Page 1

Lakeshore

Shuswap Vol. 28 No. 50 December 15, 2017

Market News

Wa App rrant rov y ed!

No ent tm n i o ry App cessa e N

It’s Our Duty to Your Car! Since 1978

HOURS: Mon. to Sat. 8 a.m. - 6 p.m.

Helping the Environment! all used oil & filters are sent out for recycling

1291 TCH SW Salmon Arm salmonarm.gcocltd.com • 250-832-1040

Inside Shuswap

Songs of the season

A4 Lotto win

Sicamous man gets early Christmas present. Plus Opinion A6 South Shuswap A9

Bastion Elementary choir students Aurora McKenna, Daylen Zachary and Étoile Brown sing, It’s Beginning to Look a Lot Like Christmas, the opening number in the school’s Celebration of Christmas concert on Wednesday, Dec. 6.

Chase

A34

Business bests

Chamber presents Business Excellence awards. Plus Chase Heat A35

Flyers • Askew’s* • Best Buy* • Blind Bay Village Grocer* • The Brick* • Canadian Tire* • Christmas in Kamloops* • Home Hardware* • JYSK* • London Drugs* • Mark’s Workwear* • No Frills* • Peavey Mart* • Pharmachoice* • Pharmasave* • Real Estate Guide • Superstore* • Safety Mart* • Shoppers* • Sobeys-Safeway* • Source* • Sport Chek* • Staples* • Visions* • Walmart* • Zimmer Group* *Limited distribution

LachLan Labere/SaLmon arm obServer

Flagger’s death shines light on dangers

Company calls for more awareness and respect for worker safety. Martha Wickett salmon arm observer

When Traci Jeeves would send out a more inexperienced traffic control person to a job, she would always rest easy knowing they were with Belle Bourroughs. Jeeves is owner of Okanagan Traffic Control Professionals out of Armstrong and Bourroughs had worked for her for 10 years. Bourroughs, who had been a flag person for 37 years, was struck by a ve-

hicle on Nov. 17 – her 66th birthday – while doing traffic control on Highway 6 in Lavington. She died as a result of her injuries on Dec. 6. “She was top notch,” says Jeeves. Bourroughs’ death is being felt by all those she worked with and is highlighting the dangers of the job. According to WorkSafeBC statistics, between 2007 and 2016 in B.C., 15 roadside workers were killed by

a vehicle while working on or beside the road. Of the 244 people hit, 161 were in the construction trades and 124 of those, 77 per cent, were flag persons. Rob Hein, manager of roads and parks with the City of Salmon Arm, says the city used Okanagan Traffic Control regularly. “We’re pretty sad about it… It’s unfortunate – it’s an unnecessary accident. It’s a really dangerous Continued on A3

martha Wickett/SaLmon arm obServer.

Lisa Storey and Belle Bourroughs, right, with Okanagan Traffic Control out of Armstrong were pictured during a break on Aug. 18. Burroughs was struck by a vehicle on Nov. 17 while doing traffic control. She died on Dec. 6 as a result of her injuries.

GIVE THE GIFT OF SKIING

SKI

AS LOW AS

72

$

* / DAY

3 OR 5 “ANY DAY” LIFT TICKETS DIRECT TO LIFT

*Price based on Adult 5 Day pass

ON SALE UNTIL DECEMBER 20

ONLY AVAILABLE AT


Page A2 Friday, December 15, 2017

BRABY MOTORS CHRISTMAS CASH Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

FREE Gift with

every vehicle purchase!

Plus

tom

9 Speed Au

$

1500 M A R 7 1 20 SXT 4X4 5.7 L Hemi

Plus

1,000

$

18-17

10,000

HOLIDAY CASH!

No Payments ‘til Spring 17-500

2018 RAM 3500 LARAMIE CREW CAB Diesel, auto, 4x4

Plus

1 ,000 HOL $

IDAY C A

SH!

18-88

2017 RAM 1500 SLT 4x4 Eco Diesel, Back Up Cam

Friday, December 15, 2017 Page A43

17-381

2017 DO CARAVA DGE GRAND Stow ‘n Go. N SXT

Plus

1,00 0

$

HOL IDAY CA

CASH BACK!

1906 m9o/., 4w.19e%ek

s… u l 0 P 9 3 , ! 34 k c a B h s a C $ 5,000 $

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

$

UP TO

1,000

EE $ K O R E H EP C E J 7 1 0 2 HOLIDAY CASH! X4 SPORT 4atic

17-382

www.saobserver.net

SH!

33,495 $ Plus… 106/week $ 5,000 C ash Bac k! * 2018 $

96 mo., 4

.19%

17-406

2017 RA LARAMI M 1500 5.7 L Hemi, E CREW C AB Moon R

Plus

1 , 000 HOL $

IDAY C A

oof.

SH!

Plus

1 , 000 HOL $

IDAY C A

SH!

64,988 $ 285 /week 209/week 190 /week P … l u $ $ 45,993 Plus 87,650 63,995 s … s… Plu s… Plu 1 ! 0 k , c 0 a 0 B 0 $ h $ C s ash Bac a C 5,000 Cash Back! 10,000 Cash Back! $ 5,000 k! $

135/week .99% 96 mo., 1

$

$

96 mo., 4.19%

$

$

$

96 mo., 1.99%

96 mo., 4

.19%

Chris Davis

General Manager

Ted Boyd

General Sales Manager

Justin Braby

Sales Manager

Aaron Johnston

Sales Manager

Lisa Honcoop

Financial Services Manager

Brenda Andreas

Financial Services Manager

brabymotors com

DL 5099

*First payment Due in 90 days.

1250 Trans Canada Highway SW, Salmon Arm • 250-832-8053 or 1-888-832-8053

Don White Sales

Warren Inskip Sales

Mickey Sims Sales

Jason Schubert Sales

Brent Ross Sales

Christine Ellis Sales

Mallory Sisson Sales


Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

News

Friday, December 15, 2017 Page A3

Novelty Poinsettias

Co-workers mourn longtime traffic control worker Continued from A1 career, unfortunately. The number of people doing that job that get hit is really astounding.” The company also works regularly in Vernon and Spallumcheen. Jeeves is devastated by Burroughs’ death, who she considered a friend. Because of the fatality, Jeeves’ business is being investigated by WorkSafe BC. She has handed over about 700 documents so far. “The safety of all roadside workers is an ongoing concern and priority for WorkSafe BC,” writes the organization in an email. “Ultimately, however, the employer is obligated by law to ensure worker safety.” Jeeves emphasizes she’s a strict employer who adheres to all rules, regulations and documentation required. She says she has gone over in her head how she could have done things better, but hasn’t come up with anything that could have saved her employee’s life. “There’s nothing I can see looking back, how I could have made things safer for Isabelle and, with her experience, nothing I would have done any differently.” Jeeves would like to see more driver awareness of the job flag people must do as well as more respect for them. “We actually catch the brunt of everyone’s anger. I can tell you, on a regular basis, at each and every worksite…, if you haven’t been flipped the bird by 4 p.m., you’re still going to get it. There’s always someone that gives us hell.” Since Bourroughs was hit, flaggers Jeeves knows have been talking about whether the job is really worth

Nico’s Christmas Store Red Glitter

Ice Crystal

ut! 4” Poinsettia

Blowo

Winter Rose

Sale!! as low as

350

FREE in town Delivery on all cut trees! Cut Trees for all Budgets Let us help you decorate

In Style

Lisa VanDerVeLDe/Vernon Morning star.

Belle Bourroughs, a flag person with 37 years experience, was struck by a vehicle on Highway 6 in Lavington on Nov. 17. it. “It breaks my heart to think flag people are not being treated properly. We are already low man on the ladder, we don’t get paid enough, we know what we’re doing, and we’re first in line for abuse. “There needs to be flagger awareness. We need more respect.” A celebration of the

life of Belle Bourroughs, who leaves behind her spouse, five children and three grandchildren, will be held at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, Dec. 19 at the Enderby Royal Canadian Legion #98, 909 Belvedere St., Enderby. Telling the whole story

journALIsmis.ca

Gift Certificate available s

Wednesday

11:00 am - 7:00 pm 7 oz. NY Steak

c/w fries, salad and garlic toast.

Thursday

5:00 pm - 10:00 pm St. Louis Ribs and Spaghetti

1399 $ 69 $ 99 13 16

$

1/2 Rack

Full

the season’s freshest look begins with a living tree! from

9.99

Gift Certificates Available!

Put these great items under your tree! Socks • Gloves • Yaktrax • Multi function digital tire pressure guage • Multi purpose Jump Starter ...and not to forget 2Undr Underwear.

Just to name a few. "Where you’re treated like part of the family" 330 Alexander Street, NE Downtown Salmon Arm • 250-832-2113

New at Nico’s! Pure Coconut Oil Lotions, Diffusers, and Essential Oils

Decorated Fresh Wreaths, Swags & Hanging Gardens from 29.99

Fresh Boughs 7.50 /bundle on 3 or more bundles

Now Available! OPEN EVERYDAY ‘TIL CHRISTMAS EVE! CHRISTMAS STORE 250-804-2004

www.nicosnurseryland.com


Page A4 Friday, December 15, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

News

www.saobserver.net

DeMille’s Christmas Checklist:

Fresh Turkeys

They are the best we have checked them inside and out!

❏ Christmas Turkey -The best fresh Turkey ❏ Bread Crumbs ❏ Brussel Sprouts ❏ Yams & Sweet Potatoes ❏ Green Beans ❏ Potatoes ❏ Salad Fixin’s ❏ Dinner Buns ❏ Pies ❏ Cheese ❏ Milk ❏ Poinsettias ❏ Trees too

Check out our great selection of Marvel comic metal signs. We have man cave gifts too

Merry win for Shuswap man Five-dollar scratch lotto ticket becomes a $100,000 winner for Sicamous resident.

st The Be a’s p d Gran ranges aO Satsum World! the

Lachlan Labere Eagle Valley News

We are CLOSED Christmas Day & Boxing Day. Open Dec. 27-31st. We will be closed January 1st to Jan 4th. We will open again January 5th regular hours Mon., - Sat., 8 am - 6:30 pm, Sun., 9 am - 5:30 pm 3710 TC Hwy., West, Salmon Arm • 1-250-832-7550

BC Lottery Corporation photo

Bruce Tune holds his BC Lottery Corporation cheque for $100,000 after winning top prize on a Merry Money scratchand-win ticket.

www.demilles.ca

Christmas arrived early for Bruce Tune in the form of a $100,000 lottery win. Last week, the BC Lottery Corporation announced the retired Sicamous resident had won top prize on a Merry Money x10 scratch-and-win ticket. “I’ve never won anything more than $100 in my whole life

in scratch tickets,” said Tune, still overwhelmed by the experience. Aside from helping his kids out with a little extra Christmas money, Tune said he’ll bank most of the winnings, which will help make life a little easier. “My wife has MS and I look after her pretty much full time,” said Tune. The ticket was purchased at the Sicamous

Chevron station. Tune said he waited until he was back at home before scratching it. He then gave it a “double, triple and quadruple” check, and was back at the Chevron within an hour to confirm he had a winner. “When they check it, the lottery machine kind of freezes and says congratulations, a lottery representative will call the retailer, so you hang around and

they call and you talk to somebody from the lottery,” said Tune. After receiving confirmation, it was off to the BCLC building in Kamloops, where Tune said he answered a bunch of questions, had his photo taken with a large novelty cheque and received his winnings. Tune celebrated the win with a dinner at home with his family.

CUSTOMER APPRECIATION DAY Wednesday, December 20

nts e m h s Refre odies! & Go

15% OFF* Regular Priced Merchandise *Excludes sale items, prescriptions, lottery, phone & gift cards.

Holiday Hours: Dec.21st • Open to 8pm Dec 22 & 23 • Open to 5:30 Dec 24th • Open 10-4 (Sunday) 270 Hudson Avenue • 250-832-2111 • www.pharmasavesalmonarm.com

In Sto Draw re for

$ 50 Gift Baske

t!


Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

News

Friday, December 15, 2017 Page A5

Hurdles ahead for off-road vehicle plan RCMP, ICBC not yet on-board with District of Sicamous’ proposed bylaw. Lachlan Labere Eagle Valley News

Some significant hurdles remain in the way of Sicamous’ proposed off-road vehicle bylaw. The public got a chance to view the most current draft of the bylaw during a Nov. 28 open house hosted by the District of Sicamous. Coun. Gord Bushell said more than 200 people attended and, of them, only four expressed concerns. He said the rest were “overwhelmingly in favour,” adding similar feedback has been received through an online survey. While the bylaw remains a work in progress, the goal is to allow off-road vehicle users on designated district roads to access popular off-road recreational trails, particularly Queest and Owlhead. “It’s basically the entire town other than parks – you can drive on the streets, but it’s only to get you to the hill and back home, you can’t drive around and get groceries or go to the restaurant,” said Bushell. The district has devised a registration system that requires those wanting to take advantage of the bylaw to purchase a permit and decal. “You read the bylaw, you read the rules and regulations, you sign, you pay another fee for a sticker, a Sicamous sticker that goes on your licence plate,” said Bushell. “The

reason we’re doing it this way is because right now our bylaw officer can’t search a Saskatchewan plate or an Alberta plate… they can only search a B.C. plate. The big part of that is the education part… it is just like a rental agreement or contract.” Those who seek a permit will also have to be properly insured to drive on municipal roads. Bushell likens the bylaw to a provincial pilot project launched last summer in Chase and Qualicum Beach, one that allows residents to drive golf carts along designated municipal routes. Unlike that project, however, Bushell says the province, ICBC and the RCMP are still not onboard with the off-road vehicle bylaw. Sicamous Sgt. Murray McNeil has a number of concerns with the proposed bylaw. Regarding the pilot project in Chase, he explained that was done with support from ICBC and the province, which agreed to amend the B.C. Motor Vehicle Act to make it work. What Sicamous is proposing, however, is currently prohibited under the act. “For this bylaw to be passed and be legal, they would have to do what Chase has done, they would have to get the province to amend Motor Vehicle Act regulations and get ICBC to agree that this is something

they support, and then ICBC would then sell insurance for ATVs or snowmobiles to be operating on the street,” said McNeil, adding this is currently not occurring anywhere in B.C. McNeil said the only legal avenue available for use of an off-road vehicle on municipal streets is a police-issued permit. This, he explained, might be sought by a business wishing to use an ATV along a certain route. He emphasized this permit is not to promote tourism. And this is another difference McNeil sees between what Chase has and what Sicamous is pursuing. “It doesn’t really translate to a tourism thing because no one is going into Chase and Qualicum Beach trailering in their golf carts for the privilege of driving a golf cart through those communities,” said McNeil. “It’s just for local people to get around. And I think what Sicamous is proposing is a tourism-driven thing, to try to get people to come into this community with their ATVs or with their snowmobiles and drive them on the streets…” Bushell has stated the long-term vision for the bylaw is to help grow Sicamous’ off-road vehicle industries,especially during the spring and fall. In addition to the bylaw being in conflict with the Motor Vehi-

cle Act, McNeil said he personally is not in favour of the proposed bylaw due to the potential for collisions in high-traffic areas. “You start putting snowmobiles or ATVs on streets where you have cars, in a high-traffic, area there’s potential for collision, for injury and, of course, lawsuits tied to that…,” said McNeil. “The enforcement side would be difficult as well. These are vehicles that can travel at higher rates of speed and of course, they’re suited to evade police if they wanted to. A snowmobile can take

File photo

Dion Buhler leads, Trish Buhler, Jerry Giles and Maureen Giles head up Owlhead on their snowmobiles. A proposed District of Sicamous off-road vehicle bylaw, if approved, would make it possible for people on sleds and ATVs to use designated municipal roads to access local trailheads. off up a logging road, and so can an ATV, and it would be very

difficult for police to catch up with them. Yeah, on the law en-

For great shopping & holiday fun make your choice the Mall at Piccadilly! Santa’s Visit & Photos

December 3 - 24

Extended Shopping Hours

December 15 - 24

Christmas Gift Wrapping Station

WIN A TRIP FOR 4 TO HAWAII! Post an ad to our new classified site to be entered for a chance to win!

HAWAII FIVE’n GO: Post five or more ads to be entered to win a $1,000 Visa card too!

sellit. findit. loveit. saobserver.net/loveit

forcement side there’s lots of concern as well.”

December 14 - 24

Old Fashioned Christmas Family Day

December 16 ▪ 11am - 3pm

rd g Ca n i p op or

s Sh mps f

to all M a e t g Ch llect S g at th oppin - 23 Co ppin 0 Sh er 3 0 b sho a $5 cem e win ee D r Sp

a ristm


Opinion

Page A6 Friday, December 15, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Legalization means rules The announcement this week that B.C.’s Liquor Distribution branch will have responsibility for distribution of non-medical marijuana shouldn’t have come as a surprise, though it seems it did for many. Regardless of whatever unproven medical benefits cannabis might have it is still, like alcohol, a mind-altering drug. So using an established framework and distribution system for controlled substances only makes sense. When it comes to medical cannabis use, again, don’t be surprised when the government directs that to another established distribution network: pharmacies. You were never going to be able to light up at work, in someone else’s home without permission or while walking down the street, any more than it would be acceptable to crack open a beer in those situations. Here’s another myth to be shot down. Legal pot isn’t going to be cheap. The province isn’t likely to tax pot as heavily as cigarettes — unless they really want to keep the street dealers employed — but taxes there will be and the now legal growers, most likely big corporations, are going to want their share too. Legalizing cannabis is a good thing, but it also means major limitations on the current freewheeling production, supply and distribution of the drug. People have used “medicinal” for as an excuse for so long that many people believe it, but once it’s legal, suppliers will no longer be able to make unfounded claims — they’ll have to prove it to Health Canada. Because, after all, what we are talking about is a recreational drug. -Black Press

Publisher: Rick Proznick Editor: Publisher Tracy Hughes

171 Shuswap Street NW Box 550 Salmon Arm, British Columbia 171 Shuswap V1E 4N7 Street NW Box 550 Phone: 250-832-2131 Salmon Arm, British Columbia Fax: V1E 4N7 250-832-5140

Rick Proznick Editor Tracy Hughes Office Manager Phone:of the250-832-2131 This Shuswap Market News is a member British Columbia Press Council, Louise Phillips a self-regulatory body governing the province’s250-832-5140 newspaper industry. The council Fax:

considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. This Shuswap Market News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, the input from both the newsa self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council paper and the complaint holder. If talking theofeditor ornewspapers. publisher does not considers complaints from the public about thewith conduct member oversee theabout mediation of complaints, the input from bothyou the newspaper resolveDirectors your complaint coverage or story treatment, may contact the and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve be sent B.C. Press Council.Your written concern, with documentation, should your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press within Council.Your 45 days, to written B.C. Press Council, P.O. Box 1356, Ladysmith, B.C. V9G 1A9. concern, with documentation, should be sent within 45 days, to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanimo, or B.C. 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 goV9R to www.bcpresscouncil.org. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org

If you did not receive the Shuswap Market News, call circulation for re-delivery: 250 832-2131. p

p

Gift a taste of the great outdoors the Great outdoors James Murray The other day, while walking down to get the mail, I found myself looking at one particular tree with several apples still clinging to its branches. I suddenly had the overwhelming desire to go home and make an apple pie. Walking back, I began to think about fishing trips I would like to make in the new year. As I walked along, I also started to ponder what I would make for supper. Sometimes just going to get the mail can really work up an appetite. I like to eat. I also like to cook, and, I get a special sense of intrigue when I open up the pages of a new cook book. For me, cook books are not only a unique opportunity to experience new and exciting savoury delights, they also represent somewhat of a challenge. Success has its own reward when you sit down to enjoy the fruits of your labour. Near misses and disasters are, well, what I like to refer to as learning experiences. It is one thing to create a gourmet meal in one’s kitch-

en where you have all the necessary ingredients, not to mention proper pots and pans and space to lay everything out in preparation. It is another to prepare a meal in the wild or around the campfire. Which brings me to my point. There are a lot of really good cookbooks designed for preparing meals in the great outdoors. And, since Christmas is just around the corner, what better gift to give an outdoor enthusiast/ cook than a cookbook specifically on preparing meals in the outdoors. There is something to be said for waking up in the woods and making breakfast in the open air, or gathering with friends and family around a campfire after a day of enjoying the outdoors. Good food makes for enjoyable camping. Campfire Cuisine: Gourmet Recipes For The Great Outdoors, by Robin Donovan, is a guide for lovers of both good food and the great outdoors. “Campfire Cusine is a cookbook for the growing number of hikers,

campers and backpackers who are making healthy, tasty, and satisfying food a high priority in their lives. It offers more than 100 simple but inspired recipes for meals that can be cooked at a campsite or in any other outdoor setting. Each recipe is made with fresh foods and ingredients, never relying on ready-made food products.” Hungry Campers Cookbook: Fresh, Healthy And Easy Recipes To Cook On Your Next Camping Trip, by Katy Holder, “brings together the fun of family camping holidays with fresh, healthy, gourmet yet simple recipes. Holder has combined her many years of food writing with her love of camping to produce this cookbook for anyone embarking on a camping trip. All recipes use fresh ingredients and require minimal cooking equipment. Chapters include Prepare Ahead Meals, Fire Up the Barbecue, One-Pot Dinners and Campfire Cooking for Kids. Holder also understands the requirements of cooking while camping and offers a wealth of advice on eating well while sleeping in your tent or under the stars.” Two friends in one vehicle for five months, across 10 provinces and three territories, with eight ferries, two flights and one 48-hour

train ride culminated in Feast: Recipes and Stories from a Canadian Road Trip, by Lindsay Anderson and Dana Vanveller. Anderson and Vanveller first met around an Okanagan campfire in 2011. They became fast friends and began planning Feast a year later. “Avid cooks, writers and photographers, their project allowed them to highlight Canada’s vibrant and varied food culture – 37,000 kilometres later, and toting a “Best Culinary Travel Blog” award from Saveur magazine, Anderson and Vanveller, along with more than 80 contributors, including farmers, grandmothers, First Nations elders and acclaimed chefs, present over 100 regional recipes…” While this may not be a cookbook for cooking meals on a camp stove, it surely captures all the aromas and flavours of the outdoors and would certainly be the kind of cookbook I would recommend for preparing meals to be served over the long, cold winter. While these are but a few of the cookbooks on my shelf, I’m sure each would make a great Christmas present – especially for those who want a little taste of the wild in their meals. I know they can really work up an appetite.


Viewpoint

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Friday, December 15, 2017 Page A7

We Deliver

Pre-order your 250-832-7700 FRESH Christmas Centrepieces for pick up or delivery. Best selection of candles and napkins.

Proud Supporters of the Shuswap S.P.C.A

Salmon Arm RONA 2430 - 10th Ave. SW • 250-832-7044 Mon. to Fri. • 7 am to 5:30 pm Sat. • 8 am to 5:30 pm Sun. • 9 am to 5 pm

Merry Christmas and Happy New Year from all of us at Rona Closed Dec. 24-25-26 Open Regular Hours: Dec. 27, 28, 29 7 am to 5:30 Saturday 8 am to 5:30 pm

Jim Elliot/Salmon arm obSErvEr

Canines at Christmas

Dale and Emma Widdifield, along with their dogs Izzy and Angus (dressed in Christmas coats and collars) get in the festive spirit by picking out a Christmas tree from Jespersens tree farm.

Closed Dec. 31 and Jan. 1, 2018

Nuclear treaty needs signing Gwynne Dyer paints a gloomy picture of the current nuclear weapons threat, assuring us that President Trump does have the power and authority to order the use of nuclear weapons (Shuswap Market News, Dec. 1). He then quotes Bill Blair, who served in the US Air Force as a missile launch con-

trol officer during the Cold War. Blair says that profound reflection on the part of many of his colleagues resulted in the formation of Global Zero, a group that advocates eliminating nuclear weapons entirely. What Gwynne Dyer fails to mention is that an International Treaty on the Prohibition

of Nuclear Weapons has recently been negotiated by 122 member countries of the United Nations. Existing treaties have outlawed chemical and biological weapons, leading to their elimination. But nuclear weapons have never been prohibited, and all nine nuclear weapons countries are cur-

rently modernizing their nuclear arsenals, claiming they are essential to their security. Prime Minister Trudeau has so far refused to sign the Prohibition Treaty. We need to change his mind. Canadians are invited to endorse the ‘Call on Canada to Sign the Prohibition Treaty’, already endorsed by

many organizations, including the national United and Anglican Churches, and by nearly 2,000 individuals. Anne Morris

We have the right ski’s for your family!

141 Shuswap Street, Salmon Arm skookumcycleandski.com

Like us on Facebook

www.facebook.com/SalmonArmRona

Find out about our exclusive Facebook offers!

B.C.S.P.C.A. (Shuswap)

AD PT-A-PET

832-7376 • 5850 AUTO ROAD SE V1E 1X2 www.shuswapspca.com Hours for Adoptions - Tuesday to Saturday Noon - 4 p.m.

This is Jetty, he is a Staffordshire Terrier, Mastiff, Affenpincher, Border Collie mix. However he may not be what you might expect from a mix he is a sensitive dog, loud noises and new situations scare him, who is looking for a home that has lots of time to be with him. He has food guarding issues so he would be best in a home where he is the only dog and no preteen children. Jetty loves to be outside but wants to be with someone, we are working on him being alone in the enclosed yard for short periods. He would make a wonderful companion dog for a single or no young children couple. Jetty just loves to cuddle, we sit and read with him and he thinks that it is just the best. While Jetty is a mix of many breeds he is also a diamond in the rough.

Open 7 Days a Week

Open to 8 pm Dec 20-23 Christmas Eve 10 am - 4 pm

We also do: • Fat Bike Rentals • Ski & Board Tuning • Snowshoes - Sales and Rentals • Base Layers

250-832-7368


Page A8 Friday, December 15, 2017

News

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Hotel plan approved despite opposition Salmon Arm council gives nod to the requested rezoning and height variances. Martha Wickett Salmon Arm Observer

The pleas of existing hoteliers did not sway Salmon Arm council’s view of a rezoning application for a new hotel in town. Hollypark Hotels Corporation wants to build a six-storey, 95room Fairfield Inn & Suites Marriott International hotel at 79016th St. NE, across from Salmon Arm Secondary’s Jackson campus. The application was to rezone the 1.8-acre parcel owned by the Turner family, pioneers in the apple-growing industry, from R1, single family residential, to C6, tourist/recreation commercial zone.

