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LAKESHORE

Shuswap Vol. 28 No. 46 November 17, 2017

Market News

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JIM ELLIOT/SALMON ARM OBSERVER

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Monja and Klaire Jespersen have a blast while sledding down the hill at South Broadview Elementary on Saturday, Nov. 4.

Smartcentres awarded $8 million Judge says developers overpaid for Salmon Arm property. Martha Wickett Salmon Arm Observer

Three companies affiliated with Smartcentres have been awarded more than $8 million based on paying too much for the Salmon Arm land where the shopping centre sits. The controversial shopping centre has been open for five years, but the legal battles surrounding its development have continued. Last month the Supreme Court of British Columbia ruled that

three companies affiliated with Smartcentres – Salmon Arm Shopping Centres Limited, Calloway Reit (Salmon Arm) Inc. and a B.C. numbered company – are owed damages of $8,020,000 by the B.C. numbered company which sold the property to them. Mike Fowler of Richmond is named in court documents as principal of that company. Justice Andrew Mayer ruled the amount was appropriate as it was what the purchasers (the Smart-

centres affiliates) overpaid for the property as a result of the seller’s breach of the warranty. Referring to a second lawsuit, the judge said the $8 million figure could change depending on the amount of a settlement between the property purchasers and EBA Engineering, which prepared a Riparian Areas Regulation (RAR) report for them. The dispute in both lawsuits centred around the size of the property the developers had hoped to

develop and the actual size that was allowed once the environmental requirement was accurately determined. RAR governs setbacks to fish-bearing waters, meaning developments must be set back a stipulated distance from the high-water mark – in this case, the Salmon River. The purchasers claimed that RAR reports provided by the enContinued on A2


Page A2 Friday, November 17, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

News

www.saobserver.net

‘Unexpected’ opposition to project Continued from A1

gineering company in 2007 were wrong. “The two reports provided by EBA suggested that substantial portions of the properties could be used for development based on the anticipated RAR (riparian areas regulation) setbacks contemplated in the reports. However, that information proved to be inaccurate,” stated a court document outlining Smartcentres’ position. The area that the purchasers were permitted to develop under the regulation was just 33 per cent of the 51 acres they had hoped to develop. Court documents explain that the main parcels comprising the property’s 61 acres had been removed from the Agricultural Land Reserve in July of 2005 on application by the City of Salmon Arm to allow for commercial development. When the $14.7 million purchase agreement between the Smartcentres affiliates and the seller was completed in 2007, the purchasers expected to develop 51 of the 61 acres. About 17 acres were to be for high-density residential development and the rest, about 34 acres, for commercial. In May 2010, B.C.’s environment ministry completed its assessment, which restricted

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A Supreme Court ruling in a dispute involving the amount of land that Smartcentres could develop for its shopping centre in Salmon Arm has concluded with three affiliate companies of the developer being awarded more than $8 million. total development to about 33 per cent of the developer’s plan, or 16.7 acres. A Salmon Arm citizens group was instrumental in bringing attention to the accurate high-water mark. The seller’s warranty that the BC Court of Appeal decided had been breached referred to statements from the seller that, in preliminary meetings with the city’s planning department, the department had given full support and approval-in-principle to a rezoning; and that there were no areas of environmen-

tal concern related to the lands. The documents also refer to the unexpected strong opposition to the development by citizens. Justice Mayer said if the Smartcentres affiliates have received a financial settlement from EBA Engineering for damages from the same circumstances it would “amount to double recovery” and he might then alter his decision regarding the $8 million.

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News

Friday, November 17, 2017 Page A3

Road clearing needs improvement

WINTER DRIVING Drive Safely and Slow Down when roads are slippery

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Ministry conducting review of response to snow storm. Barb Brouwer Salmon Arm Observer

Mother Nature’s introduction to winter brewed a storm of complaints and three accidents, including a fatality on the Trans-Canada Highway near Canoe. Streets within Salmon Arm are the responsibility of the city. Maintenance on all other roads in the Shuswap, including the Trans-Canada Highway, is contracted to JPW Inc. In response to questions from the Salmon Arm Observer, the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure (MOTI) says JPW’s service to the Shuswap requires improvement. The ministry has filed a non-conformance report, which will require the company to undertake a review and develop measures to prevent a recurrence of their response to the Nov. 2 storm. Reaction from the general public has been much harsher. Outrage at the lack of highway maintenance following the Nov. 2 storm has been expressed widely on social media and in conversation. Columbia Shuswap Regional District Area C South Shuswap director Paul Demenok says his phone has been ringing incessantly as many people are under the impression the regional district is in charge of road maintenance. “Our services are being compromised – a car slid into a school bus, our garbage truck slid into the ditch and our road has yet to see a plow,” he said Nov. 10. Another Blind Bay

resident, Debbie Reeves, vented her anger on Facebook, with a post providing numbers for residents to call in order to lodge their complaints. “The weather surprised everybody, but in Blind Bay everybody lives on a steep hill and when they (JPW) don’t come out, it turns to solid ice chunks and you can’t leave the house because you’re sliding and have no way to have control,” says Reeves. “They came through Saturday night with their truck, but it was too late; it was ice and the only thing they did was sand and only some areas got it.” A Blind Bay resident for five years, Reeves says it’s not just the response time that frustrates her, but the calibre of the equipment used on her road. “The best we get is a pickup truck with a blade on the front and it just skims, it doesn’t get down to the pavement,” she says, calling for a grader for internal roads. “We don’t expect miracles; we understand it takes time to get everywhere but going two to three days is no use, the damage is done, the ice has built up.” A Nov. 9 email re-

sponse from MOTI emphasized the importance the ministry places on road safety and explained that during storms, ministry staff regularly monitor work around the clock to provide real-time monitoring. The email also contends JPW has sufficient equipment and chemical systems in place to deal with snow and ice on highways. “The ministry acknowledges that while JPW did respond to the storm, there was room for improvement in how their resources were deployed prior to and during the storm event,” reads the email. “In accordance with the contract, non-conformance reports (NCR) were issued to JPW. These NCR’s identified maintenance deficiencies and require JPW to undertake a review and develop measures to prevent re occurrence.” The email also states that JPW could have executed more proactive maintenance in the region, which would have reduced compacted snow and could have provided more information to the public through DriveBC. “Ministry staff are working with JPW to

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ensure they improve performance and deliver quality winter maintenance throughout the remainder of the winter,” reads the email. “Ministry staff drive the road network regularly to evaluate the performance of our contractors relative to contract requirements.” A ministry rep says JPW had all of its equipment out on the roads plowing and sanding during the Nov. 9 snowstorm and ministry staff were driving the roads to monitor the company’s performance. Meanwhile, Demenok is providing residents with contact numbers to use in order to lodge complaints: Local MOTI manager Peter Cocker at 250833-3371 and JPW at 1-877-546-3799.

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Page A4 Friday, November 17, 2017

News

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Group plans drone searches Martha Wickett Salmon Arm Observer

John Simpson has been relentless in his search for his daughter, Ashley, who went missing in April 2016. John lives in Ontario while Ashley went missing from Yankee Flats, but he has travelled to the Shuswap to search. Drones are his most recent tactic. His family held a fundraiser in Ontario to aid in the search and, with the money raised, he purchased two drones for the Okanagan-Shuswap, which he sent to advocate Jody Leon. She and fellow activist Meagan Louis have formed a drone operating team. They have been recruiting people with expertise and forming strategies. “Those are just for areas we can’t reach on foot,” Leon says, noting the group would like to look at areas where the women were last seen. The group has plans to launch a drone search

as early as this weekend. They also hope to fundraise to help purchase more equipment to aid their endeavours. Anyone interested in the next drone meeting should contact either Leon or Louis, joyce_ royce@hotmail.com or meaganlouis31@gmail. com.

Rally set

Leon and Louis would also like to put together a rally for Thursday, Nov. 23 at 10 a.m. on the steps of the Vernon courthouse. Louis said it won’t be a protest, but simply an action to end violence against women. With regard to Traci Genereaux and the four women missing from the Shuswap – Simpson as well as Caitlin Potts, Deanna Wertz and Nicole Bell, Leon hopes the answers will come quickly for Genereaux’s family, as well as spark a renewed call for answers on behalf of the missing women. “That the people

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Meagan Louis, Jody Leon, Neskonlith Chief Judy Wilson and other drummers lead a song at a rally on Sunday, Oct. 22 in Silver Creek condemning violence against women. don’t give up, that they’re continuing to call for action… and that doesn’t end because the investigation has stopped at that point on the farm.” She points out many women are still missing in Canada and, to this day, women continue to go missing. “It can happen to anybody. You wake up one day, you have children in your life, and one day they’re gone.” Regarding the RCMP leaving the Sagmoen farm in Silver Creek, Louis echoes the sentiments of many people.

“As a citizen I feel like we’re kind of left in the dark and the police aren’t releasing any information.” Like many people, she wonders how Traci Genereaux died and when charges will be laid. “I’m sure the family wants answers, more closure. I’m wondering if it was because of the weather – the ground has frozen and they can’t search anymore, or because they’ve found everything they’re searching for. It’s easy to speculate because they’ve stopped.”

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Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

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Community

Friday, November 17, 2017 Page A5

Honour for heart transplant recipient Every day Teri Hutchinson looks into her daughter Britton’s eyes, she’s reminded that medical miracles can and do happen. Now Teri, Britton and family have another reminder, a copy of the program for the David Foster Foundation’s 30th Anniversary 2017 Vancouver Miracle Gala and Concert, which features Britton on the cover. Britton was born with a rare congenital heart defect that, at three months, necessitated a heart transplant. The procedure was done at Stollery Children’s Hospital in Edmonton. “The transplant and surgical teams worked through the night performing the miraculous procedure,” Hutchinson wrote on Facebook on Sept. 4, 2015. “The healthy new heart seems to be a very good fit and everyone involved is over the moon with how well she is doing. The heart could not have come at a more brilliant time, as little did anyone know Britton’s shunt was clotting again and her stats were dropping moments before the surgery began! Words cannot explain our feelings and emotions at this time. We are overwhelmed and excited as a weight has been lifted.” Britton was released from hospital two weeks after her surgery. To help with the

unanticipated costs of having to leave their Sicamous home to stay and Edmonton, Teri and husband Colin received some assistance from the David Foster Foundation, a non-profit organization that provides financial support for non-medical expenses to Canadian families with children in need of life-saving organ transplants. “We were displaced from home and up in Edmonton for seven months, so obviously I wasn’t working and my husband actually did have work but he couldn’t work a lot up there while we were undergoing all of this…,” said Hutchinson. “We got a little bit of help from them… And… the first one to two years is pretty intense with appointments and different procedures and stuff. There’s a lot of travel – we were going back every month for a number of months and then it slowly spaced out.” Since the transplant, Britton has grown into an “energetic, busy, witting, funny and sometimes sassy little two-year old.” Meanwhile, the Hutchinson’s have remained in contact with the David Foster Foundation, grateful for their assistance and supporters of the cause. Earlier this year, the foundation reached out to Teri to see if they could use a photo she had taken of Briton on a park bench in Sicamous on the program for the founda-

pHoTo coNTribuTed

David Foster, second from left, joins families with children who have undergone organ transplants, including Britton, Colin and Teri Hutchinson during a meet and greet in Vancouver on Oct. 20.

tion’s upcoming 30th anniversary fundraising gala. In it, Britton is holding a framed black and white photo of herself from before the surgery. “I sent it to them and they said, ‘yeah, we can make it work and we’d love to use it if you’d allow it,’ and I’m like, ‘absolutely!’, said Hutchinson. Later, the foundation board invited the Hutchinson family to take part in a special meet and greet with David Foster on Oct.

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20, and then enjoy the concert on the 21st. “The concert was amazing,” said Hutchinson. “There was a lot of talent there, it was put together really great and it went quite late… Britton stayed awake for whole thing… “It was a really cool experience and obviously, that foundation hits us really close to home, even with our little bit of experience with them, just experiencing a transplant and knowing what

we went through and what so many other families go through.” Teri was also thrilled that the gala raised $10.2 million for the foundation. “We were there when they raised $10.2 million, which is an all-time high for the foundation and that helps an incredible amount of families,” said Hutchinson. “So we got to watch the auction and the bids and stuff go for the donations, so that was pretty awesome.”

Teri HuTcHiNsoN pHoTo

Two-year-old Britton Hutchinson holds a copy of the program for the David Foster Foundation’s 30th Anniversary 2017 Vancouver Miracle Gala and Concert, which features a photo of her on its cover.

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Opinion

Page A6 Friday, November 17, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

the season of giving and taking

’Tis the season to be on the lookout for opportunistic thieves. While it’s still a bit early for some, now that Remembrance Day has passed, many Canadians are already chomping at the bit to start celebrating the festive Christmas season. That might include getting a jump on holiday shopping. In many cases, this includes making online purchases and enjoying the convenience of home delivery, which, while convenient, comes with some inherent risk. A B.C. family discovered that the hard way this past weekend when a parcel was taken off a doorstep in a brazen daylight robbery. What makes this case somewhat more newsworthy than the average petty theft is the crystal clear surveillance footage of the robbery posted by the family on Facebook, combined with the thief’s casual stroll up and down the driveway — an approach obviously intended to give anyone who happened to be watching the sense he belonged there. These factors, combined with the timing of crime — six weeks before Christmas — is a good reminder that thieves are going to be hard at work between now and the New Year. If you can’t be home to receive a parcel, police recommend you have it sent to your place of work or to the courier’s office instead of your home. Stuff is just that, stuff. But when you’ve worked to pay for something that you know will bring a smile to the face of someone you love, it’s worth taking an extra couple of steps to ruin a thief’s Christmas. -Langley Times

Publisher: Rick Proznick Editor: Publisher Tracy Hughes

171 Shuswap Street NW Box 550 Salmon Arm, British Columbia 171 Shuswap V1E 4N7 Street NW Box 550 Phone: 250-832-2131 Salmon Arm, British Columbia Fax: V1E 4N7 250-832-5140

Rick Proznick Editor Tracy Hughes Office Manager Phone:of the250-832-2131 This Shuswap Market News is a member British Columbia Press Council, Louise Phillips a self-regulatory body governing the province’s250-832-5140 newspaper industry. The council Fax:

considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. This Shuswap Market News is a member of the British Columbia Press Council, Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, the input from both the newsa self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council paper and the complaint holder. If talking theofeditor ornewspapers. publisher does not considers complaints from the public about thewith conduct member oversee theabout mediation of complaints, the input from bothyou the newspaper resolveDirectors your complaint coverage or story treatment, may contact the and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve be sent B.C. Press Council.Your written concern, with documentation, should your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press within Council.Your 45 days, to written B.C. Press Council, P.O. Box 1356, Ladysmith, B.C. V9G 1A9. concern, with documentation, should be sent within 45 days, to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanimo, or B.C. 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 goV9R to www.bcpresscouncil.org. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org

