired by your willingness to try new things.

GEMINI

Libra

WORD SEARCH

ABDOMINAL ABDUCTION AGONIST ANAEROBIC ATROPHY BALANCE BAR BENCHES BODYBUILDING BULK BURN CALORIES CHINNING CLEAN COMPOSITION CRUNCHES DEFINITION DELTOIDS

ENDURANCE EXTENSION GLUTEALS HYDRATE INTENSITY ISOLATION ISOMETRIC MUSCLES OBLIQUES REPETITIONS RESISTANCE SETS SPOTTER TRAINER TRAINING WEIGHT WORKOUT

For all your Advertising Needs... TAMMY HOWKINS Advertising Sales

250.832.2131 tammy@saobserver.net

SUDOKU

Libra, take a few steps back and think about whether or not a new approach is needed regarding a specific situation. Thinking logically instead of emotionally may help. Scorpio, take a day to recharge your batteries if you feel your energy stores are running low. You may not need an extended vacation to do so, just a day to relax. Sagittarius, looking within yourself can help you get a grasp on your situation and your future. Make the most of this introspection and use it as a catalyst for positive change.

WS181300

PUZZLE NO. SU181170


Chase

Page A24 Friday, January 19, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Adams Lake band to get new chief

Arnouse nominated, incumbent chief Paul Michel not seeking re-election. Martha Wickett Salmon Arm Observer

The Adams Lake band will have a new chief, its third in a little more than three years, come March. Chief and council nominations opened and closed on Jan. 13, with just one person nominated for chief. Former councillor Cliff Arnouse will be sworn in following the election on March 3. Former chief Nelson Leon was nominated but he declined. Arnouse was last elected in 2012 when he served a three-year term as councillor, but

was not returned in 2015 when a new slate of chief and council was elected. In that February 2015 election, long-serving chief Leon was defeated by Robin Billy, who later resigned from the position in November of that year. Current chief Paul Michel won a byelection for chief in December 2016, defeating Leon, Joyce Kenoras-Pooley and Henry Anthony. Michel is not seeking re-election and could not be reached for comment before press deadline.

Eight people are vying for five council positions. They are Steven Teed, Doreen Kenoras, Gina Johnny, Brandy Jules, Elaine Jules, Shelley Ann Witzky, Joyce Kenoras and Talitha Wispinksi. Incumbent councillors are Brandy Jules, Greg Witzky, Norma Manuel and Ronnie Jules. Brandy Jules is the only one of the four incumbents who is seeking re-election. The band has been fraught with governance issues over the past few years with four councillors and the chief removed from office under the

band’s custom election regulations and later reinstated following trips to the Federal Court of Appeal. The political upheavals have been accompanied by staff changes. Two candidates forums are upcoming, one on Feb. 19 at the band gymnasium and a second at Pierre’s Point on Feb. 20. An advance poll will be held on Saturday, Feb. 24 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Pierre’s Point. Election day polling will be take place on Saturday, March 3, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. at the Adams Lake band gymnasium.

photo contributed

Current Chief Paul Michel of the Adams Lake band won’t be seeking re-election in March. New chief by acclamation will be Cliff Arnouse.

Challenge issued to ‘Read for 15’

Chase Contacts Please use the following information when submitting your editorial and advertising requests:

Editorial Submissions:

Email: shuswapmarket@saobserver.net Fax: 250-832-5140

Classified Advertisements:

Email: classifieds@saobserver.net Fax: 250-832-5140 Ph: 250-832-2131

Display Advertising:

Contact ~ Penny Brown Ph: 250-832-2131 Email: pennyjb@saobserver.net Fax: 250-832-5140

You’re being asked to read for 15 minutes. The TNRD Library System is once again taking part in the Read for 15 challenge on Jan. 26 and 27 as part of Family Literacy Day, with all participants entered into a draw for a Chapters gift card. Libraries across Canada will be encouraging everyone to read for 15 minutes to promote the importance of literacy in the community, and to win the coveted title of most

PLAYER OF THE WEEK

CHASE

Jr. B Hockey

Fri., January 19th 7:00 pm • Away Game

at Summerland Steam Sat., January 20th 7:35 pm • Away Game

at Osoyoos Coyotes Fri., January 26th 7 pm • Home Game

vs 100 Mile House Wranglers

Colton Nikiforuk #10

Forward

Home Town: ............ Maple Ridge, BC Favourite NHL Player: ............................................ Jamie Benn Favourite NHL Team: .............................Vancouver Canucks What do you pursue other than Hockey ................................ Football, Baseball Favourite Music Artists: ...Eric Church, Luke Bryan Favourite Movie:....................... Superbad Favourite superpower: .. To fly, so I can get everywhere easily.

“readerly” community in Canada. Last year, with almost 3,400 people reporting in, the TNRD Library System placed fifth in the country for most participants. Participation is easy — after you finish reading your chosen material for 15 minutes, let the library know. You can use the hashtag #Readfor15TNRD on Facebook or Twitter, or email the library at questions@ tnrd.ca. You can also

Celista Coffeehouse with Tatiana Speed on Jan. 20, North Shuswap Hall, doors

stop by your local TNRD library. The library system aims to create enthusiasm for reading in people of all ages and encourage friendly competition between communities, businesses or public services to help spread the word about the challenge and the importance of reading. Literacy skills are put into practice daily: reading grocery lists, Facebook newsfeeds, newspapers, traffic

photo contributed

People living in the Thompson Nicola Regional District are being asked to read for 15 minutes during the ‘Read for 15’ challenge. signs, maps and even restaurant menus. Flexing reading muscles has been proven to

reduce stress and improve memory, focus and concentration. It’s fun, too!

What’s On in Chase open at 7. Skmana Cross Country Ski & Snowshoe Club meets Jan. 23,

7 p.m. at the Chase Curling Club. The club boasts 18 kilometres of groomed nordic ski

HAVE YOUR

PHOTO PUBLISHED Submit your photos of events in the Chase area to shuswapmarket@saobserver.net for publication in the Shuswap Market News. Please include a brief description of the event and the names of anyone featured in the picture. Photos published as space allows and based on timeliness of picture.

email shuswapmarket@saobserver.net

and dedicated snowshoe trails. For more info, email ski-skmana.com or call Debi at 250-679-2309. North Shuswap Chamber of Commerce, meets Jan. 29 at Quaaout Lodge, dinner optional at 6, meeting at 6:30 p.m. Chase Fish & Game Annual Banquet, Saturday, Feb. 3, Adams Lake Conference Centre, happy hour 5:30 p.m., banquet 7 p.m., music by Patrick Ryley. For information or tickets, call Vicky at 250-955-2374 or Millers Cabin at 250-6793332.


Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Chase

Friday, January 19, 2018 Page A25

KIJHL prospects shine in showcase game Top players put best skate forward for Kootenay and Okanagan conferences. Scott Koch Contributor

The weekend of Jan. 12 to 14 was action-packed with a KIJHL Prospects Game and banquet, as well as the league’s semi-annual executive meeting. The Prospects Game is a showcase of the best 16- to 18-year-old players from the Kootenay and Okanagan Conferences meeting to flash their talent and skills. Scouts from the NHL, WHL, BCHL and colleges were in attendance to view potential prospective additions to their rosters. They weren’t disappointed as the fast and high-calibre of play thrilled the packed stands at the Rutland Arena in

Kelowna. Heat director of hockey operations Brad Fox coordinated the event for the second year in a row. Fox was the keynote speaker at the Showcase Banquet, and those in attendance provided rave reviews on his “Underdog” theme. Fox, the neverquit believer, provided underdog stories from his years of experience. That included undrafted players who now represent Canada at the Olympics, to 19-year-old rookies at the Junior B level who went on to receive scholarships and go into law, all because they didn’t believe in giving up. Heat goaltender Conor Webb from

Vernon was selected to play for the Okanagan Conference that was managed by Fox. The 13th and 14th were busy with franchise representatives dealing with the future of the league. A strategic plan is in the development stages to set the league on a new and exciting course in the future. The KIJHL is considered a top development league in Canada and the goal is to maintain that reputation and improve on it. Chase was represented with the president, general manager and head coach in attendance. In other news, the Heat clashed in Chase with the North Okanagan Knights from

Armstrong on Friday night the 12th. The local’s lack-lustre effort resulted in a 4-1 loss in front of 285 fans. Based on sales in the “Wobbly Pop Emporium,” fans attempted to drown their angst and sorrow during the evening’s ‘F’-rated performance. Those fans will enjoy a weekend off as the Heat head to the South Okanagan to clash with Osoyoos and Summerland. Next home game in Chase is Friday the 26th versus the 100 Mile House Wranglers, where 10 gallons of head gear will be in fashion. Saddle up and ride down to the barn for the night, parking is free.

PROFESSIONALS

essential

MORTGAGE BROKERS

PROFESSIONAL PROFILE

Being a Mortgage Professional is not just about taking an application and getting a mortgage for you to purchase a home or refinance your existing one. It is about building a relationship, being available, and getting you the best mortgage that fits your lifestyle. In some cases; it is also about coaching you on your credit and better financial decision making until it is the right time for you to purchase/refinance your home. It is not just a business … it is about working together to fulfill your dreams of financial freedom and owning your home. Best of all my services are free to you, the client. I have earned the distinction of an Accredited Mortgage Professional and am a member of the Verico Network Mortgage Team which allows me to offer the lowest rates available in the industry. In addition I am a member of the Mortgage Broker Association of British Columbia, Financial Institutions Commission, and the Canadian Association of Accredited Mortgage Professionals. Please visit my website for valuable information with respect to mortgages and interest rates. I can be reached anytime by email: corinehild@shaw.ca or phone: 250 832-8006 (office) 250 832-5856 (cell). Corine Hild

P O D I AT R I S T

Rick koch photo

Down 0-3 midway through the third period, Chase Heat’s Tyler Collens races in to the North Okanagan Knights zone. He attempts to split Drayton Martin, left, and Alec McLeod with the puck, looking to get the Heat on the scoreboard.

FINANCIAL

3.5” x 2.5” | Maximum Font Size: 30 pt

Corine Hild

Accredited Mortgage Professional Specializing in all products... • First Time Home Buyers • Construction • Renewals • Re�inance • Consolidation

Call me for your mortgage needs

www.corinehild.ca

140 Alexander St. NE • T��:250.832.8006 C���: 250.832.5856 • corinehild@shaw.ca FINANCIAL

Earning enough on your Have TFSA questions? savings? Let’s talk.Let’s talk. Rob Rob Hislop, Hislop, CFP® Financial Advisor Financial .

Podiatrist Dr. Bruce Booth Medicine & surgery of the Foot Custom orthotics Toll Free: 1-844-769-3338

CFP®

161 Shuswap St. N.W. P.O. Box 177 161 Shuswap Salmon Arm, BC V1E 4N3 250-833-0623

St. N.W. P.O. Box 177 Salmon Arm, BC V1E 4N3 250-833-0623

Salmon Arm Office #4-680 Marine Park Drive

Local Professionals you can trust

in the SHUSWAP

• Specializing in Tax & Estate Planning • Helping clients create and maintain wealth in the most tax-advantaged Division Director manner possible.

Teri Young

Investors Group Financial Services Inc. Member – Canadian Investor Protection Fund

Please call for appointment

by

Advisor

www.edwardjones.com

Booking Jan. 31, Feb. 14for & 28

The Plan

HOME SECURITY

Going on vacation? Not wanting to leave your home unattended? …impose upon friends or risk your home being occasionally cared for by well intentioned neighbours

Shuswap HOMEWATCH & Property Management

A Professional HomeWatch Service for Vacationers, Snowbirds & Cabin Owners, Estate Executors & Realtors www.shuswaphomewatch.com 250 804 6973 shuswaphomewatch@gmail.com Licensed and Insured

140-Alexander Street, Salmon Arm 250-319-1174

Advertise in our Professional Directory and receive both

&

250-832-2131

Email: advertising@saobserver.net

Financial

Edward Jones Downtown office: Rob Hislop Investors Group Financial Services: Teri Young Division Director

Home Security Shuswap Home Watch

Mortgage Broker

Corine Hild

Podiatrist Dr. Bruce Booth

With a combined circulation of over 15,000 this is a great place to advertise your business.