With Coun. Kevin Flynn absent, the rezoning was approved unanimously by six rather than seven council members. Not before the opinions of representatives of the Comfort Inn & Suites and the Podollan Inn were expressed during a public hearing, however. Jill Power, manager of the Comfort Inn, made an impassioned plea to council to protect existing facilities by not allowing the new hotel. Most of the hotels in town run at 20 to 25 per cent capacity during the shoulder seasons, she said, with good summer occupancy supporting the

rest of the year. “I have discussed with other hoteliers… flooding the market with another 95 hotel rooms. Supply and demand doesn’t mesh.” She says existing hotels pay taxes, sponsor events and are a part of the community. Another 95 rooms “puts a hardship on everybody. We try so hard to keep our employees employed.” Gurjit Jhajj, who owns the Subway restaurants in Salmon Arm, said he understands council wanting to welcome new businesses, but he has invested in the hotel industry and understands economics. He said another ho-

An artist’s rendering of the new Marriott International hotel planned for Salmon Arm. telier in Salmon Arm opment services, said told him there were that decision was the hard times for eight ministry’s, not counto 10 years and only cil’s. But he noted the in the past three has Boudreau property the business in Salm- was designated instion Arm been more tutional in the city’s official community sustainable. A letter from David plan (OCP), not highPodollan, owner of the way commercial as the Podollan Inn, opposed one in question is. Martha Wickett/SalMon arM obServer. the development due For most councillors, to reasons similar to OCP designation was Clint Gavel, director of design and construction for Hollypark Hotels Corporation, and Sam Dhillon, chief those of the Comfort key. Inn reps, as well as the Coun. Ken Jamieson executive officer, address the planning meeting of fact the Podollan was pointed out that the council on Dec. 4. limited by council to properties stretching school will be out. maximum height as three storeys. from the Turner propLike other council- 23.5 metres instead of Jody Boudreau said erty up past the RCMP lors, he said the issue the 19 metres allowed. she and her spouse detachment, the Dairy before council was one Most of the roof line Mike own the proper- Queen, the Comfort of land use, not eco- would be 21 metres. ty directly across the Inn and Setter’s Pub nomics. Gray Simms, speakstreet from the pro- have been designated Coun. Chad Eliason ing on behalf of the posed hotel. When highway commercial reiterated that coun- SAS youth council, exthey rezoned five in the OCP since 1992. cil’s job is not to inter- pressed concerns about years ago, restaurants “It has been on the fere in the market, but traffic and building and hotels were not radar of Salmon Arm to support amenities height, but added the allowed because of for some time. If it’s to support the hotel youth council is not traffic considerations designated… those business such as the opposed to the hotel. from the Ministry of property owners have arena, soccer fields, Harrison said he too Transportation regard- a right to apply for re- the wharf, the arts, was initially worried ing the nearby rescue zoning.” about the height but festivals, trails. unit, the school, the Although traffic conRegarding traffic, realized the trees are hospital and complex cerns were raised, he Coun. Alan Harrison higher than the varicare homes. noted that when the said he’d been princi- ance and the view is Kevin Pearson, the hotel is in its busiest pal of a school next to not obscured. city’s director of devel- season – summer – the Comfort Inn and He also said he

Chinese Garden RESTAURANT

• Dine in or Take Out • Christmas Parties • Gift Certificates

Fresh & Delicious Chinese Food!

Over 25 years experience in the restaurant business. Tues.-Fri. 11 am-8 pm • Sat. & Sun. 3 pm-8 pm Shuswap Lake Estates Marketplace 250-675-2898

the school cooperated closely with the hotel. “It worked very well. I don’t see this will be any different.” Following the rezoning approval, council considered a development permit application that included a height variance. The variance would see the

thinks entering the development on 6th Avenue NE and leaving on 16th Street NE will work, plus the hotel is providing more parking than required. Once again council approved the development permit unanimously, with Flynn absent.


Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Friday, December 15, 2017 Page A9

South Shuswap

PRESSEDFORTIME?

Lions party proceeds benefit charities

Dates to Remember

For children three and under with caregiver. Dolphin trainer Diana Robinson shares her life experiences working with dogs, horses, chimps, dolphins and Keiko, the killer whale who starred in Free Willy, from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday, Dec. 9

at Cedar Heights Community Centre. Admission by donation of a non-perishable food item. The Writer’s Nook at the South Shuswap Library is open Wednesdays, Dec. 13, Jan. 9 and 23 from 10 a.m. to noon. For more, go to

www.thethirdhouse.ca. Take an instrument or sing along to Christmas favourites at the Cedar Heights Christmas Shed Party, 2316 Lakeview Dr. at 7 p.m. Friday, Dec. 15. Refreshments available. A Christmas coffee house with musical

DOES YOUR BUSINESS STAND OUT? We can help. Digital marketing solutions designed specifically for you.

The Sorrento Lions welcome new members and if you are over 19 years of age, male or female, and would like more information about becoming a Lion, please join the club on the first and third Thursday of each month at the Sorrento Memorial Hall at 6:45 p.m., or contact Sorrento Lions club secretary Judi Kembel at 250-675-2616, or email sorrentolionsclub@ yahoo.ca. -Submitted by the Sorrento Lions Club

No problem. You can check out stories and ads anytime, anywhere through our online service. Just go to

www.saobserver.net when you’re ready and check out the latest news and classifieds.

171 Shuswap St. 250.832.2131 www.saobserver.net

Where the Locals Love to Eat!

entertainment by The Trentelance Family & Friends will be held Saturday, Dec. 16 at Sorrento Memorial Hall to raise funds for a Shuswap Community Church team that will be heading to Guatemala in March 2018. Doors open at 7 p.m.

es

be held on Saturday, Feb. 10. Music by Al Welland and a light supper will be served. More information coming in the new year. Our weekly meat draws will be held once again every Friday from 5 to 7 p.m. until June 23 at the Copper Island Pub & Grill on the Trans-Canada Highway in Sorrento. All funds raised go right back into the community. Please come out and support this worthy and fun event.

rtifi cat

by the Sorrento Glee Club and Al Welland. Appetizers and refreshments were served and this event was free to all Seniors. All items for the silent auction were graciously donated by local businesses and this year the proceeds will go to the Shuswap Lions Manor. As well, proceeds from the 50/50 draw will be given to the Women’s Safe House in Salmon Arm. The Sorrento Lions’ next big event will be a Valentine’s Dance to

Breakfast and lunch served all day! Home made dinners to go! Best soup you ever had! Come in and see why we are voted number one!

Ce

Notch Hill Hall, Christmas coffee house, 7 p.m., Dec. 16, admission $3, refreshment by donation; Notch Hill Ladies Christmas Social, 2 p.m., Dec. 17, bring a wrapped gift ($10) and six cookies to share. For more info, call 250-835-4721 or 250-803-5206. The South Shuswap Library presents a series on aromatherapy, teens & essential oils: Saturday, Dec. 16; chemical-free home: Wednesday, Dec. 20. A good selection of samples. Sessions at 1 p.m. Pre-registration begins two weeks ahead. FACES annual dessert evening and winter recital, Sunday Dec. 17, at Shuswap Lake Estates stage. Doors open at 6 p.m., show at 6:30. Dessert served between 6 and 6:30. Special guests Jasmin Frederickson of Chicken Like Birds and James Clark of Tappellachian String Band will share a number or two. For advance tickets, contact 250-515-3276. Tickets also be available at the door. Adults $10 and children (3 & up) $7. Gleneden Hall dance, takes place on the first Saturday of the month, 7 to 11 p.m., 50/50 draw, door prizes. For information, call Roger at 250-832-1599. South Shuswap Library presents Mother Goose from 10:15 to 11:15 a.m. Dec. 8.

Also in attendance were RCACC 222 Squadron Cpl. Matthew Denny and Cpl. Randy Clowry. One Air Cadet recited “In Flanders Fields,” and two Army Cadets and one Air Cadet marched on the colours. A lovely lunch was served at the Sorrento Drop-In Society following the ceremony. A wonderful time was had at the Senior’s Christmas Party and Silent Auction held on Saturday, Nov. 25. Entertainment was

Gif t

Remembrance Day at the Sorrento Memorial Hall was a full house again this year. There were four 1787 Rocky Mountain Rangers in attendance, Lance-Cpl. Keyana Tyrell, Cpl. Peter Zazzi, Cpl. Daniel Zazzi and Master-Cpl. Tanis Cote who played the trumpet for taps and reveille. This trumpet belonged to her step-grandfather who was shot down (and survived) over Frankfurt, Germany, while flying a mission in a Lancaster.

2417 #11 Golf Course Drive, Blind Bay • 250 675-2238 Hours: Tues-Sat 7 am-3pm, Sun 8 am-3 pm

WISH list Jane

All ___________________ wants for Christmas is YOU… but since we’re on the subject, here are a few other suggestions…

Biotherm Skin Care Calvin Klein Perfume Elizabeth Arden Make-up Joe Fresh Jewellery Lindt Lindor Chocolates HUSBAND HELPER HOURS December 18th-22nd. 4-8 pm

We know you’ve been busy… that’s why we’re taking all the stress out of your last-minute holiday shopping with a helpful list of her favourites, extra beauty experts on staff, and courtesy gift wrapping. Simply bring this list in and let our little helpers do the rest!

250.832.2131 w w w. s a o b s e r v e r. n e t a d v e r t i s i n g @ s a o b s e r v e r. n e t

Let us show you how — contact us today!

The Mall at Piccadilly

OPEN 9 am - 10 pm • 7 Days a Week * Some restrictions. See store for details.

250 832-2181


Page A10 Friday, December 15, 2017

A

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Community

he churches of e to t d i u g

p wa Salmon Arm and the Shus

Worship together

®

Pastors Major Carolyn Doonan Martin Ketteringham SUNDAY SERVICE 10:30 a.m. 191 - 2nd Ave. NE ~ 832-9196 Everyone Welcome!

Emmanuel Free Lutheran Church Salmon Arm Elks Community Hall 3690 30th Street N.E.

Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m. 250 832-6859

www.aflccanada.org

Joyfully centered on the word of God and led by the Spirit.

Salmon Arm Mennonite Church 4590-10 Ave. SW Sunday Worship ............ 10:00 am Sunday School ................10-11 am Message ...................... 11-11:45 am Every 4th Sunday evening Hymn Singing 5:30-6:30 pm Every other Thursday Prayer Service & Bible Study 7:30-8:30 pm

New Life Outreach

Sunday Service: 10:30 a.m. Pastor Mel Janzen 250 675-3839 or 250 803-5247 4409 Trans Can. Hwy., Tappen www.newlifeoutreach.ca

Cornerstone Christian Reformed Church Pastor Clarence Witten

10:30 a.m. Worship

Nursery Care & Children’s Programs 1191 - 22nd Street NE

250 832-8452

Church of Christ If your church would

like to advertise their services and 11:00 am Worship & Communion 10:00 am Classes for all Ages location, or special sa4Christ.com events happening at 250 833-0927 your church, please River of Life Community Church call The Salmon We meet at 490 - 5th Avenue SW

Pastor Reuben Pauls - 250 675-3636

Sunday Worship - 10 a.m. Sunday School - 10:45 a.m. (Nursery to age 12) 2405 Centennial Drive, Shuswap Lake Estates Lodge, downstairs

Rev. Jenny Carter Joanne Koster, Children & Youth ALL ARE WELCOME!

Living Waters Church

for advertising here. CHURCH ~ ELCIC

450 OKANAGAN AVE. 250 832-3860 www.firstunitedsalmonarm.ca

Arm Observer, 250-832-2131 DEO LUTHERAN

First United Church

Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m.

THE SHUSWAP’S MULTI-SITE CHURCH

SALMON ARM

Saturday Night Service at 6:00 pm Sundays at 9:00 am & 10:45 am 3151 - 6th Ave. NE

10:30 AM • WORSHIP & SUNDAY SCHOOL deolutheran.org Pastor: Rev. Erik Bjorgan 1801 - 30th St. NE ~ 250 832-6160

Crossroads Free Methodist Church

Children’s Ministry & Childcare for all ages, all services

Shepherd of the Valley Lutheran Church (LCC)

WORSHIP SERVICE & CHILDREN’S PROGRAMS Sundays 10:30 a.m.

HEALING & DELIVERANCE MINISTRY

10:30 am Sunday Worship

FRIDAY NIGHT PRAYER at 7 p.m.

Sundays at 10:30 am Parkview School, 605 Parksville St. Children’s Ministry for kids up to 12 yrs Weekly Ministries for all ages

250 832-8068 121 Shuswap Street SW

SORRENTO

St. John the Evangelist Anglican Church

Pastor James Baer 250 832-3615

SASCU Rec Center, Rm. 101 (west side) Phone for Information

250 675-3841 or 250 832-5908

Little Mountain Bible Chapel

3481 - 10th Ave. S.E. 250 803-0161 ~ Salmon Arm

• Sunday ~ Worship & Remembrance - 9:30 a.m. • Family Bible Hour/Sunday School - 11 a.m. • Thursday ~ Prayer & Bible Study 7:00 p.m.

Co-sponsor of Morning Star Bible Camp, Westbank, B.C.

Seventh-day Adventist Church Join us each Saturday ~ All ages

9:15 am - Sabbath School 10:45 am - Worship Service Wednesday Prayer and Bible Study - 7:00 pm

Anyone Welcome!

#180 Lakeshore Dr. NW Right behind Boston Pizza www.livingwaterschurch.ca

250 832-3433

St. Mary’s Anglican/ United Church 1188 Trans Canada Hwy., Sorrento Ph. 250-675-2294 www.stmarysorrento.ca Tuesday Eucharist 10 a.m.

saintmary@shaw.ca The Rev. Marcus Germaine SUNDAY WORSHIP - 10 am

3270 60th Avenue NE • 250 832-8936

Web: www.facebook.com/salmonsda Study Online: www.bibleinfo.com

10:30 a.m. Sunday Service

For the Whole Family!

plus weekly

SUNDAY WORSHIP 9 a.m. (St. Andrew’s Presbyterian) 1981 - 9th Ave. NE

Care Groups

SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30 a.m. Ministry Center 4480 - 30th St. NE 250.833.5636

3160 - 10 Ave. SE, Salmon Arm 250 832-3121

for every age!

www.fivecornerschurch.ca

www.saobserver.net

SICAMOUS

Sundays at 10:30 am Sorrento Memorial Hall, TCH Children’s Ministry for kids up to 12 yrs

Visit us at: aplacetobelong.ca Contact: 250 832-4004, email scc@aplacetobelong.ca

CATHOLIC CHURCHES Shuswap Lake Area Mass Time: SALMON ARM: St. Joseph’s 60 First Street SE Sat., 5 pm & Sun., 9 am SICAMOUS: Our Lady of Fatima Saturday at 2:30 pm BLIND BAY: Our Lady of the Lake 2385 Golf Course Drive Blind Bay Sunday, 11:15 am

Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m. Rev. L. J. Dixon

10:00 a.m. Services Sundays & Thursdays 170 Shuswap Street SE, Salmon Arm

Tel: 250 832-2828

st.johnsalmonarm.tripod.com

St. Andrew’s Presbyterian T.C.Hwy. across from RCMP

Rev. Shirley Cochrane Worship service 11:00 am Email: standrews-salmonarm.com 250 832-7282

Broadview Evangelical Free Church Kenny Toews Student Ministries Pastor Rudy Evans - Children’s Ministries Pastor

Worship Service at 9:45 Nursery Care for ages 2 & under Sunday School for ages 3 - Gr. 5 350 - 30th Street NE 250 832-6366

David and Megan Atashroo with Revy Elle.

SubmitteD

Daughter named after Revelstoke Imogen Whale Contributor

When David and Megan Atashroo’s daughter, Revy Elle, was born on Nov. 27, 2017, her name had already been decided for months. Megan, a nurse practitioner at Stanford Health Care in the adult cardiac surgery department, and David, chief of staff at Qventus, a health-care tech startup company, are avid skiers and have long travelled to Canada to hit the slopes. The couple has explored Lake Louise, Sunshine and Whistler. Last winter, they decided to venture to Revelstoke. The Atashroos rented a van at the airport, assured by employees the vehicle could handle Revy winters with aplomb. “It couldn’t,” David laughs. “After multiple attempts to summit Westside Road on the third night, we retreated to the warm refuge of Petro Canada, where a young Revelstoke native, who was home for the holidays, was kind enough to take us up to Glacier House Resort after finishing his shift at Starbucks.” The couple happily shares memories of their trip, including a

case of frostbite and the Revelstoke-wide sell-out of neoprene booties. “Word to the wise, northern climes pair frigid temps with matchless snow,” David jokes. The town and people left a positive impression on the Atashroos, and they enjoyed several local favourite stops including the Bierhaus and the Village Idiot. The resort itself took their breath away. “In the States, you hear so much about Whistler,” says David. “We went there and after the crowds and hype, it wasn’t all we thought it would be. Revelstoke is the best kept secret as far as ski hills go. Mackenzie Mountain is unlike any other place on earth. We were left wonderstruck by the beauty. In a word: Revelstoke is magical.” Months later when they were back at home in Northern California and discovered they were going to have a little girl, they knew what to call her. “David initially pushed for the name Revelstoke,” Megan says, “but our last name is long. In the end, we decided to choose an easier name; Revy.” “We wanted this little

girl to grow up knowing that she was fierce and courageous and beautiful… the mountains make us feel this way, and Revelstoke most of all,” David says. The couple chose the middle name Elle for two reasons. “Megan’s Grandmother, who maintained her indomitable spirit even after severe rheumatoid arthritis and the pains of age set in, was named Elsie,” David explains. The second reason revealed itself after reading Eugene Peterson’s (translator of the message bible) book, A Long Obedience. “There’s a passage in Philippians 4:4 that says, ‘Celebrate God all day and every day. I mean REVEL in him.’ We loved that. The idea that God is not a taskmaster bent on ruling over our lives, but rather a loving father whose delight is to see his children find joy in his presence. We wanted that for Revy, to live free, to dance hard, and to play with reckless abandon because she is loved and always will be.” David and Megan plan to visit Revelstoke again in the next couple of years to introduce their daughter to her namesake.


Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Viewpoint

Friday, December 15, 2017 Page A11

The close-knit community of Cherryville serviced pioneer farms at Richlands, the agricultural bench land above Cherryville. With high-speed Internet now available, Cherryville is becoming increasingly popular for young families, who appreciate the lifestyle and the friendly community. The beauty of the area also sparks creativity,

SHUSWAP PASSION Jim Cooperman Nestled beneath the foothills of the Monashee Mountains in the southeast corner of the Shuswap is the close-knit, rural community of Cherryville, a hub for adventure tourism. With a population of just 1,010 residents and only two stores, the community relies upon its strength of cooperation and sharing, given its isolation and distance from major population centres. As the number of jobs in rural areas provided by the forest industry continues to shrink, employment in tourism is helping to fill the gap. All winter long, hundreds of backcountry skiers take off from Cherryville to enjoy the bountiful fresh powder snow on nearby mountains and fabulous accommodations at alpine lodges. During the summer, nearby Echo Lake, Sugar Lake and Monashee Park attract campers, boaters, fishermen, hunters, hikers and backpackers who appreciate the wonders of Rainbow Falls, Sugar Lake campsites and the trails to Spectrum Lake, Peters Lake and Mount Fosthall. At the heart of Cherryville is the spacious, well-designed and well maintained, community centre where residents gather for celebrations, holidays, special events, dances, classes, meetings and family meals, including the very popular monthly senior’s dinner. In the basement is a day care centre, and across the parking lot is a new building constructed with volunteer help that houses the community food bank. Since Cherryville is unincorporated, the community club fulfills some of the roles that a local government often handles,

including planning events and managing the local park. For example, they coordinated the Cherry Creek stabilization project to protect the eroding banks, which took many years to obtain the permits and just a week to do the machine work. Across the road from the hall is the 20-acre Hanson Park, situated on both sides of Cherry Creek where there is a popular swimming hole, band shell, covered picnic area and gymkhana course. There is also an outdoor rink complete with a new concrete base and a Zamboni in a shed built by volunteers with donated materials. Students from the nearby Cherryville Elementary appreciate the trails in the forest, that they also help maintain. The first weekend in June is Cherryville Days that begins with a parade to the school, followed by a full day of fun at Hanson Park, including contests, games, helicopter rides, musical

as there are many talented artists and artisans in Cherryville. Agriculture is also becoming more viable, as evidenced by the young healthy vineyard next to Highway 6 and the new Triple Island Cheese Dairy. Telling the whole story

journALIsmis.ca

Ranchero Deep Creek Community Association

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING

File photo

Little chicks Megan Kelly, Graye Crebo and Jenna Hyciek were busy winging eggs during the Cherryville Days parade. acts, a pet show and food vendors. The day ends with a dance at the community hall. No doubt, one of the favourite events is the outhouse race! Local organizations are a key part of the Cherryville scene. The Cherry Ridge Management Committee began as a group dedicated to the protection of the hillside above the community. As part of its early effort to resist clearcutting the area, the group obtained salvage permits to selectively log dead trees. Volunteers did the logging, and the substantial proceeds have been used to fund community projects.

The Committee now manages a community forest and profits continue to benefit local residents. When a proposed development at Sugar Lake planned to utilize the lake for a sewage effluent outfall, local citizens formed the Cherryville Water Stewards to oppose the project. The provincial government responded positively to the opposition and provided a parcel of crown land for a dispersal field. Currently, the Stewards focus on education and promoting responsible recreation and water use. Signs have been posted around the

The Greatest Visitor to Earth There is life in deep space! Our Earth WAS visited by God’s Son. That’s the Christmas story, read and known for 2000 years by millions around the world. Jesus’ birth and resurrection has hugely impacted literature, science and many human issues. Since 1962 credible scientists around the world, using sophisticated equipment, have been attempting to contact ‘life’ beyond earth. The best known is the Arecibo Message (1974), an interstellar radio message, beamed towards Cluster M13 with basic info about earth and people. The hope is that extraterrestrials will receive, decipher the message and reply. 25,000 years away! There are at least 11 more such deep space probes. From where? One is Goonhilly Earth Station (Cornwall, England) with massive satellite dishes. The largest is Albert, 85 feet in diameter. The Eye Of Heaven (Qianan, China) is the largest radio telescope in the world. Consider the search for planets that can support water based life as we know it – not too hot or too cold - like the bowl of porridge in the Bears story. Discovery of such planets in the Goldilocks Zone has generated a lot of excitement! Why such efforts at huge costs to find life? Isn’t it too far for us to go there? Is it a search for human spiritual roots? Why? To connect with God? What if it were really true that He loves each one in the Shuswap? Amazingly, He does!! The Christmas events tell us God the Son visited this planet. Born in Bethlehem, Jesus lived on earth for 33 years. He healed and fed and blessed thousands. He was nailed on a cross in Jerusalem 2000 years ago for our sins. The good news? Anyone can talk with God in deep space from anywhere and anytime. We do not have to wait 25,000 years to get a hearing. Each person may have a personal connection with Him if we so choose. Right now! The angels brought this message to the shepherds: “Do not be afraid. I bring you good news of great joy that will be for all people. Today in the town of David a Savior has been born to you; he is Christ the Lord.” Look at each word. Take time to actually read the Christmas events in the New Testament before Christmas. Think about it seriously. We wish each one joy and peace of mind at Christmas. Happy New Year 2018!!

y r r e M tmas s i r Ch

community that urge residents and visitors to protect riparian areas, keep pollutants including oil and gas out of the water, and minimize boat speed close to shorelines. The community is well connected to its heritage, thanks to the dedication and work of the Cherryville and Area Historical Society and the support of local residents and businesses. Three local history books have been published and a log museum was built at the Goldpanner campground. The group also now manages the trail built on the location of the water flume that once

7:00 pm Monday, December 18, 2017 at the Ranchero Deep Creek Fire Hall ELECTION OF OFFICERS ~ Refreshments and Door Prizes ~

For All Your

ENTERTAINING NEEDS! Th e

e local choic

Catering & Platters Available

Full line of Groceries Fresh cut meat Fresh Produce Deli • Bakery Liquor Fresh Flowers

Holiday Hours

Sun, Dec.24 Christmas Eve 6am – 7pm Mon. Dec. 25 Christmas Day 10am – 4pm Tues. Dec 26 Boxing day 8am – 10pm Sun. Dec.31 New Years Eve 6am – 8pm Mon. Jan 1/2018 New Years Day 10am – 4pm

Balmoral Road, Blind Bay • 250-675-2046 Hours: Mon.-Sat. 6 am-10 pm, Sun. 7 am-10 pm

ChristmasSt. Church Service Times John the Evangelist:

December 24 – Christmas Eve Mass 7 pm December 25 – Christmas Day 10 am December 31 – Lessons and Carol Service at St. George’s, Enderby Shuswap Community Church: The Christmas Eve Candlelight Services are at 2PM, 4PM and 6PM in Salmon Arm. Sicamous will have its service at 7 PM, and Sorrento at 10:30 AM. Cornerstone Christian Reformed Church: Christmas Eve candlelight service at 7 PM Christmas Day service at 10:30 AM All are welcome! Mountainview Baptist Church: Sunday, December 24, the 4th Sunday inAdvent, 10 am, Carols. Christmas Story Light Advent Candle Special Music at St. Andrews Presbyterian Church (1920 9th Ave. NE, Salmon Arm). St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church: Christmas Eve Worship Service ~ one service this Sunday only. Join us for cookies and coffee at 3 p.m. Worship to begin at 3:30 p.m. with Christmas hymns and readings celebrating the birth of Jesus. Everyone warmly welcome!


Page A12 Friday, December 15, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Maid Perfect is operated by Brenda Babiuk, Brenda is a reliable and trustworthy housecleaner and works on her own. She has been a house cleaner in Calgary for the past 30 years and moved to Salmon Arm in 2015. She concentrates on what’s important to you and offers flexible scheduling. Multiple references are available upon request. Among housecleaning, she also does yard clean up, windows and walls. Clients’ choice of what they need done.

250-833-4339

CLEANING

Wood Heat Services

• Fully Insured • Chimney Sweep • Stove Installs & Maintenance • WETT Inspections Call Robert Babakaiff 250-803-2168 Salmon Arm

WOOD & PELLET STOVE SALES

BEST PRICES • Certified chimney sweeping • W.E.T.T. Certified Inspections • 25 years Experience • Installations • Chimney Liners & Repairs 250.833.6256

CUSTOM WOODWORKING

SHUSWAP MILLWORK & FINISHING

Home: 250-833-4339 Mobile: 403-667-4632

Bart’s

MINUTE MUFFLER & MAINTENANCE

Mufflers Brakes Shocks Complete Automotive Repairs

Mon.-Fri. 8:30-5:00

Rob Stunzi

shuswapmillwork.bc.ca

Winkler Ph. 250.832.6295 Disposal Systems 2014

cell: 250-253-2829

• Utility locating - Hydro/gas/water/fibre optics • Catch basins/sumps/drains • Line flushing (storm/sani/culverts) • Hot Water Boiler • Slot trenching • Street flushing/Lot washing

www.bigironhydrovac.ca OVERHEAD DOOR

locally owned and operated

www.winklerdisposal.com Call Brad Reimer

EXCAVATING DAN DEGLAN EXCAVATING Professionally Beautifying Properties for Over 27 Years. • Rock Walls • Utility Services • Site Prep • Terracing • Drainage • Pools

www.dandeglan.com 981 - 16th Street N.E., Salmon Arm V1E 2V2

250-832-0707

FARM SERVICES

• ICBC Repairs • Glass Replacement • Painting • Sand Blasting • Private Insurance Repairs • Frame Straightening

Trans Canada Highway

REIMER’S FARM SERVICE LTD.