If you did not receive the Shuswap Market News, call circulation for re-delivery: 250 832-2131. p

p

Winter requires special care for dogs the great outdoors James Murray I had pretty good chuckle a couple of weeks ago one morning when I let the dogs out for a run in the back yard. It was the morning after our first snowfall of the season and I was as surprised as the dogs to see snow on the ground. One just bound out ready to have a good time. Another stopped dead in its tracks for a moment looking bewildered, as if it wasn’t quite sure what the white stuff was all about. The third tried to follow the other two, gingerly lifting each foot, trying not to touch the cold snow for too long. It didn’t take too long for them to be scratching at the door. A lot of dogs do not take to the snow and cold weather well. They’re simply not equipped. Warm weather or cold, dogs have to go

out a couple of times a day for obvious reasons. The problem is when temperatures drop to well below freezing, even brief exposure to sub-zero temperatures can easily cause frostbite to a dog’s feet, nose or ears. Frost-bitten skin appears a reddish grey in the early stage and a whitish-grey in later stages. If you suspect your dog has frostbite, take it inside or to a warm place and thaw out the frostbitten area slowly by applying warm, moist towels, and continue until the affected areas become flushed. Then contact a veterinarian for further attention and care. Dog coats, sweaters and booties can help your dog stay warmer when outside in cold weather. Short-haired and elderly dogs in particular will benefit from wearing a coat

or sweater that will insulate its trunk area and help maintain body temperature. Puppies, sick and elderly dogs are more sensitive to cold weather and should only be taken out to relieve themselves or when absolutely necessary, and for only the shortest amount of time. Do not let dogs run freely on their own outside the boundaries of their own yard during extremely cold weather. Dogs often lose their scent in cold weather and can easily become lost when outside a fenced yard. Upon returning home from walking your dog, wipe snow and ice from the dog’s feet, legs and belly. Clipping the fur between a dog’s toe pads will reduce the amount of snow that collects between the toes. You might even consider keeping a container of warm water and dry towels by the door for use after walks to rinse their paws before wiping them. Salt from the

road can irritate a dog’s foot pads and can cause vomiting and/or diarrhea when licked – many de-icing and ice-melting products are even toxic to dogs. Never leave antifreeze or coolant within a dog’s reach. Such products taste appealing to dogs but are lethal when ingested. When out for a walk, make sure to steer your dog away from any suspect puddles – do not let them drink from puddles which may contain any numbers of chemicals . Whether out for a walk or playing, a strong, healthy dog will enjoy being outdoors as long as it is having fun, but remember, being outdoors in the cold also burns calories and, after awhile, will reduce body temperature. If your dog is the type that does enjoy being outdoors during the winter months, make sure to give it plenty of Omega 3 or fish oil supplements so its fur stays thick

and healthy. Never just leave your dog outside. Think about how you would feel if you were put outside in cold weather and left out there alone. Think how you would feel if you couldn’t get back inside when you wanted to. Regular exercise is importance for a dog’s health and well-being. Dogs with high energy levels require more exercise than others, and without it they can become anxious or depressed. Make the time to take your dog for a walk, both in the morning and evening. It will be good for the both of you. While I may have had a good laugh a couple of weeks ago over the dogs stepping out into the snow for the first time this season, the very thought of having to get up and open that door at 6:30 in the morning for the rest of the winter is not really something I’m looking forward to. It is, however, something I’m afraid I’ll have to do. Oh, well.


Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Viewpoint

Friday, November 17, 2017 Page A7

Lumby – where small is beautiful shuswap passion Jim Cooperman E.F. Schumacher’s book, Small is beautiful – A Study of Economics as if People Mattered certainly applies to the Village of Lumby. With 1,833 residents, Lumby is indeed the smallest municipality in the Shuswap, but it may also be one of the friendliest. It is a close knit, outdoors oriented community that has many of the services available in larger centres, including an impressive parks and recreation program. It was the nearby natural meadows that first attracted the early settlers, many of them from Quebec; to the area they called the White Valley, named after one of the earliest settlers, George LeBlanc. Although agriculture has long been the mainstay of the local economy, forestry was and continues to be the major employer. As well, the village is becoming a bedroom community for Vernon, just 20 minutes away. Almost all of Lumby’s public buildings, including the schools, city hall, community centre and library, skating arena and curling club are located in the centre of the community adjacent to the beautiful Whitevalley Community Park where there is also an outdoor

swimming pool and skate board park. A colourful attraction for visitors and residents are the 32 historical murals that adorn many of the buildings in the village depicting themes such as the early pioneers, logging, farming and the salmon. It could be said that one way to judge a community is by the strength of its volunteer organizations and Lumby has many successful groups. The Whitevalley Community Resource Centre has been serving Lumby and the local area with social programs since 1989. In addition to counseling services, the centre provides programs for seniors, students and young parents. During the summer, residents and visitors appreciate the weekly Lumby market held every Saturday where they can shop for locally produced vegetables and crafts. There is no shortage of cultural activities as well in Lumby, including dance and art classes and musical theatre at the community centre. The Monashee Arts Council supports local artists, sponsors events including the annual Festival of the Arts and operates a gallery. Another group, the Lumby Arts Cooperative also supports local

artists and operates the Village Gallery that markets locally produced, original arts and crafts. The key recreational feature in Lumby is the eight kilometre long series of Salmon Trails that follow Bessette and Duteau Creeks, which are the easternmost spawning grounds for coho and Chinook salmon. Interpretive signs and activities help make the hiking interesting and educational and during the summer the Lumby visitor Centre provides student trail guides for visitors. Lumby is often billed as the gateway to the Monashees, as it is an excellent starting point for outdoor adventures in the nearby mountains and lakes. To the north is the scenic Mabel Lake, a favourite destination for swimmers, fishers, campers, boaters and paddlers. To the south is Echo Lake Provincial Park, where families appreciate the beaches and the fishing. More adventures can be found in nearby Monashee Provincial Park, where the magnificent Rainbow Falls delight visitors and backpackers enjoy alpine hiking to Peter’s Lake and Mount Fosthall. One only needs to look up to the skies to see the Lumby Air Force practice their recreational pursuits, as these fearless hang gliders and paragliders utilize the ideal conditions for flying in the area. The flying group began in 1975,

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Lumby has 32 historical murals that adorn many of the buildings in the village when they hosted their first hang gliding competition. There are a number of launch sites from local mountains and there is no shortage of large fields for landing. Early in June is a great time to visit the community and enjoy Lumby Days, which is hosted yearly by a volunteer organiza-

tion. In addition to the parade, there are historical displays, arts and crafts, hang gliders and paragliders, car shows, trade booths, games and events for kids, and live music on the stage. Camping is also available all summer long at the Lumby Lions Campground located at the head of the Salmon Trail.

SALMAR COMMUNITY ASSOCIATION Owners and operators of the Salmar Classic and Salmar Grand Cinemas

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING Will be held at the SHUSWAP ART GALLERY 70 Hudson Avenue NE, Salmon Arm B.C. Thursday, Nov. 23, 2017 at 7:30 p.m.

Business: Review of theatre operations. Directors’ reports, Auditor’s report, Election of Directors. Any other business arising. The Nominating committee has nominated three incumbents (Patty Munro, Gary Brooke, Chris Letham) for re-election. No other nominations have been received.

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Moxie is a beautiful senior kittie who is looking for a new home. Moxie would rather not live with small children but she’d be great in a more mature home. She’s very social with people but we don’t know how she is with other cats or dogs. Moxie has a lovely long coat which would benefit from brushing fairly regularly. If you’d like to meet Moxie she is waiting at the Shuswap Branch.

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South Shuswap

Page A8 Friday, November 17, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Man charged in Tappen robbery

Accused arrested in Salmon Arm, faces seven offences. Martha Wickett Salmon Arm Observer

A man faces seven charges following the robbery of the Tappen Esso on Halloween, including wielding an imitation firearm and possessing heroin. Paulo Anthony Murphy-O’Neil, born in 1992, will reappear in BC Provincial Court in Salmon Arm on Tuesday, Nov. 21. Court documents show he is charged with robbery, using an imitation firearm while committing the robbery, two counts of possessing a prohibited weapon (“brass knuckles/ taser”) without a licence and contrary to a court order, possessing heroin and methamphetamine, and

photo contributed

as four police cars and a number of officers, at least one with a weapon drawn, converged on the scene. A witness had provided police with a description of the occupants of the truck and a detailed description of the get-

away vehicle, which included the B.C. licence plate. The other two people who were arrested have not been charged; Crown counsel did not divulge if further charges will be forthcoming.

www.saobserver.net

www.shuswaphospitalfoundation.org

Book your

Christmas Party

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stratis MEDITERRANEAN GRILL Sorrento Plaza • 250-675-3677 Open at 4 p.m. Wednesday to Sunday

An officer arrests a suspect from a silver pickup truck about 4:30 p.m. on Oct. 31 on the Trans-Canada Highway between Alexander and Ross streets. possessing “pipes, syringes or other drug paraphernalia” contrary to a court order. Salmon Arm RCMP arrested three people that afternoon, two men and a woman, in a dramatic takedown in downtown Salmon Arm. Police had received a call at 4:30 p.m. Oct. 31 telling them

a suspect with a gun approached an employee of the Tappen Esso and demanded money before fleeing the scene in a pickup truck. Officers made the arrest on the Trans-Canada Highway near the intersection of Ross and Alexander streets. Traffic was delayed

Sail into your midlife crisis. Deals that float your boat.

A Guide to

v i G ing The Salmon Arm Observer will be publishing a Guide to Giving on November 29. This free guide will feature non-profit societies and what they need, in terms of donations. If you would like to be a part of the Guide to Giving, please send an outline of your non-profit organization - what it does, why it’s needed, who it serves - and then list what your organization requires. Also list contact information or a location where donations can be sent or dropped off. Please keep your information as brief as possible maximum 200 words.

E-mail your information to: newsroom@saobserver.net or drop it off at: 171 Shuswap Street NW

Any questions call Tracy Hughes at 250-832-2131

sellit. findit. loveit. saobserver.net/findit

Deadline for submissions will be Friday, Nov. 25 @ 5 pm


Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

South Shuswap

New liquor rules a concern Barb Brouwer Salmon Arm Observer

Crannog Ales owner Brian MacIsaac is hopeful but not yet ready to lift a tankard in celebration. Changes the previous government made to regulations governing the Agricultural Land Reserve (ALR) put Canada’s first certified organic farmhouse microbrewery in jeopardy. A Nov. 9 Ministry of Agriculture media release maintains a change in regulations has all alcohol producers in the ALR operating under the same rules, levelling the playing field for British Columbia brewers, mead makers and distillers.

File photo

A view of Left Fields Farm near Sorrento, which is home to Crannog Ales. The change amends a 2015 regulation that created different rules for wineries and cideries than other alcohol producers, and led to calls for policy change from the BC Chamber of Commerce, the Union of British Columbia Municipalities and the Craft Distillers Guild

of British Columbia. Minor amendments now require breweries, distilleries, meaderies, wineries and cideries operating in the ALR to either (a) produce at least 50 per cent of the primary farm product used to make the alcohol on the farm where the production facility

is located; or (b) if the farm on which the facility is located is at least two hectares in area, produce at least 50 per cent of the farm product on that farm and/ or under a three-year minimum term contract with another B.C. farm. “My concern is about making sure light industry on any ALR property would take up the smallest of percentages, including infrastructure such as pavement,” he says. MacIsaac says the reason Crannog Ales does not operate a lounge is because it would require more less-impermeable structures such as paved driveways, septic fields, etc.

Shuswap HOMEWATCH & Property Management

A Professional HomeWatch Service for Vacationers, Snowbirds & Cabin Owners, Estate Executors & Realtors Professional, customized care of your home whenever you are away. Scheduled, comprehensive home checks to minimize risks associated with “an empty house”, decrease damage by unmonitored plumbing HVAC & electrical systems, satisfy house insurance policy requirements … and provide “peace of mind”. www.shuswaphomewatch.com 250 804 6973 shuswaphomewatch@gmail.com Licensed and Insured

P O D I AT R I S T

The Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure invites the public to attend an information session regarding the four-laning project planned for the Trans-Canada Highway from Hoffman’s Bluff to Jade Mountain. Ministry staff will be on hand to provide information and answer questions. The drop-in open house is scheduled for the following date: Wednesday, November 22, 2017 3:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Chase Community Hall 547 Shuswap Avenue, Chase, B.C.

For more information, please contact Ken Aura, Senior Project Manager, by telephone at 250 828-4254 or by email at Ken.Aura@gov.bc.ca

MORTGAGE BROKERS

Being a Mortgage Professional is not just about taking an application and getting a mortgage for you to purchase a home or themortgage same that fits your refinance your existing one. It is about building a relationship, being available, andWant getting to youuse the best pain and recovery treatments lifestyle. In some cases; it is also about coaching you on your credit and better financial decision making until it is the right time for you to purchase/refinance yourthat home. is not just a business areIt available to the … it is about working together to fulfill your dreams of financial freedom and owning your Best of all my services world’s top home. athletes? are free to you, the client. Did you know Salmon Arm is home to I have earned the distinction of an Accredited Mortgage and Therapy am a member of the Verico a worldProfessional class Laser centre? Network Mortgage Team which allows me to the Laser lowest rates availableisin shown the industry. In addition Oroffer that Therapy in over 1200I am a member of the Mortgage Broker Association of British Columbia, published clinicalFinancial studiesInstitutions to healCommission, many and the Canadian Association of Accredited Mortgage Professionals. of the worst acute and chronic Please visit my website for valuable information with respect to mortgages and interest rates. I can be pain issues? reached anytime by email: corinehild@shaw.ca or phone: 250 832-8006 (office) 250 832-5856 (cell). Corine Hild

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Trans-Canada Highway Four-Laning: Hoffman’s Bluff to Jade Mountain

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PODIATRIST Dr. Bruce Booth Medicine & Surgery of the Foot Custom Orthotics

Booking for Dec. 6 & 20

Please call for appointment

Toll Free: 1-844-769-3338

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ACUPUNCTURE CLINIC and

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Saturdays 10 - noon, Oct. 14 through Dec. 2. Call to register

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To register call Jeremy or Duncan 778-489-5249 4940 50 St., Salmon Arm Check us out: theworkshopstudiogallery.com

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With a combined circulation of over 15,000 this is a great place to advertise your business.

Call 250-832-2131 or email

advertising@saobserver.net

www.saobserver.net


Page A10 Friday, November 17, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

South Shuswap Local crafters will be featured Nov. 18 & 19, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Sunnybrae Seniors Hall, 3585 Sunnybrae Canoe Pt. Rd. South Shuswap Library hosts knitters and crocheters from 10 a.m. to noon on the first and third Fridays of the month. Carlin Hall Christmas craft sale takes place Saturday, Nov. 18, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Table rental $15. For more information, call Joan at 250-835-0104.