Call 250-832-2131 or email

advertising@saobserver.net

www.saobserver.net


Page A26 Friday, January 19, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Remembering Loved Ones

CHRISTINA EILEEN (nee COX) KIRK

Place your condolences online. (Visit your local newspaper website, obituary page) Darren Wilson Wilby

August 12, 1973 – December 30, 2017 Our world got a little darker with the recent passing of a bright light. Darren Wilby will be forever loved and missed by his beloved wife Nyla and children Kohen, Ethan, Reese, Caleb, Madison and Ben. He also leaves behind his parents Ed & Kathy Wilby, sisters Kim Cox (Steve) and Kerri Spanier (Stuart) and brother Warren as well as many nieces, nephews, aunts, uncles, cousins, dear friends and co-workers. Darren enjoyed camping, boating, hockey and music. He loved family dinners, card games and playing his guitar. He approached everything in his life with tremendous integrity, courage, thoughtfulness and a wicked clever sense of humor. Darren’s family thanks staff at Vernon Jubilee Hospital, the cancer center and North Okanagan Hospice house. An open house celebration of Darren’s life will be held January 20, 2018 between 1:30-3:30PM in Coldstream at the Women’s Institute Hall 9909 Kalamalka Road. In lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate donations in Darren’s name to the Okanagan Rail Trail (okanaganrailtrail.ca). Arrangements have been entrusted to Vernon Funeral Home, Phone: 250 542 0155 Condolences may be offered at www.vernonfuneralhome.com

Fischer’s Funeral Services wishes to express sympathy to the families which we served in December 2017… Edwin Mitchell Gertrud Findling John Graham Allan Aitken Gordon Henschell Elly Simpson John Myerscough

Marcel St. Pierre Ted Martin Ben Herbach Alice Mielke Bjintze Jelsma Rene Van Der Kraats Elton Anderson

View obituaries and share memories at

www.fischersfuneralservices.com

In Memoriam

FUNERAL SERVICES & CREMATORIUM LTD.

Tammy & Vince Fischer

4060-1st Ave, S.W. Salmon Arm 833-1129 Serving Kamloops to Golden Toll Free 1-888-816-1117

You left us beautiful memories, Your love is still our guide, and though we cannot see you you’re always at our side.

WE CAN HELP We provide support: • for the terminally ill and their families • for living with Quality of Life to End of Life • for Grief and Bereavement • by teaching how to have the difficult conversations • through various educational workshops • for Caregivers through respite breaks • how to navigate the system

DELA BAGSHAW - August 23, 2017

In Loving Memory

Dear Dela, We are the friends you’ve gathered through a lifetime that was too short. From elementary school to girlhood, married life, motherhood, the workplace, years of living overseas, up to retirement in Blind Bay, the friends who shared your life are still here, missing you. We miss your sparkling blue eyes, your smile that lit up the room, your never-failing kindness and your generosity of spirit that only saw the good. We remain inspired by the optimistic and uncomplaining way you handled adversity that was far more than your share. Thank you, dear one, for the gentle example of right living that you displayed every day and thank you for the treasured memories you have left behind.

Your loving friends and sisters of the heart.

• become a member • become a volunteer • make a donation • leave a bequest #4-781 Marine Park Drive

250-832-7099

www.shuswaphospice.ca

Wednesday Mourning Cafe If you are looking for a support in your grief journey, you may want to consider our informal Wednesday Mourning Café. You will likely find the following things: • Emotional support in a safe and non-judgmental environment. • Support and understanding from others who have experienced a similar loss. • Coping skills to help you on your grief journey. • Hope through companionship with people who “get it” and understand first-hand what you’re going through. • Permission to grieve and permission to live a happy productive life. • Information will be available for how children and other family members may react to loss. The most important thing is to take care of yourself. Drop-in to our weekly Wednesday Mourning Café, facilitated by Naomi Silver, at our Mountainside Common Room from 10:00 to 11:30 am.

440 – 10th Street SW (PO Box 388) Salmon Arm, BC V1E 4N5 250-832-2223

Chris passed away January 4, 2018. She was born December 28, 1928, in Toronto, ON and just celebrated her 89th year. Chris leaves her Daughter Linda Wereschuk (Dale). Her Grand Daughter’s Jamie Bowden (Sonnie), Taleah Schmidt (Justin) and Kellie McMillan (Ben). Great Grand Children Leland 12, Reegan 9, Tylerann 3 and Jessee 1. Chris grew up in Toronto (Willowdale). Also living in Bracebridge, ON. Her Mother passed away when she was 8 months old and She was raised by her Grandmother Catherine (Hamilton) Dear. She worked at Eaton’s Centre in her late teens for many years where she met the love of her life George. After getting married they moved where the work took them, Edmonton, Grand Prairie, Vancouver Island, and finally with 2 kids in tow they settled in Surrey, BC. Chris moved to Salmon Arm in 2006, selling her home after 47 years. She settled here very well. She loved meeting people. Her Surrey neighbour told me, Chris never met a stranger – She’d talk to anyone. She visited the All Churches Thrift Store often, and every place she ventured someone knew Her. Her health had changed and she moved to Hillside Village in March 2017. The staff there is amazing, and I Thank All of You for your dedication to giving Mom a Happy Home to live in. She is predeceased by Her Mother, Christina 1929, Grandmother, Catherine 1950, Father, James 1992, Husband, George 1973, and her Son, Robert 1998. Until We meet again…. We all Love You, and are Missing You. There will be No Service by request.

Are you living with a life changing illness? Are you a Caregiver?

YOU CAN HELP

If tears could build a stairway and memories a lane, I’d walk right up to Heaven and bring you Home again.

www.saobserver.net

Helen Martha Lewis (nee Burstyk) July 29, 1921 – January 5, 2018

Helen passed away peacefully January 5, 2018 at the age of 96 in Salmon Arm, BC. She is survived by two daughters, Sandra (Jerry) and Delgene (John); two granddaughters, Stacy (Lorne) and Bonnie (Kasey). Helen was predeceased by her husband, Tom in 1984. As well as eight siblings: five brothers and three sisters. The past seven years, Helen has enjoyed living at Landers Lodge. Special thanks from the family to the staff at Landers Lodge and to Nadia for the many hair do’s you did for our mother. Thank you to the second level nursing staff and doctors for their care of Helen at Shuswap Lake General Hospital. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to a charity of your choosing. No service will be held. Cremation. Online condolences may be sent to Helen’s family through her obituary at www.bowersfuneralservice.com

Bowers Funeral Service is again pleased to be sponsoring our annual grief information seminar facilitated by Naomi Silver. Naomi has over 25 years of experience providing grief support to families in our community. This seminar will include practical and useful suggestions on ways to help yourself when you are grieving. Handouts will be provided. This seminar will be held in the Bowers Funeral Home Mountainside Complex on Saturday, January 27, 2018, from 9:30 - 2:30 p.m. with a lunch provided. To pre-register or for more information, please contact Bowers Funeral Service at 832-2223. There is no charge for this seminar.


Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Friday, January 19, 2018 Page A27

Garth Baumann

Remembering Loved Ones

March 9, 1938 – Jan.12, 2018 Garth (The Legend) passed away peacefully with his family by his side at home in Sunnybrae at the age of 79. Garth is survived by Kaye, six children, nine grandchildren, and six great grandsons. Family and friends will miss him dearly, as well as his community. He was a gifted mandolin player and he shared his music and many years with The Dust Puppets. Thank you to the caregivers, hospice team, and nurses who cared for him. A celebration of life will take place in May at the Carlin Hall. In lieu of flowers donations may be gifted to Salmon Arm SPCA. 5850 Auto Road SE, Salmon Arm, BC, V1E 2X2 Share online memories and condolences through Garth’s obituary at www.fischersfuneralservices.com (250) 833-1129

Place your condolences online. (Visit your local newspaper website, obituary page)

Place a loved ones Memoriam or Obituary

You can place a loved ones in memoriam or obituary in one of our BC award winning newspapers... Call our Classified Centre at:

1.866.865.4460

BCClassifieds.com

Thomas Alexander Estrada June 7 1962 -December 30 2017

Tom a resident of Salmon Arm BC Canada passed away on December 30th with some family members by his side.Tom has many family and friends and he will live on in our hearts forever . Karen would like to extend her thanks to the loving support and Care from this amazing team of people. Dr. D. Breugem, Dr. C. Main, the nurses in the Oncology Clinic, and all the employees at SLGH. Dr. Hoegler and his staff at BC cancer in Kelowna. The pharmacist Blane,and his team at shoppers, Salmon Arm. Interior Health the Nurses and RCA’s. Shuswap Hospice Society Krista, Red Cross,and Chris Elliott. A celebration of life, to be announced at a later date will take place in Calgary, Alberta and Okanagan, BC in the spring of 2018. Condolences can be put on the website www .MyAlternatives.ca under Armstrong.

ONLINE bcclassifieds@blackpress.ca IN PRINT 1.866.865.4460

...in your community, online and in print

Friendly Frank says...

CLEAR THE CLUTTER!

It’s time to sell, call today!

Garage sales are the talk of town! Give your JUNK a new life!

Showcase your hidden treasures.

Sell any single item dirt cheap!

Are You The Best at What You Do?

Spotlight your business with our business builder packages Call today to reserve your spot, space is limited!

Announcements

Announcements

Announcements

Announcements

Announcements

Employment

Employment

Information

Information

Cards of Thanks

Information

Information

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Ron Marchand

Joyce Marchant

Complimentary Hot Chocolate and Popcorn!!

Book Now for your Fun!

t4BMNPO"S N

AA, NA and Al-Anon Meetings AA 1-866-531-7045 Salmon Arm AA: Tuesday 12:00 noon – First United Church 450 Okanagan Avenue, SE Wednesday 8:00 p.m. – St. Joseph’s, 90 1st ST SE Thursday 7:00 p.m. – Women’s Circle AA St. Josephs Friday 12:00 noon – First United Church 450 Okanagan Avenue, SE Sunday 11:00 a.m. – Health unit, 851-16 St. NE Sunday 7:00 p.m. – Downtown Activity Center Blind Bay – Our Lady of the Lake Catholic Church, Blind Bay, 2740 Fairway Hill Rd. – Saturday at 10 a.m. Sorrento – St. Mary’s Anglican Church, 1188 TCH, Sunday 7:00 p.m. – OAPA Hall, 1148 Passchendaele Rd., Monday 8:00 p.m. Enderby – St. Ann’s Catholic Church, 1310 George St., Tuesday 8:00 p.m. Enderby – United Church, 1106 Belvedere, Friday 8:00 p.m. Sicamous – Sicamous United, 705 TCH., Tuesday 8:00 p.m. Al-Anon: 1-866-531-7045 Salmon Arm – Seniors Resource Center, 320 2 Ave NE, Wednesday 8:00 p.m. – First United Church, upstairs, 450 Okanagan Ave SE, Thursday 12:00 noon Narcotics Anonymous: 1-866-778-4772 Salmon Arm – Crossroads Church, 121 Shuswap (behind Barley Station, alley entrance). Monday 7:00 p.m.

the Video Man

832-3320

Sleigh Rides

The “Reaching Out MS Society of Salmon Arm� Would like to thank the following people for their continued support in our annual Christmas Gift Wrap: Piccadilly Mall and Merchants. Special thanks to the following: M&M Meats, Apple Auto Glass, Shuswap Clothing, Shoes & Such, Telus (Piccadilly Mall) The 40 hardworking volunteers who donated many hours to assist us in the wrapping of gifts and the general public who so generously donated to our gift wrap. All the money raised stays in the community to assist our members with their various equipment needs in dealing with MS.

Here Today – Here Tomorrow There is no better way to create an everlasting tribute than by making a memorial donation to the Shuswap Community Foundation. Every tax receipted gift ensures that the name of your loved one will be remembered in perpetuity.

Films, photos, slides, audio/video transferred to DVD, CD & USB

ronmarchand49@gmail.com Salmon Arm Advertise in the 2018 BC Hunting Regulations Synopsis largest Sportsman publication

Office: 250-832-5428 www.shuswapfoundation.ca

DRIVERS!

Drivers wanted for our Sicamous, Malakwa run. Call Kimm in circulation for more information. 250-832-2131 ext. 203 or email circ@saobserver.net

Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES with Black Press (Interior South)

Information

Information

SALMON ARM CITIZENS PATROL

Community service, flexible hours, interesting information, and friendship = SACP membership

Donations and bequests are requested for equipment to help care for patients and residents of the Hospital and Bastion Place. Tax receipts will be issued. Mail to: Shuswap Hospital Foundation Box 265, Salmon Arm, BC 7&/r1I Donate Online (secure site): www.shuswaphospitalfoundation.org

Help keep Salmon Arm safe by going out on a 4-hour patrol one afternoon or evening each month. We also take part in numerous community events and enjoy socializing together. For more information and an application find SAP at salmonarmcitizenspatrol.ca or at facebook.com/SACitizensPatrol

Black Press is Canada’s leading private independent newspaper company with more than 170 community, daily and urban newspapers in Canada, Washington State, Hawaii, California and Ohio and has extensive digital and printing operations.