Mark Pennell owner

250-832-8947

We have the equipment & expertise to accurately identify & repair the cause of your vehicle trouble

We Deliver

• Bark Mulch • Shavings • Sawdust

250-838-0111 or 1-855-737-0110 GUTTERS

D&L GUTTER SERVICES Aluminum & Steel Gutters Fascia, Soffits and Metal Roofs

centerpointauto.ca

Ave SW Salmon Arm • 250-804-0333

Refuse containers to 40 cu. yd. Water delivery - potable & bulk • Spray bar Compacting units • Firewood sales • Sea cans • Demolition

AUTOMOTIVE

4130 - 1st Avenue SW

STAFF & INSTALLERS

5500 48th Ave. SE, Unit #3

Over 30 years of reliable and trustworthy housecleaning

Ben’s Fischer’s Towing Funeral Home

Graham Dudfield

24 Hour Service

info@winklerdisposal.com 4211 Auto Road SE Salmon Arm BC

42nd Street SW

WETT CERTIFIED

(Next to Natural Choice Instore Garden Centre)

Housecleaning and Professional Organizing

250-832-8064

GAS • WOOD • PELLET

HYDRO EXCAVATING

DISPOSAL

Salmon Arm, BC and areas

HEATING

ARRO

250-832-9556

Brenda Babiuk

Com mu n ity!

CHIMNEY

• Stairs • Custom Doors • Furniture • Mouldings • Kitchens

Check Engine light on?

Your Local Business Professional Directory

H i re Lo c al • Support ou r

Profile of the week

1st Ave. SW

AT YOUR SERVICE

Sh op Lo c al

www.saobserver.net

#2 - 320 3rd Ave. SW • 250-833-0132

FREE ESTIMATES

dandlgutters@gmail.com DOUG: H: 250-833-4706 C: 250-804-9640

BARRY:

C: 250-803-1174

Shop Local Hire Local Support our Community!

250-253-2244 ultimateenclosures@gmail.com

SALES-INSTALLATION-SERVICE

PET SITTING

Claws ‘n’ Paws

250-253-SITS (7487) Patrice Le Blanc

Pet Sits ‘n’ Walks

Serving Salmon Arm and area

PET SITTER AND DOG WALKER

Walks, dog sitting right in our home, pet taxi, visits to your home, pet waste clean-up. 4650 72 Ave. NE, P.O. Box 535, Canoe, BC V0E 1K0 clawsnpawspet@mail.com

PLUMBING

J’s PumPs & Plumbing • water systems • water well testing • crane for pump pulling • plumbing • service work • BC Certified Pump Installer

Call Jerry Jones Ph: 832-7922

• Fax: 832-7699

Advertise in our Business Directory and receive both

&

250-832-2131


Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

News

Friday, December 15, 2017 Page A13

Avalanche improvements promise fewer delays B.C.’s new remote-control systems ready for Trans-Canada winter season. By Carmen Weld Black Press

The government is promising British Columbians shorter closures and delays along Highway 1 due to a new avalanche-control system west of Revelstoke. “The highway network is critical to transportation between rural communities and the ministry is dedicated to reducing delays and closures due to avalanche,” said Minister of Transportation and Infrastructure Claire Trevena. “This expanded remote-control system allows our technicians to reduce the risk of uncontrolled avalanches and keep the highway open and safe for motorists.”

The province reports $2.3 million has been invested in remote avalanche-control systems in Three Valley Gap, west of Revelstoke. This year, the total number of stations has been increased from four to nine, just in time for winter. While previous technology relied on a helicopter dropping detonations in specific conditions, remote avalanche-control systems allow technicians to conduct explosive control missions on a 24-hour basis with the use of a laptop. This means they can easily control when and how long road closures take place, reducing the effect on B.C. Highways. During avalanche

season, the ministry said drivers can still expect some closures either due to high avalanche hazard conditions or to allow for avalanche control. However, with the new technology in place, the average closure length is expected to be reduced by approximately 50 per cent. Motorists are reminded to obey traffic-control personnel if traffic is stopped while avalanche-control work with explosives is taking place. The ministry provides a province-wide program, which manages more than 60 avalanche areas and includes almost 1,400 individual paths.

The system is now in place at nine locations along the south side of Three Valley Lake.

Ministry oF transportation.

SICAMOUS Business Directory Bill Walker

CERTIFIED TREE ASSESSOR

Serving Sicamous & the Shuswap FULLY INSURED, REFERENCES

TREE SERVICE We Cut Trees and More!! Stump Grinder - Bobcat - Excavator Residential & Commercial Properties 250-836-4147

All Better at Home services are delivered by a mixture of trained volunteers, vetted professional contractors, employees and staff. Wysteria Sholtz is our Regional Coordinator, Carol MacLean-Angus is our North Shuswap Outreach Coordinator, Heather O’Brien is our South Shuswap Outreach Coordinator and Tracey Lehr is our Enderby Outreach Coordinator. Better at Home is located at 1214 Shuswap Avenue in Sicamous. To contact them call Central Intake at 250253-2749

Advertise in the Sicamous Business Directory & your ad runs in the Eagle Valley News and Shuswap Market News. For information call Terry 250-836-4613 or cell 250-517-0034 • terry.sinton@eaglevalleynews.com

call for more info 250-836-0004

Shuswap Better at Home “A little extra help for seniors to remain confidently in their own homes”

Housekeeping • Yardwork • Transportation Home Repair • Snow Shoveling Friendly Visiting • Grocery Shopping Staff, Volunteers and Contractors have been carefully vetted and trained for your security SBAH Central Intake (250)253-2749 Wysteria Sholtz

Need Help? KEYSTROKE COMPUTER SERVICE

250-836-5300

MALMAR MARKET

• Repairs & Sales • Upgrades & Accessories • Virus and Malware Removal

John Schlosar • Serving A+ Certified Sicamous computer@cablelan.net since 2002

Markets

Firewood For Sale Fir Fire wood For sale

Seniors Program

Better At Home is a program that helps seniors with day-to-day tasks by coordinating simple, non-medical services so that they can continue to live independently in their own homes and remain connected to their communities. Serving the communities and rural areas, including First Nations communities, within the Columbia Shuswap Regional District area, as well as Enderby and surrounding area. Shuswap Better at Home is managed by the Eagle Valley Community Support Society.

Computer Service

Sawmills

TREE SERVICES

Profile of the week: Shuswap Better At Home

Gas & Convenience Store Fresh Baked Goods, Gifts & Ice

• We now carry • Sure Crop Feed and Wood Pellets for pellet stoves with competitive prices

Open 7 days a week 250-836-2928 Trans Canada Hwy, Malakwa, BC

For Eagle Valley News advertising information call 250-832-2131 or email jeff.morrison@saobserver.net


Page A14 Friday, December 15, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

News

www.saobserver.net

Dedicated volunteers look for clues

Police appreciate work of searchers who provide extra eyes for investigation. Martha Wickett Salmon Arm Observer

‘Extra feet on the ground and drones in the air’ is the way Wendy Mohr describes how she and others have been spending their time recently. Mohr and Jody Leon are two of the people committed to making sure the four missing women and one whose remains were found in the North Okanagan-Shuswap are not forgotten. But their goal involves more than emails and posters. They are literally walking the talk. “It’s been several weeks and we’ve been in many different areas. We tried to do a little bit in each area, based on tips we might get and parents of the missing might get,” says Mohr.

Missing are Caitlin Potts, Deanna Wertz, Ashley Simpson and Nicole Bell. The remains of Traci Genereaux were discovered on a farm on Salmon River Road. “We talk to people who live in the area and they give us permission to look on their land. We plan days where we go to search together… We are not experts,” she says, noting the searchers simply photograph anything that might be evidence, mark where it was found on the map and pass it on to the police. “We don’t determine whether it’s anything significant to the case. We don’t know everything they’re looking for. We’re just community members who go out and go looking for the police. It’s such

a large area.” She says police have been very good, “understanding of our efforts and appreciating them.” RCMP spokesperson Cpl. Dan Moskaluk agrees: “RCMP investigators never discount the efforts and the possible results that can be obtained by volunteers. In these instances it is always recommended to these groups, that they have ongoing communications with us. It is my understanding that this has been the case in these recent efforts. “In many investigations it is information that is obtained from the public that can be a linchpin for advancing an investigation and this can be in the form of physical evidence

found by a single individual or a collective group.” Joining the walkers have been two drone companies, Crystal Mountain Aerial Media from West Kelowna and SkyCrew Aerial Imagery in Salmon Arm. Mohr says the volunteers do not try to analyze the footage – it’s given to experts. Dakota Lalonde of SkyCrew said he has been on two of the searches. The first was earlier in the year when John Simpson, Ashley’s father, was in the region from Ontario to search for his daughter. Lalonde flies a drone and takes photos or video depending on the terrain. “It’s taken us a few hours each time. I know the other area group did

PROFESSIONAL PROFILE

HOME SECURITY

Going on vacation? Not wanting to leave your home unattended? …impose upon friends or risk your home being occasionally cared for by well intentioned neighbours

Shuswap HOMEWATCH & Property Management

A Professional HomeWatch Service for Vacationers, Snowbirds & Cabin Owners, Estate Executors & Realtors www.shuswaphomewatch.com 250 804 6973 shuswaphomewatch@gmail.com Licensed and Insured

FINANCIAL

The Plan by

• Specializing in Tax & Estate Planning • Helping clients create and maintain wealth in the most tax-advantaged Division Director manner possible.

Teri Young

Investors Group Financial Services Inc.

140-Alexander Street, Salmon Arm 250-319-1174

a search in the Salmon River area – six to eight areas. The first time we did our search, it was in the Enderby-Grindrod area, near the Enderby bridge…,” he says. “The other one was behind the Sagmoen Farm. We did a ground search on

that one because it was raining. The group has been very diligent about acquiring permission.” As a husband and father, he’s been touched. “I’ve got a wife and two little girls – the victims being women, that hit home,” he says.

PROFESSIONALS

essential Name of Business: The Workshop:Studio and Gallery Business owner: KJ MacAlister Address: 4940 50 St. NE (HWY 1) Salmon Arm, BC V1E1Y6 Phone: 778-489-5249 Established: May 2015 Services: We provide comprehensive instruction in the creation and completion of ceramic work on both the potter’s wheel and through hand building techniques. We also teach children’s classes, single night hand building classes, and facilitate specialty firings such as raku. Specialty: Our primary offering is six week adult classes on the potter’s wheel. During this class we take a beginner without any experience through the creative process to the point that they’re glazing pieces to be fired and kept at the end of the session. Other info: We cater to all skill levels and can also do specialty classes for more experienced students. If our schedule doesn’t accommodate you we can

Jim Elliot/Salmon arm obSErvEr

Drones are being used to help a search of several areas linked to the cases of missing women in the North Okanagan-Shuswap.

POTTERY

usually make arrangements for additional times. With two instructors (Jeremy Pawlowicz and Duncan Tweed) we have over 30 years of experience in the ceramic arts. Mission statement: Our goal is to be a creative outlet in the ceramic arts for the greater Shuswap community. Given time and support we hope to grow to facilitate additional mediums and more specialized classes. Recent Changes: In the past year we have begun offering more specialty classes such as raku. We also just recently began offering children’s classes on Saturday mornings. Contact: Duncan or Jeremy @ 778-489-5249 theworkshopsg@gmail. com

I NSize: AN CIAL 3.5” x 2.5” | MaximumF Font 30 pt

STARTING THE WEEK OF JANUARY 15TH – CALL TO REGISTER ADULT CLASSES

NEW SESSIONS

To register call Jeremy or Duncan 778-489-5249 4940 50 St., Salmon Arm Check us out: theworkshopstudiogallery.com

P O D I AT R I S T

Have TFSA RESP questions? Have questions? Let’s talk. Let’s talk. Rob Rob Hislop, Hislop, CFP® Financial Advisor Financial .

Member – Canadian Investor Protection Fund

MORTGAGE BROKERS

Corine Hild

Podiatrist Medicine & surgery of the Foot Custom orthotics

Booking Dec. 20, Jan. 3for & 31

Please call for appointment

Accredited Mortgage Professional Specializing in all products... • First Time Home Buyers • Construction • Renewals • Re�inance • Consolidation

Call me for your mortgage needs

www.corinehild.ca

140 Alexander St. NE • T��:250.832.8006 C���: 250.832.5856 • corinehild@shaw.ca

Shuswap Home Watch

Mortgage Broker

Dr. Bruce Booth

Dr. Bruce Booth

www.edwardjones.com

Home Security

Podiatrist

Advisor

St. N.W. P.O. Box 177 Salmon Arm, BC V1E 4N3 250-833-0623

Financial

Edward Jones Downtown office: Rob Hislop Investors Group Financial Services: Teri Young Division Director

Corine Hild

CFP®

161 Shuswap St. N.W. P.O. Box 177 161 Shuswap Salmon Arm, BC V1E 4N3 250-833-0623

“Also seeing the families there with very raw emotions – that does inspire you as a call to action to do more.” Anyone with information about the five local women is asked to call the RCMP tip line at 1-877-987-8477.

Toll Free: 1-844-769-3338

Salmon Arm Office #4-680 Marine Park Drive

Local Professionals you can trust

in the SHUSWAP

Pottery Workshop Studio Gallery With a combined circulation of over 15,000 this is a great place to advertise your business.

Call 250-832-2131 or email

advertising@saobserver.net

www.saobserver.net


Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Community

Friday, December 15, 2017 Page A15

www.saobserver.net

At Home or Online... Observer SALMON ARM

Don’t Guilty plea in sexual assault miss out on the latest news, views and entertainment

Wednesday February 9, 2011

www.saobserver.net $1.25 HST INCLUDED

OBSERVER STAFF

a Salmon Arm church A former youth leader at nine-month conditional has been sentenced to a probation after pleading sentence and one year of a 15-year-old girl he guilty to sexually assaulting met through church work. must also provide a Daron Mark Crown, 25, with the sex ofDNA sample and be registered years. of 10 fender database for a period De Walle accepted On Tuesday, Judge Edmond Crown counsel and dethe joint submission from which means Crown sentence, the for fence counsel the nine-month term; will not be incarcerated for in the community instead he will serve his sentence These include havunder a number of conditions. remaining under and ing no contact with the victim or approved house arrest except for employment he could be breached, absences. If conditions are time in prison. required to serve his remaining and accept respon“I wish to express deep regret the court,” said Crown, sibility for my actions to wife and a small cluswho attended court with his a dark blue pin-striped ter of friends. Dressed in wife as he sat his with suit, Crown often held hands with his head bowed. and put this matter “I hope to make restitution behind me.” after allegations of Crown was charged in May came to light. the inappropriate relationship the victim’s family Concerns were raised by sent roses had Crown members, who discovered emails and text commuto the girl and later found The victim later spoke nication of a sexual nature. which began in to authorities of the relationship, touching and sexual February 2010, and included oral sex, but not intercourse. and his wife was Although Crown was married prosecutor Bill offences, the pregnant at the time of believed Crown was in Hilderman said the victim have an ongoing relove with her and they would lationship. serious breach of trust “What we have here is a of authority with a from a person in a position See Crown on page A2

Council: Proposal would allow city to recoup costs for special events. By Lachlan Labere

One-stop shopping for job hunters

alarms employment program raises Special report: New B.C. yed and the privacy of citizens. about services for the unemplo

A

This week

Not everyone’s happy about the SilverBacks' winning streak. See A24.

A lifetime of calling bingo friends & neighbours Leah Blain “Under the B - 5… under the G - 55, five, five..” Johnny Purdaby is quick to smile when he’s at work. It would be hard to imagine anyone more suited to be a bingo caller. He’s been a caller for 30 years, and he’s only 39. The numbers come up on the screens around the room. The room is separated by a glass wall but the sounds of music, rings, and animated conversation wafts in from the casino. Somebody calls “bingo”. After it’s verified, Johnny offers congratulations. “The next game is a block of nine. Game 17 should be on the olive card,” he says in his melodic voice. “Good luck everybody. Here we go…” Some people play on

the computer, others use paper cards, and some do a combination. As his co-workers walk by they turn and wave to him and he gives them a wave and big smile back. Just after 6 p.m. he tells the players he will is taking a break and will be back at 7 p.m. “I just got hired last year,” he says with a smile that lights up his whole face. “I love bingo calling. I tried for a whole two years to get on here.” In the meantime he was working at Mica dam but when things slowed down, he tried for this job again, and he wasn’t taking ‘no’ for an answer. “I brought my resume here once a week for a month. I kept bugging them,” he says breaking into a laugh. “Now I’ve been here

just over a year.” His resume would show he had a lot of experience, as a caller and a worker. “I started young at the bingo hall at Pierre’s Point. I was seven or eight when I collected the garbage on the tables. My grandma, Caroline Johnny, would pay me a can of pop and a bag of chips. Then it moved up to a can of pop, a bag of chips, and a chocolate bar. Then it went up to $5.” When he was nineyears-old, they needed a bingo caller and he was ready to take on the job. “My mom would come looking for me. She couldn’t see me because the bingo machine was so high. She could hear me but she couldn’t see me.” His voice and personality were perfect for the job, and he was instantly popular. “I like making people laugh. They loved my calling and I loved making them smile and sending them home

with money.” Over the years he has had other jobs, including several years at Mica dam, doing everything from janitorial and housekeeping to dishwashing. But these physical jobs were harder for him because he has rheumatoid arthritis that has already necessitated two hip replacements. This job is much easier physically, and it allows him to be home every night with his wife, Shelly, and their children, Lola-Ann, Johnny Jr., and Owen. “And we’ve got one on the way, the baby is due December 20.” Their house is usually busy because they foster as well. He likes it that way, and he likes to be busy when he goes to work. “I like calling for big crowds. I just love giving these big pots away. I like seeing a lot of people gathered and enjoying everybody’s company. It’s one big happy family, that’s how I look it it.”

Index

See Council on page A3

Opinion ....................... A8 View Point .................. A9 Life & Times ............. A10 Sports............... A24-A28 Arts & Events ... A29-A31 Time out ................... A22 Vol. 104, No. 06, 56 pages

&

Leah BLain photo

Wednesday February 16, 2011 www.saobserver.net $1.25 HST INCLUDED

OBSERVER STAFF

Their reasoning may have differed but their message to city council was by and large the same: shelve the special events bylaw. On Monday evening, council’s chamber was open to the public to speak to the bylaw created in response to the coming of the Sturgis North motorcycle rally. The intent of the bylaw, as laid out by city administrator Carl Bannister, is to give the city the ability to collect fees associated with special events with 5,000 or more participants, particularly in relation to costs associated with policing, fire control and municipal public works. Additional costs related to the bylaw are an $800 application fee for a special event permit, a $500 fine for not having the permit, and a requirement of $10 million in liability insurance. First to comment on the bylaw was Salmon Arm Fall Fair president Phil Wright. He suggested the bylaw would have a negative impact on the Children’s Festival, which has no funds available for these costs. Wright suggested that instead of the underlong, so for 700 pagesnumber of attendees, the bylaw focus on the more than 400 contracts type it entails and standing what work themselves, and that of festival and, for services to the unemployed how to put a bid example, the number of beer garfiguring out the privacy of B.C.’s citizens dens By Martha Wickett it willparticuhave. to about 70, so that clients is daunting, together OBSERVER STAFF may be compromised. new 98 of The second speaker was Christopher Green can go to one of the smaller agencies. While the provincial govprovincial Em- larly for Langley-based complete and funGreenWay Legal Centre. Speaking the program idea of consoli- ‘full-service’ Providing Centres, as Services both damental transfor- ernment’s a legal representative of ployment of Sturgis North, as renovations range of services could require well mation of the way dating the as an investor or in some cases to a satelof equip-in the event, Green suggested the purchase are available to the unemployed lite office, to access all the premises,city does not andan events bylaw at this employment services time and ment, training of staffneed into a ‘one-stop shopping’ asked expenses, that it be shelved services they qualify for and but provided to the unemployed until Jan. 2012. Green said format is seen as a good one, RFP is other start-up the bylaw would in this region and across B.C. are unthe will need. The final not only add additional cost to the that’s where support for the financial institutions expected in March, with Sturgis event, based is underway, a change which in likely to provide loans but could prove prohibitive for organew plan appears to stop, new program beginning has sparked fear in the hearts nizers smaller events. contract. ofof on this type particularly in rural regions. April 2012. of individuals and organizamin-bylaw you will, you pass this development Social “If In October, B.C.’s Miniswith the stroke One of many concerns al- Arm tions. said of a pen, make Salmon of Social Development the most difficult and program ister Kevin Krueger The fear centres around try with for about the proposed probably request empathizes the he draft most a expensive though venue in British Copublished is that it favours large organipredictions that the unemconsultalumbia much to host a special event, and one really has to as proposals (RFP) for agenwho concerns, in ployed will no longer be the zations or corporations ask done, is that resulting really what tion was you intended…,” said Green. of cies wishing to provide have the resources and finanwell-served, that many Green re-iterated an offer made recently proposed Employment Proby SturSee Big-Box on page A2 cial backing to launch a bid. those people with expertise gis to the city of $35,000 to cover associated the gram of British Columbia. The draft RFP is more than policin providing services to the ing costs. of The intent is to reduce unemployed could be out

A Shuswap Middle School student gets set for the regional spell-off. See A15.

Johnny Purdaby at his work calling bingo games at Chances Salmon Arm.

SALMON ARM

Groups want hold on bylaw

Court: Former church leader admits to sexual contact with 15-year-old. By Tracy Hughes

Observer

Looking where the sun don’t shine: City

was accidently connected to the storm

workers look for the place where the JAMES MURRAY/OBSERVER city’s sewer system water system.

Raw sewage causes stink

Downtown: After numerous citizen complaints, the city discovers a sewer line pumping waste into the storm drain system. By Martha Wickett

I find very annoying,” says Hays. OBSERVER STAFF Davidson, too, said city hall’s attitude If it smells like sewage, it probably is. stunk. And it was. “They’ve been awful to deal with. Maggy Davidson at Spirit Quest Inferring I didn’t know what a sewer Bookstore and some of her neighbours smell smells like – and it’s true, I don’t on Lakeshore Drive have been living spend time crawling around sewers; with a disgusting odour for months they inferred my staff didn’t know what now. It comes and goes, wafting into it smelled like.” their stores, making them nauseous, She said she’s had a plumber to her then disappearing. building four times, and other tradesDavidson says she’s been dealing people. with it since October, Jacalyn Hays at “The city said it was a gas leak... so Bella Interiors noticed it about a year the gas company came with their meago. ters. The city said it’s after burners, you “I had got in touch with the city a couneed to get your furnace looked at.” ple of times a year ago about this probFinally, she says, the city agreed to lem. They passed it off – it’s nothing, flush the storm-sewer lines out front. it’s nothing, it’s your imagination type “Then the smell was gone, miracle.” of thing. It’s been a big problem for a But the problem moved to Hays’ long time and they’ve ignored it, which store.

“I guess when they flushed the lines, they sent it down her direction and made her life miserable,” says Davidson. Then it came back Davidson’s way. The smell was so bad, she wondered if some poor unsuspecting fish had made a wrong turn and got lodged in the storm water pipe. However, last week, action. City staff sniffed out the source of the problem. Dale McTaggart, the city’s director of engineering and public works, told the Observer Friday that by running cameras into both the sanitary and storm sewers, staff discovered that somebody got the pipes mixed up. Sewage has been running into the storm water system while storm water has been funnelled into the sewage pipes. “I don’t know what happened, but See Crews on page A2

This week

Index

The Salmon Arm Icebreakers felt the need for speed. See A16.

Opinion ....................... A6 View Point .................. A7 Life & Times ............... A8 Sports............... A16-A20 Arts & Events ... A21-A24 Time out ................... A25 Vol. 104, No. 07, 48 pages

A local surgeon indulges his passion for theatre. See A21 for details.

Just FORE Christmas!