An Artistry Christmas Gift & Bake Sale takes place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 18 and Sunday, Nov. 19 at Blind Bay Community Hall, 2510 Blind Bay Rd. Upper hall and Reedman Gallery. The Sorrento and Area Community Health Centre hosts a Name That Tune event at Sorrento Memorial Hall at 7 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 18. Tickets are available at Lighthouse Market in Sorrento, Munro’s IDA

www.saobserver.net

Dates to remember pharmacy or at the Sorrento & Area Community Health Centre, a fun evening of music, food, a bar, and a silent auction. The Writer’s Nook at the South Shuswap Library is open Wednesdays, Nov. 22, Dec 13, Jan. 9 and 23 from 10 a.m. to noon. For more information, go to www. thethirdhouse.ca. A family pot luck supper at Gleneden Hall takes place at 6 p.m. Friday, Nov. 24. Take your favou-

rite dish. Buns, tea, coffee and ice tea will be supplied. For more information, call 250-804-0220. The South Shuswap Library presents Baby Talk at 10:15 a.m. Friday, Dec 1 and Jan 5. Join Health Nurse Shannon for a casual, informative gathering for children 18 months and younger with caregiver. For more information, call 250675-4818. The South Shuswap Library presents a series on

aromatherapy: Introduction to Essentials Oils: Wednesday, Nov 22; Stress & Emotions: Wednesday, Dec 6; Teens & Essential Oils: Saturday, Dec 16; Chemical Free Home: Wednesday, Dec 20. There will be a good selection of samples to try. All sessions begin at 1 p.m. Pre-registration begins two weeks before each session. The South Shuswap Library presents Crafty Saturdays from 2 to 3 p.m. Dec

2 for school aged children. Pre-registration is required and begins two weeks prior to date at 250-675-4818. Gleneden Hall Dance, takes place on the first Saturday of the month, 7 to 11 p.m., 50/50 draw, door prizes. For information, call Roger at 250-832-1599. South Shuswap Library presents Mother Goose from 10:15 to 11:15 Friday, Nov 24, Dec 8, Jan 12 and 26. For children three and under with caregiver.

Shop Local Hire Local • Support our Community!

AT YOUR SERVICE

AUTOMOTIVE Bart’s

CHRISTMAS LIGHT INSTALLATION

MINUTE MUFFLER & MAINTENANCE 250-832-8064

Mufflers Brakes Shocks Complete Automotive Repairs

Mon.-Fri. 8:30-5:00

Check Engine light on? Salmon Arm Fireplace is your local source for “all things FIRE”. Fireplaces, BBQ’s, Smokers, Firepits and more! Titus and Graham bring over 25 years of fireplace and BBQ experience to help you with your purchase, project or problem. We source our products from Canadian manufacturers and suppliers to facilitate installations and repairs and with over 40 units on display in our showroom, you can be sure to find the fire-feature or BBQ you want. Need to repair that old BBQ? We offer a wide range of OEM and after-market replacement BBQ parts to get you cookin’ again! And we’ll even do the work. Salmon Arm Fireplace – We’re here to help!

We have the equipment & expertise to accurately identify & repair the cause of your vehicle trouble We install lights on residential homes, commercial properties, strata, retirement homes, public spaces, and various trees large and small!! We will also take down all of the lights!

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Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Community

Friday, November 17, 2017 Page A11

Over 10,000 ads - updated daily bcclassified.com

Falls serious – but can be prevented the highest risk group, with almost double the rates of deaths, hospital stays, visits to the emergency room and permanent partial disability than older men. This may be due to the fact that women have less muscle mass than men and weaker bones, making them more likely to fall and break a bone. The good news is there are many things that can be done to prevent falls. The number one reason why seniors fall is because their muscles become weak due to inactivity. While you should always consult your doctor before beginning an exercise program, the best advice for all ages is to get active, and include strength and balance training in your routines. For example Tai Chi has been shown to be effective at preventing falls in seniors. Many community recreation centres now offer strength and balance classes designed for older participants

Sh op Lo c al

or those with health issues. Taking more than five medications also increases the risk of falling, as many medications have dizziness or drowsiness as a side effect. Sleeping pills should be avoided, if possible. It is important to tell your doctor or pharmacist about all the medications you take and to make sure you take your medications as directed. If you think your medications are making you dizzy and might cause you to fall, be sure to tell your doctor or pharmacist right away. Don’t stop taking your medication without speaking with your doctor first. Be especially careful when you are starting a new medication as the side effects may be worse at the beginning. Other tips to prevent falls: · Reduce clutter inside your home, especially on the floors. · Make sure all outdoor pathways and stairs are well lit and

free of ice, snow and leaves. · Avoid using ladders or step stools. Move things down to where you can reach them and/or ask a neighbour, family member or friend for assistance. · Use handrails and remove your reading glasses when going up and down stairs. · Wear comfortable low-heeled shoes that provide good support. · Eat healthy foods and drink lots of water – poor nutrition and dehydration can cause dizziness. · Avoid rushing and “multi-tasking”. Be more mindful of where you put your feet and stay alert to your surroundings when you are walking, especially on stairs. · Have your vision checked each year. Wear your glasses and hearing aids. · Consider using a walker or cane to help with getting around. Talk to a Community Physiotherapist or Occupational Therapist first to make sure you

is Sewing Savings Season!

buy the right walking aid for you. For more information about fall and injury prevention, visit the fall prevention site www.findingbalancebc.ca and the Your Health section at www. interiorhealth.ca.

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FARM SERVICES

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• Utility locating - Hydro/gas/water/fibre optics • Catch basins/sumps/drains • Line flushing (storm/sani/culverts) • Hot Water Boiler • Slot trenching • Street flushing/Lot washing

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GUTTERS

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Peterson ) ) Orchards

Laura’s Homemade Pies Phone to Order or Drop In www.a-l-petersonorchards.ca

Apples 80¢/lb, Plums & Pears

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Falls happen every day, across all age groups. For children and youth, it might be a fall off playground equipment or a bicycle. For adults, it might be a fall off a ladder or slipping on the floor at work. For older adults, most falls occur in the home. Falls can have devastating effects: · They are the number one cause of injury-related deaths, hospital stays, visits to the emergency room and the most common cause of permanent disability for children, adults, and seniors. · Falls are the leading cause of injury‐related deaths and hospitalizations for B.C. seniors. In fact, within B.C. an average of 557 seniors die each year from falls. · For youth, falls are second only to car and bike crashes. On average in B.C., 13,397 seniors (aged 65 and older) are hospitalized each year —that’s 37 hospitalizations a day. Women over 65 are

Fall…

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Call Jerry Jones Ph: 832-7922

• Fax: 832-7699

Your Local Business Professional Directory


Page A12 Friday, November 17, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Community

A

Beauty to surround brides

Tyler O’Hara, Defining Decor’s artisitic director, poses for a photograph with the company’s display at the Shuswap Bridal Fair on Sunday, Nov. 12.

together

Looking for a new or used vehicle? Check out the Salmon Arm Observer and the Shuswap Market News for great deals at our local car dealers.

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Don’t take a wrong turn

Pastors Major Carolyn Doonan Martin Ketteringham SUNDAY SERVICE 10:30 a.m. 191 - 2nd Ave. NE ~ 832-9196 Everyone Welcome!

Emmanuel Free Lutheran Church

171 Shuswap St., 250 832-2131 www.saobserver.net

Salmon Arm Elks Community Hall 3690 30th Street N.E.

Sunday Worship 11:00 a.m.

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250 832-6859

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Joyfully centered on the word of God and led by the Spirit.

Salmon Arm Mennonite Church 4590-10 Ave. SW Sunday Worship ............ 10:00 am Sunday School ................10-11 am Message ...................... 11-11:45 am Every 4th Sunday evening Hymn Singing 5:30-6:30 pm Every other Thursday Prayer Service & Bible Study 7:30-8:30 pm

New Life Outreach

Sunday Service: 10:30 a.m. Pastor Mel Janzen 250 675-3839 or 250 803-5247 4409 Trans Can. Hwy., Tappen www.newlifeoutreach.ca

Cornerstone Christian Reformed Church Pastor Clarence Witten

10:30 a.m. Worship

Nursery Care & Children’s Programs 1191 - 22nd Street NE

250 832-8452

like to advertise their services and 11:00 am Worship & Communion 10:00 am Classes for all Ages location, or special sa4Christ.com events happening at 250 833-0927 your church, please River of Life Community Church call The Salmon We meet at 490 - 5th Avenue SW

Pastor Reuben Pauls - 250 675-3636

Sunday Worship - 10 a.m. Sunday School - 10:45 a.m. (Nursery to age 12) 2405 Centennial Drive, Shuswap Lake Estates Lodge, downstairs

CHURCH ~ ELCIC

450 OKANAGAN AVE. 250 832-3860 www.firstunitedsalmonarm.ca

Rev. Jenny Carter Joanne Koster, Children & Youth ALL ARE WELCOME!

Living Waters Church

for advertising here.

DEO LUTHERAN

First United Church

Sunday Worship 10:30 a.m.

Arm Observer, 250-832-2131

THE SHUSWAP’S MULTI-SITE CHURCH

SALMON ARM

Saturday Night Service at 6:00 pm Sundays at 9:00 am & 10:45 am 3151 - 6th Ave. NE

10:30 AM • WORSHIP & SUNDAY SCHOOL deolutheran.org Pastor: Rev. Erik Bjorgan 1801 - 30th St. NE ~ 250 832-6160

Crossroads Free Methodist Church

Children’s Ministry & Childcare for all ages, all services

Shepherd of the Valley Lutheran Church (LCC)

HEALING & DELIVERANCE MINISTRY

10:30 am Sunday Worship

FRIDAY NIGHT PRAYER at 7 p.m.

Sundays at 10:30 am Parkview School, 605 Parksville St. Children’s Ministry for kids up to 12 yrs Weekly Ministries for all ages

250 832-8068 121 Shuswap Street SW

SORRENTO

St. John the Evangelist Anglican Church

Pastor James Baer 250 832-3615

SASCU Rec Center, Rm. 101 (west side) Phone for Information

250 675-3841 or 250 832-5908

Little Mountain Bible Chapel

3481 - 10th Ave. S.E. 250 803-0161 ~ Salmon Arm

Co-sponsor of Morning Star Bible Camp, Westbank, B.C.

Seventh-day Adventist Church Join us each Saturday ~ All ages

9:15 am - Sabbath School 10:45 am - Worship Service Wednesday Prayer and Bible Study - 7:00 pm

Anyone Welcome!

#180 Lakeshore Dr. NW Right behind Boston Pizza www.livingwaterschurch.ca

250 832-3433

St. Mary’s Anglican/ United Church 1188 Trans Canada Hwy., Sorrento Ph. 250-675-2294 www.stmarysorrento.ca Tuesday Eucharist 10 a.m.

saintmary@shaw.ca The Rev. Marcus Germaine SUNDAY WORSHIP - 10 am

3270 60th Avenue NE • 250 832-8936

Web: www.facebook.com/salmonsda Study Online: www.bibleinfo.com

10:30 a.m. Sunday Service

For the Whole Family!

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Church of Christ If your church would

WORSHIP SERVICE & CHILDREN’S PROGRAMS Sundays 10:30 a.m.

• Sunday ~ Worship & Remembrance - 9:30 a.m. • Family Bible Hour/Sunday School - 11 a.m. • Thursday ~ Prayer & Bible Study 7:00 p.m.

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plus weekly

SUNDAY WORSHIP 9 a.m. (St. Andrew’s Presbyterian) 1981 - 9th Ave. NE

Care Groups

SUNDAY SCHOOL 10:30 a.m. Ministry Center 4480 - 30th St. NE 250.833.5636

3160 - 10 Ave. SE, Salmon Arm 250 832-3121

for every age!

www.fivecornerschurch.ca

SICAMOUS

Sundays at 10:30 am Sorrento Memorial Hall, TCH Children’s Ministry for kids up to 12 yrs

Visit us at: aplacetobelong.ca Contact: 250 832-4004, email scc@aplacetobelong.ca

CATHOLIC CHURCHES Shuswap Lake Area Mass Time: SALMON ARM: St. Joseph’s 60 First Street SE Sat., 5 pm & Sun., 9 am SICAMOUS: Our Lady of Fatima Saturday at 2:30 pm BLIND BAY: Our Lady of the Lake 2385 Golf Course Drive Blind Bay Sunday, 11:15 am

Sunday Worship: 11:00 a.m. Rev. L. J. Dixon

10:00 a.m. Services Sundays & Thursdays 170 Shuswap Street SE, Salmon Arm

Tel: 250 832-2828

st.johnsalmonarm.tripod.com

St. Andrew’s Presbyterian T.C.Hwy. across from RCMP

Rev. Shirley Cochrane Worship service 11:00 am Email: standrews-salmonarm.com 250 832-7282

Broadview Evangelical Free Church Kenny Toews Student Ministries Pastor Rudy Evans - Children’s Ministries Pastor

Worship Service at 9:45 Nursery Care for ages 2 & under Sunday School for ages 3 - Gr. 5 350 - 30th Street NE 250 832-6366


Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

News

Friday, November 17, 2017 Page A13

Vernon

School districts tackle drug crisis

Naloxone kits to be made available in case of overdose. Parker Crook Black Press

The Vernon School District is taking a proactive approach to battling the opioid crisis. Rather than waiting for drug problems to develop, school counsellors, backed by the district, are tackling potential problems before they materialize through a new program. Preventure, a schoolbased preventative drug and alcohol program, aims to reduce drug and alcohol use in high-risk teenagers. “The starting point is prevention, then intervention,” said Doug Rogers, district substance abuse prevention counsellor. The Canadian-developed program screens Grade 8 students for four personality traits that are considered at risk: sensation-seeking, impulsiveness, anxiety sensitivity and hopelessness, as research indicates that up to 90 per cent of at risk youth can be identified from these traits. And, as these traits are prevalent in youth at a young age, it allows counsellors to reach at risk students earlier.

“This doesn’t start in high school, it starts much earlier than that,” Rogers said. “Let’s deal with it now.” Adolescents that are brought into the program attend two 90-minute workshops focused on educating and motivating youths to understand how their personality traits impact emotional and behavioural actions. “A trait isn’t a weakness,” Rogers said. “It’s who you are.” To demonstrate the potential of Preventure, director of instruction in student support services Truman Spring, alongside University of British Columbia Okanagan psychology professor Marvin Krank and lead for child and youth mental health and substance use of Interior Health Authority David Smith have invited minister of mental health and addictions Judy Darcy to see the program in action, as the Vernon School District is one of the first to implement the program. “We are one of the few districts in Canada that are actually doing that,” Spring said of the screening process.