Alphaliner Operator (Vernon Press) Vernon Press is hiring an Alphaliner/Mueller Stitcher Operator for their mailroom department. Duties will include helping operate a Alphaliner Collating Machine as a backup operator to the Shift Supervisor. Wage negotiable depending on experience. Should have some mechanical knowledge. Temporary Multi Media Sales Consultant (Vernon) Enjoy a creative environment? Understand the power of marketing on multiple platforms? The Vernon Morning Star is on the hunt for a full-time Multi-media Advertising Consultant on a temporary basis. We are looking for an exceptional sales person that’s as comfortable talking to tattoo artists as boardroom executives. You are creative, persuasive, fearless and have passion in everything you do. Every day you will take our incredible brand out into the Vernon market and convey the many benefits of advertising with the Morning Star both in print and through our digital options.

IF YOU and / or YOUR CHILDREN are being abused, call the

Women’s Emergency Shelter 250-832-9616

Stopping the Violence Counseling, 250-832-9700. Children who witness abuse program, 250-832-4474. Shuswap Mental Health Intake, 250-833-4102 or RCMP 250-832-6044

For more information on these vacancies and other regions throughout B.C. visit:

blackpress.ca/careers Denied Long-Term Disability, CPP or other Insurance? If, YES. Call: 604.937.6354 or e-mail: jfisher@dbmlaw.ca


Page A28 Friday, January 19, 2018

INDEX IN BRIEF

FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS ..............1-8 COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS....9-57 TRAVEL .......................................61-76 CHILDREN ...................................80-98 EMPLOYMENT .........................102-198 BUSINESS SERVICES ...............203-387 PETS & LIVESTOCK .................453-483 MERCHANDISE FOR SALE........503-587 REAL ESTATE...........................603-969 RENTALS.................................703-757 AUTOMOTIVE...........................804-862 MARINE...................................902-920

INDEX IN BRIEF

It is agreed by any Display or Classified Advertiser requesting space that the liability of the newspaper in the event of failure to publish an advertisement shall be limited to the amount paid by the advertiser for that portion of the advertising space occupied by the incorrect item only, and that there shall be no liability in any event beyond the amount paid for such an advertisement. The Publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. cannot bcclassifieds.com be responsible for errors after the first day of publication of any advertisement. Notice of errors on the first day should immediately be called to the attention of the Classified Department to be corrected for the following edition. reserves bcclassifieds.com the right to revise, edit, classify or reject any advertisement and to retain any answers directed to the bcclassifieds.com Box Reply Service and to repay the customer the sum paid for the advertisement and box rental.

DISCRIMINATORY LEGISLATION

Advertisers are reminded that provincial legislation forbids the publication of any advertisement which discriminates against any person because of race, religion, sex, colour, nationality, ancestry or place of origin, age, and physical or mental disability, unless the condition is justified by a bona fide requirement for the work involved.

COPYRIGHT

Copyright and/or properties subsist in all advertisements and in all other material appearing in this edition of bcclassifieds.com. Permission to reproduce wholly or in part and in any form whatsoever, particularly by a photographic or offset process in a publication must be obtained in writing from the Publisher. Any unauthorized reproduction will be subject to recouse in law.

ON THE WEB:

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Announcements

Employment

Employment

Employment

Services

Personals

Career Opportunities

Education/Trade Schools

Help Wanted

Education/Tutoring

Misc. Wanted

OPTICIAN TRAINING

Experienced Hooktender for New 650 Log Champ -12 mo yr, ext health,better than union wage, accommodations provided, Sechelt. Resume to dsladey@ telus.net 604-883-2435 Sladey Timber

PHARMACY TECHNICIAN TRAINING Online-based 43 wk program incls 8 wk practicum. Regulated Pharmacy Technicians earn $25-$28/hr in hospitals & $20-$27/hr in community pharmacies. Accredited by the Canadian Council for the Accreditation of Pharmacy Programs (CCAPP). www.stenbergcollege.com Toll-Free: 1-866-580-2772

Little bag of old gold, broken gold,scrap gold, broken gold, unwanted gold. 250-864-3521

MAKE A Connection. Real People, Flirty Chat Call FREE! 250-220-1300 or 1-800-2101010. www.livelinks.com 18+0

Employment Business Opportunities HIP OR KNEE REPLACEMENT? Arthritic Conditions/COPD? Restrictions in Walking/Dressing? Disability Tax Credit $2,000 Tax Credit $20,000 Refund. Apply Today For Assistance: 1-844-4535372.

MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION! In-demand career! Employers have work-at-home positions available. Get online training you need from an employertrusted program. Visit: CareerStep.ca/MT or 1-855-7683362 to start training for your work-at-home career today!

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Bartender/Server

Royal Canadian Legion #62 Salmon Arm Bartender/server long term (Serving It Right required). Semi-fulltime. Person must be well organized and be able to carry out duties plus promote the Legion’s objectives. We are looking for someone that can handle customers from 10 to 100. Saturdays is a must and some evening shifts are also required. Wage is entry level. Please drop off resume at the Legion or email

legion62@shaw.ca

Liquor Store Manager

Setters Pub Liquor Store is looking for a Manager or Manageress. Must have Serving It Right, experience in scheduling employees, ordering products, computer skills and working with provitec system. Benefits included. Please email resume to: setterspub@shaw.ca

Part Time Sales Associate

Fabricland is looking for a Part Time Sales Associate. Willing to work occasional weekends, sewing experience required.

Help Wanted Care Worker

Part-time position available, $18/hr to start, care experience preferred but can train the right candidate. Must be physically fit, nonsmoking environment. call Gwen at (250)835-0145

F/T General Labourers North Timber is looking to hire general labourers for full-time employment. We offer competitive wages & a comprehensive benefit pkg. Please email resume to netimber@junction.net

Liquor Store Clerk

Setters Pub Liquor Store is looking for a store clerk. Must hold Serving It Right and be 19 years of age.

Please email resume to: setterspub@shaw.ca

Drop off Resume: Salmon Arm Fabricland

Brad, owner and operator of Meszaros Plumbing would like to thank the community of Salmon Arm for the continued support and success of the business over the last 4 years. With the growth of the business brad is pleased to announce the change of name to...

Volunteers Shuswap Lake Health Care Auxiliary

invites you to join our volunteer group. Meetings are the 3rd Monday of each month throughout the year (except July & August). We are an active and dedicated group and have several fundraisers each year; raising money to purchase equipment for Shuswap Lake General Hospital and Bastion Place. Please call Donna at 250-804-3287 for more information.