J.P. Duranleau Teaching Pro

Holiday Pro Shop

Open December 16, 21, 22 & 23 8:00 - 5:30 (Other times available by appointment)

Merry Christmas Specials 18 Hole with Cart • $40 Limit 4

10% OFF 9 Hole Coyote Ridge or 18 Hole Lakeview Greens Punch Cards Lesson Packages Early Bird Memberships Stocking Stuffers

Your friendly, affordable golf experience! 5751 Trans Canada Hwy. N.E., Canoe, B.C., 8 km east of Salmon Arm • Ph: 250 832-7345 Fax: 250 832-7341 • Email: golf@clubshuswap.com • www.clubshuswap.com

“All Out, All Game, UPCOMING HOME GAMES: Fri., Dec. 29 @ 7:00 pm All Season!” vs Vernon Vipers Dec. 29

Salmon Arm’s Got Talent

Fri., Jan. 5 @ 7:00 pm

vs Wenatchee Wild Cash accepted

Ticket Office Mon-Fri 9-4 ~ Sat 4-8 pm & Sun noon-4 pm ~ 8 pm on Game Nights - Shaw Centre 250-832-3856 ext. 108 • www.sasilverbacks.com • Blog: backstalk.wordpress.com

@SASilverbacks


Page A16 Friday, December 15, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Friday, December 15, 2017 Page A29

DECEMBER 15 - 21 playing at THE GRAND 100 Hudson Avenue

CROSSWORD

STAR WARS: LAST OF THE JEDI Fri-Tues 7PM2D

Nightly 6:45 3D & 9:35PM 2D Sat - Sun Matinees 2:00PM 2D

HOROSCOPES

CLUES ACROSS

FERDINAND

Nightly 6:35PM 3D & 8:45PM 2D Sat - Sun Matinees 2:00PM 2D

1. Member of a Semitic people 5. Certified public accountant Wed & Thurs 6:40 & 9PM 8. Residue WONDER 11. Sayings attributed to Nightly 6:30PM & 8:45PM Sat - Sun Matinees 2:10PM Christ 13. The products of human THE STAR Sat - Sun 2:10PM creativity playing at THE CLASSIC 360 Alexander Street 14. Listen to CUPE Community Film 15. Longed THE POLAR EXPRESS 16. No (Scottish) Saturday, Dec. 16th, 12PM 17. Descriptor THE NUTCRACKER BALLET 18. Yankees’ sensation Judge THE MAN WHO INVENTED CHRISTMAS Sunday, Dec. 17th, 1PM 20. Zero Friday - Tuesday 7:30PM 21. Comics legend Lee 22. Honorary title holder 25. “Uncle Joey” 30. Graceful and stylish 31. Pitching term 32. Former Mets outfielder Jones 33. One who avoids animal products 38. Quick to learn 41. Mechanism in an Shuswap Community Foundation, in partnership with theorgan 43. Redo withfor new materials City of Salmon Arm, provides a permanent place your memorable moments at the McGuire Lake45.Memorial Walkway. Epics Wings to swap Community Foundation, in partnership Purchase a brick onwith thethe Memorial47.Walkway of Salmon Arm, provides a permanent place for your 49. Extrasensory perception able moments at the McGuire Lake Memorial Walkway.  Shuswap Welcome a child thethe Recognize a volunteer 50. Cavalry sword with ShuswapCommunity CommunityFoundation, Foundation,ininpartnership partnership with City of Salmon Arm, provides a permanent place for your Purchase abrick on the Memorial Walkway to City of Salmon Arm, provides a permanent place for your Congratulate a McGuire gradLake Walkway. Thank55.anBangladeshi employeemonetary unit memorable Walkway. memorable moments momentsatatthe theMcGuire LakeMemorial Memorial 56. Not the bottom lcome a child  Recognize a volunteer  Remember aononbeloved  Mark a business milestone Purchaseaabrick brick theMemorial MemorialWalkway Walkway Purchase the toto ngratulate a  grad  Thank an employee 57. Afflicted Welcome child an anniversary  Recognize a volunteer Celebrate  Commemorate an event  Welcome aachild  Recognize a volunteer member a beloved  Mark abusiness milestone Congratulateaagrad grad Thank Thankananemployee employee 59. Bound  Congratulate Rememberaabeloved Marka abusiness business milestone ebrate an anniversary deductible Commemorate an event  Remember Mark With a taxbeloved donation ofmilestone $1,500, this 60. permanent One who is gesture highly skilled Celebrate an anniversary Commemorate Commemorate an event  Celebrate an anniversary  an event ones and special moments. creates a lasting legacy for your loved 61. Jewish spiritual leader h a tax deductibleWith donation of $1,500, this gesturegesture a tax deductible donation of permanent $1,500, this permanent With a tax deductible donation of $1,500, thisand permanent gesture tes a lasting legacy for loved ones and special moments. creates ayour lasting legacy for your loved ones special moments. 62. Tall, rounded vase www.shuswapfoundation.ca creates a lasting legacy for your loved ones and special moments. www.shuswapfoundation.ca www.shuswapfoundation.ca 63. Liturgical language of Office: 250-832-5428 info@shuswapfoundation.ca www.shuswapfoundation.ca Office: 250-832-5428 info@shuswapfoundation.ca ffice: 250-832-5428 info@shuswapfoundation.ca Office: 250-832-5428 info@shuswapfoundation.ca Hinduism (abbr.) 64. Cheek

Dec. 22-Jan. 20

JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE

WORD SCRAMBLE

HOLIDAY SPIRIT! Le Comptoir Aroma

Diffusers

~ Beautiful design ~ Up to 6 hours running time

15% off

Last-Minute Gift Giving Ideas… Himalayan Salt Lamps All sizes from Small to Jumbo!

CLUES DOWN

1. Pie _ __ mode 2. Portuguese cape 3. Ottoman military title 4. Movable frame used in burials 5. Type of coal 6. A treeless grassy plain 7. Artist’s workroom 8. Assists 9. Protein-rich liquids 10. A song of praise to God 12. Much __ about nothing 14. Japanese city 19. Atomic number 10 23. Egyptian goddess 24. Go places 25. Having ten 26. Complete 27. Automotive belt 28. Psyche 29. Melodious bird

34. Medical personnel 35. Acquired 36. Type of beverage 37. Neither 39. Spanish monetary units 40. Small area of grass 41. Your 42. Diana __, singer 44. Salt’s partner 45. Made of wood 46. No longer alive 47. Alaskan island 48. Wild animal’s resting place 51. Swiss river 52. Partiality 53. “Luther” actor Idris 54. UNLV’s “Runnin’ __” 58. Criticize PUZZLE NO. CW17C310

December 15 - December 21

Christmas Traditions

• Mince & Butter Tarts “Gluten Free” Biscotti • Mixed Nuts in the Shell • Halvah – Marble, Chocolate or Vanilla • Ribbon Candy, Candied Almonds • Belgian and Callebout European-quality chocolate • Fruit & Nut Gift Trays • Holiday Teas & Coffee Blends • Mulling Spices & Hot Apple Cider •Delicious Stocking Stuffers!

Hours: Monday - 9:30 - 5:30 • Friday - 9:30 - 7:00 Saturday - 9:30 - 5:30 • Sunday/Stat Holiday - 11:00 - 4:00

Centenoka Park Mall • 250-833-0144

Happy Holidays for you and your family!

supplementsinsalmonarmbc.ca

CAPRICORN

Capricorn

Assignments at work take precedence this week, Capricorn. Do your best to navigate your way through a lengthy to-do list. Don’t let distractions get in your way.

Jan. 21-Feb. 18

AQUARIUS

Aquarius

Aquarius, living in your imagination helps you drum up creative ideas, but this week you have to periodically reconnect with reality. Shift the focus to work or family.

Feb. 19-Mar. 20

PISCES

Mar. 21-Apr. 20

ARIES

Aries

Aries, an outburst of creativity may surprise those close to you, but this week you just may need an outlet. Channel this energy into a project you have been hoping to complete.

Apr. 21-May 21

TAURUS

Pisces

Taurus

May 22-June 21

GEMINI

June 22- July 22

You can’t seem to sit still this week, Gemini. Get outdoors and take a hike or engage in another form of physical activity. Enjoy getting outside for some fun and fresh air.

CANCER

Cancer

Cancer, a drastic shift in direction at work can catch you off guard at first, especially since you’ve been comfortable. But this challenge can provide greater opportunities.

July 23-Aug. 23

LEO

Aug. 24-Sept. 22

VIRGO

Virgo

A partnership might hit a rough patch this week, Virgo. But it isn’t anything serious. Commit to working things out and you will have benefitted from this experience.

Sept. 23-Oct. 23

LIBRA

Libra

Libra, an unexpected turn of events spices things up in the coming days. Enjoy this change of pace but do your best to stay grounded throughout the tumult.

Oct. 24-Nov. 22

SCORPIO

Scorpio

Scorpio, controlled chaos is the source of your inspiration this week. Ruffle a few feathers, but make sure you do so in a productive and effective way.

Nov. 23-Dec. 21

SAGITTARIUS

Leo

Sagittarius

Daily Features Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner Come Celebrate our New Menu!

Top of the Hill Salmon Arm 250-832-9991

CRYPTO FUN

The road to satisfaction can’t be found on a GPS device, Pisces. You have to do some soulsearching and figure out what you want.

Your poker face is on this week, Taurus. Keep things close to the vest as you have a surprise to announce and don’t want to spill the beans prematurely.

Gemini

WORD SEARCH

Impatience will not serve you well this week, Leo. There is no room for shortcuts, so buckle down and devote yourself to the tasks at hand, even if they take a while.

Sagittarius, the solution to a problem you have had for awhile will come to you this week. This immediately makes you more comfy allows you to focus on recreation.

ACCOMMODATION ADD-ON ADVENTURE AFFILIATE AGENT AGGREGATOR BARGAIN BED AND BREAKFAST BLACKOUT BOOKING CHARTER COMMISSION CONCIERGE CRUISE CURRENCY CUSTOMER DEALS DESTINATION

WS17C100

ESTABLISHMENT EVENTS EXCURSION FARE GUIDE HOSTEL INDUSTRY INVOICE KEYCARD LEISURE MERCHANT OVERBOOKING PASSENGER SIGHTSEE SUITE TOUR TRIP VACATION

For all your Advertising Needs... TAMMY HOWKINS Advertising Sales

250.832.2131 tammy@saobserver.net

SUDOKU

PUZZLE NO. SU17C150


Arts & Events

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Friday, December 15, 2017 Page A17

Vernon

Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram

THE FUN STORE

YEAR END

Author and environmentalist Jim Cooperman thumbs through a copy of his new book, Everything Shuswap. All proceeds from book sales, which was produced in partnership with the North Okanagan-Shuswap School District, will be donated to support outdoor learning programs.

CLEAROUT! XMAS - SPLURGE THIS - PAY OFF DEBT - GO TO MEXICO!

25 CUSTOM PICS @ WWW.VERNONDODGE.COM

2016 GRAND CHEROKEE OVERLAND Only 12,000 Kms Loaded WAS

68,235

$

CLEAROUT!

54,888

$ Tracy HugHes/salmon arm observer

Everything Shuswap’s success story Sales of the first book about the Shuswap region, Everything Shuswap, have exceeded expectations with the first edition nearly sold out. It has been a hot ticket item for holiday gifts, and there could be a shortage on the shelves. Fortunately, a second printing will be available soon. Reviews have been overwhelmingly positive, including the fullpage coverage in BC Bookworld by former CBC almanac host, Mark Forsythe. He wrote, “Jim Cooperman guides us through each watershed, pausing at key parks, valleys, old growth forests (including an interior rainforest), providing relevant historical context along the way. Early chapters on ecology and geology trace the physical landscape, while stories and profiles of indigenous peoples and

settlers occupy most of the pages. There is a strong sense of place throughout.” Everything Shuswap is more than a book; it is also an educational project. Efforts have begun to integrate the book into the high school curriculum with the aid of a teacher’s guide that is now in draft form. There is a plan for high school students to assist with the research for the next two volumes. Next spring, funds from the sales of the book will be used to help cover the costs of student outdoor field trips. After a recent tour with book launches in Surrey and Victoria, Everything Shuswap is attracting more interest. Soon, the book will be featured in the The Tyee, with excerpts from chapter four and an interview with Cooperman. Plans are in the works to secure a na-

At Home or Online... SALMON ARM

Don’t Guilty plea in sexual assault miss out on the latest news, views and entertainment

Wednesday February 9, 2011

www.saobserver.net $1.25 HST INCLUDED

OBSERVER STAFF

a Salmon Arm church A former youth leader at nine-month conditional has been sentenced to a probation after pleading sentence and one year of a 15-year-old girl he guilty to sexually assaulting met through church work. must also provide a Daron Mark Crown, 25, with the sex ofDNA sample and be registered years. of 10 fender database for a period De Walle accepted On Tuesday, Judge Edmond Crown counsel and dethe joint submission from which means Crown fence counsel for the sentence, the nine-month term; will not be incarcerated for in the community sentence his instead he will serve These include havunder a number of conditions. remaining under and ing no contact with the victim or approved house arrest except for employment he could be breached, absences. If conditions are time in prison. required to serve his remaining and accept respon“I wish to express deep regret the court,” said Crown, to actions my for sibility wife and a small cluswho attended court with his a dark blue pin-striped ter of friends. Dressed in with his wife as he sat suit, Crown often held hands with his head bowed. and put this matter “I hope to make restitution

behind me.” after allegations of Crown was charged in May came to light. the inappropriate relationship the victim’s family Concerns were raised by Crown had sent roses members, who discovered emails and text commuto the girl and later found The victim later spoke nication of a sexual nature. which began in to authorities of the relationship, touching and sexual February 2010, and included oral sex, but not intercourse. and his wife was Although Crown was married prosecutor Bill offences, pregnant at the time of the believed Crown was in victim the said Hilderman have an ongoing relove with her and they would lationship. serious breach of trust “What we have here is a of authority with a from a person in a position See Crown on page A2

SALMON ARM

Council: Proposal would allow city to recoup costs for special events. By Lachlan Labere

OBSERVER STAFF

Their reasoning may have differed but their message to city council was by and large the same: shelve the special events bylaw. On Monday evening, council’s chamber was open to the public to speak to the bylaw created in response to the coming of the Sturgis North motorcycle rally. The intent of the bylaw, as laid out by city administrator Carl Bannister, is to give the city the ability to collect fees associated with special events with 5,000 or more participants, particularly in relation to costs associated with policing, fire control and municipal public works. Additional costs related to the bylaw are an $800 application fee for a special event permit, a $500 fine for not having the permit, and a requirement of $10 million in liability insurance. First to comment on the bylaw was Salmon Arm Fall Fair president Phil Wright. He suggested the bylaw would have a negative impact on the Children’s Festival, which has no funds available for these costs. Wright suggested that instead of the underlong, so for 700 pagesnumber of attendees, the bylaw focus on the more than 400 contracts type it entails and standing what work themselves, and that of festival and, for services to the unemployed how to put a bid example, the number of beer garfiguring out the privacy of B.C.’s citizens dens By Martha Wickett it willparticuhave. to about 70, so that clients together is daunting, OBSERVER STAFF may be compromised. The second speaker was Christopher Green can go to one of 98 new of the smaller agencies. While the provincial govprovincial Em- larly for Langley-based complete and funGreenWay Legal Centre. Speaking the program idea of consoli- ‘full-service’ Providing as both a legal of Services Centres, damental transfor- ernment’s of Sturgis North, as range of services ployment cases to a satel- could require renovationsrepresentative well mation of the way dating the as an investor or in some of equip-in the event, Green suggested the purchase are available to the unemployed lite office, to access all the premises,city does not andan events bylaw at this employment services time and ment, training of staffneed into a ‘one-stop shopping’ asked expenses, that it be shelved services they qualify for and but provided to the unemployed one, until good a Jan. as 2012. start-up seen Green is other said format RFP is the bylaw would in this region and across B.C. are unthe will need. The final not only add additional cost to the that’s where support for the financial institutions Sturgis event, based expected in March, with is underway, a change which in likely to provide loans but could prove prohibitive for organew plan appears to stop, new program beginning has sparked fear in the hearts nizers smaller events. contract. ofof on this type particularly in rural regions. April 2012. of individuals and organizamin-bylaw you will, you pass this development Social “If In October, B.C.’s Miniswith the stroke One of many concerns al- Arm tions. said of a pen, make Salmon of Social Development the most difficult and program ister Kevin Krueger The fear centres around try with for about the proposed the most he empathizes expensive venue in British Cothoughprobably published a draft request is that it favours large organipredictions that the unemconsultalumbia much to host a special event, and one really has to as proposals (RFP) for agenwho concerns, in ployed will no longer be the zations or corporations ask done, is that resulting really what tion was you intended…,” said Green. of cies wishing to provide have the resources and finanwell-served, that many Green re-iterated an offer made recently proposed Employment Proby SturSee Big-Box on page A2 cial backing to launch a bid. those people with expertise gis to the city of $35,000 to cover associated the gram of British Columbia. The draft RFP is more than policin providing services to the ing costs. of The intent is to reduce unemployed could be out

One-stop shopping for job hunters

alarms employment program raises Special report: New B.C. and the privacy of citizens. about services for the unemployed

A

This week A Shuswap Middle School student gets set for the regional spell-off. See A15. Not everyone’s happy about the SilverBacks' winning streak. See A24.

&

Index Opinion ....................... A8 View Point .................. A9 Life & Times ............. A10 Sports............... A24-A28 Arts & Events ... A29-A31 Time out ................... A22 Vol. 104, No. 06, 56 pages

See Council on page A3

Looking where the sun don’t shine: City

was accidently connected to the storm

Shuswap as their travel guide. Copies are available in Salmon Arm at Askews, Bookingham Palace, DeMille’s and Hidden Gems.

workers look for the place where the JAMES MURRAY/OBSERVER city’s sewer system water system.

Raw sewage causes stink

If it smells like sewage, it probably is. And it was. Maggy Davidson at Spirit Quest Bookstore and some of her neighbours on Lakeshore Drive have been living with a disgusting odour for months now. It comes and goes, wafting into their stores, making them nauseous, then disappearing. Davidson says she’s been dealing with it since October, Jacalyn Hays at Bella Interiors noticed it about a year ago. “I had got in touch with the city a couple of times a year ago about this problem. They passed it off – it’s nothing, it’s nothing, it’s your imagination type of thing. It’s been a big problem for a long time and they’ve ignored it, which

This week The Salmon Arm Icebreakers felt the need for speed. See A16. A local surgeon indulges his passion for theatre. See A21 for details.

I find very annoying,” says Hays. Davidson, too, said city hall’s attitude stunk. “They’ve been awful to deal with. Inferring I didn’t know what a sewer smell smells like – and it’s true, I don’t spend time crawling around sewers; they inferred my staff didn’t know what it smelled like.” She said she’s had a plumber to her building four times, and other tradespeople. “The city said it was a gas leak... so the gas company came with their meters. The city said it’s after burners, you need to get your furnace looked at.” Finally, she says, the city agreed to flush the storm-sewer lines out front. “Then the smell was gone, miracle.” But the problem moved to Hays’ store.

Our Most Sought After 1500 WAS

52,995

$

CLEAROUT!

46,888

$

“I guess when they flushed the lines, they sent it down her direction and made her life miserable,” says Davidson. Then it came back Davidson’s way. The smell was so bad, she wondered if some poor unsuspecting fish had made a wrong turn and got lodged in the storm water pipe. However, last week, action. City staff sniffed out the source of the problem. Dale McTaggart, the city’s director of engineering and public works, told the Observer Friday that by running cameras into both the sanitary and storm sewers, staff discovered that somebody got the pipes mixed up. Sewage has been running into the storm water system while storm water has been funnelled into the sewage pipes. “I don’t know what happened, but See Crews on page A2

Index Opinion ....................... A6 View Point .................. A7 Life & Times ............... A8 Sports............... A16-A20 Arts & Events ... A21-A24 Time out ................... A25 Vol. 104, No. 07, 48 pages

A1101

2014 CHRYSLER 300 S On Winter Tires! Pano Roof, Navi WAS

28,995

$

CLEAROUT!

24,888

$

170434A

2010 JEEP COMMANDER SPORT 4X4

Give the Gift of Hope.

Auto Parksense WAS $ 19,995

CLEAROUT!

16,888

$

170186A

2013 DODGE JOURNEY SE PLUS uConnect Voice Command Bluetooth WAS $ 16,995 CLEAROUT!

13,888

$

170177A

2006 BMW 330Ci Convertible 140 kms Donations to the Shuswap Hospital Foundation in the name of a loved one will help to provide for the wellness of others. Participation in a Planned Giving program is an opportunity to ‘pay it forward’ for the gift of living in the wonderful, caring community of the Shuswap.

We invite you to speak to your accountant, lawyer or financial advisor to discuss the numerous tax advantages to planned giving. The Shuswap Hospital Foundation would be happy to provide you with detailed information on the variety of options for planned giving within our community.

Downtown: After numerous citizen complaints, the city discovers a sewer line pumping waste into the storm drain system.

By Martha Wickett

OBSERVER STAFF

2017 RAM 1500 REBEL

WAS

16,995

$

CLEAROUT!

12,888

$

www.shuswaphospitalfoundation.org Box 265, Salmon Arm, BC V1E 4N3 or call 250-803-4546

Learn about charitable giving opportunities through investment and taxation planning.

160553E1

2010 HYUNDAI ELANTRA TOURING

GL 146 kms

Wednesday February 16, 2011 www.saobserver.net $1.25 HST INCLUDED

Groups want hold on bylaw

Court: Former church leader admits to sexual contact with 15-year-old. By Tracy Hughes

Observer

memorable feedback comments about the book came from a local, young couple who decided to have a summer “stay-cation” using Everything

Planned Giving can be arranged in many ways such as: • Securities or Real Estate • Life Insurance • Cash Donations • Charitable Trusts • Retirement Plans • Wills & Estates

www.saobserver.net

Observer

tional distributor to get a presence in larger retail outlets such as BC Ferries, Mountain Equipment Co-op and other national chains. One of the most

160272

WAS

9,995

$

CLEAROUT!

4 888

$ ,

Vernon

Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram

170100B

250-545-2261 DLR #5204

4607 27 STREET

WWW.VERNONDODGE.COM All prices $495 documentation fee and taxes. *On approved credit.


Page A18 Friday, December 15, 2017

Sports

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

From the Christmas Turkey

www.saobserver.net

to Dessert!

rs e t t a l P g n i n i a t r e t mily a F n e h t E g n i r d o e e F to

Wilkie fourth in World Cup Jim Elliot Salmon Arm Observer

! n u o o t y n y t u i l o a c u q n e a c has th The Mall at Piccadilly • 250-832-2278 www.saveonfoods.com

Natalie Wilkie of Salmon Arm just missed the podium in all three events of her first international cross-country skiing races as a member of the national para-nordic prospect team. At the Para-Nordic World Cup, held in Canmore on Dec. 9 to

What do you get the person who has everything?

Gift Certificates! Then they can choose what they would like: • Vehicle Details • Undercoating • Oil Changes • Vehicle Services • Parts • We have a few gift ideas: Caps, Die Cast Cars, Travel Mugs & more!

brabymotors com

photo contributeD

Natalie Wilkie competes in the Cross Country Ski nationals in March in Canmore.

1250 TCH • 1-250-832-8053

17, Wilkie placed fourth in the women’s standing sprint, middle and long races. In the sprint race on Dec. 9, Wilkie qualified for the final alongside fellow Canadians Emily Young from Vancouver and Brittany Hudak of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan. Wilkie finished the 1250 metre race with a time of 3:38.22. She was on the heels of Young but could not pass her teammate to get on the podium.

The following day, Wilkie was back on the course for the 7.5-kilometre middle-distance race. After three 2.5-kilometre laps, Wilkie finished 31 seconds behind Young for another fourth-place result. Wilkie raced her way to another fourth-place in the 15-kilometre long-distance race on Dec. 12. This time, Young was able to pick up a silver medal while Anna Milenina took bronze.

Wilkie’s situation is rare in that she is a member of both the able-bodied BC Nordic Team and the Canadian para-prospect team. She was selected for the BC Nordic team following her bronze-medal finish at cross-country ski nationals in March. She is eligible to compete on the para-nordic team because she lost most of the fingers on her left hand in a school woodshop accident at in 2016.

Salmon Arm YOUR LOCAL PHARMACY

Close to the Hospital, Walk in Clinic & Physician Ofces

“The Pharmacy For All Of You”

581 B Hudson Avenue NE. Salmon Arm

(Across from McGuire Lake)

250-804-0700

Body Waves A gift for you!

102 Hudson Ave. N.W. Salmon Arm

Esthetics & Tanning Salon

10% off until Christmas!

250-804-2600 bodywavessalon.com


Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Sports

Friday, December 15, 2017 Page A19

SAFE WINTER DRIVING TIPS Before you head into winter with your car, check out these winterization and safe driving tips: • Keep up with your scheduled oil changes. • Ensure tires are properly inflated and replace summer tires with winter tires. • Add tire chains if necessary. • Top off the fuel tank before a trip. • Check windshield washer fluid level. • Keep emergency first aid kit and blanket in trunk. • Adjust driving speed for deteriorating conditions. • Watch for black ice.

171 Shuswap St. • 250 832-2131 • www.saobserver.net

OUSE ~ Sunday, Decem ber 17 • 1 to 5 pm OPEN H Until Dec. 31st all accepted offers will receive an allinclusive trip for two to Mexico • Only 8 units left • All units 100% complete & Move-in Ready • 5-minute walk to downtown • Award-winning building Jim Elliot/Salmon arm obSErvEr.

Slapshot

Contact us now!

info@imperialheights.ca • www.imperialheights.ca HR_QP_AD_PRINT_SAO_1711.pdf 2017-11-09 3:22 PM SALMON2 ARM OBSERVER (855) 977-4725

www.saobserver.net

Connor O’Brien of the Johnson Meier Insurance Atom Rec Mustangs fires a shot at the Winfield Bruins’ goal during a game at Hucul Pond on Saturday, Dec. 9.

“JOY TO THE WORLD” Sing along to classic Christmas carols, favorite hymns & holiday songs Richard Good Songster

give the gift of Home this holiday season

Timothy Weicker Accompanist

Margaret Oxley, Melissa Wood; First Ladies Shuswap Barbershop Project – Men’s A Cappella Chorus C

M

Y

Admission by direct donation in support of Salmon Arm Women’s Shelter

CM

MY

CY

CMY rs

lla

K

lty

Do

ya

Lo

rs

lla

Do

lty

ya

Lo

.

h laasrs Dolr c alty ed fo

Loy

M.C.: S.A.F.E. Society’s Chairman Rev. George Fleming Your last opportunity to contribute to the Women’s Emergency Shelter before Christmas Day!

St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church 1981 - 9th Ave. N.E. Saturday, December 23, 7:00 p.m.

God bless us, every one! ~Tiny Tim

em

de

e re

e.

ay

b ot

n

med

M

lu

sh

No

ca

va

no

for

.

sh

ca

dee

e re

tb

May

. lue. . va nly cash sh for 8o ca 01 emed No ,2 rede ly. 21 t be on h 18 ay no arc e. M , 20 M 21 valu ru cash arch 8 th ru M ly. No 1 on 18 th 20 , 20 1, 2018 ch 21 Mar aryy 1, thru nuuar Ja n 2018 m Ja y 1, m frfrooJanuar le m abafro ble mle eab em de em Re de Rede Re

Purchase a $25 gift card & receive $5 Loyalty Dollars Valid January 1, 2018 thru March 21, 2018 Only No cash value. May not be redeemed for cash. While supplies last.

Hucul Printing

Hope, Merritt, Sorrento, Maple Ridge, Salmon Arm


Page A20 Friday, December 15, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

ONLINE SAFETY BEGINS AT HOME.

Sports

www.saobserver.net

S R I A P E * R Light Duty on all ucks Ford Tr

2018 ary 31, es Janu nance items ir p x e r Offe des mainte * Exclu

.COM

JACOBSON

Parts & Service Department (250) 832-2101 (250) 832-2108

File Photo

Plans for a BMX track may become a reality at the Silver Creek Community Park.

SPECIAL Holiday Coupons

Hear for the Holidays! Take advantage of these limited-time, end of the year offers! The holidays are a wonderful time to reconnect and celebrate with family and friends. But if you struggle to hear well, this time of year can leave you feeling overwhelmed and frustrated. That’s why we’re celebrating the holidays with these limited-time coupon offers. Combine and redeem them at more than 200 participating locations in Canada! Book your FREE hearing test today!