“Our most at risk, those are the kids we really try to target. The key thing in the school district is prevention.” Preventure is the Vernon School District’s frontline to battling the opioid crisis; however, it is not their only defence. In all district high schools and alternate schools, naloxone kits are available should the need for their use arise. The district foot the bill for introducing the kits, and hold regular training seminars with school administrators and first aid. “Everybody said the same thing – it makes sense,” Rogers said. Naloxone kits are now recommended by officials to be available in all high schools across the province. With the same purpose of prevention and preparation, the North

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The Vernon School District has naloxone kits available in all high schools and alternate schools, and the North Okanagan-Shuswap School District is looking to bring kits in to select schools. Okanagan-Shuswap School District is looking at having naloxone available in select schools. “An assessment is being done at each school to determine what schools, sites and student population may be at risk,” said Alice Hucul, North Okanagan-Shuswap School District communications officer. “If it is determined to

be at risk, the school district will follow up with training to staff on how to use the naloxone kits.” Risk assessments are currently underway in the North Okanagan-Shuswap district, and a trained first aid professional will provide necessary training, with the district hoping to have everything in place by mid-December.

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Page A14 Friday, November 17, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Friday, November 17, 2017 Page A23

NOVEMBER 17 - 23 playing at THE GRAND 100 Hudson Avenue

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Capricorn, are your achievements isolating you from others? You may have to let someone else get some of the glory this week, if only to show your vulnerable and accommodating side.

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Aquarius

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Feb. 19-Mar. 20

PISCES

Mar. 21-Apr. 20

ARIES

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25. Type of scan 26. Atomic mass unit 29. Article 30. Incriminate 31. Passes by 32. Most nerve-inducing 35. David Alan Grier sitcom 36. Achieve 38. Freshwater fish 40. Beginner 41. Dark brown or black 42. A newlywed wears one 43. DiFranco and Vardanyan are two 44. Diego, Francisco, Anselmo 45. Ancient Egyptian King 46. Old name (abbr.) 47. Brazilian city (slang) PUZZLE NO. CW17B310

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CAPRICORN

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Pisces

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Gemini

June 22- July 22

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July 23-Aug. 23

Leo

Aug. 24-Sept. 22

Virgo

Sept. 23-Oct. 23

Libra

Oct. 24-Nov. 22

Scorpio

Nov. 23-Dec. 21

Sagittarius

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Pisces, your self-esteem can soar this week if you surround yourself with the right people. Fill your days with fun and many activities.

Taurus, your words and actions may not be matching up right now. This may be confusing to others. It may be better to just lead by example.

GEMINI Gemini, things have been moving along quite easily for you and you are enjoying the respite. Take all the deep breaths you can during this period of recovery.

CANCER Time has been passing quite rapidly, Cancer. You may be feeling like you aren’t quite catching up to the clock. As long as some work is getting finished, you are completely fine.

LEO

Leo, you are anxious to go on an adventure, but you simply can’t find time in your schedule. You may just have to make it happen by turning off your devices and heading out.

VIRGO

Virgo, even if you are sure that your perspective will win over the crowd, you have to accept there will be some who don’t agree with you. Be gracious and don’t step on any toes.

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Libra, although you might not realize it, someone is making a concerted effort to get to know you this week. Be open to new relationships and you may make a lifelong friend.

SCORPIO

Scorpio, you have worked hard and are now beginning to enjoy the fruits of your labor. Treat yourself to whatever you would like. Be proud of your efforts.

SAGITTARIUS

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www.saobserver.net

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Friday, November 17, 2017 Page A15


Page A16 Friday, November 17, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

News

www.saobserver.net

www.shuswaphospitalfoundation.org

Shuswap

One who served Veteran Charles McGrath participates in the March of the Colours in Sicamous’ Remembrance Day ceremony.

AUTO DETAILING & WINDOW TINTING

YOUR U LOCAL NEWS

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GIFT CERTIFICATES make a great gift! • Detailing • Window Tinting • Xpel Paint Protection 410 - 5th Street SW

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Newspaper offers free service for non-profits Barb Brouwer Salmon Arm Observer

The Salmon Arm Observer will be publishing a Guide to Giving at the end of November. Any non-profit group who would like to appear in the guide should send an email to news-

room@saobserver.net, outlining what they donations they need. Send an outline of your organization explaining what it does, why it’s needed, who it serves and then outline what is needed. As well, list contact information

or a location for donations. Keep information as brief as possible, with a maximum of 200 words. For more information, call Observer editor Tracy Hughes at 250-832-2131.

DO YOU KNOW WHAT YOUR DONATION LOOKS LIKE?

Confidence Alasdair, who suddenly lost his job and couldn’t afford food, visited a United Way drop-in meal program. Thanks to people like you, he has a new job and is volunteering in the same kitchen that helped him turn his life around.

Please give generously. Visit unitedwaycso.com/alasdair

Letters to Santa DEADLINE: DECEMBER 13, 2017

l a n i g i r O ork is . artwreciated app MAIL LETTERS TO: Box 550, Salmon Arm, BC V1E 4N7 or drop off your letters at the Salmon Arm Observer 171 Shuswap St. NW or email: santa@saobserver.net


www.saobserver.net

Viewpoint

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Friday, November 17, 2017 Page A17

A great way to start your day!

Stories from out of this world FRIENDS & NEIGHBOURS

171 Shuswap St.

250.832.2131

DISTRIBUTION & PRINTING

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Leah Blain The theatre room at Lakeside Manor is full to capacity and then some. There is great excitement because Bruce Aikenhead is the guest speaker. Bruce is there at the invitation of his good friend, Bill Sim. Bruce has a binder full of information and pictures. These pages that fill his personal ‘scrapbook’ are also chronicles of Canadian history. He worked on the Avro Arrow program; after going south and working for NASA he came back to Canada and worked on the Canadarm, he helped train Canada’s original seven astronauts and eventually became director general of the Canadian Space Agency astronaut program. “I don’t know if anyone remembers seeing a Zeppelin in the old days,” he says. “There was a great deal of excitement about this huge thing flying around the world. We made our way down to the waterfront, in Windsor, Ont. A small group of people were waiting, then low and behold it came. Some people were on board and they were looking down and waving at us and we were waving at them. And that was my first introduction to a big flying machine. That’s my start in aviation.” By the age of 12 he was biking to the airport to study airplanes. In high school he learned the Morse

D

Code. In 1941, Bruce was still in high school but the government offered students a graduation certificate early if their grades were good and if they planned to go into the forces, work in a factory, or learn a trade. Bruce took a radio servicing course then went off to join the air force. Because of his background they suggested he join the British Royal Air Force and he soon found himself in England. After serving time there, he and other Canadians were given another assignment. “We asked, ‘What are we doing?’ and they said, ‘Just wait.’ We set sail but no one told us where we were going.” The destination was India, where he was stationed for two years. After the war he took math and physics at the University of Waterloo. He married and when he graduated in 1950 he had no trouble finding a job. He was designing and manufacturing radios and TVs but he was offered a more exciting job at Canadian Aviation Electronics. “They were building and designing a most remarkable airplane and they were looking for people…” says Bruce and his talk is interrupted by clapping. He smiles. “It was designed to be able to fly over the North Pole and intercept the Russians. We had to be able to intercept them and shoot

Look to the classifieds for all of the resources you need to fulfill your career goals. Whether you’re out of work or looking to advance or change jobs altogether, the classifieds will steer you in the right direction.

Bill Sim (left) and Bruce Aikenhead at a special presentation regarding Aikenhead’s career in aviation and with the space program. them down.” Everyone in the room, of course, knows the story of the Avro Arrow, the cutting-edge of aerospace technology at the time, that was scrapped by the Diefenbaker government in 1959. “That was the end of them,” Bruce says, “It resulted in 10,000 layoffs - such a ripple effect.” Bruce and many others were quickly snapped up by NASA. “I was introduced to the man who was in charge of training the pilots. The pilots had a funny name – astronauts. I was helping my new boss design the apparatus and techniques to train these pilots.” When NASA wanted their engineers to move to Texas, Bruce and his wife decided they would rather move back to Canada. He worked on the Can-

adarm and eventually became the director general of the Canadian astronaut program. When Bruce retired in 1993, he moved to B.C. where his wife, dog, and cat were waiting. He got involved in creating the Okanagan Science Centre in Vernon, which is where he met his friend, Bill. “My first big job was to design a planetarium. We painted it to look like a starship. This is my artwork,” he says showing a picture. “We volunteered there for 10 years, right Bill?” He mentions receiving the Order of Canada medal in 1997 and he is interrupted by clapping. As the residents file out of the theatre one lady turns to her friend and says, “That was really interesting wasn’t it?” Her friend nods and smiles by reply.

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Page A18 Friday, November 17, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

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Page A18 Friday, November 17, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

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Arts & Events

Page A20 Friday, November 17, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Season rolls in on hayride

www.saobserver.net

A great way to start your day!

171 Shuswap St.

250.832.2131

Barb Brouwer Salmon Arm Observer

The Louisiana Hayride crew is rolling into Salmon Arm, this time with a festive twist. All the favourite characters will be back with some of the well-loved songs from the original Louisiana Hayride, a radio and later television country music show broadcast from the Shreveport Municipal Memorial Auditorium that, during its heyday from 1948 to 1960, helped the careers of some of the greatest names in American country and western music. Hear Patsy Cline, Roy Orbison, Loretta Lynn and “newcomer” Garth Brooks in the special Louisiana Hayride Christmas Show on Monday, Nov. 27. Popular DJ Patrick Ryley will appear with his familiar portrayal of Hank Williams and will also sing Irving Berlin’s White Christmas, which was written in 1942 and has been a well-loved Christmas tradition ever since.

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with his Friends in Low Places. Gil Risling adds Roy Orbison and a Christmas number to the mix. “Gil has had vocal training and he will show his full range and how he can really sing when he performs Hark the Herald Angels Sing.” Rounding out the regular cast are fan favourites William Brookfield on keyboards and guitar and Mike Melnichuk. Talented Sony record-

ing artist Jesse Mast will open the show, appearing with band mate and accomplished bass player Jake McIntyre-Paul. “I was really super excited about hearing Jesse at the fall fair,” says Risling, noting Mast will join the cast for the entire tour. The show takes place at 7 p.m. Monday, Nov. 27 at the Salmar Classic Theatre. Tickets at $45 are available at Touch ‘a Texas, Wearabouts and online at ticketseller.ca.

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n every body - collagen is the primary ‘structural protein.’ However, due to its importance for your skin it is also referred to as the ‘beauty protein’. In youthful skin collagen is abundant making up 75% of the dermis (the dermis is the layer of tissue below your skin). It contains your capillaries, nerve endings, sweat glands, and hair follicles, and is responsible for giving your skin it’s structure, firmness, and elasticity. Believe it or not, your collagen starts to decline by the age of 20. By 60, your collagen production is reduced by 80%! Age-related decline in collagen production is met with yet another problem. Collagen is constantly under attack by free radicals which damage and weaken the collagen matrix.

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Jim Elliott/SalmoN arm obSErvEr

Lori Risling, Patrick Ryley and Gil Risling are ready to roll with the Louisiana Hayride Christmas Show, which takes place Monday, Nov. 27 at the Salmar Classic Theatre. “It’s ranked as the number-one Christmas song,” says hayride creator and director Lori Risling. Andrea Anderson’s familiar characters, Patsy Cline and Loretta Lynn will perform Hayride favourites and Anderson will also lend her beautiful voice to the powerful How Great Thou Art. From Battleford, Sk. and new to the Christmas show, Troy Wakelin will bring Garth Brooks

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Arts & Events

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Friday, November 17, 2017 Page A21

Artists explore ways Canadians embrace winter Barb Brouwer Salmon Arm Observer

Salmon Arm Art Gallery presents True North, the final exhibition of the Canada 150 year, a juried show on the theme of winter. “Canadians are proud of their embrace of winter – from the joys of tobogganing and skiing, to the stories of snowplows burying their cars,” says gallery curator Tracey Kutschker.

“How we approach winter can be likened to how we approach life itself; with determination, resilience, and a sense of humour.” This exhibition allows visual artists to tell their winter stories through colour and form in a multitude of media. It opens at 7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 17, with live music and refreshments. The show continues until Dec. 16.

Coffee Break and Artist Talk is on Thursday, Dec.14 at 2 p.m. Gallery hours are Tuesday to Saturday, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is by donation. The gallery once again offers the Elves’ Workshop from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 9, featuring four creation stations with the elves helping families make Christmas-themed art projects.

The last Trader Tuesday of the year takes place from 3 to 4 p.m. on Dec. 12, for people of all ages to make and exchange artist trading cards. On Dec. 16, the final afternoon of the True North exhibition, the arts council invites visitors to join gallery staff in a cup of hot chocolate to toast the end of the Canada 150 year.

Photo coNtributed

Maryanne Jespersen’s “Shuswap Gold” is one of the entries in the Salmon Arm Art Gallery’s juried exhibition, which opens with a 7 p.m. reception Friday, Nov. 17.

Bluegrass pros play house concert Barb Brouwer Salmon Arm Observer

Fans of bluegrass music are in for a treat next month as four award-winning artists will perform in a house concert on Dec. 3 in Salmon Arm. Greg Blake, K.C. Groves, Isaac Callender and Craig Korth are accomplished musicians and vocalists. West Virginia native Greg Blake provides powerful bluegrass vocals steeped in country heritage, bringing a truly authentic sound developed from a lifetime of singing bluegrass, gospel, and country. Blake has twice been nominated for the Society for the Preservation of Bluegrass Music of America’s (SPBGMA) Traditional Male Vocalist of the Year award, and his phenomenal bluegrass guitar playing has earned him nine nominations and an amazing five consecutive wins as SPBGMA’s Guitarist of the Year. He currently is vocal/ guitarist in the high energy five-piece bluegrass band Jeff Scoggins & Colorado. K.C. Groves is an accomplished instrumentalist (mandolin, guitar, bass), vocalist and songwriter, who has been at the heart

of many celebrated projects. He has been the creative centre and bandleader of Uncle Earl for over a decade. In addition to Uncle Earl, Groves has released two solo albums of original material, and was a Telluride Troubadour contest finalist and a Detroit Music Award winner. She has teamed up with countless notable musicians, including old-time musician and craftsman Riley Baugus and Leftover Salmon’s Vince Herman. A grand master fiddler, Isaac Callender has toured with Jeff Scroggins and Colorado and teaches, writes and performs with various other groups. Banjo meister Craig Korth is one of Canada’s finest bluegrass musicians. If he’s not up on stage with a banjo in his hand, he’s in his workshop building guitars, teaching banjo or guitar. He is also –(together with his wife Julie) director of the famous NimbleFingers & OldTime Music Workshop & Festival. See more at www. craigkorth.com. Seating will be limited. To purchase tickets at $20, call Bruce Cook at 250-833-6486.