WE WELCOME NEW MEMBERS

Farm Services

GREAT WEST PLUMBING AND GASFITTING LTD. With experienced staff we intend to continue serving the Shuswap area. Our qualified technicians come prepared and equipped to assist with any commercial or residential job.

REIMER’S FARM SERVICE LTD.

• Bark Mulch • Shavings • Sawdust

We Deliver

250-838-0111 or 1-855-737-0110 Garden & Lawn

Garden & Lawn

Salmon Arm

We are seeking individuals, preferably with experience handling challenging behavior, though on-the-job training will also be provided. Applicants must be committed to service of the highest quality and display a positive and helpful attitude. Shift work is involved. Requirements: O O

O

Education: Grade 12 or equivalent Experience: working with behavioral challenges is an asset Additional Skills: all aspects of care and training for adults with developmental disabilities is preferred

O

Valid Class 5 Drivers License/abstract

O

Community Care First Aid

O

Criminal Record Check

O

Medical Exam and Negative TB test

Please respond with your resume and cover letter to TCS at reception@tcsinfo.ca

PICK-UP OR DELIVERY

www.bccollegeofoptics.ca

Financial Services GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877-987-1420 www.pioneerwest.com

Home Improvements

Stanley Bland 832-6615 or 833-2449

Pets

PET GROOMING With Michelle

rFencing rDecks rSheds

Monday to Friday

All Breeds including Cats & Large Dogs

Appointments necessary. 271A Trans-Can. Hwy. N.E. (across from KFC) • 250-832-0604

Merchandise for Sale

Real Estate

Mortgages TEKAMAR MORTGAGES

Best rate 5yr-3.14%OAC

Serving the Columbia-Shuswap since 1976. www.tekamar.ca Rates Consistently better than banks

(250)832-8766

Toll free 1-800-658-2345

Rentals Modular Homes MARA: remodeled 3bdrm. mobile, wood stove & elec. heat, large addition & covered deck, 12 x 18 garage, $900/month + DD (250) 838-7670

250-253-4663

Trailer for Rent in Tappen 3 Bed, $900 / month. Avail. February 1st Adult park, text for more info: 250-262-7863

Painting & Decorating

Shared Accommodation

WWW.PAINTSPECIAL.COM

Salmon Arm Room For Rent

(250) 833-2505

3 Rooms For $299 2 Coats Any Colour (Ceiling & Trim extra)

Price incls. Cloverdale High Performance Paint. NO PAYMENT, until job is completed!

Pets

Feed & Hay ALFALFA grass first crop, excellent horse hay. $7.00/bale (250)803-8298

Merchandise for Sale

Auctions ONLINE AUCTION OF RESTAURANT & FOOD EQUIP - BIDDING OPEN JAN 23 / CLOSES JAN 30.5 Bailiff Seizures, 7 Walk-ins,7 Meat Grinders,14 + Slicers,Meat Band Saws, Spiral Mixers,Upright Freezers & Coolers,Sandwich Prep Line,Tables,Chairs,4 Combi & Convection ovens,35 Late Model Taylor Soft Serves,Microwaves,Smallwares & MORE!! - View ONSITE at Active Auction Mart, VIEW & BID Online at www.activeauctionmart.com - Tel # 604-371-1190 / email: buyit@activeauctionmart.com

Firewood/Fuel FOR SALE WANTED

r4IBWJOHT 4BXEVTU #BSL .VMDI 8PPE$IJQT CVMLNJOJCBHT

r8FMM3PUUFE.BOVSF r4PJMT r&YUSB$MFBO8IFBU4USBX

Pets

rRenovation rRepair rMaintenance

Dead standing Fir and Pin also decked wood and unwanted wood shed wood.

F

COMMUNITY SUPPORT WORKERS

Toll free: 1-877-581-0106

Seasoned Fir and Pine $180/Large Cord, local delivery available.

’s BARlMaSnALd ES

Contact us at: 250 804 6621 greatwestplumbing@gmail.com

26-week program includes hands-on practical. Earn $18-$28/hr. Work in an optometrist office or retail optical. Even start your own optical business 33-years in operation and PTIB accredited. All tuition fees income taxable deductible

Home & Yard

Farm Services

TCS is seeking Community Support Workers in the Salmon Arm area to work with adults with developmental disabilities.

.EWÖ */"3Ö POSTEDÖ DAILY

www.saobserver.net

250-832-1914

Misc. for Sale ERICKSON’S APPLIANCES

Shared accommodation, own bathroom, everything included. No parties, No drug use.

$650/month 778-762-2223

Suites, Upper Salmon Arm LARGE 1 bedroom, Single working adult, 35+ NP, NS, utilities, wifi incl.,damage deposit & written refs req. $800/month, Available Now 250-804-6123 /250-832-4827

Legal

Legal Notices CRIMINAL RECORD? Why suffer Employment/Licensing loss? Travel/Business opportunities? Be embarrassed? Think: Criminal Pardon. US Entry Waiver. Record Purge. File Destruction. Free Consultation 1-800-347-2540. accesslegalmjf.com IN THE MATTER OF WAREHOUSEMAN’S LIENS ACT Super Self Storage 4750 40th Avenue SE, Salmon Arm, BC Claims a Warehouseman’s lien against the following persons. If not paid in full on or before date stated, the goods will be disposed of on or after January 26, 2018. Jordan Simpson $750.00 Ales Paladino $570.00 Lawrence Scherle $670.00 Disposal date Jan 26 2018. Phone: 250-803-0030

Reconditioned Appliances New/Used Parts 90 Day Warranty Return

250-832-9968

603 - 3rd Ave. SW, Salmon Arm 100% Proceeds to Second Harvest. Hand Crafted Maple, Oak, Mountain Ash Canes & Walking Sticks. (250)832-7982 COLORADO BLUE SPRUCE: $0.99/each for a box of 180 ($178.20). Also full range of tree, shrub, and berry seedlings. Free shipping most of Canada. Growth guarantee. 1866-873-3846 or TreeTime.ca. For Sale: Snowblower 10 hp, electric start, call evenings, $ 300. obo 250-832-9475 SAWMILLS from only $4,397 MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/400OT 1-800-5670404 Ext:400OT.