THESE COUPONS CAN BE COMBINED

50 FREE

AIR MILES® REWARD MILES

1000

AIR MILES® REWARD MILES

Receive a FREE hearing test and earn 50 AIR MILES® reward miles! Hearing tests are provided free of charge for adults ages 18 and older. 50 reward mile offer is limited to adults ages 50 and over and is non-transferable. Please allow up to 45 days for the reward miles to appear in your collector account. ®†™†Trademark of AIR MILES® International Trading B.V. Used under license by LoyaltyOne Inc. and Canada Hearing Ltd. Expires 12/30/17. Limit first-time tests, per Collector Account.

Earn up to 1,000 AIR MILES® reward miles with your purchase of select hearing aids. Reward mile value is non-transferable and depends on select models purchased. Please allow up to 45 days for the reward miles to appear in your collector account. ®†™†Trademark of AIR MILES International Trading B.V. Used under license by LoyaltyOne Inc. and HearingLife Canada Ltd. Expires 12/30/17. Limit one offer per customer, per Collector Account.

Over 200 locations nationwide - Call a nearby clinic below or visit HearingLife.ca/HolidayCoupons to Book your FREE Hearing Test. Formerly

Salmon Arm 251 Trans Canada Highway Call Anna-Marie or Theresa at 1-877-224-4610

D’Arcy White Registered Audiologist

Sorrento 1257 Trans Canada Highway Call Anna-Marie or Theresa at 1-877-225-4387

Amber Phillips Registered Hearing Instrument Practitioner

Live Life Completely!

TRUSTED PARTNER OF

NIHB, VAC and Worker’s Compensation Provider

HearingLife is registered and in good standing with WorkSafeBC. VAC Health Identification Cards Accepted.

Promo Code NSP-HDAY-SHUN

BMX group eyes up Silver Creek Jim Elliot Salmon Arm Observer

Plans to build a BMX track in the Shuswap are continuing but focusing on a new location – Silver Creek. Shelly Desautels and a subgroup of the Shuswap Cycling Club interested in BMX are working to get a track built at the Silver Creek Community Park. Desautels, who has been spearheading the project, says so far the Columbia Shuswap Regional District (CSRD) and the Silver Creek community have been very receptive to the plan. A message from Desautels and others lobbying for the construction of the track, promises the venue in Silver Creek will provide kids with an opportunity to be active, bring in riders from other communities who will buy gas and groceries at the local store and provide an opportunity to host events at the community hall which will bring money into Silver Creek. Desautels said a meeting with the CSRD Area D parks committee went very well. She said the parks committee think the track will be great for local kids and will complement a bike

path which is planned for the area. “We used to live in Vernon. We lived across the street from the BMX track so my son grew up riding on that,” Desautels said. “It would have been nice to have something here to be closer to.” The track will be constructed by volunteers and designed by BMX Canada engineers to make sure it conforms to their standards. There is a $2,500 fee for the engineer’s assistance with building the track. Desautels and the cycling club will not be asking the CSRD for funding; she says they plan to fund the track through grants, corporate sponsorship and fundraising events. Shuswap residents who are interested in BMX racing currently have to travel to Vernon, Kamloops or Kelowna. Desautels said approximately 30 riders from Salmon Arm regularly make the trip to another city while another 300 people are members of a facebook group expressing interest in the track. Now that she has presented her idea to the Area D parks committee, Desautels will also present to the CSRD board of directors.


N

At Askew’s Foods we are working to provide you with natural and organic choices in every department.

ATURALLY A

healthy lifestyle b egins

Kettle

Celestial Seasonings

Potato Chips

Tea

220 g

Asst. Var. • 20 Pack

2 for

$4.98

2 for

$4.98

OOD with healt hy

Martinelli’s

choices !

Shuswap Coffee Co.

Sparkling Apple Juice

Organic Fair Trade Coffee

Asst. Varieties 750 mL

454 g

$11.98

$4.68

Decaf Varities $12.98

+ Deposit

www.askewsfoods.com • Salmon Arm Downtown • Salmon Arm Uptown • Armstrong • Sicamous

PRICES IN EFFECT: DECEMBER 17-30, 2017


N

ATURALLY

Blue Diamond

Pacific

Almond Breeze Almond Beverage

Organic Broth 946 mL - 1 L

946 mL

$2.28

Case 12 x 946 mL • $24.98 Nature’s Path

OOD

Knudsen’s

Natural Apple Juice Cider & Spice 946 mL

$3.48

Crofter’s

Kiju

Organic Juice Blends 1L

+ Deposit

$4.98

Organic Premium Fruit Spread

Que Pasa

Organic Tortilla Chips 300-350 g

383 mL

2 for

$3.68

A healthy lifestyle begins with healthy choices.

+ Deposit

$3.98

$2.98

Nuts to You

Que Pasa

Almond Butter

Organic Salsa

365 g

420 g

$2.98

Raincoast Trading Co.

Pamela’s

Sockeye Salmon

Gourmet Rice Cookies

160 g

Gluten Free 150 g

400 g

$5.68

$3.68

$3.68

$6.98

Nature’s Bakery

Raincoast Trading Co.

Lesley Stowe

Stan’s Canada #1

Seventh Generation

Whole Wheat Fig Bars

Wild Skipjack Tuna

Raincoast Crisps

Silver Hills

Dishwashing Liquid

142 g

150 g

Liquid or Creamed Honey

Organic Cereal 284-400 g

$3.48

Premium Varieties • $3.98

340 g

$4.68

$2.98

Blue Diamond

Spectrum

Gluten-Free Nut Thins

Organic Meditarranean Olive Oil

120 g

1L

Silver Hills

Sprouted Whole Grain Bagels

Organic Sprouted Tortillas

739 mL

255 g

1 kg

$3.68

$8.98

$2.98

Simply Organic

Endangered Species

Seventh Generation

Organic Seasoning Mixes

Chocolate Bars

Wholesome Sweeteners

Organic Brown Sugar

Laundry Liquid

$4.98

85 g

Dip, Gravy & Sauces 24-45 g

2X Concentrate 2.95 L

Light or Dark 680 g

$13.98

$3.98

$12.98

$1.68

$3.48

$5.98

Lundberg

San Pellegrino

Gerolsteiner

Uncle Luke’s

Simply Organic

Caboo

Nutra Farm Rice Blends 454 g

$4.98

Sparkling Fruit Beverage

Mineral Water

Canada #1 Maple Syrup

Organic Spices

Bathroom Tissue

6 x 330 mL

750 mL

375 mL

4-85 g

12 Roll, 2 Ply

$4.98

$1.88

+ Deposit

Case 15 x 750 mL • $24.98 + dep.

$6.98

30% off Regular Price

$7.98


N

ATURALLY

Blue Diamond

Pacific

Almond Breeze Almond Beverage

Organic Broth 946 mL - 1 L

946 mL

$2.28

Case 12 x 946 mL • $24.98 Nature’s Path

OOD

Knudsen’s

Natural Apple Juice Cider & Spice 946 mL

$3.48

Crofter’s

Kiju

Organic Juice Blends 1L

+ Deposit

$4.98

Organic Premium Fruit Spread

Que Pasa

Organic Tortilla Chips 300-350 g

383 mL

2 for

$3.68

A healthy lifestyle begins with healthy choices.

+ Deposit

$3.98

$2.98

Nuts to You

Que Pasa

Almond Butter

Organic Salsa

365 g

420 g

$2.98

Raincoast Trading Co.

Pamela’s

Sockeye Salmon

Gourmet Rice Cookies

160 g

Gluten Free 150 g

400 g

$5.68

$3.68

$3.68

$6.98

Nature’s Bakery

Raincoast Trading Co.

Lesley Stowe

Stan’s Canada #1

Seventh Generation

Whole Wheat Fig Bars

Wild Skipjack Tuna

Raincoast Crisps

Silver Hills

Dishwashing Liquid

142 g

150 g

Liquid or Creamed Honey

Organic Cereal 284-400 g

$3.48

Premium Varieties • $3.98

340 g

$4.68

$2.98

Blue Diamond

Spectrum

Gluten-Free Nut Thins

Organic Meditarranean Olive Oil

120 g

1L

Silver Hills

Sprouted Whole Grain Bagels

Organic Sprouted Tortillas

739 mL

255 g

1 kg

$3.68

$8.98

$2.98

Simply Organic

Endangered Species

Seventh Generation

Organic Seasoning Mixes

Chocolate Bars

Wholesome Sweeteners

Organic Brown Sugar

Laundry Liquid

$4.98

85 g

Dip, Gravy & Sauces 24-45 g

2X Concentrate 2.95 L

Light or Dark 680 g

$13.98

$3.98

$12.98

$1.68

$3.48

$5.98

Lundberg

San Pellegrino

Gerolsteiner

Uncle Luke’s

Simply Organic

Caboo

Nutra Farm Rice Blends 454 g

$4.98

Sparkling Fruit Beverage

Mineral Water

Canada #1 Maple Syrup

Organic Spices

Bathroom Tissue

6 x 330 mL

750 mL

375 mL

4-85 g

12 Roll, 2 Ply

$4.98

$1.88

+ Deposit

Case 15 x 750 mL • $24.98 + dep.

$6.98

30% off Regular Price

$7.98


Meat

Frozen Daiya

Mapleton’s

Cheesecake

Organic Ice Cream

Dairy & Gluten Free 400 g

473 mL

$9.98

$4.98

So Delicious

Stahlbush Island Farms

ea.

Sustainable Vegetables 283 - 340 g

2 for

266 mL

$4.98

$3.48

Smoked Smoked Sockeye Salmon or Tuna 113 g

$5.48 Coconut Whipped Topping

Raincoast Trading Co.

Fresh or Frozen

Farm Fed Natural Roasting Chickens

6.99/kg

$3.17

lb.

Dairy Happy Planet

Dairyland

Organic Milk Skim, 1%, 2%, Homo 2L

$4.48

Dairyland

$3.98 $7.68

Organic Produce

113 g

$3.98

Soy & True Almond Beverage

$3.98

1.89 L

Providing a selection of quality organic fruits and vegetables. Fresh

Fresh

Organic Chinese Mandarin Oranges

$4.98

While quantities Last

Organic Cauliflower 3.48/kg

ea.

$1.58

lb.

Fresh

Fresh

Romaine Hearts

Organic Russet Potatoes 5 lb. Bag

+ Dep.

Silk

Organic Butter

4 lb. Box

$4.48

Soft Goat Cheese

Liberté

454 g

1.75 L

Woolwich

Organic 10% Cream 1L

Fresh Organic Juice

$3.98

ea.

$2.98

ea.


www.saobserver.net

Community

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Friday, December 15, 2017 Page A25

Great Christmas Gifts start with Canadian Tire!

Photo contributeD

From left: Jabin Zuidhof and Mayor Nancy Cooper, pose with Josiah Trentalance and Reese Tremblay, the owners of Great Grooves, which raised $500 by selling wooden chalkboards and candle holders.

Small Appliances, Automotive Accessories, Hand Tools, Home Furniture. Kids Toys and Games, Cookware, Outdoor Christmas Decor, Snowblowers and so much more.

Student entrepreneurs donate profits to charity From colourful duct tape wallets to beautiful doll clothes or rustic cherry candle holders fourteen local, entrepreneurial homeschool students gathered at Piccadilly Mall to sell original handmade products and show that they care about alleviating poverty worldwide. Market Day composed of five groups of homeschooling students from Heritage Christian Online School ranging from grades 3-8 that have each created a business and original products to sell to the community to raise awareness and funds. This course, created to meet competencies in the Applied Design and Career subject areas, combined authentic hands on learning with deep, formative thinking about how to alleviate poverty. Every dollar that these students earned went to Opportunity International, a worldwide charity that support entrepreneurs in Third World countries. The class raised $1,860 in their short three hour sale. One of their shoppers was Mayor Nancy Cooper. “These students have wrestled with issues of global poverty and how to “help without hurting” through hand ups not handouts,” states Sarah Zuidhof, teacher. “Many of them were moved deeply by the documentary Poverty Inc and encouraged their family and friends to watch the film so they could

discuss it with them.” For the past eight weeks the group has met every Thursday and each group had to create a name, logo, mission statement and product for their business. Then they had to complete market research and create a financial plan. A month ago, each business had to stand before “Shark Tank”, a group of four business people/ entrepreneurs in Salmon Arm and solicit a loan for their business. “It can often be difficult for children to understand the larger issues faced in the world, but through this entrepreneurship course the boys have been able to understand poverty and take their own steps to help,” stated Stephen Black, a father to two sons in the course. “By feeling the genuine pressure of developing a product and asking for a loan, the boys developed compassion for some of the obstacles that third world entrepreneurs face everyday.” A few of the businesses are even talking about continuing their businesses long after Market Day is over to raise money for their university education or to continue to donate. Reece Friesen, grade 6, and co-owner of N&R Ltd which made handmade wooden boxes, summed up his learning in the course by saying: “In our desire to help, through our feelings of compassion, we can turn it around and our helping be-

comes solely a feel-good thing for us and actually quite hurtful to those receiving our help. We need to wise about how we help others.” -Submitted by Sarah Zuidhof

Full Service Auto Centre open Monday - Saturday

Canadian Tire 1151 10th Ave. SW • The Mall at Piccadilly, Salmon Arm Store hours: Mon. to Fri. 8am-9pm • Sat 8am-6pm • Sun 9am-5pm

250-832-9600 • Locally Owned & Operated

Join with the Salmon Arm Observer

Help out the local

Food Banks How it works:

• From November 22nd to December 20th bring a full bag (or 2) of non-perishable, current food items to the Salmon Arm Observer at 171 Shuswap Street.

No out-of-date items please! • Pick a numbered card from our Christmas Tree and receive the corresponding gift or gift certificate (Minimum $25) • All gifts and gift certificates are donated by local merchants

&

Participating Merchants in the 2017 campaign: Save On Foods Salmon Arm Roots and Blues Pharmasave Victorian Impressions Woodsman Equipment Canadian Tire Fountain Tire Braby Motors Salmar Theatre InView Optical Munro’s Sorrento Prescriptions IDA Talking Rock Golf Course Skookum Cycle & Ski


Page A26 Friday, December 15, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

S A H M O T S U I R R S H C We will be closed December 25th, 26th & January 1st OPEN DECEMBER 27 - 29 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

The office will return to regular office hours on Tuesday, January 2, 2018 (8:00 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon.-Wed.)

HOLIDAY DEADLINES

Observer:

Dec. 20

EVN:

Dec. 20

Market:

Dec. 22

Observer:

Dec. 27

EVN:

Dec. 27

Market:

Dec. 29

Observer:

Jan. 3

EVN:

Jan. 3

Market:

Jan. 5

Display Classified Display Word Classifieds Display Classified Display Word Classifieds Display Classified Display Word Classifieds Display Classified Display Word Classifieds Display Classified Display Word Classifieds Display Classified Display Word Classifieds Display Classified Display Word Classifieds Display Classified Display Word Classifieds Display Classified Display Word Classifieds

Dec. 15 • 12 noon Dec. 15 • 10 a.m. Dec. 15 • 12 noon Dec. 15 • 12 noon Dec. 15 • 10 a.m. Dec. 15 • 12 noon Dec. 18 • 4 p.m. Dec. 18 • 2 p.m. Dec. 18 • 4 p.m. Dec. 19 • 12 noon Dec. 19 • 10 a.m. Dec. 19 • 12 noon Dec. 19 • 12 noon Dec. 19 • 10 a.m. Dec. 19 • 12 noon Dec. 20 • 12 noon Dec. 20 • 10 a.m. Dec. 20 • noon Dec. 29 • 12 noon Dec. 29 • 10 a.m. Dec. 29 • 12 noon Dec. 29 • 12 noon Dec. 29 • 10 a.m. Dec. 29 • 12 noon Jan. 2 • 12 noon Jan. 2 • 10 a.m. Jan. 2 • 12 noon

Merry Christmas

www.saobserver.net


www.saobserver.net

Community

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Friday, December 15, 2017 Page A27

DO YOU KNOW WHAT YOUR DONATION LOOKS LIKE?

Belonging

After Angie’s husband passed away, she began to feel lonely and isolated until a local seniors’ program (with a party bus) helped make life more meaningful again. Social isolation affects seniors’ mental health. You help fund programs to combat this.

Aladdin at Bastion

Top: A collection of belly dancing Bastion Elementary students perform as part of the school’s Aladdin performance on Thursday, Dec. 7. Right: Logan Kallies, as Prince Justin of the Bieber, attempts to woo Princess Jasmin, played by Ida Newnes.

Please give generously. Visit unitedwaycso.com/angie

TRACY HUGHES/SALMON ARM OBSERVER

LEARN THE SIGNS OF STROKE is it drooping? can you raise both? is it slurred or jumbled?

to call 9-1-1 right away. ACT BECAUSE THE QUICKER YOU ACT, THE MORE OF THE PERSON YOU SAVE. © Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, 2014

Learn more at heartandstroke.ca/FAST


Page A28 Friday, December 15, 2017

For all your Advertising Needs... Penny Brown Advertising Sales

250.832.2131

pennyjb@saobserver.net

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Viewpoint

The End of Ali Abdullah Saleh

Marla Beblow

GLOBAL VIEWS

DENTURIST LTD.

■ Complete Dentures ■ Partial Dentures ■ Repairs or Relines ■ Personalized Denture Services

832-7204

Monday to Thursday

#1 - 480 Harbourfront Drive, N.E., Salmon Arm

Columbia Shuswap Regional District 2018 Board Meeting Schedule

The 2018 Meeting Schedule for regular meetings of the CSRD Regional Board has been set. Meetings are typically held the third Thursday of each month commencing at 9:30 a.m. at the CSRD offices: January 18, 2018 February 15, 2018 March 29, 2018 April 19, 2018 May 17, 2018 June 21, 2018

July 19, 2018 August 16, 2018 September 20, 2018 October 18, 2018 November 15, 2018 Friday, Dec. 7, 2018

Please note these dates and times are subject to change. Please refer to www.csrd.bc.ca for up to date information.

CSRD Holiday Hours The CSRD Office in Salmon Arm will be closed from SATURDAY, DECEMBER 23, 2017 until 9 AM on TUESDAY, JANUARY 2, 2018.

Visit our website at www.csrd.bc.ca 555 Harbourfront Dr. NE, Salmon Arm, BC | PO Box 978 V1E 4P1 | 250.832.8194 | Toll Free 1.888.248.2773

Gwynne Dyer Ali Abdullah Saleh seized power in Yemen in 1978, when he was only 36 years old. He lost it in 2012, when the ‘Arab spring’ was in full spate, and had been trying to get it back ever since. Thirty-four years was not enough. But on Monday, his truly astonishing ability to switch sides got him killed. Saleh was Saudi Arabia’s man in Yemen for a long time, but when Riyadh turned against him in 2012 and put his vice-president, Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi, in power instead, Saleh went rogue. A lot of the army was still loyal to him, so he made an alliance with the powerful Houthi tribes in the north (exactly the same people whom he had attacked six times in the past), and started working his way back. In 2014 the Houthi militia and Saleh’s forces seized control of the capital, Sanaa, and Saudi Arabia’s new placeman, President Hadi, fled south to Aden, the country’s

COLUMBIA SHUSWAP REGIONAL DISTRICT

CHRISTMAS LIGHT

RECYCLING Be sure to drop off your used Christmas lights for FREE.

Bill’s Bottle Depot: 2840 13 Avenue SW, Salmon Arm Scotch Creek Bottle Depot: 3855 Squilax - Anglemont Road

www.csrd.bc.ca | T: 250.833.5950 | TF: 1.888.248.2773 PO BOX 978, 555 Harbourfront Dr. NE, Salmon Arm, BC V1E 4P1

www.saobserver.net

second city. Later Hadi fled to Saudi Arabia, and the Houthi-Saleh alliance took over most of the country. Yemen matters a lot to the Saudis, because it is the other big country in the Arabian peninsula, with 27 million people (same as Saudi Arabia), but it is very poor and very unstable. The fact that almost half the Yemenis follow the Shia branch of Islam (in their own Zaidi variant) is of particular concern to the Saudi regime. Such distinctions didn’t stop the Houthis (who are Shia) from getting together with Saleh’s people (who are mostly Sunnis), because Yemenis are not much troubled by such things. But the Saudi Arabian regime, all Sunnis, is obsessed by the ‘Shia threat’. That mostly means Iran, their rival across the Gulf, but the Saudis sees Iranian plots everywhere, especially if there are Shias involved. The current Yemeni

civil war is about the twentieth such power struggle in the past thousand years, and little different from all the others. Iran no doubt enjoys the Saudi Arabian panic about it, but there is no evidence that it is sending the Houthis anything except good wishes. Whereas Riyadh and its allies are sending bombers. In March 2015 Saudi Arabia and eight Arab allies launched a bombing campaign against the Houthis and Saleh’s forces, with the United States and the United Kingdom both providing political, logistical and propaganda support to the operation. More than 8,000 Yemenis have been killed by the coalition’s air strikes and around 50,000 wounded, but the lines on the ground have scarcely shifted in the past two years. The air war has been very costly for Saudi Arabia both in money and in reputation, and it has been getting increasingly embarrassing for the man who started it, Saudi Arabian Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman. So Ali Abdullah Saleh calculated that this was the right time to change

sides: he could get a good price for ratting on the Houthis, and maybe even recover the presidency he had held for so long. He pretended to be driven by humanitarian motives. In a televised speech on Saturday, he called on “the brothers in neighbouring states and the coalition to stop their aggression, lift the siege, open the airports and allow food aid and the saving of the wounded, and we will turn a new page by virtue of our neighbourliness.” The bit about “aggression” was meant to placate his Yemeni audience, which does not love the Saudis, but he was actually offering to change sides. The Saudi-led coalition immediately responded, welcoming Saleh’s decision to “take the lead and to…free Yemen of… militias loyal to Iran.” The Houthis, however, had seen his treachery coming. They accused Saleh of staging a coup against “an alliance he never believed in,” and Sanaa was engulfed by heavy artillery fire as the Houthis went to war against their former ally. Despite Saudi air strikes to help Saleh’s forces,

the Houthis had fought their way to within 200 metres of Saleh’s house by Monday morning. Reports differ about what happened next. Some say Saleh died in the wreckage of his house, which was blown up by Houthi fighters. Others say he made a run for it in his car, which was hit by a rocket-propelled grenade. What the internet images show is a fatal wound in his head. The old fox is definitely dead, and the civil war within the civil war is probably over. Bits of Saleh’s army may fight on for a while, but without him to bind them together most of Saleh’s soldiers will eventually either go over to the Houthis or go home. The Houthis will be a bit weaker without Saleh’s support, but so long as the the coalition’s members are not willing to put large numbers of their own troops in the ground in Yemen – and they are not – the Houthis will probably keep control of most of the country. And the war will go on until Mohammed bin Salman gets tired of it, or the Saudis get tired of him.

Put pens to paper for writing contest Askew’s Foods’ Word on the Lake Writing Contest is now open. It closes at midnight on Feb. 28, 2018. Contestants may submit original unpublished works in the following categories: fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. First place winners will receive a cash prize of $150, a 2018 festival package including a Saturday night award

FILE PHOTO

Askew’s Foods’ Word on the Lake Writing Contest is now open. ceremony ticket, and their submission will

be published in the Askews’ Foods’ Word

Parkland Dental Centre All the staff at Parkland Dental would like to wish all our clients and friends the best this holiday season. Our office will be closed for the holidays from Dec 22/17 to Jan 7/18 We Welcome New Patients!

250-836-6665

Dr. Bruce Prokopetz DDS

4-1133 Eagle Pass Way, Sicamous

on the Lake Anthology, which will be available at the festival and through Bookingham Palace Books, located in the Mall at Piccadilly. Winners will be contacted prior to the Word on the Lake Writers’ Festival, which takes place May 11 to 13, 2018 at the Prestige Harbourfront Resort and Okanagan College, May 11 to 13, 2018, and will be recognized at the Saturday night festivities. For further details, including submission guidelines and information about the festival, go to www.shuswapassociationofwriters.ca

just click www.saobserver.net


Page A16 Friday, December 15, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Friday, December 15, 2017 Page A29

DECEMBER 15 - 21 playing at THE GRAND 100 Hudson Avenue

CROSSWORD

STAR WARS: LAST OF THE JEDI Fri-Tues 7PM2D

Nightly 6:45 3D & 9:35PM 2D Sat - Sun Matinees 2:00PM 2D

HOROSCOPES

CLUES ACROSS

FERDINAND

Nightly 6:35PM 3D & 8:45PM 2D Sat - Sun Matinees 2:00PM 2D

1. Member of a Semitic people 5. Certified public accountant Wed & Thurs 6:40 & 9PM 8. Residue WONDER 11. Sayings attributed to Nightly 6:30PM & 8:45PM Sat - Sun Matinees 2:10PM Christ 13. The products of human THE STAR Sat - Sun 2:10PM creativity playing at THE CLASSIC 360 Alexander Street 14. Listen to CUPE Community Film 15. Longed THE POLAR EXPRESS 16. No (Scottish) Saturday, Dec. 16th, 12PM 17. Descriptor THE NUTCRACKER BALLET 18. Yankees’ sensation Judge THE MAN WHO INVENTED CHRISTMAS Sunday, Dec. 17th, 1PM 20. Zero Friday - Tuesday 7:30PM 21. Comics legend Lee 22. Honorary title holder 25. “Uncle Joey” 30. Graceful and stylish 31. Pitching term 32. Former Mets outfielder Jones 33. One who avoids animal products 38. Quick to learn 41. Mechanism in an Shuswap Community Foundation, in partnership with theorgan 43. Redo withfor new materials City of Salmon Arm, provides a permanent place your memorable moments at the McGuire Lake45.Memorial Walkway. Epics Wings to swap Community Foundation, in partnership Purchase a brick onwith thethe Memorial47.Walkway of Salmon Arm, provides a permanent place for your 49. Extrasensory perception able moments at the McGuire Lake Memorial Walkway.  Shuswap Welcome a child thethe Recognize a volunteer 50. Cavalry sword with ShuswapCommunity CommunityFoundation, Foundation,ininpartnership partnership with City of Salmon Arm, provides a permanent place for your Purchase abrick on the Memorial Walkway to City of Salmon Arm, provides a permanent place for your Congratulate a McGuire gradLake Walkway. Thank55.anBangladeshi employeemonetary unit memorable Walkway. memorable moments momentsatatthe theMcGuire LakeMemorial Memorial 56. Not the bottom lcome a child  Recognize a volunteer  Remember aononbeloved  Mark a business milestone Purchaseaabrick brick theMemorial MemorialWalkway Walkway Purchase the toto ngratulate a  grad  Thank an employee 57. Afflicted Welcome child an anniversary  Recognize a volunteer Celebrate  Commemorate an event  Welcome aachild  Recognize a volunteer member a beloved  Mark abusiness milestone Congratulateaagrad grad Thank Thankananemployee employee 59. Bound  Congratulate Rememberaabeloved Marka abusiness business milestone ebrate an anniversary deductible Commemorate an event  Remember Mark With a taxbeloved donation ofmilestone $1,500, this 60. permanent One who is gesture highly skilled Celebrate an anniversary Commemorate Commemorate an event  Celebrate an anniversary  an event ones and special moments. creates a lasting legacy for your loved 61. Jewish spiritual leader h a tax deductibleWith donation of $1,500, this gesturegesture a tax deductible donation of permanent $1,500, this permanent With a tax deductible donation of $1,500, thisand permanent gesture tes a lasting legacy for loved ones and special moments. creates ayour lasting legacy for your loved ones special moments. 62. Tall, rounded vase www.shuswapfoundation.ca creates a lasting legacy for your loved ones and special moments. www.shuswapfoundation.ca www.shuswapfoundation.ca 63. Liturgical language of Office: 250-832-5428 info@shuswapfoundation.ca www.shuswapfoundation.ca Office: 250-832-5428 info@shuswapfoundation.ca ffice: 250-832-5428 info@shuswapfoundation.ca Office: 250-832-5428 info@shuswapfoundation.ca Hinduism (abbr.) 64. Cheek

Dec. 22-Jan. 20

JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE

WORD SCRAMBLE

HOLIDAY SPIRIT! Le Comptoir Aroma

Diffusers

~ Beautiful design ~ Up to 6 hours running time

15% off

Last-Minute Gift Giving Ideas… Himalayan Salt Lamps All sizes from Small to Jumbo!