WINTER DRIVING Slow down and drive according to winter conditions

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Page A22 Friday, November 17, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Community

Shop Local • Hire Local • Support our community!

Thank You Warm hands

Interest in outdoor school FilE photo

An outdoor education program is being considered for the former South Canoe School. but indicate a strong desire from parents to participate. Like the French Immersion program already available in the school district, transportation to and from the outdoor school would be the responsibility of parents. The school district

to all who donated to or sponsored the

Jim Elliot/SalmoN arm obSErvEr

Barbara Alexander and Lani Cooke try on gloves at the Grandmothers to Grandmothers knitting show and sale in Piccadilly Mall.

An initiative to bring an Outdoor Learning School to the North Okanagan-Shuswap School District appears to have strong support from parents. School District #83 indicated they received 1,003 parent responses to a survey, with 522 expressing interest in enrolling their child in an outdoor learning school at South Canoe. A recent parent information night had over 125 people in attendance and we have over 90 intent to register forms completed. These forms are non-binding,

www.saobserver.net

says it will continue to research policies and the feasibility in terms of costs. The issue is planned to return to the school district at the December 19 regular board meeting, which will take place at 6 p.m at the District Education Support Centre in Salmon Arm.

SA Chevrolet Buick GMC Ltd. First Klass Transmission & Auto Care Blackburn Excavating Ltd. Club Shusewap Golf & RV Tappen Co-op Eric’s Automotive Salmon Arm Recreation Centre Pure Flowers Floor Store Canoe Beach Paddle Board Rental The Boathouse Restaurant Private donor - aka Jen Canoe Creek Golf Course Buckerfields Ltd. Bob Burechailo Alyssa Blair IC Urethane Products Inc. Big Rock Urban Brewery Urban Market Pinz Tattoo Nico’s Nurseryland Ltd. Byrill Kurtz Dave Peel Designs ProActive Fitness Health & Wellness A-Finnity Comfort Solutions Jacobson Ford Sales

Mabel Lake Golf Course Home Hardware Stores Ltd. Centerpoint Automotive D. C. Quinn Munro’s Sorrento Prescriptions Canada Nufloors Group Inc. Vernon Office CCS Lana Boulanger Body Waves Esthetics Neptune Pools & Spas Ovino Winery Roots & Blues Lakeside Bowling Centre Chadalin Medi-Spa Ltd. Victorian Impression Bedding Lace & Lingerie Sunnybrae Vineyards & Winery Shuswap Film Society Askew’s Foods DeMille’s Salmon Arm Curling Club Salmon Arm Observer Finz Bar & Grill Shuswap Lake Estates Golf & Country Club Masonic Lodge Elks Royal Purple

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Page A14 Friday, November 17, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

Friday, November 17, 2017 Page A23

NOVEMBER 17 - 23 playing at THE GRAND 100 Hudson Avenue

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CROSSWORD

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1. Holds candles THOR: RAGNAROK 7. In possession of Nightly 6:45PM 2D & 9:10PM 3D 10. Rodents Sat - Sun Matinees 2:00PM 2D 12. Type of cofactor (Brit. DADDY'S HOME 2 sp.) Nightly 6:50PM & 9:00PM 13. Hard candy on a stick Sat - Sun Matinees 2:10PM 14. Animal of the weasel playing at THE C LASSIC 360 Alexander Street family 15. Things that should not BANFF FILM FESTIVAL be overlooked November 18th & 19th 16. “Silence” author MET Opera THE 17. Dried, split lentils EXTERMINATING A BAD MOMS 18. People native to Ghana ANGEL, Nov. 18th, 9:55AM CHRISTMAS 19. Barros and Gasteyer Fri, & Mon - Thurs 7:30PM are two 21. British thermal unit 22. Large oblong hall 27. Ethnic group in Asia 28. Holiday decoration 33. Milliliter 34. Open 36. Health physics concept (abbr.) 37. Tantric meditation Shuswap Community Foundation, in partnership with the City of Salmon Arm, provides a permanent place golf for your 38. Where games memorable moments at the McGuire Lake Memorial begin Walkway. Birth swine swap Community Foundation, in partnership Purchase a brick onwith thethe Memorial39. Walkway to of Salmon Arm, provides a permanent place for your 40. Rip able moments at the McGuire Lake Memorial Walkway.  Shuswap Welcome a child thethe Recognize a volunteer 41. Remove with ShuswapCommunity CommunityFoundation, Foundation,ininpartnership partnership with City of Salmon Arm, provides a permanent place for your Purchase abrick on the Memorial Walkway to City of Salmon Arm, provides a permanent place for your Congratulate a McGuire grad Walkway. Thank44. anPuts employee together in time memorable Lake Walkway. memorable moments momentsatatthe theMcGuire LakeMemorial Memorial lcome a child  Recognize a volunteer Rotary engines  Remember aononbeloved  Mark45. a business milestone Purchaseaabrick brick theMemorial MemorialWalkway Walkway Purchase the toto ngratulate a  grad  Thank an employee 48. Skeletal  Welcome Welcome a child  Recognize a volunteer Celebrate  Commemorate anstructure event a child an anniversary  Recognize a volunteer member a beloved  Mark abusiness milestone Congratulateaagrad grad Thank Thankananemployee employee  Congratulate 49. Member of a labor Rememberaabeloved beloved Marka abusiness business milestone ebrate an anniversary deductible Commemorate an event  Remember Mark milestone With a tax donation of $1,500, this permanent gesture organization Celebrate an anniversary Commemorate an event  Celebrate anaanniversary Commemorate an event ones and special moments. creates lasting legacy for your loved 50. Japanese classical h a tax deductibleWith donation of $1,500, this permanent gesture a tax deductible donation of $1,500, this permanent gesture With a tax deductible donation of $1,500, thisand permanent gesture tes a lasting legacy for loved ones and special moments. creates ayour lasting legacy for your loved ones special moments. theater www.shuswapfoundation.ca creates a lasting legacy for your loved ones and special moments. www.shuswapfoundation.ca www.shuswapfoundation.ca 51. Undergarments Office: 250-832-5428 info@shuswapfoundation.ca www.shuswapfoundation.ca Office: 250-832-5428 info@shuswapfoundation.ca

Dec. 22-Jan. 20

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Capricorn, are your achievements isolating you from others? You may have to let someone else get some of the glory this week, if only to show your vulnerable and accommodating side.

Jan. 21-Feb. 18

AQUARIUS

Aquarius

Do not avoid others to escape conflict, Aquarius; otherwise, you are only delaying the inevitable. Speak your mind and address the situation with tact and professionalism.

Feb. 19-Mar. 20

PISCES

Mar. 21-Apr. 20

ARIES

Aries

Aries, you may be tempted to tie up loose ends this week, but there is a lot to finish so expect things to take longer than you hoped. Focus only on one project at a time.

Apr. 21-May 21

TAURUS

Taurus

CLUES DOWN

1. “Snake Tales” cartoonist 2. Religious group 3. Singer Redding 4. __ and tuck 5. Head honcho 6. Second sight 7. Composer 8. About aviation 9. Senior officer 10. Forecasts weather 11. Seasoned Hungarian soup 12. Town in Hesse, Germany 14. Thought to derive from meteorites 17. Hit lightly 18. Seemingly bottomless chasm 20. Title of respect 23. Warms up 24. Man and Wight are two

25. Type of scan 26. Atomic mass unit 29. Article 30. Incriminate 31. Passes by 32. Most nerve-inducing 35. David Alan Grier sitcom 36. Achieve 38. Freshwater fish 40. Beginner 41. Dark brown or black 42. A newlywed wears one 43. DiFranco and Vardanyan are two 44. Diego, Francisco, Anselmo 45. Ancient Egyptian King 46. Old name (abbr.) 47. Brazilian city (slang) PUZZLE NO. CW17B310

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CAPRICORN

Capricorn

Pisces

May 22-June 21

Gemini

June 22- July 22

Cancer

July 23-Aug. 23

Leo

Aug. 24-Sept. 22

Virgo

Sept. 23-Oct. 23

Libra

Oct. 24-Nov. 22

Scorpio

Nov. 23-Dec. 21

Sagittarius

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Pisces, your self-esteem can soar this week if you surround yourself with the right people. Fill your days with fun and many activities.

Taurus, your words and actions may not be matching up right now. This may be confusing to others. It may be better to just lead by example.

GEMINI Gemini, things have been moving along quite easily for you and you are enjoying the respite. Take all the deep breaths you can during this period of recovery.

CANCER Time has been passing quite rapidly, Cancer. You may be feeling like you aren’t quite catching up to the clock. As long as some work is getting finished, you are completely fine.

LEO

Leo, you are anxious to go on an adventure, but you simply can’t find time in your schedule. You may just have to make it happen by turning off your devices and heading out.

VIRGO

Virgo, even if you are sure that your perspective will win over the crowd, you have to accept there will be some who don’t agree with you. Be gracious and don’t step on any toes.

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SUDOKU

LIBRA

Libra, although you might not realize it, someone is making a concerted effort to get to know you this week. Be open to new relationships and you may make a lifelong friend.

SCORPIO

Scorpio, you have worked hard and are now beginning to enjoy the fruits of your labor. Treat yourself to whatever you would like. Be proud of your efforts.

SAGITTARIUS

Conversations with others should be kept light and easy this week to avoid any drama, Sagittarius. Delving deeper into others’ lives is the furthest thing from your mind.

WS17B300

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Page A24 Friday, November 17, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

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Chase

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

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HAVE YOUR

Fire destroys Chase house Jim Elliot Salmon Arm Observer

Submit your photos of events in the Chase area to shuswapmarket@saobserver.net for publication in the Shuswap Market News. Please include a brief description of the event and the names of anyone featured in the picture. Photos published as space allows and based on timeliness of picture.

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CHASE

Rick koch photo

A house fire broke out around 5:05 p.m. at 1203 Thompson Ave. in Chase on Friday, Nov. 10.

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Little is left standing of the home which burned down Friday night in Chase.

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Chase Fire and Rescue crews worked hard to save neighbouring structures after a house fire broke out on Thompson Avenue on Nov. 10. Firefighters were called to the house at 1203 Thompson Ave. in Chase just after 5 p.m. and found the single-family home already fully engulfed in flames. “Once we got on scene it was defensive only to protect the exposure. There was limited damage to the house next door and some vehicle damage,” said Chase Fire Chief Brian Lauzon. Firefighters were on scene battling the blaze until approximately midnight and some were on standby overnight to ensure it did not flare up again. There were no injuries reported as a result of the fire. The house that burned is a total loss and there was also minor damage to a neighbouring house as well as a truck parked in its car port. Lauzon said the fire burned the house so badly there probably won’t be enough evidence left to determine the cause of the fire. The structure is too dangerous and unstable to enter it and investigate.

Friday, November 17, 2017 Page A25

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Page A26 Friday, November 17, 2017

Chase

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

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A tale of two Shuswap towns By Scott Koch Observer contributor

A blast of Heat passed through the Thompson-Shuswap during the cold snap from Tuesday the 7th to Saturday the 11th. The kids from the local junior shinny squad created the unique weather phenomenon. The rough and tumble lads of the Kamloops Storm came to the Art Holding Memorial Arena midweek and attempted to disrupt the Heat front. The Chase side popped in a pair, the first from Kolten Moore assisted by Josh Bourne and Jayce Schweizer. Moore was money in the bank from there on in for the three games in the hot streak. The big fellow Zachary Fournier got the second counter from Gavin Mattey and Schweizer. The Loops lads got a pair back from the infamous Curtis Magas to tie up the match. Magas would end his game early, getting three goals and a nine-game suspension for his extracurricular activities. Moore from Kaden Black and Cory Loring ensured the first ended 3-2 for Chase. In the second, Kamloops notched it at 3-3. In the third, it was rookie Gavin Mattey from Fournier and Evan Hughes, followed by Pat Brady with an empty net tally from Grady Musgrave and Fournier, which put a bow on a 5-3 win. Dependable and

consistent rear guard Cam Watson has been lost to the team for 10 weeks, due to a broken leg and ligament damage received in a fracas with the goaltender running Magas. Mathew Ens in goal, played with maturity and resolve in fending off the invaders. Game 2 saw the Heat in Sicamous on Friday the 10th versus the Eagles. Chase scored three in the first, four in the second and four in the third to earn a lopsided 11-2 road win. In the first, it was Fournier from Brady and Hughes, followed by Colten Nikiforuk from Black and Fournier. The third goal came from Moore assisted by Bourne. In the second it was Moore again from Brady and Ryan Okino, Bourne from Loring and Moore, Brady on the man advantage from Bourne and Loring, and then Bourne from Moore and Loring. In the third period, it was Loring from Grady Musgrave and Moore, Bourne again from Jackson Marshall and Brayden Haskell, and Okino from Nikiforuk and Musgrave. The Eagles then popped a pair to stymie a shutout. Ens defended his end of the business, stopping 34 of 36 in goal for the win. The line of Moore ( two goals, four assists, six points), Bourne (3-3-6) and Loring (1-3-4) com-

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Rick koch photo.

Chase Heat goalie Billy Cawthorn lunges out with his stick to knock the puck away, keeping the heat up 1-0 after two periods. Cawthorn would later complete the shutout as Chase knocked off the Sicamous Eagles by a final score of 4-0. bined for 16 points. Game 3 was back in Chase against the Eagles on Saturday the 11th, Remembrance Day. Bourne from Brady in the first was the only scoring until midway through the third period. Moore got the next one from Brady and Loring, then Loring lasered a goal from Moore and Okino. The third goal of the final stanza came off the twisted twig of Bourne into an empty net, helped by Loring and Schweizer. Billy Cawthorn earned a shutout in a 4-0 win, stopping 21 Eagle attempts. Ice chips: Remembrance Day was recognized with the team participating in the parade and service, followed by an opening game ceremony including a Legion piper and colour party. The Heat presented the Legion Branch 107 with a camouflage jersey with

the number 107 on the back in an emotional moment. Seven Heat players are in the top 50 in the KIJHL, led by Josh Bourne who is tops in the entire league. The seven include Bourne (1), Moore (14), Fournier (15),

Black (22), Brady (29), Loring (30) and Okino (47). Next up on Friday the 17th are the Summerland Steam who lead the Okanagan Division. This game will have a playoff feel to it as Chase is tops in the Doug Birks Division.