Misc. Wanted Coin Collector Buying Coins Collections, Olympic Gold & Silver + Chad 250-863-3082

STAY CONNECTED. your local news, in print and online.


www.saobserver.net

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Friday, January 19, 2018 Page A29

PROTECT OUR

24/7 access to your local news wherever you are

PLANET...

RECYCLE THIS NEWS PAPER.

Fight Back. Volunteer your time, energy and skills today.

Visit your local community Black Press Media newspaper website & click on the E-EDITIONS button at the top of the page.


Page A30 Friday, January 19, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Community

WANT TO OUTSHINE YOUR COMPETITOR? Helping you deliver

THE RIGHT MESSAGE TO THE RIGHT AUDIENCE AT THE RIGHT TIME. Targeting your message to local consumers. Let us show you how — contact us today!

Disc drive saobserver.net Tel: 250-832-2131 • email: advertising@saobserver.net

Jim Elliot/Salmon arm obSErvEr

Levi and Mia Simpson race down the popular sledding hill at South Broadview Elementary.

We’re local!

BC Owned & Operated

50%

Your space is valuable - Ours is affordable...

OFF FIRST MONTH’S

Abbotsford – Simpson Rd. 30666 Simpson Rd

(604) 850-1696

RENT

*

*based on availability, not to be combined with any other discounts

Salmon Arm

Abbotsford – Townline Rd.

(250) 803-0030

(604) 755-5555

4750 40th Ave SE

2035 Townline Rd.

www.SuperSelfStorage.ca


Around Town

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

SATURDAY, JAN. 20

MUSIC FESTIVAL – Registration is open for the 18th Annual Shuswap Music Festival to be held April 16 to 27. Register online for adjudicated performances in strings, piano, vocal, choir and band at www.ShuswapFestival. com. Registration closes Jan. 31, 2018.

Friday, January 19, 2018 Page A31

Week, the Under the Lights Family Snowshoe runs from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Little Mountain Sports Fields, bring your own snowshoes, as there are only a limited number available.

MARCH - The annual Women’s March Canada, a march in solidarity with women and human rights groups around the world, will begin at 11 a.m. at Salmon Arm FRIDAY, JAN. 26 City Hall, 550 Second St. SE and will continue through SUNDAY, JAN. 21 Salmon Arm’s downtown to wind up at the Ross Street SHUSWAP JAMMERS – Take an instrument or plaza. BOLSHOI BALLET Romeo & Juliet, a new producyour dancing shoes to the new school district building LAST NIGHT - Written by Tim Kelly, the play Is on Shuswap Street every Friday for music, dancing and tion from the Bolshoi, will be transmitted live, begins at There a Doctor in the House? is from the SAS Acting singing, featuring door prizes, a 50/50 draw and lunch 1 p.m. and runs two hours and 20 minutes at the Salmar 11/12 class. This family-friendly farce runs Saturday, from 7 to 10 p.m. For more information, call Dean at Classic. Check with the Arts Council for $5 Youth Shu Jan. 20 at the Sullivan campus theatre. Tickets can be 250-804-9219. Go tickets. purchased at the SAS Sullivan office, through members COFFEE HOUSE - Writers and Readers meet from FAMILY SWIM - A free session from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. of the cast or at the door. 2 to 4 p.m., Blue Canoe Bakery on Hudson Street, feaat the SASCU Recreation Centre. FITNESS FOR SENIORS - The SASCU Recreation turing Jim Cooperman who will talk about Everything Centre has once again received sponsorship to run a Shuswap, copies available. Presented by the Shuswap fitness program for inactive seniors. The Active Age MONDAY, JAN. 22 Writers’ Group. Level One Program is designed for people 65 years and WALKING MEDITATION - Labyrinth walks at 10 older and not physically active but would like to become a.m. at the First United Church Hall. SATURDAY, JAN. 27 more active. The free program will run from Thursday, Feb. 8 to April 26 from 9 to 10 a.m. FILM - Shuswap Film Society Call the rec centre at 250-832-4044 presents Beatriz at Dinner, a U.S. for more information. modern-day comedy of ethnic UNPLUG AND PLAY WEEK manners, where a group of CaliNumerous activities to enjoy and fornia grandees celebrating some disconnect parents and kids from new extra-legal financial coup are screens. A full schedule available on analyzed by the family’s masseuse, www.shuswapliteracy.ca runs 5 and 7:30 p.m. at the Salmar Classic. PUPPET PLAY - Special puppet time at 3 p.m. at the Salmon Arm OPEN DANCE - City Dance branch of the Okanagan Regional is hosting an open dance with a Library. variety of dance styles including country, ballroom and Latin at FLEA MARKET - The Shuswap 7:30 p.m. in the studio upstairs at Society for the Arts and Culture Shuswap Total Fitness, in the same announces the start of a monthly building as Junglemania. Please use indoor flea market. The first market side staircase for entry. from 1 to 5 p.m. in the gymnasium at the Downtown Activity Centre, THEATRE FUN - Family fun Includes clean, 451 Shuswap Street, S.W. Organifrom noon to 1:30 at the Shuswap adjust and lube as required… zations are welcome as well as inTheatre. dividual sellers. Admission by $2 FAMILY FOOTY - An all-ages • Most cars and light trucks donation. Table rental is $20. Call fun event runs at the Salmon Arm up to 30 for 250-832-2300 to reserve a space. Indoor Arena from 1 p.m. only + tax to 3 p.m.Soccer + tax min. incl. for Future markets will be the third Bring clean, indoor runSaturday of the month until May. ning shoes. Offer Valid ‘til Feb. 28, 2018 FILM - Shuswap Film Society STORYTIME - Runs at 3:30 p.m. presents Pop Aye, a film from Thaiat the Salmon Arm Library branch land where Thana, unable to deal located in the Mall at Piccadilly. 1151 10th Ave. SW • The Mall at Piccadilly, Salmon Arm with his mid-life crisis at home, ART EXHIBITION - First-ever Auto Service hours: Monday to Saturday 8am-5pm leaves on a journey in his native 250-832-5030 • Locally Owned & Operated Silver Creek Art Workshop exhiThailand. Along the way he meets bition form 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the up with his former childhood pet, Silver Creek Seniors Hall. Food and FAMILY CURLING - All welcome for a free session Pop Aye the elephant. Runs at 5 p.m., Salmar Classic. from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the Salmon Arm Curling Rink. refreshments served by donation. REINO KESKI-SALMI LOPPET - The 34th annual Bring clean indoor shoes. TUESDAY, JAN. 30 Reino Keski-Salmi Loppet goes at Larch Hills ski area. BOWLING - Kids under 18 bowl free from 3 p.m. Online registration at www.skilarchhills.ca. Race routes to 6 p.m. Reservations recommended at 250-832-3946. DOCUMENTARY - A showing of Screenagers, a and start times are the same as last year, with the first documentary about online usage for teens, is running races beginning at 9 a.m. See www.skilarchhills.ca for TUESDAY, JAN. 23 at 6:30 p.m., at the Salmar Classic Theatre. All are welmore. come and admission is free but RSVP at sd83dpac@ BLUES LOVERS - The Blind Bay Blues Club is having STROLL LAKESIDE - Sorrento Beach Walkers walk gmail.com or by clicking the EventBright link online on the foreshore on the third Saturday of the month. For a jam session at the Blind Bay Hall at 7 p.m.. For more, at dpac.sd83.bc.ca. Donations the Literacy Alliance of contact Chris Emery at 250-675-2865. information, call Dan McKerracher at 250-319-5121. the Shuswap are welcome. ALL MAGIC - Leif David will perform a magic show COUNTRY BREAKFAST - Sunnybrae Senors Hall WEDNESDAY, JAN. 31 at 3585 Sunnybrae Canoe Point Road from 8 a.m. to 11 at 4 p.m. at the Salmon Arm Library branch. a.m. Breakfast with plain or blueberry pancakes, French WINTER PARTY - Carlin School hosts the Unplug FILM - Shuswap Film Society presents Faces Places, toast, hash brown potatoes, smokey or a mennonite and Play event from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., there will a film from France, a documentary which celebrates sausage and all the fixings. be sledding if there is suitable snow. the power of art to transform lives. Runs 7:30 p.m. at WRITE STUFF – The Askew’s Word on the Lake the Salmar Classic. writing contest is open for fiction, non-fiction and po- THURSDAY, JAN. 25 FRIDAY, FEB. 2 etry, cash prizes for first-place winners, awards at SatSHUSWAP GARDEN CLUB - Meeting 7 p.m. at the urday night festivities of the Word on the Lake Writers’ ENDERBY OLD TIME DANCE CLUB – will hold Scout Hall, 2460 Auto Rd. Guest speakers Phil Wright Festival that takes place May 11 to 13 at the Prestige its Valentine’s dance at 7 p.m. at the Enderby Drill Hall. and Ronnalee McMahon will give a presentation on the Harbourfront Resort and Okanagan College. For info, Everyone of all ages is welcome. Refreshments. For info, history of the Salmon Arm Fall Fair. Everyone welcome. go to www.shuswapassociationofwriters. call Jim at 250-515-1176. FAMILY SNOWSHOE - Part of Unplug and Play