CLUES DOWN

1. Pie _ __ mode 2. Portuguese cape 3. Ottoman military title 4. Movable frame used in burials 5. Type of coal 6. A treeless grassy plain 7. Artist’s workroom 8. Assists 9. Protein-rich liquids 10. A song of praise to God 12. Much __ about nothing 14. Japanese city 19. Atomic number 10 23. Egyptian goddess 24. Go places 25. Having ten 26. Complete 27. Automotive belt 28. Psyche 29. Melodious bird

34. Medical personnel 35. Acquired 36. Type of beverage 37. Neither 39. Spanish monetary units 40. Small area of grass 41. Your 42. Diana __, singer 44. Salt’s partner 45. Made of wood 46. No longer alive 47. Alaskan island 48. Wild animal’s resting place 51. Swiss river 52. Partiality 53. “Luther” actor Idris 54. UNLV’s “Runnin’ __” 58. Criticize PUZZLE NO. CW17C310

December 15 - December 21

Christmas Traditions

• Mince & Butter Tarts “Gluten Free” Biscotti • Mixed Nuts in the Shell • Halvah – Marble, Chocolate or Vanilla • Ribbon Candy, Candied Almonds • Belgian and Callebout European-quality chocolate • Fruit & Nut Gift Trays • Holiday Teas & Coffee Blends • Mulling Spices & Hot Apple Cider •Delicious Stocking Stuffers!

Hours: Monday - 9:30 - 5:30 • Friday - 9:30 - 7:00 Saturday - 9:30 - 5:30 • Sunday/Stat Holiday - 11:00 - 4:00

Centenoka Park Mall • 250-833-0144

Happy Holidays for you and your family!

supplementsinsalmonarmbc.ca

CAPRICORN

Capricorn

Assignments at work take precedence this week, Capricorn. Do your best to navigate your way through a lengthy to-do list. Don’t let distractions get in your way.

Jan. 21-Feb. 18

AQUARIUS

Aquarius

Aquarius, living in your imagination helps you drum up creative ideas, but this week you have to periodically reconnect with reality. Shift the focus to work or family.

Feb. 19-Mar. 20

PISCES

Mar. 21-Apr. 20

ARIES

Aries

Aries, an outburst of creativity may surprise those close to you, but this week you just may need an outlet. Channel this energy into a project you have been hoping to complete.

Apr. 21-May 21

TAURUS

Pisces

Taurus

May 22-June 21

GEMINI

June 22- July 22

You can’t seem to sit still this week, Gemini. Get outdoors and take a hike or engage in another form of physical activity. Enjoy getting outside for some fun and fresh air.

CANCER

Cancer

Cancer, a drastic shift in direction at work can catch you off guard at first, especially since you’ve been comfortable. But this challenge can provide greater opportunities.

July 23-Aug. 23

LEO

Aug. 24-Sept. 22

VIRGO

Virgo

A partnership might hit a rough patch this week, Virgo. But it isn’t anything serious. Commit to working things out and you will have benefitted from this experience.

Sept. 23-Oct. 23

LIBRA

Libra

Libra, an unexpected turn of events spices things up in the coming days. Enjoy this change of pace but do your best to stay grounded throughout the tumult.

Oct. 24-Nov. 22

SCORPIO

Scorpio

Scorpio, controlled chaos is the source of your inspiration this week. Ruffle a few feathers, but make sure you do so in a productive and effective way.

Nov. 23-Dec. 21

SAGITTARIUS

Leo

Sagittarius

Daily Features Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner Come Celebrate our New Menu!

Top of the Hill Salmon Arm 250-832-9991

CRYPTO FUN

The road to satisfaction can’t be found on a GPS device, Pisces. You have to do some soulsearching and figure out what you want.

Your poker face is on this week, Taurus. Keep things close to the vest as you have a surprise to announce and don’t want to spill the beans prematurely.

Gemini

WORD SEARCH

Impatience will not serve you well this week, Leo. There is no room for shortcuts, so buckle down and devote yourself to the tasks at hand, even if they take a while.

Sagittarius, the solution to a problem you have had for awhile will come to you this week. This immediately makes you more comfy allows you to focus on recreation.

ACCOMMODATION ADD-ON ADVENTURE AFFILIATE AGENT AGGREGATOR BARGAIN BED AND BREAKFAST BLACKOUT BOOKING CHARTER COMMISSION CONCIERGE CRUISE CURRENCY CUSTOMER DEALS DESTINATION

WS17C100

ESTABLISHMENT EVENTS EXCURSION FARE GUIDE HOSTEL INDUSTRY INVOICE KEYCARD LEISURE MERCHANT OVERBOOKING PASSENGER SIGHTSEE SUITE TOUR TRIP VACATION

For all your Advertising Needs... TAMMY HOWKINS Advertising Sales

250.832.2131 tammy@saobserver.net

SUDOKU

PUZZLE NO. SU17C150


Page A30 Friday, December 15, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Arts & Events

www.saobserver.net

LOCAL NEWS, VIEWS AND ADVERTISING

and 171 Shuswap Sh S St. t

2 250.832.2131 50 832 2 2131

Even Santa knows a great deal! CHOOSE ANY FRAME at regular price Add lenses for as low as:

Stuffies on ice

The Salmon Arm Silverbacks are showered with teddy bears after a first period goal against the Vernon Vipers on Friday, Dec. 8.

Nutcracker returns to Salmar screen

Progressives: ...$300 Bifocals: ..........$120 Single Vision: ....$74

Evelyn’s

Jim Elliot/Salmon arm obSErvEr

• Gift Certificates • Stocking Stuffers

EYEWEAR

evelynseyewear.com

102 - 231 TCHwy. NE • 250 832-1156 • Salmon Arm *Some conditions apply - see store for details. Sale ends December 30, 2017

The Nutcracker from the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow is back on the big screen. As the clock strikes midnight on Christmas Eve, Marie’s wooden nutcracker doll comes to life and transforms into a prince. Soon joined by her other

toys that have also come to life, Marie and her prince embark on a dreamy unforgettable adventure. The Nutcracker is a holiday tradition for the whole family as it sweeps the Bolshoi stage for two hours of enchantment and

magic. Along with Tchaikovsky’s cherished score and some of the Bolshoi’s greatest artists, The Nutcracker remains a treasure not to be missed. The show runs Sunday, Dec. 17, at 1 p.m. at the Salmar Classic Theatre.

Find your diamond in the rough.

Helping you deliver

THE RIGHT MESSAGE TO THE RIGHT AUDIENCE AT THE RIGHT TIME.

sellit. findit. loveit.

Targeting your message to local consumers. Let us show you how — contact us today!

saobserver.net/findit saobserver.net Tel: 250-832-2131 • email: advertising@saobserver.net

Celebrate 100

www.saobserver.net @99

WANT TO OUTSHINE YOUR COMPETITOR?

let your fingers do the clicking

Used once by mistake.

LOCAL headlines • news • entertainment sports and opinion

Wedding dress for sale.

The Salmar is bringing in this encore presentation with special pricing of $15 for adults and $7 for youth. ShuGo passes are also available for youth at the Salmon Arm Arts Centre – check the Salmar website.


l powerfu h e2017 r t15, e e s v y o o c p a Friday, December Page A31 r g r u o c w it h a p o r y ➧ a w a t c h d e n t ia l t o d e m o e b a t e g in ll e t s t d y le s ➧ es b li c ➧ stor the who ory he truth m for pu ➧ t e ll in g t e d t o t e ll in g t c r e a t in g a f o r u g t h e w h o le s t h it in ut ➧ c o m m e n d e n t v o ic e ➧ in t e r e s t ➧ t e ll g t h e t r ic e in ll e t o c p t li e vo ➧ a n in d it t e d t o t h e p u b c y ➧ c o m m it t e d n in d e p e n d e n t c y a ra ocra ➧ c o m m t ia l t o d e m#JOURNALISMIS e b a t e ➧ JOURNALISMIS.ca o democ ebate t d l c ia li t b n u n e c d for p ➧ ess ➧ esse f o r p u b li a forum he truth c r e a t in g t e d t o t e ll in g t r e a t in g a f o r u m c c o m m it young and “relatable,” playing to the perception of Wilkinson as an elitist from wealthy Vancouver-Quilchena. De Jong trailed Clark and Kevin Falcon in the 2012 leadership campaign, and judging by the latest debate, he seems resigned to third or fourth again. He’s endorsed by Surrey South MLA and former cabinet minister Stephanie Cadieux, fellow Abbotsford MLA Simon Gibson, Chilliwack’s John Martin, Richmond’s Teresa Wat and Peace River South MLA Mike Bernier, who dropped out of the leadership contest early on. De Jong’s record as finance minister is both his greatest strength and weakness, as he tries to empha36 Maps size five balanced bud350+ Photos gets and move past the Watershed “The Shuswap finally gets its due! Jim Cooperman is your penny-pinching repuTour trusted guide to fascinating landscapes and ecosystems, tation that members wildlife, culture and heritage–and wonderful places to Geology blame for the election play. Perfect for planning your Shuswap adventures.” Ecology loss. Mark Forsythe, retired host of B.C. Almanac on CBC Radio Secwepemc Tom Fletcher is B.C. History $ 00 legislature reporter and History of columnist for Black INCLUDES GST Settlement Press. Email: tfletcheverythingshuswap.ca ph 250 833.5554 er@blackpress.ca

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Viewpoint

Liberal battle getting bitter BC VIEWS Tom Fletcher B.C. Liberal leadership hopefuls Mike de Jong, Sam Sullivan and Michael Lee seemed to be enjoying the show at their recent debate in Kelowna, as apparent front-runners Andrew Wilkinson, Todd Stone and Dianne Watts went toe to toe for party member support. As their arguments became more heated in front of a packed room, de Jong and Lee were doubled over in their chairs to muffle their laughter. Sullivan suggested the next debate should be a cage match. A quick summary of the Floggin’ in the Okanagan: Wilkinson waved a glossy copy of his platform, insisting only his is costed to balance budgets. He had a former deputy finance minister look at Stone’s, pronouncing it a deficit-prone spending spree. Stone fired back that his plan is balanced but bold, describing Wilkinson’s as old and tired, like its author. Both of them turned on Watts, who remains embarrassingly unprepared for B.C. politics since resigning her Conservative MP seat. Plan? She doesn’t even have the proverbial

cocktail napkin with scribbled notes on it. As in the Prince George and Nanaimo debates, Watts was grilled on complex issues like forest policy, and she didn’t have a clue. Watts has money, name recognition and almost nothing else. If any party members still think she’s Christy Clark 2.0, they haven’t been paying attention. Watts has a vision, but can’t articulate it. She promises to listen, then blames the B.C. Liberals for losing 11 seats because they didn’t listen. Her opponents remind her that she only joined the party in May. I usually don’t give polls the attention that even dogs do, but this is not a general public decision. Interim B.C. Liberal leader Rich Coleman tells me party membership is about 40,000 people, as signups continue until Dec. 31 in preparation for an online vote to be revealed Feb. 4. Those members have all been phoned and door-knocked by the leadership teams, and the candidates must have a good idea where they stand. If there’s a front-runner now, it’s Wilkinson, formerly a cab-

inet minister, party president, city lawyer and country doctor. He reminds everyone that his MLA support is more than all other candidates combined. Cabinet veterans Mary Polak (Langley), John Rustad (Nechako Lakes), Michelle Stilwell (Parksville-Qualicum), Norm Letnick (Kelowna-Lake Country) and Mike Morris (Prince George-Mackenzie) are in Wilkinson’s camp, along with experienced backbenchers Donna Barnett (Cariboo-Chilcotin) and Laurie Throness (Chilliwack-Hope). Newcomers Ellis Ross (Skeena), Tracy Redies (Surrey-White Rock), Doug Clovechok (Columbia River-Revelstoke), Tom Shypitka (Kootenay East) and Joan Isaacs (Coquitlam-Burke Mountain) have come on board, showing Wilkinson has party support all over the province. Stone is backed by MLAs Peter Milobar (Kamloops-North Thompson), Greg Kyllo (Shuswap), Jane Thornthwaite (North Vancouver-Seymour) Coralee Oakes (Cariboo North), Ian Paton (Delta South) and Steve Thomson (Kelowna-Mission). Stone, a smoothtalking former technology entrepreneur from Kamloops-South Thompson, likes to describe himself as

You are Invited!

C E L E B R AT E T H E S E A S O N W I T H

AVA I L A B L E F O R 35

TO D E E N U O Y G IN H T EVERY

Please join

MP Mel Arnold’s Christmas and Holiday Season

Open House! Date: Monday, December 18th, 2017 Time: 4:00 pm to 7:00pm Location: 951- 5th Avenue, Salmon Arm (Sunlife Building)

WE’RE OPENING

Friday, December 15th! Stop by and meet the team 8AM - 6PM!

We will be collecting donations for the Salmon Arm Food Bank. Let’s support those in need! For more information call 250-260-5020 or email mel.arnold.c1@parl.gc.ca

534 - MAIN STREET, SICAMOUS, BC 250.836.4306

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK MPMOTORSPORTS.COM


Page A32 Friday, December 15, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Community

www.saobserver.net

250.832.2131

OPEN EVERYDAY Full Breakfast, Homemade Soups & Baking

200 off

$

your order when you spend $20 or more

Just 15 minutes from Salmon Arm *one coupon per group. Exp. Feb 28, 2018 Not valid with any other promotion

3096 TCH - across from Balmoral Store. 250-833-2050

Royal Canadian Legion #62

COMING EVENTS Monday Night Crib

7:00 pm sharp

Tuesday Nights Drop in Fun Darts & Pool - 7 pm

Closed

Dec. 25, 26, Jan. 1 & 2

Dec. 16 Santa is here with Ham & Turkeys

◆ Darts ◆ Shuffleboard ◆ Pool – Anytime! ◆ Meat Draws Saturdays at 2 pm ◆ Members & bonafide guests welcome OPEN 11:00 A.M. • legion62sa@gmail.com

Royal Canadian Legion Branch #62 ~ 141 Hudson St. NW, Salmon Arm ~ 832-3687

Artistic elf

Jim Elliot/Salmon arm obSErvEr

Oliver Simpson gets a helping hand on a bird feeder craft from Ava Wutke the Christmas elf at the art gallery on Saturday, Dec. 9.

Students earn journey of a lifetime Erin Christie Black Press

Two North Okanagan students were recently awarded the opportunity to study

abroad thanks to a prestigious scholarship. Haley Kuzek, of Salmon Arm and Lauren Shykora of Enderby, will continue

& e l k r a Sp s i h T e n Shi ! ! s a m t Chris DIAMONDS 20-25% OFF SILVER 30-40% OFF GOLD 20-25% OFF

their studies in France and the Netherlands, respectively, after receiving the Premier’s Scholarship from Irving K. Barber British Columbia Scholarship Society. A record 29 students in B.C. have been awarded scholarships of between $6,000 and $10,000 to study abroad in more than 21 countries from Australia to Korea to Peru, announced Premier John Horgan Tuesday afternoon. The students are Job Solutions that Work

Your best source for local jobs.

enrolled in overseas programs and will be studying a wide variety of subjects ranging from Business Administration to Molecular Biology. “Studying abroad is the chance of a lifetime,” said Premier Horgan. “It enriches the lives of students as well as deepens the understanding of world around us. I wish these hard-working 29 students from B.C. every success and hope they bring home new ideas and innovations that will continue to grow our great province.” Premier’s Scholarships are funded from the returns on a $17

million endowment fund established by the Province of B.C. for international education. The scholarships are part of the larger One World international scholarship program offered by the Society. The Irving K. Barber British Columbia Scholarship Society has awarded over $4 million in international scholarships since 2008 when the program began. In addition to the Premier’s Scholarships, One World Scholarships of $1,000 to $3,500 are available throughout the year for students attending B.C. public post-secondary institutions.

CARRIERS WANTED FOR MORE INFORMATION:

The Mall at Piccadilly 250-832-8300 arthursgss@gmail.com

250 832-2131

circ@saobserver.net


Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Viewpoint

Make use of nature’s cupboard ShuSwap outdoorS Hank Shelley The billy can bubbled over the fire, as I dropped in Labrador tea. Later, the fishermen all felt mellow and happy. The tea contains a mild narcotic! Oregon’s Milton Freewater is a vegetable growing region, helping to feed the nation. The Campbell soup company has a plant there, for the abundance of vegetables for their great variety of soups. It so happens that there are also a good many outdoors men and women who hunt and fish. Some finding their way to our fishing lodge at Postill lake in years past. One cold winter’s morn while checking our trap line towards Karen’s

meadow toward Beaver Lake (Winfield), I veered the snowmobile into a large copse of giant spruce trees, to find a small ice covered deep lake. Next day I took bug samples and depth recordings. We already had boats on five of our lakes but, this would be special. It should hold a good population of brook trout. Next day I called the Summerland trout hatchery in Summerland, and explained the situation. Two weeks later, they called back saying they had 2,000 parr (3-4 inch) ready for spring. I then called an oldtime timber cruiser for SM Simpson mill named Fred Kistch. He arrived and with

compass we blazed a trail right to the lake. Come spring, we back packed the fish in tanks to the lake. Two years later, we were now taking in our first Oregon anglers. Along with packed lunches, the fire/billycan/ brewed tea became a tradition at our lodge’s brookie lake. A few seasons later, drifting down the Eagle River, counting spawning coho, my boss, Byril, always carried a plastic pail to fill with wild high bush cranberries, hanging in clusters out over the banks. Part of nature’s larder for those who want to hike winter trails or experiment with vitamin C enriched hot drinks. Most evergreens are jam-packed with nutrient rich ingredients.To make evergreen tea, place three to four small branches of spruce or fir with

needles attached. Place in boiling water in pot or billy can. Steep until desired strength is reached. Too, rose hips can still be found in winter. Gather. At home, split open and remove seeds. Boil as with tea, strain and enjoy. With bush teas, one may want to sweeten with honey, or a shot of brandy. Note: Labrador tea bush will be found in spruce tree locations similar to buck brush. Go online for more information regarding what nature can provide us medicinal and healing properties.

Friday, December 15, 2017 Page A33

Looking for all the greatest local deals? Exclusive local specials and promotions in your community

For advertising information call the and

250.832.2131

Visit your local community Black Press Media newspaper website & click on the E-EDITIONS button at the top of the page.

Your Black Press Okanagan Leadership Team Dave Hamilton

President, BC Interior South

Ian Jensen

Dave will oversee the operations of nine newspapers and related digital platforms in his role as President of the BC Interior South Division, including the Kelowna Capital News, Vernon Morning Star, Salmon Arm Observer, Sicamous Eagle Valley News, Lake Country Calendar, Summerland Review, Penticton Western News, Keremeos Review and Princeton Similkameen Spotlight. Dave will also be responsible for the Vernon Press Centre and the mailroom operations in the Okanagan market, plus he will oversee three newspapers on North Vancouver Island including the North Island Gazette, Campbell River Mirror, and Comox Valley Record. Dave has worked with Black Press since 2007 beginning his career in sales at the Comox Valley Record, then taking on multiple Black Press Publisher and Group Publisher roles including the Fernie Free Press, Invermere Valley Echo, Golden Star, Campbell River Mirror, Comox Valley Record, Comox Valley Echo and the North Island Gazette. Dave is pleased to take on his expanded role with Black Press and looks forward to working with the Okanagan and North Island communities.

Ian started his newspaper career in 1985 at the Nanaimo Daily Free Press as a Circulation Representative. In 1987 he became the Circulation Manager of the Prince Albert Daily Herald and held the same positions at the Vernon Daily News, Prince George Citizen and also had a stop at the Victoria Times Colonist. In 2003, Ian was promoted to Publisher of the Prince Albert Daily Herald and in the spring of 2012 moved to Vernon to become publisher of the Vernon Morning Star. Ian will oversee the Distribution and Manufacturing teams of nine newspapers in his role as Director of Distribution and Manufacturing Operations, BC Interior South, including the Kelowna Capital News, Vernon Morning Star, Salmon Arm Observer, Sicamous Eagle Valley News, Lake Country Calendar, Summerland Review, Penticton Western News, Keremeos Review and Princeton Similkameen Spotlight.

Karen Hill

Director of Sales, BC Interior South

In October of 1989 Karen began her career in the classified department at the Kelowna Capital News. Most of her tenure in Kelowna was spent in the accounting department where she worked her way to Group Controller for the Interior with Lower Mainland Publishing and then West Partners Publishing when they bought the newspaper in 2001. In 2003 Black Press purchased the Capital News and Karen integrated into the accounting department working with the President on all the Southern divisions until she took on the position of Publisher at the Vernon Morning Star in 2006. In September 2010 she made her way back to Kelowna as Publisher of the Capital News and Lake Country Calendar as well as our specialty products Food & Wine Trails and Grapes to Wine. Karen will oversee the sales, creative teams and the advertising support teams of nine newspapers and related digital platforms in her role as Director of Sales of the BC Interior South Division, including the Kelowna Capital News, Vernon Morning Star, Salmon Arm Observer, Sicamous Eagle Valley News, Lake Country Calendar, Summerland Review, Penticton Western News, Keremeos Review and Princeton Similkameen Spotlight.

Director of Distribution and Manufacturing Operations, BC Interior South

www.blackpress.ca


Chase

Page A34 Friday, December 15, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Chase Chamber honours best in business Annual Christmas Gala & Business Excellence Awards take place on Dec. 9. The Chase Community Hall was transformed into an elegant Winter Wonderland on Saturday night to honour the best in business. The occasion was the 2nd Annual Christmas Gala & Business Excellence Awards put on by the Chase Chamber of Commerce. One hundred and 60 people turned out to enjoy the festivities, complete with dinner, dance and awards presentation. Included in the awards was the Chase Citizen of the Year, which the chamber has been awarding since 1979. This year there were two citizens honoured: Alison Lauzon and Shirley Phillips. They were presented with their awards by

Mayor Rick Berrigan. The Business Excellence Awards were awarded by Chamber directors. Taking ‘Business of the Year – 7+ Employees’ was Quaaout Lodge & Spa at Talking Rock Resort. Carmen Miller, Chamber president, presented general manager Jesse Ziercke and Little Shuswap Lake Indian Band Chief Oliver Arnouse with the award. ‘Business of the Year – under 6 Employees’ went to Village U-Brew. Kerri Lindsay, Chamber vice-president, presented owner Brenda Esslinger with the award. Liquid Hair Salon earned ‘Employer of the Year.’ Chamber director Kelsey Snelgrove presented the

award, which was accepted on the owners’ behalf as they were unable to attend. Chamber director Donna Smith-Bradley presented ‘Organization of the Year’ to the Chase & District Skate Park Society. Terri Mindel accepted the honour. Pete Murray’s Corn Farm was given the ‘ E nv i ro n m e n t a l ly Conscientious Award.’ Owner Pete Murray accepted it from Shelley Aimes, Chamber business member. Chamber vice-president Kerri Lindsay presented Village Lanes Fun Centre with the ‘Customer Service Award.’ Proprietors Kelly and Calyn Collins accepted the honour. Chahal Priddle LLP earned ‘New Business

of the Year.’ Hardeep Chahal and Nathan Van Kampen accepted the award from Carmen Miller,

Chamber president. Emcee was Ali Maki, manager of the Chase & District Chamber of Commerce.

Photo contributeD

Photo contributeD.

Kerri Lindsay, Chamber vice-president, presents Village U-Brew with Business of the Year in the under-six employees category on Dec. 9. Owner Brenda Esslinger accepts the award.

Carmen Miller, Chamber president, presents Quaaout Lodge & Spa at Talking Rock Resort with Business of the Year in the 7-plus employees category. Jesse Ziercke, general manager, and Chief Oliver Arnouse of the Little Shuswap Lake Indian Band accepted the award.

Changes for Haldane Elementary Grade 7s considered Changes may be in the works for Grade 7 students. The School District #73 Board of Education approved a motion Monday, Dec. 11 to explore the possibility of moving Grade 7 students from elementary schools to secondary schools starting next

school year, following consultation with parents. The option is being explored as a way to provide Grade 7 students earlier access to secondary-level programs such as shops, as well as other specialty areas and counselling, states a news release

from the school district. The proposal is being considered for students in Chase, Barriere and Clearwater. The move would also allow elementary schools a chance to explore ways to best use school space for the benefit of kindergarten to Grade 6 students.

School trustees agreed no changes would be made without proper consultation with parents in the affected communities. A consultation schedule, which will include meetings with parents, trustees and district staff, is being planned for January.

This Holiday Season Chase Contacts

Holiday Hours: Dec. 23 ~ 1-6 pm Closed Dec. 24 & 25 Dec. 26-30 ~ 1-6 pm Closed Dec. 31 & Jan 1 Jan. 2-5 ~ 1-6 pm Jan. 6 ~ 1-9 pm Jan. 7 ~ 1-6 pm

734 -1st Ave. Chase • 250.679.3432

www.villagelanes.ca

black Press File Photo

Happy Holidays!

Have a Ball

es m a g 3 Bowl 2 r o f y a p

Haldane Elementary is one of the schools that could be affected by possible changes to Grade 7 schooling.