Chase Contacts Please use the following information when submitting your editorial and advertising requests:

Editorial Submissions:

Email: shuswapmarket@saobserver.net Fax: 250-832-5140

Classified Advertisements:

Email: classifieds@saobserver.net Fax: 250-832-5140 Ph: 250-832-2131

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Contact ~ Penny Brown Ph: 250-832-2131 Email: pennyjb@saobserver.net Fax: 250-832-5140

I N P CHATTER at Village Lanes Fun Centre by Calyn Buresh

Hey Everyone! We had a wonderful week as per usual here at Village Lanes! This past Sunday a group of our Youth Bowlers travelled to Falcon Lanes in Kamloops for the first Travel Tournament of the year! Although our young bowlers didn’t medal at this event, they had a lot of fun! It was Danica Morley and Logan Natrall’s first ever tournament, and they did an amazing job! I want to take the time to thank these kids for being on their best behaviour (especially when I’m not there to harp on them!) their coach had nothing but great things to say about them! So, thanks guys! Some local bowling news from this past week! Ali Maki threw a monster 325 single on Monday night – showing us gals, AND guys how it’s really done! Violet Nancekivell had another amazing game on Wednesday afternoon. After bowling a 300 last week, she followed it up with a 298 this week! Well done Vi! Beryl Murrell also bowled a 247 on Wednesday! On our Thursday Club 55 league, Helen Beauchamp bowled a 253 game, while Rod Wolney had a 264! Great bowling this week everybody! Don’t forget – if you haven’t already – The Village Lanes Bowling Club has raffle tickets for sale at the bowling centre. Tickets are $10.00 each with the chance to win $2000.00 cash! Make sure to stop in and get your tickets! We also have our Ladies Sip and Shop event happening on November 25th! Tickets are available at Village Lanes and proceeds go to the Chase Hamper Society Toy Store! We hope you all have a wonderful week, and look forward to bringing you the latest news next Friday! Cheers!

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Chase

Friday, November 17, 2017 Page A27

Police opposed to one TCH access Chase RCMP are not pleased with plans for the Trans-Canada Highway past Chase. The Ministry of Transportation has announced plans to widen approximately 12 kilometres of highway from Hoffman’s Bluff to Jade Mountain. While the ministry has said it will be installing a median barrier and improving

access to Chase, Sgt. Gary Heebner does not agree in an Oct. 25 letter he wrote to the mayor of Chase, Rick Berrigan. He said he attended a meeting of Chase council on Oct. 24 during which a possible Brooke Drive access was discussed, but it would be at the cost of eliminating all three access points.

“It is inconceivable from an emergency response perspective to only have one access to Highway 1…,” Heebner wrote. In a public emergency such as a wildfire, he said a choke point would be created with the public trying to get out and public safety officials trying to get in. With the village bisected by the CPR’s

main line, he said in the event of a derailment and leak of chemicals, one exit would not be enough. Heebner also pointed to police pursuits of suspects, where occasionally it’s necessary to block off one exit. He said having just one access would make it difficult for police, as well as fire and ambulance, to have quick access to

the highway. Meanwhile, the ministry is inviting the public to an open house on Wednesday, Nov. 22, from 3 to 7 p.m., at the Chase Community Hall. Ministry staff will be on hand to provide information and answer questions. The ministry states that input gathered will be used to further refine the project’s design.

Antoine elected chair of TOTA The new chair of the Thompson Okanagan Tourism Association is well-known at the Quaaout Lodge. Frank Antoine, cultural coordinator for the lodge, was elected chair at the association’s annual general

meeting on Nov. 2. Antoine has served as a director on the board for the past two years, the only Chase-area director. Other members of the board come from towns including Kamloops, Kelowna, Big

White, Vernon, Penticton and Osoyoos. At the gathering in Kamloops on Nov. 1 and 2, association directors were joined by tourism stakeholders, industry leaders and presenters. Sustainability was a

key theme, and TOTA was the recipient of the Biosphere Destination accreditation as a Sustainable Tourism Destination, the first in the Americas to do so, states a news release from the association.

Frank Antoine Quaaout Lodge

What’s On in Chase Bidding for Murder, Murder Mystery Dinner Theatre, Nov. 17,18,19 at the Quaaout Lodge. Tickets available at 1-800-663-4303, email info@quaaoutlodge. com. Free Flu Clinics, Chase flu clinic, to book private/family appointment, call for a pneumococcal shot at 250-679-1393, Chase Community Hall, 547 Shuswap Ave. The Fab Fourever with special guest Ready Steady Go on Nov. 25, silent auction, British-themed buffet dinner and entertainment presented by the Little Shuswap Lake Indian Band. Third annual fundraiser for the Sk’wlax Volunteer Fire Department, call 1-800-

663-4303 or email info@quaaoutlodge. com. Stick Curling Bonspiel will be held at the Chase Curling Club, Nov. 27, $30 per person including lunch. For more information, call Blaine at 250-679-4424. 2nd Annual Christmas Gala & Business Excellence Awards put on by the Chase and District Chamber of Commerce, Dec. 9 at the Chase Community Hall. Register and pay at the Chamber office or through PayPal via the Chamber website. RSVP by Nov. 22, call 250-6798432 Pancake Breakfast at the Chase Curling Club on Sunday, Dec. 10, 9 to 11 a.m., $7 a person, kids eat for less.

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orders kept increasing and the old mill could not keep up with the increase of large oversized timber and beams. In 1990, Kim’s father (Merv Siegrist) and mother Anne moved to Sicamous to become partners. Alan and Merv bought a new mill large enough to fill the orders of the beams and timbers that the old saw mill could not handle. The next generation has now joined the business. Alan and his son Tyler work the mill together making a great father/son team. Our team at Hyde Sawmill takes great pride in their workmanship and in supplying a superior product to customers.

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Page A28 Friday, November 17, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Your Health &

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Wellness

INFORMATION DESIGNED TO PROMOTE AND ENHANCE YOUR WELLBEING

Successful fitness routines Family chiropractic Dr. Warren Gage Many times in my career I have seen people increase their activity and start a fitness program only to later on fail to reach their health goals. This week I would like to outline a few possible issues with exercise routines that may be preventing you from reaching your desired goals. A very common issue I see is when people only incorporate walking as the main fitness activity. Don’t get me wrong, walking on a daily basis is known to have some general ben-

efits to health. In fact, brisk walking regularly is known to reduce your chances of dying from anything (all-cause-mortality) by 10%. Walking does not however, provide the dramatic health benefits that other forms of exercise provide such as strength development, increased metabolism and efficient fat loss. So, for best effects, start an exercise routine with brisk walking as a foundation, but also incorporate other physical activities. Strength training is an extremely important

part of an effective exercise routine. So much so, I would contend that proper (and varied) types of strength training is the key to achieving one’s exercise goals. An important part of strength training is that it must progress and change with your abilities. The best thing to do is to enlist a professional to ensure you start easy, but then gradually increase the intensity and change the routine so your body doesn’t plateau and continues to progress. Successful exercise programs cannot be discussed without addressing nutrition. It is now understood that reducing calories is not an effective way to improve health. In fact the most important part of

fitness nutrition is ensuring your are eating both the proper amount and types of foods – in other words, you need adequate proteins and sufficient amounts of good-fats. Your body requires the right nutrients to function properly. Reduced calorie dieting does not work because your body is designed to store fat when it is in survival mode due to a lack of proper nutrients. The final key to a successful training program is you must exercise with high intensity and must progress (increase) resistance in your training. Simply doing the same exercises every time you go to the gym will limit your gains. Research is showing higher intensity and consistently pushing

your body to work harder is the key to success. Obviously, this requires some caution and this is a gradual process. Lifting and exercising to your maximum from the start can set you up for injuries; it is recommended to have someone help ensure you are doing it safely and correctly. Chiropractic is also an important piece of the fitness puzzle. Regular Chiropractic care will help ensure the spine and nervous system are functioning optimally. This will maximize gains while minimizing injuries. Dr. Warren Gage is a family wellness Chiropractor who can be reached at Harbourfront Family Chiropractic at (250) 803-0224.

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Annual General Meeting of the

Seniors’ Resource Centre 320A - 2nd Ave. NE Salmon Arm (Under Dr. G. Chu’s dental office building and, beside City Hall and splash park)

Monday, November 20, 2017 at 1:00 p.m. Meeting followed by Sonnyside Bluegrass Band musical entertainment. Refreshments and Door Prizes.

Benefits of yoga in your exercise routine Yoga continues to grow in popularity. In a questionnaire administered every five years as part of the National Health Interview Survey, the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health and the National Center of Health Statistics found that the number of people practicing yoga increased dramatically between 2002 and 2012, when approximately 21 million adults acknowledged practicing yoga. That figure equated to nearly double the number of people who practiced yoga just 10 years earlier. The almost meteoric rise in popularity of yoga can likely be traced to many factors, including a growing awareness among the general public regarding the impact a healthy lifestyle can have on both short- and long-term health. An essential component of a healthy lifestyle involves taking steps to protect our bodies, and that can

include making an effort to reduce the aches and pains that are often associated with aging. “The relaxation techniques incorporated in yoga can lessen chronic pain, such as lower back pain, arthritis, headaches and carpal tunnel syndrome,” explained Natalie Nevins, DO, a board-certified osteopathic family physician and certified Kundalini Yoga instructor. The American Osteopathic Association notes the benefits of yoga extend even further than relieving chronic pain. According to the AOA, yoga can help men, women and even children increase their flexibility as well as help them build stronger, more toned muscles. Additional benefits of yoga include weight reduction, improved cardiovascular and circulatory health and improved energy and vitality. But the benefits of yoga extend beyond

the physical to the mental. The American Psychological Association notes that several studies have shown that yoga can help strengthen social attachments, reduce stress and relieve anxiety, depression and insomnia. For example, a 2012 study from researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles, found that a particular type of yoga that included brief, daily meditation reduced the stress levels of caregivers tasked with caring for people suffering from Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. One of the more at-

tractive aspects of yoga is that it requires little or no financial commitment on the part of the people who practice it. Unlike fitness centers that typically require members to commit to yearly contracts or even potentially costly month-to-month memberships, many yoga studies do not require long-term commitments, instead asking that customers pay a small amount each time they visit if they are hesitant to commit to memberships. In addition, yoga requires just a mat and some appropriate clothing,

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ideally clothing that’s conducive to flexibility but not so loose that it will prevent you from performing certain poses. Before including yoga in your exercise regimen, speak with your physician. Once you get the green light, look for a beginner’s course, explaining to your instructor that you are just starting out. Many yoga studios offer introductory classes that help men and women acclimate their bodies to yoga and the various poses it entails before moving on to more challenging poses.

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Remembering Loved Ones Perhaps they are not stars in the sky, but rather openings where our loved ones shine down to let us know they are happy.

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• become a member • become a volunteer • make a donation • leave a bequest #4-781 Marine Park Drive

WILLIAM “BILL” FRANK BERRY November 19, 1946 - November 9, 2017 Bill passed away peacefully with family by his side after fighting a strong and courageous battle with cancer. He is predeceased by; his dad Frank, mom Margaret (Eric, Mike) and sister Val (survived by Roger). He is survived by his loving wife Glenna, daughters Shelley, Kari, and son Mitch (Terra), Brothers Fred (Beth), George (Deanna) and numerous nieces and nephews who will all lovingly cherish his memory. Bill and Glenna met through a radio station dating line and made an instant connection. They shared a life together for 19 years and enjoyed many special moments and making memories. They loved road trips together, often holding hands along the drive and enjoying the beauty of BC. Bill and Glenna retired to Chase in 2013 where their adventures continued. Bill and his sidekick Jody (dog) and close friend Paul would often travel the back roads. Loved ones were important to Bill and he was happy to host Barbeques for them, he was known for his oversized “Bill sized” portions of dessert. Bill was a hardworking, humble man, who was always on the go and never hesitated to lend a helping hand. He would often joke with others who were left scratching their heads as to whether or not he was serious, though showing his dimple was a sure sign he was teasing. Bill was a caring and devoted husband to Glenna, a loving dad, brother and friend. We are all blessed to have known him and will always hold him in our hearts. Though we will miss him dearly we take comfort in knowing he is on a new adventure “always waiting to see what’s around the next bend”. We will be holding a celebration of life in the early spring. Arrangements entrusted to Fischer’s Funeral Services & Crematorium (250) 833-1129. Share memories and condolences online through Bill’s obituary at www.fischersfuneralservices.com.

250-832-7099

www.shuswaphospice.ca

Supporting Children Through Change and Loss Workshop being held on

Saturday, November 25, 2017 9:00 am - 12:00 noon at the Mountainside Complex (across from Bowers Funeral Home) No charge

This workshop will be helpful for any adult who cares for a child or teen going through grief due to a loss of any kind (e.g., death, separation, divorce, serious illness…) Parents and other caregivers grandparents, friends, etc.) are all welcome to attend this practical and informative seminar. Handouts will be given. The facilitator is Naomi Silver, who has 28 years experience working with grieving children and their families. To pre-register or for more information, Bowers Funeral Service at 832-2223

DONNA DELORES SEAWARD November 10, 1940 - November 3, 2017 Donna Delores Seaward, age 76, died on Friday November 3, 2017 in the Shuswap Lake General Hospital. She was born in Calgary, AB on November 10, 1940. She was the eldest child and sister to Mina Margret Seaward. She is survived by her husband, George Seaward; daughters, Marlene, Marie Beverly, Anita, Marie, and son, Chad. Donna was survived by many loved and cherished grandchildren and great grandchildren. Donna loved to cook, and play a good game of cards, usually ending up the victor! She loved spending time with her grandchildren. Everyone was always welcomed with open arms and a heart filled with love. She will be greatly missed by all! A celebration of life was held on Sunday November 12, 2017 at 1:00 pm at the Canoe Seniors Halls. Online condolences may be sent to Donna’s family through her obituary at www. bowersfuneralservice.com

Wednesday Mourning Cafe If you are looking for a support in your grief journey, you may want to consider our informal Wednesday Mourning Café. You will likely find the following things: • Emotional support in a safe and non-judgmental environment. • Support and understanding from others who have experienced a similar loss. • Coping skills to help you on your grief journey. • Hope through companionship with people who “get it” and understand first-hand what you’re going through. • Permission to grieve and permission to live a happy productive life. • Information will be available for how children and other family members may react to loss. The most important thing is to take care of yourself. Drop-in to our weekly Wednesday Mourning Café, facilitated by Naomi Silver, at our Mountainside Common Room from 10:00 to 11:30 am.