Get a grip!

We have lots of winter tires in stock and on sale. Let’s get some traction and get going!

Brake Service ~ all 4 wheels Check Engine Light Scan & System Diagnostic

49

95

69

95

Canadian Tire

Call us at 250-832-2131, drop in to our office, or use our new, easy to use calendar online. You can now upload your own events on our website…AND IT’S EASY!! Simply go to www.saobserver.net, go to CALENDAR, and click on Add Your Event.


Page A32 Friday, January 19, 2018

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

SHUSWAP PERKS CHOCOLATES - MADE IN STORE WIDE SELECTION OF BULK FOOD • DAILY SPECIALS

READY TO ENJOY MEALS • COFFEE SHOP & BAKERY SURE CROP FEEDS • FREE WI-FI • LOTTERY

Hours: Monday-Thursday 8:30 am - 7 pm Friday 8:30 am - 8 pm Saturday 8:30 am - 6 pm Sunday & Holidays 9 am - 6 pm

250-679-3261 Chase, BC

SALE PRICES EFFECTIVE:

January 19 - 25, 2018 W IT H

smart one card price

Big Savings!

New Harbor

100% Arabic Coffee

453 g . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Theresa’s Bakery Picks: Flax Bread ..............................

4 98 2 48 2

00

2 for

Cream Horns

Made Fresh in Store, 3 Pack . . . . . . . . . . . .

Cake Donuts

6 Pack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

W IT H

Picked Fresh CARE

YOU SAVE 3

01

Good Natured

Hearty Lentil Soup

481 mL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

for

YOU SAVE 2 9 8 o n 2

Clover Leaf

Chunk or Flaked Tuna

Sel. Var., 170 g . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

YOU SAVE 4

Carey

56

on 4

Salsa

Sel. Var., 12 oz. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Tio Franco

YOU SAVE 1

98

432 g . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

YOU SAVE 1

for

on 2

Refried Beans

98

for

for

on 2

Clover Leaf

Baby Clams

142 g . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

YOU SAVE 3

38

for

on 2

Western Family

Pieces & Stems Mushrooms

284 mL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

YOU SAVE 2

Laura’s Produce Picks B.C. Ambrosia Apples 2.16/kg . . . . . . . . . . . Stalk Celery

98 ¢ 78 98 2

1.72/kg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Organic

Carrots

2 lb. Bag . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

¢ lb.

lb.

ea.

95

for

on 5

Richfield

French Style Beets

425 g. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

YOU SAVE 2

19

for

on 3

Island Farms

Ice Cream

Sel. Var., 4 L . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

YOU SAVE 3 01

Bulk Foods

Pinto Beans ...................

4 500 00 5 00 5 00 5 500 00 5 498 98

4

98

Brent’s Deli Picks:

Marble Cheddar

........................

Casa Italia

45

/100 g

YOU SAVE 30¢/kg

100 g /100 g

Mild Soppressata . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . InStore Made!

Beef Pot Pies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

100 g

each

W IT H

Cut Fresh CARE

Carol’s Meat Picks

Eye of Round Roast

4 98 5 98 6

10.98/kg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Pork Back Ribs

¢

2 29 2 99 2 29

Armstrong

13.18/kg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Stewing Beef

15.39/kg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

At Safety Mart Foods Customers Are Really Everything!

EVERYTHING WE DO IS BAKED, PICKED, CUT & MADE WITH C.A.R.E. because

We reserve the right to limit quantities - Check our weekly flyer for more specials

98 lb.

lb.

lb.

Lakeshore News, January 19, 2018  

January 19, 2018 edition of the Lakeshore News

Lakeshore News, January 19, 2018  

January 19, 2018 edition of the Lakeshore News