Please use the following information when submitting your editorial and advertising requests:

Editorial Submissions:

Email: shuswapmarket@saobserver.net Fax: 250-832-5140

Best wishes for a wonderful holiday season and a new year filled with peace and happiness!

from all of us at…

Classified Advertisements:

Chase Dental Clinic

Display Advertising:

Closed Dec. 22, 2017 to Jan. 1, 2018, re-opening Jan. 2, 2018 from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Email: classifieds@saobserver.net Fax: 250-832-5140 Ph: 250-832-2131 Contact ~ Penny Brown Ph: 250-832-2131 Email: pennyjb@saobserver.net Fax: 250-832-5140

Please call:

250 679-3556 #3 - 305 Brooke Drive, Chase, B.C.

NEED NEW FURNITURE? Find your next comfy sofa or chair in our

CLASSIFIEDS

&

250 832-2131


Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Chase

Friday, December 15, 2017 Page A35

Heat earn hard-fought wins over 100 Mile, Sicamous Fourteen goals in four nights helps to ease the pain of injured teammates.

A Heat rash can be annoying, itchy and sore, but there is a very effective cure. The Chase Heat have discovered that 14 goals in four nights, rather than ointments and scratching, can sooth the troubled spots. Stepping up to play through the pain of losing many teammates also has a special effect on the irritating ailment. So while five or more fight the serious injury rash, others less afflicted and the few who are actually health fight to conquer contests of flash and dash, as well as the errant elbow or two. Commencing Wednesday the 6th, the Heat left Chase by stage coach to meddle with the lawless Wranglers from 100 Mile House. The Cariboo Cowboys ride hard every time the two teams meet, but they were no match for the Heat wave that swept through their town. The only score in the first came off the twig of Zachary Fournier, assisted by Kaden Black and Michael Fidanza. In the second, it was Fidanza from Pat Brady and Kolten Moore, followed by the Fournier “Force,” assisted by Brady and Black. In the third period, the Wranglers popped a pair

hp um, 20 l a e alumin Lowelin olling motor, du , tr ats Johnson rs, pedestal se , son nde depth fi one sea st d se u nly mu trailer. O t of province 00. ou moving 0. 000 000-00 5 ,2 1 $ ll. se

to make the situation tense. However, Evan Hughes from Seamus Collins and Cory Loring restored justice. Veteran Fournier iced the capades with a hattrick, empty-net goal. The end result was a 5-2 tough-road win, with Jared Breitkreuz, obtained in trade from 100 Mile House, stopping 30 of the 32 shots he faced. Feisty Friday Night in Sicamous found the Heat cruising down the Shuswap to meet the Eagles. This contest was nasty and injuries mounted up throughout the game. Chase lost Colton Nikiforuk to a lower body injury, Grady Musgrave to an upper body laceration as well as Caleb Biensch, Quinn Slezak and Zachary Fournier to periods of rehab. Trainer Julio Iglesias had a parade of wounded and bloodied warriors spend time with him. There was no scoring until the second when the houseboat crew got a marker. In the third, the big man on campus Fournier scored on the man-advantage from Hughes and Ryan Okino. In the second overtime, “Black Friday” Black blasted in the winner from Bourne and Brady. It was a very hard-

fought 2-1 road win with Conor Webb repelling 38 of 39 Eagle shots. While the boys on the bus licked their wounds, Musgrave and Fournier went to the hospital where medical staff left them in stitches. On Saturday night, the Princeton Posse rode into town to face off versus the Heat at the Art Holding Memorial Arena. The Heat fielded 15 skaters with Fidanza moved to the back end for the night. The locals fired in two counters in the first, Brady on the power play from Moore and Fidanza, then Moore from Bourne and Breitkreuz. In the second, the visitors tied the game prior to Okino from Moore and Biensch regaining the lead. Princeton tied it up again, but Moore with his second from Brady and Bourne resurrected the lead. Five goals in the third hushed the crowd in the beginning but the cacophony soon returned. Princeton took the lead with a pair, but the short-benched Heat came back hot, Brady with his second from Gavin Mattey and Hughes started things. Bourne then popped a pair, the first from Fidanza and Moore and the clos-

er, an empty-net tally once again assisted by Moore. Moore, Bourne and Brady each fired two goals and Moore ended the night with six points to move up the KIJHL League Leaders chart. Bourne regained the number 1 spot in the league. Trading places: The Heat traded power forward Cory Loring to the Grand Forks Border Bruins in exchange for forward Brady Marzocco. Program sales have increased with all the multiple roster changes in the past two weeks; what a great fundraising initiative. The tough and talented Kelowna Chiefs come to town Friday the 15th to face the Heat. See you there!

CHASE

Jr. B Hockey

Fri., December 15th 7:00 pm • Home Game

vs Kelowna Chiefs

Find whatever you need in the classifieds!

Wed., December 20th

&

Fri., December 22nd

250 832-2131

Rick koch photo

Just over a minute after tying the game up at 5-5, Chase Heat’s Kolten Moore watches the puck slide between Princeton Posse netminder Danyon Lorencz’s legs and over the goal line, giving the Heat a 6-5 lead late in the third.

PLAYER OF THE WEEK

Scott Koch Contributor

7:00 pm • Away Game

at Sicamous Eagles 7:00 pm • Home Game

vs 100 Mile House Wranglers

Josh Bourne #92

HAVE YOUR

PHOTO PUBLISHED Submit your photos of events in the Chase area to shuswapmarket@saobserver.net for publication in the Shuswap Market News. Please include a brief description of the event and the names of anyone featured in the picture. Photos published as space allows and based on timeliness of picture.

email shuswapmarket@saobserver.net

Village of Chase Notice of Disposition of Lands Pursuant to section 26(3) of the Community Charter, the Village of Chase hereby gives notice of its intension to dispose of that approximately 0.589 hectare portion of those lands legally described as Parcel Identifier: 012-953-997, Parcel C (Plan A634) of District Lot 517 Kamloops Division Yale District Except Plan 27406, shown outlined in heavy black on the sketch below, to Chase DevCo Ltd. for a purchase price of 80,373.38. The nature of the proposed disposition is fee simple.

Left Wing

Home Town: ................Richmond, BC Favourite NHL Player:......Sidney Crosby Favourite NHL Team: ................................ Edmonton Oilers What do you pursue other than Hockey .......................Volleyball and Lacrosse Favourite Music Artists: .......................................One Direction Favourite Movie:......................Dodgeball Favourite superpower: .................. Ability to have super speed.

Any persons interested in further information can contact: Sean O’Flaherty, Corporate Officer, Village of Chase, PO Box 440, 826 Okanagan Avenue, Chase BC, V0E1M0, soflaherty@chasebc.ca

chasebc.ca

250-679-3238


Your Health &

Page A36 Friday, December 15, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Wellness

INFORMATION DESIGNED TO PROMOTE AND ENHANCE YOUR WELLBEING

How aging adults can maintain their mental acuity Aging is associated with or linked to a host of mental and physical side effects. For example, many adults expect their vision to deteriorate as they grow older. Such a side effect can be combatted with routine eye examinations that may indicate a need for a stronger eyeglass prescription, a relatively simple solution that

won’t impact adults’ daily lives much at all. While physical side effects like diminished vision might not strike much fear in the hearts of aging men and women, those same people may be concerned and/or frightened by the notion of age-related cognitive decline. Some immediately associate such de-

LAUREN Lauren participates in SOBC - Salmon Arm in Bocce and Club Fit. She tells us that what she likes best about Special Olympics are learning new things and having fun with friends. Lauren attends Okanagan College, works at Pharmasave, and volunteers at the Loft Program. She seems always to be happy. Her hobbies include crafts and video games, and she enjoys reading.

cline with Alzheimer’s disease, an irreversible, progressive brain disorder that gradually destroys memory and cognitive skills, ultimately compromising a person’s ability to perform even the simplest of tasks. But age-related cognitive decline is not always symptomatic of Alzheimer’s disease. Learning about Alzheimer’s and how to maintain mental acuity can help aging men and women better understand the changes their brains might be

undergoing as they near or pass retirement age. Is Alzheimer’s disease hereditary? The National Institute on Aging notes that only a very rare form of Alzheimer’s disease is inherited. Early-onset familial Alzheimer’s disease, or FAD, is caused by mutations in certain genes. If these genes are passed down from parent to child, then the child is likely, but not certain, to get FAD. So while many adults may be concerned about Alz-

Stay Healthy GET ADJUSTED! New patients welcome. • Infants to Adults • On Site Digital X-Ray • Instrument Adjusting • Spinal Decompression Table • Custom Orthotics

#1 - 661 ROSS STREET, SALMON ARM, BC APPOINTMENTS

250.803.0224 www.wellnesschiro.net

heimer’s because one of their parents had the disease, the NIA notes that the majority of Alzheimer’s cases are late-onset, which has no obvious family pattern. Can Alzheimer’s disease be prevented? Studies of Alzheimer’s disease are ongoing, but to date there is no definitive way to prevent the onset of the disease. How can I maintain mental acuity as I age? Researchers have not yet determined a way to prevent Alzheimer’s disease, but adults can take certain steps to maintain their mental acuity into retirement. • Exercise regularly. Routine exercise may be most associated with physical benefits, but the NIA notes that such activity has been linked to benefits for the brain as well. For example, a 2011 study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America found that aerobic exercise training increases the size of the hippocampus, leading to improvements in spatial memory. The NIA also notes that one

study indicated exercise stimulated the brain’s ability to maintain old network connections and make new ones vital to cognitive health. • Read more. Avid readers may be happy to learn that one of their favorite pastimes can improve the efficiency of their cognitive systems while delaying such systems’ decline. A 2013 study published in the journal Neurology by researchers at Chicago’s Rush University Medical Center found that mentally active lifestyles may not prevent the formations of plaques and tangles associated with Alzheimer’s disease, but such lifestyles decreases the likelihood that the presence of plaques or tangles will impair cognitive function. • Stay socially con-

nected. Maintaining social connections with family, friends and community members also can help women prevent cognitive decline. Epidemiologist Bryan James of the Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center studied how social activity affected cognitive decline, ultimately noting that the rate of cognitive decline was considerably lower among men and women who maintained social contact than it was among those with low levels of social activity. The idea of age-related cognitive decline strikes fear in the hearts of many men and women, but there are ways for adults to maintain their mental acuity well into their golden years. HM181601

She has her mother’s eyes, cheekbones, and prescription amphetamines. Some things should never be passed down. Lock up or turn in your prescription drugs. Learn more at SecureYourMeds.ca A message from Drug Free Kids Canada.


Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Friday, December 15, 2017 Page A37

Remembering Loved Ones

Place your condolences online. (Visit your local newspaper website, obituary page) ALBERT JILEK Feb. 23, 1930 - Dec. 17, 2012 Five years ago I lost more than my best friend. He was my husband for more than 60 years, who showed me what love, safety, comfort and to belong means. The best song to describe our life is ‘I Remember When’ by Alan Jackson. You are always with me in my heart and all our family.

Remember when we said when we turned gray, When the children grow up and move away For all the life we’ve had And we’ll remember when. ~ Love all your family.

Place a loved one’s Memoriam or Obituary in one of our BC award winning newspapers. Call our Classified Centre at:

1.866.865.4460

LEWIS VICTOR WILLIAMS August 20, 1932 - December 5, 2017 The family of Lew Williams sadly announces his passing suddenly on Tuesday, December 5, 2017. Lew was pre-deceased by his father, mother and 4 siblings. He was left broken hearted on December 16, 2014, when his loving wife, Shirley, passed. He is survived by his sister, Bernice Shuttleworth from Surrey, BC; his daughter, Kim Fuller (Rod); son, Ken Williams (Robbie); 5 grandchildren, Reilly Fuller (Danelle); LeRay Fuller (Jesse); Reid Fuller (?); Bailey Williams (Jesse); Blake Williams (Cody); and 2 great grandchildren, Rylan and Swayzie. A Celebration of Life will be held on December 16, 2017, at the Salmon Arm Scout Hall, 2460 Auto Rd. SE. at 1:00 pm. A sincere thank you to Dr. Levins and medical staff and to all who stopped in to visit, made phone calls, sent cards, food and best wishes. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made the Shuswap Lake Hospital Foundation.

If tears could build a stairway and memories a lane, I’d walk right up to Heaven and bring you Home again.

Wednesday Mourning Cafe Armstrong 250-546-7237 & Vernon 250-558-0866

Funeral Services & Crematorium Ltd.

Extends an open invitation to

Your Christmas Candlelight Service of Remembrance

Honesty Makes a Difference

We accept all Memorial Society and Pre-Need Funeral Policies Making final arrangements for a loved one is not easy. That’s why compassion goes into everything we do. We are prepared to arrange any special request you may have. • Traditional Services • Cremation Services • Prearrangement Planning • All inquiries welcome 24 hrs.

Sat., Dec. 9, 2017 at 1:00 p.m. Fischer’s Funeral Ser vices 4060 - 1st Avenue SW This is a multi-denominational service. Everyone welcome! Coffee and refreshments will be ser ved. Please feel free to bring a photo or item for the memorial table.

250 833-1129

If you are looking for a support in your grief journey, you may want to consider our informal Wednesday Mourning Café. You will likely find the following things: • Emotional support in a safe and non-judgmental environment. • Support and understanding from others who have experienced a similar loss. • Coping skills to help you on your grief journey. • Hope through companionship with people who “get it” and understand first-hand what you’re going through. • Permission to grieve and permission to live a happy productive life. • Information will be available for how children and other family members may react to loss. The most important thing is to take care of yourself. Drop-in to our weekly Wednesday Mourning Café, facilitated by Naomi Silver, at our Mountainside Common Room from 10:00 to 11:30 am.

Tammy & Vince Fischer

FUNERAL SERVICES & CREMATORIUM LTD. 4060-1st Ave. S.W. Salmon Arm, 833-1129 www.fischersfuneralservices.com Serving Kamloops to Golden Toll Free 1-888-816-1117

Obituaries Honour and share the memory of a loved one. Place an announcement in the classifieds.

Are you living with a life changing illness? Are you a Caregiver?

WE CAN HELP We provide support: • for the terminally ill and their families • for living with Quality of Life to End of Life • for Grief and Bereavement • by teaching how to have the difficult conversations • through various educational workshops • for Caregivers through respite breaks • how to navigate the system

YOU CAN HELP

440 – 10th Street SW (PO Box 388) Salmon Arm, BC V1E 4N5 250-832-2223

• become a member • become a volunteer • make a donation • leave a bequest #4-781 Marine Park Drive

250-832-7099

www.shuswaphospice.ca

Serving and caring for families in our community since 1947. Whether you’re considering pre-planning or have lost a loved one, you can trust our professional and friendly team to support you with meaningful grief services. We provide individualized funeral, memorial and celebration of life services, as well as grief counselling and an aftercare program. For more information and the answers to many frequently asked questions, visit us online at: Kevin Bolen, Funeral Director

www.bowersfuneralservice.com

440 - 10th Street SW (PO Box 388) Salmon Arm, BC V1E 4N5

250-832-2223


Page A38 Friday, December 15, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

BCClassifieds.com

www.saobserver.net

ONLINE bcclassifieds@blackpress.ca IN PRINT 1.866.865.4460

...in your community, online and in print

Friendly Frank says...

Sell any single item dirt cheap! It’s time to sell, call today!

INDEX IN BRIEF FAMILY ANNOUNCEMENTS ..............1-8 COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS....9-57 TRAVEL .......................................61-76 CHILDREN ...................................80-98 EMPLOYMENT .........................102-198 BUSINESS SERVICES ...............203-387 PETS & LIVESTOCK .................453-483 MERCHANDISE FOR SALE........503-587 REAL ESTATE...........................603-969 RENTALS.................................703-757 AUTOMOTIVE...........................804-862 MARINE...................................902-920

INDEX IN BRIEF

It is agreed by any Display or Classified Advertiser requesting space that the liability of the newspaper in the event of failure to publish an advertisement shall be limited to the amount paid by the advertiser for that portion of the advertising space occupied by the incorrect item only, and that there shall be no liability in any event beyond the amount paid for such an advertisement. The Publisher shall not be liable for slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value of an advertisement. cannot bcclassifieds.com be responsible for errors after the first day of publication of any advertisement. Notice of errors on the first day should immediately be called to the attention of the Classified Department to be corrected for the following edition. reserves bcclassifieds.com the right to revise, edit, classify or reject any advertisement and to retain any answers directed to the bcclassifieds.com Box Reply Service and to repay the customer the sum paid for the advertisement and box rental.

DISCRIMINATORY LEGISLATION

Advertisers are reminded that provincial legislation forbids the publication of any advertisement which discriminates against any person because of race, religion, sex, colour, nationality, ancestry or place of origin, age, and physical or mental disability, unless the condition is justified by a bona fide requirement for the work involved.

COPYRIGHT

Copyright and/or properties subsist in all advertisements and in all other material appearing in this edition of bcclassifieds.com. Permission to reproduce wholly or in part and in any form whatsoever, particularly by a photographic or offset process in a publication must be obtained in writing from the Publisher. Any unauthorized reproduction will be subject to recouse in law.

ON THE WEB:

1 x 1 inch ad showcases your seasonal theme. Christmas is the talk of the town!

“TIS THE SEASON�

Announcements

Announcements

Announcements

Employment

Coming Events

Coming Events

Information

Career Opportunities

Remember we have great Christmas shopping at CHURCHES THRIFT SHOP Dec 11-23. New items out all day. The last day we will be open is Dec 23 No Donations Please We will remain closed until Tues. Jan 2. Churches Thrift Shop is located at: 461 Beatty Ave. NW, across the tracks from A&W Have a blessed Christmas & May God Grant You Health & Happiness in 2018

Please come and join us for our

COMMUNITY CAROL SERVICE th Sunday December 17 10:30 a.m

Living Waters Church 180 Lakeshore Dr NW ( behind Boston Pizza).

Come enjoy Carols & Christmas goodies as we celebrate Christ’s birth. All are welcome & we look forward to connecting with you.

Information

Information Advertise in the 2018 BC Hunting Regulations Synopsis largest Sportsman publication

Here Today – Here Tomorrow There is no better way to create an everlasting tribute than by making a memorial donation to the Shuswap Community Foundation. Every tax receipted gift ensures that the name of your loved one will be remembered in perpetuity.

Help keep Salmon Arm safe by going out on a 4-hour patrol one afternoon or evening each month. We also take part in numerous community events and enjoy socializing together. For more information and an application find SAP at salmonarmcitizenspatrol.ca or at facebook.com/SACitizensPatrol

AA, NA and Al-Anon Meetings AA 1-866-531-7045 Salmon Arm AA: Tuesday 12:00 noon – First United Church 450 Okanagan Avenue, SE Wednesday 8:00 p.m. – St. Joseph’s, 90 1st ST SE Thursday 7:00 p.m. – Women’s Circle AA St. Josephs Friday 12:00 noon – First United Church 450 Okanagan Avenue, SE Sunday 11:00 a.m. – Health unit, 851-16 St. NE Sunday 7:00 p.m. – Downtown Activity Center Blind Bay – Our Lady of the Lake Catholic Church, Blind Bay, 2740 Fairway Hill Rd. – Saturday at 10 a.m. Sorrento – St. Mary’s Anglican Church, 1188 TCH, Sunday 7:00 p.m. – OAPA Hall, 1148 Passchendaele Rd., Monday 8:00 p.m. Enderby – St. Ann’s Catholic Church, 1310 George St., Tuesday 8:00 p.m. Enderby – United Church, 1106 Belvedere, Friday 8:00 p.m. Sicamous – Sicamous United, 705 TCH., Tuesday 8:00 p.m. Al-Anon: 1-866-531-7045 Salmon Arm – Seniors Resource Center, 320 2 Ave NE, Wednesday 8:00 p.m. – First United Church, upstairs, 450 Okanagan Ave SE, Thursday 12:00 noon Narcotics Anonymous: 1-866-778-4772 Salmon Arm – Crossroads Church, 121 Shuswap (behind Barley Station, alley entrance). Monday 7:00 p.m.

Call today to reserve your spot, space is limited!

Education/Trade Schools PHARMACY TECHNICIAN TRAINING Online-based 43 wk program incls 8 wk practicum. Regulated Pharmacy Technicians earn $25-$28/hr in hospitals & $20-$27/hr in community pharmacies. Accredited by the Canadian Council for the Accreditation of Pharmacy Programs (CCAPP). www.stenbergcollege.com Toll-Free: 1-866-580-2772

Help Wanted

Information

Community service, flexible hours, interesting information, and friendship = SACP membership

Spotlight your business with our business builder packages

MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION! In-demand career! Employers have work-at-home positions available. Get online training you need from an employertrusted program. Visit: CareerStep.ca/MT or 1-855-7683362 to start training for your work-at-home career today!

Office: 250-832-5428 www.shuswapfoundation.ca

SALMON ARM CITIZENS PATROL

Are You The Best at What You Do?

SEASONS GREETINGS!

Donations and bequests are requested for equipment to help care for patients and residents of the Hospital and Bastion Place. Tax receipts will be issued. Mail to: Shuswap Hospital Foundation Box 265, Salmon Arm, BC 7&/r1I Donate Online (secure site): www.shuswaphospitalfoundation.org Salmon Arm Open House for Christian books, bibles - for all ages. Christmas cards, journals, colouring books, DVD’s Odyssey, Veggie tales, etc. some gift ideas. Call Bev 250-804-8775 For appointments almost anytime til Christmas.

Care Worker Permanent, part-time position available, $18/hr to start, care experience preferred but can train the right candidate. Must be physically fit, non-smoking environment. call Gwen at (250)835-0145

Help Wanted F/T General Labourers North Timber is looking to hire general labourers for full-time employment. We offer competitive wages & a comprehensive benefit pkg. Please email resume to netimber@junction.net

Volunteers Shuswap Lake Health Care Auxiliary

Personals MAKE A Connection. Real People, Flirty Chat Call FREE! 250-220-1300 or 1-800-2101010. www.livelinks.com 18+0

Employment Career Opportunities

invites you to join our volunteer group. Meetings are the 3rd Monday of each month throughout the year (except July & August). We are an active and dedicated group and have several fundraisers each year; raising money to purchase equipment for Shuswap Lake General Hospital and Bastion Place. Please call Donna at 250-804-3287 for more information.

WE WELCOME NEW MEMBERS

JOURNEYMAN HEAVY DUTY, OFF ROAD CERTIFIED MECHANICS Fort McMurray. Excellent wages and benefits. Fax: 1-780-986-7051 hr@gladiatorequipment.com gladiatorequipment.com

Information

IF YOU and / or YOUR CHILDREN are being abused, call the

Women’s Emergency Shelter 250-832-9616

Stopping the Violence Counseling, 250-832-9700. Children who witness abuse program, 250-832-4474. Shuswap Mental Health Intake, 250-833-4102 or RCMP 250-832-6044

Employment

Employment

F/T Lumber Manufacturer Looking for Team Member Richwood in Enderby is looking for a full-time team member. Physically demanding job. Steel toed boots required. We’ve got an awesome team & are looking for another awesome person to join us! www.richwoodbrand.ca or email benfrank@telus.net

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES with Black Press (Interior South) Black Press is Canada’s leading private independent newspaper company with more than 170 community, daily and urban newspapers in Canada, Washington State, Hawaii, California and Ohio and has extensive digital and printing operations.

Multi-Media Advertising Consultant Temporary (Vernon) Enjoy a creative environment? Understand the power of marketing on multiple platforms? The Vernon Morning Star is on the hunt for a full-time Multi-media Advertising Consultant on a temporary basis. We are looking for an exceptional sales person that’s as comfortable talking to tattoo artists as boardroom executives. You are creative, persuasive, fearless and have passion in everything you do. Every day you will take our incredible brand out into the Vernon market and convey the many benefits of advertising with the Morning Star both in print and through our digital options. Social Media Squad (Shuswap) One position for the Social Media Squad in Shuswap is available within Black Press, Canada’s largest private, independent newspaper company, with more than 150 community, daily and urban newspapers and websites in B.C., Alberta and the U.S. The job is part-time, based in Shuswap, working with Black Press media in that region and reporting to the Okanagan Digital Editor. A vehicle and valid B.C. driver’s licence is required. Social Media Squad (Okanagan) One position for the Social Media Squad in the Okanagan is available within Black Press, Canada’s largest private, independent newspaper company, with more than 150 community, daily and urban newspapers and websites in B.C., Alberta and the U.S. The job is part-time, based in the Okanagan, working with Black Press media in that region and reporting to the Okanagan Digital Editor. A vehicle and valid B.C. driver’s licence is required. Collators and Inserters (Vernon) Vernon Press is hiring Collators and Inserters for their continually expanding collating department. Duties include hand collating, straightening papers and pocket feeders on Alphaliner Machine. This is a general labour position that requires frequent lifting up to 10 kg and involves the handling of newspapers and advertising supplements. Multi Media Marketing Assistant (Kelowna) The Kelowna Capital News is looking for a full time Assistant to work with our team of Multi-Media Marketing Consultants. The primary function of the Media Marketing Assistant is the administration and implementation of advertising and marketing programs across our print and digital platforms. The position will liaise with the creative service team, marketing specialists and advertising clients. For more information on these vacancies and other regions throughout B.C. visit:

blackpress.ca/careers


Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Services

Services

Services

Financial Services

Home Improvements

Painting & Decorating

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877-987-1420 www.pioneerwest.com

Home & Yard

rRenovation rRepair rMaintenance

rFencing rDecks rSheds

250-253-4663

EXPERIENCED Painter hire (250)517-8831

for

Merchandise for Sale

Merchandise for Sale

Rentals

Feed & Hay

Misc. for Sale

Suites, Lower

ALFALFA grass first crop, excellent horse hay. $7.50/bale (250)803-8298

STEEL BUILDING SALE ...�FALL CLEARANCE SALE ON NOW!� 20X21 $5,990. Front & Back Walls Included. 25X25 $6,896. One End Wall Included. 32X33 $8,199. No Ends Included. Check Out www.pioneersteel.ca for more prices. Pioneer Steel 1-855212-7036

FURNISHED 2 bedroom. short or long term, utilites & wiďŹ included NS, NP, Ref Req. $1100/mo. (250)832-3417

WWW.PAINTSPECIAL.COM

(250) 833-2505

3 Rooms For $299 2 Coats Any Colour (Ceiling & Trim extra)

Help Wanted

Misc. Wanted

Price incls. Cloverdale High Performance Paint. NO PAYMENT, until job is completed!