Friday, November 17, 2017 Page A29 CHARLES “CHUCK” HOLBROOK Aug 5, 1929 - Sept 4, 2017

Charles “Chuck” Griffen Holbrook of Blind Bay, B.C. passed away at the Strathmore Hospital in Alberta on Monday, September 4 2017 at the age of 88 years. Chuck will be dearly missed by his children Jerry Holbrook, Morgan Holbrook and Kelly Hagel, their spouses, 7 grandchildren and four great grandchildren. He was predeceased by his dear wife Bernie of 59 year and his son Don. A funeral service was held on September 14 2017 in Beiseker Alberta. All of Chucks siblings, family and Alberta friends were able to attend. It was a day of remembrance and lots of laughs. An intimate celebration of Chucks’ life was held on September 30 in Chucks living room with his closest friends and neighbors. Thank you to all of you that gathered. Chuck and Bernie retired to the Blind Bay area in 1982 where they enjoyed the Shuswap Lake Golf Course for many years. Chuck will be remembered for his great sense of humor, his love of nature, people and his talent for tying Fishing flys. He was the Master of that and many fishermen in the area have caught fish with the flys that were made by Chuck. The family of Chuck Holbrook would like to sincerely thank the staff of the Salmon Arm Hospital for the compassionate care that they gave our Dad these past three years and also the EMTTeam who had made several trips to Blind Bay to taxi him to the Hospital. Each time they came to get him he felt so thankful for the care and respect they gave him while getting him to safety. We would also like to especially thank Lois Barker and her staff at the Blind Bay Country Market for providing our Dad with homemade soup every day and even making a delivery when he didn’t show up. They all watched over him and he loved all of you for that. When he came out to Alberta he couldn’t wait to get back home to “his girls.” If it wasn’t for the excellent care that Salmon Arm Interior Health provided Chuck he would have never been able to live on his own in his home for as long as he did. He loved all the Health Care aides that visited him twice a day, seven days a week. Chuck and his family felt so blessed to have this service provided, it meant that he could live life where he wanted right to the very end.

Place a loved one’s Memoriam or Obituary in one of our BC award winning newspapers. Call our Classified Centre at:

1.866.865.4460

Funeral Services & Crematorium Ltd.

Extends an open invitation to

Your Christmas Candlelight Service of Remembrance Sat., Dec. 9, 2017 at 1:00 p.m. Fischer’s Funeral Ser vices 4060 - 1st Avenue SW This is a multi-denominational service. Everyone welcome! Coffee and refreshments will be ser ved.

Sponsored by:

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Please feel free to bring a photo or item for the memorial table.

250 833-1129


Remembering Loved Ones

Page A30 Friday, November 17, 2017

Honesty Makes a Difference

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

JOSHUA HANDLEY Joshua Lee Handley was a lover of family, music, and adventure. He was most at home when connected to nature. Joshua travelled through Australia, New Zealand, and Fiji in his youth. He serviced weather stations in remote regions across BC. Throughout his life, Joshua sought out skiing, snowboarding and backcountry adventuring around Whistler, Revelstoke and Calgary. After graduating from Revelstoke Secondary School, he started post-secondary schooling at Mount Royal College in Calgary. Later he attended the Centre for Digital Imaging and Sound in Burnaby where he graduated with a Recording Masters. Josh then worked in the recording industry at Warehouse Studios in Downtown Vancouver where he worked with a number of major recording artists. Following the birth of his son Noah, Josh and Sarah moved back to Sicamous. Here he started a new job in finishing carpentry and cabinet making in Salmon Arm. Joshua returned to school again and completed his diploma in Electrical Electronics Technologies at Okanagan College. Upon graduation he began working with the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure as an Electronics Technician with the Snow Avalanche Section. He loved his job and it gave him the opportunity to put his computer and problem-solving skills to work in combination with his love of the outdoors. As an avid music lover, Josh wrote and recorded his own songs. He is fondly remembered for attempting to play whatever song was requested, playing his guitar around the campfire, spinning records as a DJ, or recording mixed CD’s for his friends and family. Josh is survived by his wife Sarah, son Noah and daughter Hannah. Left to mourn are his parents Dean and Sally Handley, sister Shelley Carruthers (James), brothers Ryan Handley and Robert Edwards, grandfather Les Handley along with numerous aunts, uncles, nephews, nieces, cousins, as well as many friends and colleagues. In lieu of flowers, a trust fund for Noah and Hannah has been established at the Sicamous branch of SASCU. Josh, you will be missed. A Celebration of life service was held in the Red Barn, Sicamous, on Friday morning, November 10th at 11 a.m. with Jack Bowers the Funeral Celebrant. Tributes were shared by family and friends. Condolences may be sent to Josh’s obituary at www.bowersfuneralservice.com Arrangements were in the care of Bowers Funeral Home & Crematorium, Salmon Arm.

We accept all Memorial Society and Pre-Need Funeral Policies Making final arrangements for a loved one is not easy. That’s why compassion goes into everything we do. We are prepared to arrange any special request you may have. • Traditional Services • Cremation Services • Prearrangement Planning • All inquiries welcome 24 hrs.

Tammy & Vince Fischer

FUNERAL SERVICES & CREMATORIUM LTD. 4060-1st Ave. S.W. Salmon Arm, 833-1129 www.fischersfuneralservices.com Serving Kamloops to Golden Toll Free 1-888-816-1117

MARY (GINTER) SIGVALDASON May 3, 1944 – October 30, 2017 We loved, and were loved by an incredible, strong, hardworking woman. Born on May 3rd, 1944 in Steinbach Manitoba. Mary was a Wife, Mother, Grandmother, Great Grandmother, Sister, Daughter, Cousin, Aunt, and deeply cherished friend to many. She passed away peacefully with family at her side October 20th 2017 in Salmon Arm, B.C. She was born and raised in Steinbach M.B. where she started her family with John Ginter. Together they had six children and ran a family restaurant ‘The Cozy Corner Inn’ and warmed people’s hearts with their home cooked meals, love, laughter and music. Predeceased by her parents Abraham and Anna Broesky, and her husband John Ginter. Mary leaves behind her loving family; six children, Marilynn (Barry), John (Anna), Fred (Carla), Felecia (D’Arcy), Charlotte (Paul), Timothy (Audrey). She also leaves behind 12 siblings, 18 grandchildren and 16 great-grandchildren. We have comfort in our hearts knowing she is our Angel looking out for us now, and doesn’t feel any more pain.  She’s dancing in the stars with her Johnny. Arrangements entrusted to Fischer’s Funeral Services & Crematorium Ltd., (250) 833-1129. Share online condolences and memories of Mary through her obituary at www. fischersfuneralservices.com.

“When someone you love becomes a memory the memory becomes a treasure”

HARRIET MARILYN KERNAGHAN April 11, 1930 - November 14, 2017 Our lovely mother, Marilyn, passed away peacefully in the Shuswap Lake General Hospital early Tuesday morning. She was predeceased by her husband of 65 years, Ralph, by nine days. Marilyn was an amazing individual of many talents. She was born and raised in Salmon Arm, and earned her RN diploma from St. Paul’s School of Nursing in Vancouver, B.C., when it was still a three-year program. To support her schooling, she took tailoring courses and sewed professional quality garments for family. She worked in private duty nursing as well as Essendale Hospital when it was a psychiatric facility. Marilyn took an extended break from nursing to raise her family of five, while still being a camp nurse for the Boy Scouts during summers. She is survived by five children: Casey (Pip) of New Zealand, Jerry of Vernon and Shaun (Michelle) of Malakwa; daughters: Jennifer Bertram of Salmon Arm and Sharon Lockie of Tappen; her sister Lorna Duncan of Revelstoke and family, and grandchildren Liam, Matti, Lindsay, Luke, Genieve, Reed, Travis & Lacey as well as great grandchildren. Marilyn happily followed Ralph to military postings across Canada: Esquimalt, Victoria, Edmonton, Calgary, Winnipeg, Camp Borden, Ontario and Gagetown, NB. Her warm, engaging personality ensured many friends and happy memories. She returned to nursing at Shuswap Lake General Hospital in Salmon Arm when Ralph reired here in the early seventies. A joint service at the First United Church will be held for both our parents. Arrangements in care of Alternatives Funeral Home in Armstrong, B.C. Those wishing to make donations, may choose a charity of their choice.

www.saobserver.net RIEBERGER, PETER PAUL July 7, 1926 – Nov 5, 2017 It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Peter Rieberger on Nov 5, 2017 at the age of 91. Peter was born to John and Hedwig Rieberger in Holdfast, Saskatchewan and was a dear brother to 12 siblings. He was predeceased by his parents, 5 sisters and 3 brothers. Pete is survived by his devoted and loving wife of 58 years, Shirley, sons Stephen (Erin) and Kevin (Becky), and daughters Cathy and Maureen, grandchildren Kiersten, Chloe, Jacob and Josh, brothers Mike, Sid and Joe, sister Hedy, sister-in-law Margaret and many nieces and nephews. Pete’s early years were kept busy with farming and helping to support his family. Pete spent a few years in the army and then joined the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1952 where he spent the next 20 years as an aircraft mechanic. During Pete’s time in the RCAF he became a marksman with the Winnipeg Rifle Team where he won numerous awards. After Pete retired from the RCAF, the family moved to the Creston Valley where he worked as a heavy duty mechanic until his retirement from Imasco in 1991. In 1996, Pete and Shirley moved to Blind Bay B.C. and built their dream home where they enjoyed many visits from friends and family. Pete had many hobbies and particularly enjoyed fly tying, fishing, hunting, winemaking and watch repair. Pete was a kind, gentle and generous man who was always there to lend a hand. There wasn’t anything he couldn’t fix. Pete will be dearly missed by all who knew him. His family will hold him close and cherish him always. Heartfelt thanks go out to Dr. Breugem, all the staff at Harmony Haven, many friends, family and neighbors. Our gratitude for the care by Fischers Funeral Services. Special thanks to our dear friends Muriel and Dean Sloan. A private service will be held at a later date. Any donations may be made to the Alzheimer Society of BC. Arrangements entrusted to Fischer’s Funeral Services & Crematorium Ltd. 250 8331129. Share condolences and memories of Pete online through his obituary at www. fischersfuneralservices.com.

ANNE LOUISE WALL (LOUISA) 1934 - 2017 Anne Louise Wall (nee Hammel) passed away at Hillside Village, Salmon Arm, BC. on Tuesday, November 7th, 2017 at the age of 83. She was born in Scepter SK on January 19, 1934, the third of six daughters, to Ralph and Rose Hammel. Louisa grew up on the family’s farm in Lemsford, SK, but moved to Prelate, SK to attend High School. Louisa then moved to Saskatoon, SK. She was predeceased by her loving husband, Peter J Wall, in 2011. Louisa was a devoted wife and cared deeply for her family. She is survived by step-children Diana, Gerry (Karen), Murray, and Laura (David) as well as 6 grandchildren and 3 great-grandchildren. Louisa and Peter met in Lethbridge, AB and lived there, as well as in Prince Rupert and Victoria, BC. She was well respected for her work at BC Land Titles. After her retirement, she and Peter relocated to Salmon Arm, BC. They enjoyed many happy years living closely to the extended family in the area. She cherished her faith and often spent time involved in the various programs and activities of St Joseph’s Catholic Church. The family would like to thank Dr Heunis and the staff at Hillside Village for their caring and kindness. A memorial service was held on Monday, November 13th, 2017 at 1:00 p.m. at Fischer’s Funeral Services and Crematorium, with Reverend George Fleming officiating. Share memories and condolences online through Louisa’s obituary at www. fischersfuneralservices.com.


Friday, November 17, 2017 PageA31 A31 www.lakeshorenews.bc.ca

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

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Announcements

Announcements

Employment

Employment

Services

Services

Merchandise for Sale

Coming Events

Lost & Found

Help Wanted

Medical/Dental

Financial Services

$100 & Under

Churches Thrift Shop will be receiving furniture and large items only on Tuesdays and Saturdays effective November 13. We thank you for following these guidelines. We will continue to do pickups on Wed, Thurs and Friday. Thank you for continuing to Bless Us

FOUND: ladies cream coloured mitts w/fur at the Field of Dreams last season game of midget football (250)8323438

Live Hang Department and General Labourers

Certified Dental Assistant required, full-time. Please contact Dr. E Kovalcik at (250)832-3626 or email your resume to: drekovalcik@gmail.com

GET BACK ON TRACK! Bad credit? Bills? Unemployed? Need Money? We Lend! If you own your own home - you qualify. Pioneer Acceptance Corp. Member BBB. 1-877-987-1420 www.pioneerwest.com

Painting & Decorating

Information

Donations and bequests are requested for equipment to help care for patients and residents of the Hospital and Bastion Place. Tax receipts will be issued. Mail to: Shuswap Hospital Foundation Box 265, Salmon Arm, BC 7&/r1I Donate Online (secure site): www.shuswaphospitalfoundation.org

Employment Business Opportunities HIP OR KNEE REPLACEMENT? Arthritic Conditions/COPD? Restrictions in Walking/Dressing? Disability Tax Credit $2,000 Tax Credit $20,000 Refund. Apply Today For Assistance: 1-844-4535372.

Career Opportunities MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION! In-demand career! Employers have work-at-home positions available. Get online training you need from an employertrusted program. Visit: CareerStep.ca/MT or 1-855-7683362 to start training for your work-at-home career today!

Education/Trade Schools

Here Today – Here Tomorrow There is no better way to create an everlasting tribute than by making a memorial donation to the Shuswap Community Foundation. Every tax receipted gift ensures that the name of your loved one will be remembered in perpetuity.

Office: 250-832-5428 www.shuswapfoundation.ca

PHARMACY TECHNICIAN TRAINING Online-based 43 wk program incls 8 wk practicum. Regulated Pharmacy Technicians earn $25-$28/hr in hospitals & $20-$27/hr in community pharmacies. Accredited by the Canadian Council for the Accreditation of Pharmacy Programs (CCAPP). www.stenbergcollege.com Toll-Free: 1-866-580-2772

Help Wanted ANDOVER TERRACE Come join our team! CARE AIDE Part-time, casual, days, evening & nights Apply within or email:

Advertise in the 2018 BC Hunting Regulations Synopsis largest Sportsman publication

grace.lentz@advocarehealth.com

Information IF YOU and / or YOUR CHILDREN are being abused, call the

Women’s Emergency Shelter 250-832-9616

Stopping the Violence Counseling, 250-832-9700. Children who witness abuse program, 250-832-4474. Shuswap Mental Health Intake, 250-833-4102 or RCMP 250-832-6044 Shuswap Day Care Society Annual General Meeting Tuesday, November 21, 2017 6:30pm to be held at Shuswap Day Care, 90 5th Ave. SE

Annual Reports, Adoption of Bylaws, Election of Directors, Goodies & Refreshments. For more details call Karen (250)832-6192

Personals MAKE A Connection. Real People, Flirty Chat Call FREE! 250-220-1300 or 1-800-2101010. www.livelinks.com 18+0

Full-time for Colonial Farms. Excellent starting wage, must be in good physical condition & very reliable. Please drop resumes off at 3830 Okanagan St, Armstrong, BC between 9am-2pm, Mon- Fri.

Volunteers

Cleaning Services

NEW RATES

Shuswap Lake Health Care Auxiliary

HOUSE cleaning, janitorial, office & apartment building cleaning. Daily, weekly, biweekly. Move in & outs, before parties & after. (250)804-8794

NEW TRUCKS ARRIVING

Experienced Class 1 Drivers full-time / part-time for Drivers for California /Arizona runs. Safety bonus and benefits included.