1-800-222-TIPS Help Wanted

Merchandise for Sale

Misc. for Sale

$200 & Under

100% Proceeds to Second Harvest. Hand Crafted Maple, Oak, Mountain Ash Canes & Walking Sticks. (250)832-7982

PEARL drum set $200., Everlast punching bag $60. OBO, treadmill $25. (250)804-0220

Misc. for Sale ERICKSON’S APPLIANCES Reconditioned Appliances New/Used Parts 90 Day Warranty Return

250-832-9968

603 - 3rd Ave. SW, Salmon Arm

Salmon Arm Items for sale • 2000 Ford 150, 5.4 litre, auto, 2wd, 152,000km. $5500.00 • Versa sport utility trailer, 96 inch x 53 inch, 2 spares, LED lights. $875.00 • Honda 6.5, 2700 psi pressure washer, 20 ft. wand, 80 ft. hose. $600.00 • Craftsman 10 inch compound miter saw. $175.00 • Craftsman 60 litre wet/dry shotvack, 27 ft. hose. $90.00 • Mastercraft 8 inch drill press. $55.00 • 17ft. ďŹ skars tree saw. $25 All in excellent condition.

250-833-1469

SAWMILLS from only $4,397 MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/400OT 1-800-5670404 Ext:400OT.

Farm Services

Farm Services

REIMER’S FARM SERVICE LTD.

• Bark Mulch • Shavings • Sawdust

We Deliver

250-838-0111 or 1-855-737-0110 Pet Services

Pet Services

PET GROOMING With Michelle PRODUCTION POSITION Our business is growing and we are looking for enthusiastic, motivated people to join our team! We are accepting resumes for Production positions in our Salmon Arm manufacturing facility. We are looking for candidates who have both significant experience and applicable skillsets, as well as those who are energetic and motivated to start a new career. Consideration will be given to applicants that can demonstrate the following capabilities: t Organize orders / priorities t Work well with minimal supervision t Experience with hand and power tools t Teamwork t Positive attitude t Attention to detail t Sense of urgency t Ability to work overtime if required t Previous Experience on a Production Floor If this describes you and you are interested in a rewarding career and a great place to work, please send your resume in confidence to: Talius ATTN: Operations Manager Fax: 250-832-8577 Email: employment@talius.com We will contact any applicants considered for interviews. No telephone inquiries please. www.talius.com

Monday to Friday

All Breeds including Cats & Large Dogs

Appointments necessary. 271A Trans-Can. Hwy. N.E. (across from KFC) • 250-832-0604

Garden & Lawn

Garden & Lawn

’s BARlMaSnALd ES F

PICK-UP OR DELIVERY

Friday, December 15, 2017 Page A39

r4IBWJOHT 4BXEVTU #BSL .VMDI 8PPE$IJQT CVMLNJOJCBHT

r8FMM3PUUFE.BOVSF r4PJMT r&YUSB$MFBO8IFBU4USBX

Stanley Bland 832-6615 or 833-2449

Storage

Storage

AAA MINI-STORAGE-250.832.3558 t1FSTPOBM#VTJOFTT t4FBTPOBM5PZT5JSFT t$PWFSFE374UPSBHF t4FOJPST%JTDPVOU

t.JDSPTUPSBHFVOEFS t1BDLJOHTVQQMJFT tIPVSBDDFTTTFDVSJUJFT t'SJFOEMZ4FSWJDF

www.aaaministorage.ca t 431 42 St. SW, Salmon Arm nd

3rd Generation Coin Collector Looking to Buy Coins, Collections, Silver,Gold coins, Bills+ Call Chad 250-863-3082 Cash for GOLD, concentrate, nuggets, gold dust, scrap, gold dental work,Unwanted GOLD+ Call Todd (250)-864-3521 COIN collector buying old coins, collector coins, coin collections Todd 250-864-3521

Real Estate

Mortgages

Suites, Upper Salmon Arm LARGE 1 bedroom, Single working adult, 35+ NP, NS, utilities, wifi incl.,damage deposit & written refs req. $800./month, Available Jan 1 (250)804-6123 (250)832-4827 STUDIO Suite. Full kitchen & bath, living room/bdrm. $900/mo + damage dep. Incl. heat, power, garbage & recycling. NP, non partier. (250)803-0381

Transportation

Vehicle Lease / Rent Autobody paint shop for lease, paint booth, shop & storage for lease (250)832-3829

TEKAMAR MORTGAGES

Scrap Car Removal

Serving the Columbia-Shuswap since 1976. www.tekamar.ca

#1AA Auto Recycler’s. Scrap Cars/Metal. Will pay for some cars. Scott 1-250-558-8855

Best rate 5yr-3.14%OAC Rates Consistently better than banks

(250)832-8766

Toll free 1-800-658-2345

Rentals Apt/Condo for Rent LAKEVIEW MANOR Fully Furnished Apartments 1 Bed + Study Views McGuire Park $955/mo + hydro Avail. Now Deluxe 1 bedroom Views Shuswap lake. $1025/mo + hydro Avail. Jan 1. Quiet adult N/S, N/P building, close to all amenities. Ref’s req’d (250)833-9148

LILY MANOR

NOW RENTING Brand new, bright & spacious 1 bedroom apartments in town Rent ranging from $800-$820 No smoking & No pets, mature adults. F/S, D/W Call (250)803-1694 or visit: ponichproperties.com

Duplex / 4 Plex Scotch Creek

Clean and Comfortable 3 Bedroom Duplex

Fenced yard, Pets welcome. Available January 1st 2018

$1000/ month

250-675-4952 250-741-4936

Halls/Auditoriums GLENEDEN COMMUNITY HALL for rent. Banquets, meetings, weddings, reunions or ? 250-832-9806 www.glenedencommunity.com

Modular Homes MARA: remodeled 3bdrm. mobile, wood stove & elec. heat, large addition & covered deck, 12 x 18 garage, $900/mo. + DD. Also, 2 bedroom & electric heat $750/month plus DD (250) 838-76702

)HWFKD'RJ)URP WKH6KHOWHU

4HE"#30#!CARESFOR THOUSANDSOFORPHANED ABAN DONEDANDABUSEDDOGSEACH YEAR)FYOUCANGIVEAHOMELESS DOGASECONDCHANCEAT HAPPINESS PLEASEVISITYOUR LOCALSHELTERTODAY

"#30#!

WWWSPCABCCA

More than 1.5 million Canadian families are in need of affordable housing. Your contributions provides Habitat with the resources it needs to help families.

Sport Utility Vehicle 2010 Dodge Journey R/T AWD, nav, b/up camera, 6dvd am/fm Sirius usb HD stereo, leather int. 7 passenger, loaded, V6, auto $17,999. OBO (250)515-0642

Legal

Give the gift of a new home and donate today!

Legal Notices CRIMINAL RECORD? Why suffer Employment/Licensing loss? Travel/Business opportunities? Be embarrassed? Think: Criminal Pardon. US Entry Waiver. Record Purge. File Destruction. Free Consultation 1-800-347-2540. accesslegalmjf.com

www.habitat.ca

Legal Notices

Legal Notices

NOTICE Notice to the insurer and Insurance Company et al for Arthur M Grant et al, GRANT KOVAC NORREL et al, Justice Hope Hyslop et al, Administration of little shuswap Lake Indian Band Stewart Adamson and Doug Brown et al, BC Law Society et al, Rhys Laug et al, Talking Rock Resort and Golf Course et al are being sued by the Consular post of the anishinabe indigenous people et al of the Turtle Island government for Five million USD each, cc attorney general of canada and attorney general of BC et al.

We are #1 for Helping You Find Work

FIND SUPER EMPLOYERS!!


Page A40 Friday, December 15, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Chase

Shop Local Support our local economy • Local Jobs • Community

Support these local Chase businesses and enter a draw to win in Merchant gift certificates

$225

• • • •

No purchase required Participating merchants and employees cannot enter at their place of employment One semi-finalist will be drawn each week from each participating merchant and entered into the final draw. The names of the semi-finalsts will be published each week in the Shuswap Market News

Final Draw Date: FRIDAY, December 22

1st Prize:

100

$

in merchant certificates

2nd Prize:

$

75

in merchant certificates

This Week’s Semi-finalists: Chad V. Reid Yvonne B Sheri Larsen Barb Maarsman

Anne McDonald Dora MacQuarrie Debbie Sampson Lloydene Howard

3rd Prize:

$

50

in merchant certificates

Relaxation is a beautiful thing. Gift Certificates for: • Spa • Restaurant • Lodge • Golf Course

44999

$

WOW!

MSRP $574.99

Miller’s Cabin

~ Your Coffee Source ~ 250.679.3332

717 Shuswap Avenue, Chase

Your Christmas Gift store: • Himalayan Salt Lamps • 100% Turkish Cotton Scarves • Organic Coffee • White Sage Products: Body Wash, Incense & Sage/Mint Tea • Natural Cozy Bamboo & Hemp Clothing • New fragrance in Soapstone from India

SAVE 125

Now Open Mondays 11-3

Pebbles Place 642 Shuswap Ave. • 250-572-5842

$

4 CU. FT. TOP LOAD WASHER

• 700 RPM • Dual Action Agitator

34999

$

MSRP $474.99

SAVE $125 6.5 CU. FT. DRYER

• 11 Cycles • 3 Temperatures

LAUNDRY PAIR

79998

$

SAVE $250

709 Shuswap Avenue, Chase • 250-679-3245 nationwideapplianceplus.com

Your Christmas Gift Store • Puzzles • Chocolates • Toys & Games • Fragrance • Gift Cards

We have something for everyone!

GIFT GIVING IDEAS • Natural Bath & Body Care

PHARMACHOICE FOOD + DRUG

• 100% Beeswax Candles • Himalayan Salt Lamps

(Formally Peoples Food & Drug)

825 Shuswap Ave., Chase 250-679-3553

• Nut & Fruit Trays

EVERYDAY NEEDS: • Vitamins & Supplements

• Organic & Gluten Free Foods THE

Willows

250-679-3189

See us for all your Holiday Entertaining needs… • Deli & Veggie Trays • Baking • Snacks • Chocolates & more!

NATURAL FOODS 729 Shuswap Ave. NATURAL FOODS Chase Mon.-Fri.: 9 am-5 pm • Sat.: 9 am-3 pm

Give the Gift of Wine • Gift Certificates • Giftware

• Salts from the Salt Cellar

QUAAOUTLODGE.COM

• Red Plaid Shirts, Vests & Jackets • Peanut Brittle, Coffee & Teas • Fudge • Pet Toys & Treats • Clothing/Jewelery (Papillon, Papa, Tribal Fashions)

Planet Bee Honey & Lotion!

• Wine Kits

1663 Little Shuswap Lake Rd West, Chase 250-679-3090 Toll Free: 1-800-663-4303

the whole fami ly! Great Gifts Ideas for

Village U-Brew

722 1st Ave - Chase 250-679-8885

Chase Plaza 250-679-3261

• Cards • Gift Wrap & Bags • Decorations • Lights • Toys

We have great Stocking Stuffers too!

CHASE PLAZA

Dollar & Gift Store Chase Plaza 250-679-4486


Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Friday, December 15, 2017 Page A41

THIS HOLIDAY SEASON...

Shop Local,

Shop the Shuswap

You Could Win 900 $

in Merchant Gift Certificates 1. Save all your receipts when you shop at any of these participating merchants. 2. On Monday, December 18, 2017 everyone who shows up at the Salmon Arm Observer office with $300 or more (before taxes) in participating merchant receipts will be entered into a draw to win $900 in Merchant Gift Certificates. You may enter the draw for the Merchant Certificates prior to December 18th, but you must appear in person on the 18th to be eligible for one of the 20 Gund teddy bears. The first 20 people who provide proof of purchase from these participating merchants, totalling $300 or more (before taxes) will receive ONE Auburn Bear - a limited edition GundTM Teddy bear.

Meet Auburn Bear

The LIMITED EDITION GUNDTM TEDDY BEAR The Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News are pleased to announce Auburn Bear, a limited edition GUNDTM Teddy Bear.

(Proofs of purchase must be dated between November 10 & December 17, 2017 3. One bear per family

Participating Merchants: 3901 11th Ave. NE, Salmon Arm

Shuswap

450 Trans-Can. Hwy.

102 Hudson Ave. NE, Salmon Arm

Shuswap Optometric Centre

Service Department 3710 Trans Canada Hwy. SW

AUTO DETAILING

1250 Trans-Canada Hwy. SW

Jacobson

Auburn Bear will be a great addition to anyone’s teddy bear collection. By shopping at the participating merchants during this promotion you could receive ONE of 20 Auburn teddy bears to take home with you!

1771 10th Ave. SW, Salmon Arm

The Mall at Piccadilly

#3 160 Trans-Can. Hwy., Salmon Arm (Complex by Java Jive)

The Mall at Piccadilly

MOUNT IDA PHARMACY

Your Neighbourhood Drug Store

& WINDOW TINTING

BOWLING

410 - 5th Street SW Salmon Arm

Salmon Arm 250-832-3946

200 Trans-Canada Hwy. SW Salmon Arm

118 Lakeshore Dr. NE, Salmon Arm

The Mall at Piccadillly

1701 10 Ave SW Salmon Arm

2350 TCH NE

Centenoka Park Mall 250 832-5333

330 Alexander St., NE 250-832-2113


Around Town

Page A42 Friday, December 15, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

THURSDAY, DEC. 14

HOLIDAY TRAIN - The CPR Rail Holiday Train returns to the Shuswap starting in Sicamous - Silver Sand Road intersection, at 5:15 p.m.; in Canoe at the 50th Street Railway crossing at 6:45 p.m.; in Salmon Arm at the Lordco parking lot at 8 p.m., at Notch Hill across from the hall at 9:30. Entertainment on this year’s holiday train includes Alan Doyle and the Beautiful Band. Bring donations for the food bank. ARTIST TALK – Coffee Break and Artist Talk for the True North juried exhibition of Shuswap artists takes place from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Salmon Arm Art Gallery. FISHING FANS – Shuswap Fly Fishers meets on the second Thursday of every month at 5:30 p.m. at Yan’s Restaurant. For more information, call Al at 250-8045166. GAME DAY - Seniors welcome to play various games from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Seniors Drop-In Centre at 31 Hudson Ave. CHANUKAH CELEBRATION from 11 a.m. to noon at the Mall at Piccadilly. There will be a menorah lighting, refreshments, music and a raffle. ROOTS & BLUES – Tickets to the August 2018 Roots and Blues Festival go on sale. Memberships in the Salmon Arm Folk Music Society are also due. Active members can purchase up to four festival passes at reduced prices until March 31 and are able to vote at the society’s AGM, which takes place Wednesday, Jan. 17 at the Comfort Inn. Tickets are available online at www.rootsandblues.ca, or by calling 250-833-4096. WRITE STUFF – The Askew’s Word on the Lake writing contest is now open for fiction, non-fiction and poetry, cash prizes for firstplace winners, awards at Saturday night festivities of the Word on the Lake Writers’ Festival that takes place May 11 to 13 at the Prestige Harbourfront Resort and Okanagan College. For info, go to www. shuswapassociationofwriters. ART AUCTION – The Arts Council presents Art in the Attic, an online art auction featuring 75 items of previously-loved artwork. In addition to original works, there are a few prints and packages of art materials. The link to the auction is https://www.32auctions.com/ArtintheAttic2017. The auction runs until Dec. 8. MUSIC FESTIVAL – Registration is open for the 18th Annual Shuswap Music Festival to be held April 16 to 27. Register on-line for adjudicated performances in strings, piano, vocal, choir and band at www.ShuswapFestival. com. Registration closes Jan. 31, 2018.

OLD FASHIONED FAMILY CHRISTMAS - Enjoy a day at the Mall at Piccadilly from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Includes free sleigh rides, strolling carolers, musical entertainment, old fashioned tree decorating and much more.

SUNDAY, DEC. 17 LADIES SOCIAL - Notch Hill Ladies Christmas Social at 2 p.m. Bring a wrapped gift ($10 value) and six cookies to share. For more call 250-835-4721 or 250-803-5206. BALLET SHOWING - The Nutcracker from the Bolshoi Theatre in Moscow at 1 p.m. at the Salmar Classic. The Nutcracker is a holiday tradition for the whole family as it sweeps the Bolshoi stage for two hours of enchantment and magic. FACES DESSERT EVENING AND RECITAL The recital will be held at Shuswap Lake Estates stage. Doors open at 6 p.m. with the show starting at 6:30 p.m. Special guests opening the show will be Jasmin Frederickson of Chicken Like Birds and James Clark

www.saobserver.net

more information, go to www.spiritualistchurchofsalmonarm.com. SALMON VALLEY SENIORS - Monthly Meeting at the Silver Creek Seniors Hall, 3056 Hornsberger Road. New members are always welcome.

THURSDAY, DEC. 21 WINTER SOLSTICE – Salmon Arm Downtown hosts a Winter Solstice and Bonfire Night from 4 to 7 p.m. on Alexander Street, with hot dogs and marshmallow roast, gingerbread decorating at the Shuswap Pie Company, pine cone crafts at Dolce Bistro, performances by Shuswap Singers and Shukulele late night, free movies at the Salmar Classic, a visit from Santa, the Winter Queen and shopping until 8 p.m.

FRIDAY, DEC. 22 CHRISTMAS CANTATA – “One Small Child” at 7 p.m. at the Little Mountain Bible Chapel at 3481 10th Ave S.E.

SATURDAY, DEC. 23

Douglas Fir Christmas Trees

JOY TO THE WORLD – Sing along to classic Christmas carols, favorite hymns and holiday songs with Richard Good, Timothy Weicker, Melissa Wood and the Shuswap Barbershop Project, along with MC Rev. George Fleming, at 7 p.m. at St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, 1981 9th Ave. NE. Admission by direct donation in support of Salmon Arm Women’s Shelter.

6’ - 7’

Only

$

THURSDAY, DEC. 28

28

SATURDAY, DEC. 16 COFFEEHOUSE - Notch Hill Hall hosts a coffeehouse event at 7 p.m. Drop-in fee and refreshments by donation. TEEN GIFT-MAKING - Teens, age 13 to 18, can come to the Salmon Arm Branch of the library at 3 p.m. and make fun gifts for friends and family. Space is limited, so register now by calling 250-832-6161. GATHERING - Silver Creek Community Hall hosts a coffeehouse event at 6:30 p.m. Open Mic sign up 6:30 to 7 p.m., show at 7 p.m. Two toonies or three tunes gets you in the door.

LARCH HILLS NORDICS’ LANTERN SKI – will be held from 5 to 9 p.m. at Larch Hills ski area. Bring a mug for a warm drink and baking to share. Donations to the Second Harvest Food Bank and Larch Hills Nordic Ski Club.

99 1771 10th Avenue SW, Salmon Arm • 250-832-8424 Store Hours: Daily 8 am to 6 pm Fri. 8 am- 7 pm

SATURDAY, DEC. 30 SNOW BLAZERS MOONLIGHT POKER RUN - Event goes 4 p.m. to 11 p.m. at the Fly Hills snowmobile area. Registration: 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. at the Main parking lot, concession, cards to be handed in by 10 p.m. and prizes drawn at

of Tappellachian String Band. For advance tickets to Sunday’s show, please contact 250-515-3276. Tickets will also be available at the door. JAMMERS DANCE - Event at the Seniors 5th Ave. Activity Centre starting at 7 p.m. Bring your musical instrument or come and dance or listen. Coffee and snacks will be provided.

DANCE – The Silver Creek Community Hall hosts a New Year’s Eve Dance with a DJ and cash bar, from 8 p.m. to 2 a.m. Tickets are available at the Silver Creek Store and include food, dessert trays.

MONDAY, DEC. 18

TUESDAY, JAN. 2

SHOP AND HELP - Come to the Barley Station Brewpub for food, drinks and Christmas shopping while supporting the local food bank. Local artisans will be displaying their works from 3 to 9 p.m. Bring a non perishable donation and receive a five per cent discount off your handmade purchase.

TUESDAY, DEC. 19 SPIRITUALIST CHURCH – Hosts a spiritual healing service at 7 p.m. on the third Tuesday of the month at the Seniors’ Drop-in Centre on the corner of Hudson Avenue and Shuswap Street. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Must be 19 years of age or have parental consent. For

10:30 p.m.

SUNDAY, DEC.31

SHUSWAP STORYTELLERS – The group meets every first Tuesday of the month from 7 to 9 p.m. in the community room at Askew’s Uptown. Everyone is welcome. For more information, contact Estelle Noakes at 250-546-6186.

FRIDAY, JAN. 5 SHUSWAP JAMMERS – Take an instrument or your dancing shoes to the new school district building on Shuswap Street every Friday for music, dancing and singing, featuring door prizes, a 50/50 draw and lunch from 7 to 10 p.m. For more information, call Dean at 250-804-9219.

Call us at 250-832-2131, drop in to our office, or use our new, easy to use calendar online. You can now upload your own events on our website…AND IT’S EASY!! Simply go to www.saobserver.net, go to CALENDAR, and click on Add Your Event.


Page A2 Friday, December 15, 2017

BRABY MOTORS CHRISTMAS CASH Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

FREE Gift with

every vehicle purchase!

Plus

tom

9 Speed Au

$

1500 M A R 7 1 20 SXT 4X4 5.7 L Hemi

Plus

1,000

$

18-17

10,000

HOLIDAY CASH!

No Payments ‘til Spring 17-500

2018 RAM 3500 LARAMIE CREW CAB Diesel, auto, 4x4

Plus

1 ,000 HOL $

IDAY C A

SH!

18-88

2017 RAM 1500 SLT 4x4 Eco Diesel, Back Up Cam

Friday, December 15, 2017 Page A43

17-381

2017 DO CARAVA DGE GRAND Stow ‘n Go. N SXT

Plus

1,00 0

$

HOL IDAY CA

CASH BACK!

1906 m9o/., 4w.19e%ek

s… u l 0 P 9 3 , ! 34 k c a B h s a C $ 5,000 $

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

$

UP TO

1,000

EE $ K O R E H EP C E J 7 1 0 2 HOLIDAY CASH! X4 SPORT 4atic

17-382

www.saobserver.net

SH!

33,495 $ Plus… 106/week $ 5,000 C ash Bac k! * 2018 $

96 mo., 4

.19%

17-406

2017 RA LARAMI M 1500 5.7 L Hemi, E CREW C AB Moon R

Plus

1 , 000 HOL $

IDAY C A

oof.

SH!

Plus

1 , 000 HOL $

IDAY C A

SH!

64,988 $ 285 /week 209/week 190 /week P … l u $ $ 45,993 Plus 87,650 63,995 s … s… Plu s… Plu 1 ! 0 k , c 0 a 0 B 0 $ h $ C s ash Bac a C 5,000 Cash Back! 10,000 Cash Back! $ 5,000 k! $

135/week .99% 96 mo., 1

$

$

96 mo., 4.19%

$

$

$

96 mo., 1.99%

96 mo., 4

.19%

Chris Davis

General Manager

Ted Boyd

General Sales Manager

Justin Braby

Sales Manager

Aaron Johnston

Sales Manager

Lisa Honcoop

Financial Services Manager

Brenda Andreas

Financial Services Manager

brabymotors com

DL 5099

*First payment Due in 90 days.

1250 Trans Canada Highway SW, Salmon Arm • 250-832-8053 or 1-888-832-8053

Don White Sales

Warren Inskip Sales

Mickey Sims Sales

Jason Schubert Sales

Brent Ross Sales

Christine Ellis Sales

Mallory Sisson Sales


Page A44 Friday, December 15, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

SHUSWAP PERKS CHOCOLATES - MADE IN STORE WIDE SELECTION OF BULK FOOD • DAILY SPECIALS

READY TO ENJOY MEALS • COFFEE SHOP & BAKERY SURE CROP FEEDS • FREE WI-FI • LOTTERY

Hours: Monday-Thursday 8:30 am - 7 pm Friday 8:30 am - 8 pm Saturday 8:30 am - 6 pm Sunday & Holidays 9 am - 6 pm

250-679-3261 Chase, BC

SALE PRICES EFFECTIVE:

December 15-21, 2017 W IT H

smart one card price

Big Savings!

Aquafina

Bottled Water

500 mL + dep. . . . . . . .

Crystal’s Bakery Picks: Butterflake Rolls

2 3 48 3

12 Pk.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Cheese or Jalapeno Cheese Bread . . . . . . . . . .

48 48

YOU SAVE 4 9 9 o n 24

Orchard Classic

Cranberry Juice

3.78 L + dep. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

YOU SAVE 5 9 9

A&W

Root Beer

4 Pk. + dep. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

YOU SAVE 2 2 9

each

Portuguese Rolls 6 Pack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Powerade

Sel. Var., 946 mL + dep. . . . . . . 4

for

YOU SAVE 5 0 0 o n 4

Nestles

Hot Chocolate

6 Pk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

YOU SAVE 1

W IT H

Picked Fresh CARE

Case of 24

98

for

on 2

Aussie Out Back

Liquorice

Sel. Var., 115 g . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

YOU SAVE 1

58

for

on 2

Taste of West

Mixed Fruit

425 mL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

YOU SAVE 4

Steve’s Produce Picks

Mexican Grown

Avocadoes ..............................

88 48 3 ¢ 88

Romaine Hearts 3 Pack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Canadian Grown

Nugget Potatoes

1.94/kg. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

¢ ea.

ea.

lb.

16

for

on 4

Stove Top

Stuffing Mix

Sel. Var., 112-120 g . . . . . . . . . . 5

YOU SAVE 2

95

for

on 5

Cracker Barrel

Cheese

Sel. Var. 600-650 g . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

YOU SAVE 7 61

Bulk Foods

Fancy Satin Mix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . YOU SAVE $1.50/kg

500 500 00 5 00 5 00 5 300 00 5 00 5 6

98

147

/100 g

At Safety Mart Foods Customers Are Really Everything!

Chris’ Deli Picks:

Saputo

2 29 2 29 1

Monterey Jack Cheese . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cassa Italia

Mild Genoa Salami . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . InStore Made!

Broccoli Salad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

29

100 g /100 g

100 g

100 g

W IT H

Cut Fresh CARE

Loyalle’s Meat Picks Olymel or Mitchell’s

Toupie Hams

9 98 8 98 19

..............................

Beef Prime Rib Oven Roasts

98 ea.

19.80/kg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

lb.

5-7 kg, with purchas e of $50 (ex cluding Lotto, tobacco) . . . .

ea.

Grade A Frozen Turkey

EVERYTHING WE DO IS BAKED, PICKED, CUT & MADE WITH C.A.R.E. because

Serving Chase and area for 40 years

We reserve the right to limit quantities - Check our weekly flyer for more specials

Lakeshore News, December 15, 2017  
Lakeshore News, December 15, 2017  

December 15, 2017 edition of the Lakeshore News