Email: bill@keywestexpress.ca 1-604-539-1700

PRT Skimikin Nursery Tappen BC requires Nursery Workers for 2017 Fall Harvest $13.00/hr - 40hr/week Submit resume to Nelson Reed by email: Nelson.Reed@PRT.com or in person weekdays, 8-4 Ph:(250)515-0194

PT/FT CARE-AID

needed. Must have certificate and own transportation,

some light housekeeping & meal prep., 8am-4:30pm Wage $19+/hr., yearly raises

Email resume:

salmonarmca@hotmail.com

Receptionist

Busy multidisciplinary health care clinic in Sorrento is looking for a part time receptionist. The successful applicant will be outgoing, personable and able to work in a busy environment. Competitive wage offered. Please apply in person to Sorrento Chiropractic Wellness Centre or forward your resume to Mary at info@sorrentochirowellness.ca

Come join our team! Piccadilly Terrace Retirement Residence is in need of a

Part-time Server

The job will involve Saturday and Sunday shifts only. Must be energetic, a team player and have good time management skills. Employment applications will be issued at Front Desk and are to be accompanied with resume. Attn: dining Room Dept. 510 10th Street SW (Directly across from Canadian Tire)

Help Wanted F/T General Labourers North Timber is looking to hire general labourers for full-time employment. We offer competitive wages & a comprehensive benefit pkg. Please email resume to netimber@junction.net

Come join our team!

Piccadilly Terrace Retirement Residence is in need of a

Seasonal Snow Removal Person

The job will involve early morning snow removal from vehicles and pathways. Must be a morning person and available on snow days during the winter months. Employment applications will be issued at Front Desk and are to be accompanied with resume. Attn: Jeremy Menzies, 810 10 Street SW (directly across from Canadian Tire)

invites you to join our volunteer group. Meetings are the 3rd Monday of each month throughout the year (except July & August). We are an active and dedicated group and have several fundraisers each year; raising money to purchase equipment for Shuswap Lake General Hospital and Bastion Place. Please call Donna at 250-804-3287 for more information.

WE WELCOME NEW MEMBERS

Services

Health Products Get up to $50,000 from the Government of Canada. Do you or someone you know Have any of these Conditions? ADHD, Anxiety, Arthritis, Asthma, Cancer, COPD, Depression, Diabetes, Difficulty Walking, Fibromyalgia, Irritable Bowels, Overweight, Trouble Dressing...and Hundreds more. ALL Ages & Medical Conditions Qualify. CALL THE BENEFITS PROGRAM 1-(800)-211-3550

Handypersons Handyman Services Specializing In Home Improvements 250-253-0202

Home Improvements

Home & Yard

rRenovation rRepair rMaintenance

rFencing rDecks rSheds

250-253-4663

Business Opportunities

WWW.PAINTSPECIAL.COM

LARGE, solid wood rocking chair $50., stereo stand $25. (250)838-0667

3 Rooms For $299

Misc. for Sale

(250) 833-2505

2 Coats Any Colour (Ceiling & Trim extra)

Price incls. Cloverdale High Performance Paint. NO PAYMENT, until job is completed!

Pets

Feed & Hay

ERICKSON’S APPLIANCES Reconditioned Appliances New/Used Parts 90 Day Warranty Return

250-832-9968

603 - 3rd Ave. SW, Salmon Arm

FEEDER pigs, 50lb. +, $80. each, wiener pigs $60. each, (250)835-8453 (250)253-1640

A-Steel Shipping Storage Containers. Used 20’40’45’53’ insulated containers. All sizes in stock. Prices starting under $2,000. Modifications possible doors, windows, walls etc., as office or living workshop etc.,Custom Modifications Office / Home� Call for price. Ph Toll free 24 hours 1-866528-7108 or 1-778-298-3192 8am-5pm. Delivery BC and AB www.rtccontainer.com

Information

Information

ALFALFA grass first crop, excellent horse hay. $7.50/bale (250)803-8298

Livestock

SALMON ARM CITIZENS PATROL

Community service, flexible hours, interesting information, and friendship = SACP membership Help keep Salmon Arm safe by going out on a 4-hour patrol one afternoon or evening each month. We also take part in numerous community events and enjoy socializing together. For more information and an application find SAP at salmonarmcitizenspatrol.ca or at facebook.com/SACitizensPatrol

AA, NA and Al-Anon Meetings

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL LOG HAULING SERVICES. Tolko has been an integral part of BC’s Southern Interior and a steady employer for the surrounding communities for over 60 years.

PROJECT SCOPE

Tolko is seeking to fill a three year, non-replaceable log hauling contract to support harvesting operations in the Southern Interior of BC. Trucks will be marshalled out of Vernon, BC. The ability to provide lowbed services will be considered an asset. Interested parties should contact Tolko’s Woodlands office in Lumby for more information and be prepared to provide the following background information: • Company description and history • Contact information • References for whom you have conducted similar work in the past two years.

Proposals are to be submitted by December 1, 2017 to:

Mark Fichtner RPF, Harvesting Superintendent Phone: 250 547 1201 Fax: 250 547 1274 Email: Mark.Fichtner@tolko.com

AA 1-866-531-7045 Salmon Arm AA: Tuesday 12:00 noon – First United Church 450 Okanagan Avenue, SE Wednesday 8:00 p.m. – St. Joseph’s, 90 1st ST SE Thursday 7:00 p.m. – Women’s Circle AA St. Josephs Friday 12:00 noon – First United Church 450 Okanagan Avenue, SE Sunday 11:00 a.m. – Health unit, 851-16 St. NE Sunday 7:00 p.m. – Downtown Activity Center Blind Bay – Our Lady of the Lake Catholic Church, Blind Bay, 2740 Fairway Hill Rd. – Saturday at 10 a.m. Sorrento – St. Mary’s Anglican Church, 1188 TCH, Sunday 7:00 p.m. – OAPA Hall, 1148 Passchendaele Rd., Monday 8:00 p.m. Enderby – St. Ann’s Catholic Church, 1310 George St., Tuesday 8:00 p.m. Enderby – United Church, 1106 Belvedere, Friday 8:00 p.m. Sicamous – Sicamous United, 705 TCH., Tuesday 8:00 p.m. Al-Anon: 1-866-531-7045 Salmon Arm – Seniors Resource Center, 320 2 Ave NE, Wednesday 8:00 p.m. – First United Church, upstairs, 450 Okanagan Ave SE, Thursday 12:00 noon Narcotics Anonymous: 1-866-778-4772 Salmon Arm – Crossroads Church, 121 Shuswap (behind Barley Station, alley entrance). Monday 7:00 p.m.


Page A32 Friday, November 17, 2017

Employment

Employment

Career Opportunities

Career Opportunities

CAREER OPPORTUNITIES with Black Press (Interior South) Black Press is Canada’s leading private independent newspaper company with more than 170 community, daily and urban newspapers in Canada, Washington State, Hawaii, California and Ohio and has extensive digital and printing operations.

Multi-Media Reporter (Penticton) The Penticton Western News, an award-winning twice a week publication serving more than 23,000 homes, has an opening for a full-time reporter to join our newsroom and be a part of the Okanagan’s biggest news team. The position requires a dynamic reporter that can write on a variety of beats and generate original story ideas. Circulation Supervisor (Salmon Arm) The Salmon Arm Observer has an immediate opening for a full-time permanent circulation supervisor. The ideal candidate will be detail oriented, have extensive experience working with people, strong organizational skills, computer skills and lots of energy and enthusiasm. For more information on these vacancies and other regions throughout B.C. visit:

blackpress.ca/careers

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Merchandise for Sale

Merchandise for Sale

Misc. for Sale

Misc. for Sale

Misc. Wanted

SAWMILLS from only $4,397 MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com/400OT 1-800-5670404 Ext:400OT.

Wanted: good used washer & dryer , in working order. 250-832-8992

ESTATE Sale Everything Must Go! oak bdrm. suite queen size $350., love seat $200., queen propane BBQ 150., large computer desk $150., dining room hutch $150., numerous other items, all in new condition (778)489-0027 KITCHENAIDE stainless steel range, excellent condition, self cleaning, warming drawer, ceramic top, convection oven, loaded. Paid $2200 asking $750. obo (250)675-4359

STEEL BUILDING SALE ...�FALL CLEARANCE SALE ON NOW!� 20X21 $5,990. Front & Back Walls Included. 25X25 $6,896. One End Wall Included. 32X33 $8,199. No Ends Included. Check Out www.pioneersteel.ca for more prices. Pioneer Steel 1-855212-7036

Storage

Storage

AAA MINI-STORAGE-250.832.3558 t1FSTPOBM#VTJOFTT t4FBTPOBM5PZT5JSFT t$PWFSFE374UPSBHF t4FOJPST%JTDPVOU

t.JDSPTUPSBHFVOEFS t1BDLJOHTVQQMJFT tIPVSBDDFTTTFDVSJUJFT t'SJFOEMZ4FSWJDF

www.aaaministorage.ca t 431 42nd St. SW, Salmon Arm

Pets

Pets

With Michelle

We are seeking individuals, preferably with experience handling challenging behavior, though on-the-job training will also be provided. Applicants must be committed to service of the highest quality and display a positive and helpful attitude. Shift work is involved.

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Experience: working with behavioral challenges is an asset Additional Skills: all aspects of care and training for adults with developmental disabilities is preferred

F

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Valid Class 5 Drivers License/abstract

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Community Care First Aid

O

Criminal Record Check

O

Medical Exam and Negative TB test

r4IBWJOHT 4BXEVTU #BSL .VMDI 8PPE$IJQT CVMLNJOJCBHT

r8FMM3PUUFE.BOVSF r4PJMT r&YUSB$MFBO8IFBU4USBX

Stanley Bland 832-6615 or 833-2449

Please respond with your resume and cover letter to TCS at cjarl@tcsinfo.ca

Help Wanted

PICK-UP OR DELIVERY

Help Wanted

THE BOARD OF EDUCATION OF S.D. NO. 83 (North Okanagan-Shuswap)

Accounts Payable Clerk The North Okanagan-Shuswap School District No. 83 invites qualified individuals to apply for the Accounts Payable Clerk position. This is a full time CUPE union position and the rate of pay is $20.50 per hour. Qualifications: • Completion of Grade 12 plus six months post secondary courses in business education including Business Accounting 111/121. • Six months’ recent Accounts Payable experience in a similar position with a high volume of transactions. • Demonstration ability with Accounts Payable software in a computerized environment (AtrieveERP software preferred). For further details on duties, responsibilities and other qualifications, please visit the Make a Future website at www.makeafuture.ca. Please submit a cover letter, resume and supporting documentation to apply@sd83.bc.ca by 12:00 p.m. on Friday, November 17, 2017. We thank all applications for their interest, however, only those selected for interviews will be contacted.

Farm Services

Farm Services

REIMER’S FARM SERVICE LTD.

We Deliver

• Bark Mulch • Shavings • Sawdust

250-838-0111 or 1-855-737-0110

heartandstroke.ca/FAST With the support of:

TEKAMAR MORTGAGES

Best rate 5yr-3.14%OAC

Serving the Columbia-Shuswap since 1976. www.tekamar.ca Rates Consistently better than banks

(250)832-8766

Toll free 1-800-658-2345

Garage Sales

Rentals LAKEVIEW MANOR Deluxe, Fully Furnished 1 Bedroom Apartment Viewing Shuswap Lake Close to all amenities in quiet adult, NS, No Pets building, Avail. Now $995/mo + hydro Short Term Rates Available Ref’s req’d (250)833-9148

NOW RENTING Brand new, bright & spacious 1 bedroom apartments in town Rent ranging from $800-$820 No smoking & No pets F/S, D/W Call (250)803-1694 or visit: ponichproperties.com

GLENEDEN COMMUNITY HALL for rent. Banquets, meetings, weddings, reunions or ? 250-832-9806 www.glenedencommunity.com

Modular Homes MARA: remodeled 3bdrm. mobile, wood stove & elec. heat, large edition & covered deck, 12 x 18 garage, $900/mo. + DD (250)838-7670

Homes for Rent RENO’D 2bdrm. house, close to D/T, NS, NP, suits mature adult or couple, ref’s & DD req’d $1250/mo. + utilities (250)833-9008 leave msg.

SEMI lakefront, older 2bdrm, 1.5bath house for rent. Oversized garage, acreage in Blind Bay. $1075/month. Available immediately. Email:

CANOE: Moving Sale, Nov18, 9-3, 5291 68Ave. NE, dog house, garden tools, tablesaw, saws, camping, furn. & misc

Rentals

Transportation

Storage

Scrap Car Removal

LOOKING FOR BOAT STORAGE? BOATHOUSE MARINE & LEISURE is pleased to offer year round indoor, secure, boat storage We have the lowest prices in the Shuswap. Call now to book your spot (250)832-7515

Suites, Lower SA: w/o furn. 2bdrm. suite, view, NP, NS, adults, ref’s req’d, util incl. $1100/mo. (250)832-3417

Suites, Upper 1BDRM, 2bdrm & 3bdrm by Hillcrest School. NS, NP. Avail. Immediately. For more info: 1 (250)549-9471

Saving Lives, Supporting Victims

Report Impaired Drivers! Call 911

   

terry@shuswaplakeestates.com

Rooms for Rent SA: Close to town, shared kitchen, int/cable/util incl. NS, NP, $550/mo. (250)832-4236

Shared Accommodation

            

SILVERCREEK. Share home with senior male. priv bed/bath $450/mo 250-832-4655



WANTED

Your unwanted cars & trucks, scrap metal, car removal, etc. Renee & Richie Transport & Salvage 250-835-8618 or Renee’s cell 250-804-8618

Legal

Legal Notices CRIMINAL RECORD? Why suffer Employment/Licensing loss? Travel/Business opportunities? Be embarrassed? Think: Criminal Pardon. US Entry Waiver. Record Purge. File Destruction. Free Consultation 1-800-347-2540. accesslegalmjf.com

More than 1.5 million Canadian families are in need of affordable housing. Your contributions provides Habitat with the resources it needs to help families.

       

Homes for Rent

Š Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada, 2017 | ™The heart and / Icon on its own or followed by another icon or words in English are trademarks of the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.

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Garden & Lawn

’s BARlMaSnALd S E

Education: Grade 12 or equivalent

Mortgages

Halls/Auditoriums

271A Trans-Can. Hwy. N.E. (across from KFC) • 250-832-0604

Requirements: O

Monday to Friday

Appointments necessary.

Garden & Lawn

Real Estate

LILY MANOR

All Breeds including Cats & Large Dogs

Salmon Arm

TCS is seeking Community Support Workers in the Salmon Arm area to work with adults with developmental disabilities.

Merchandise for Sale

Apt/Condo for Rent

PET GROOMING COMMUNITY SUPPORT WORKERS

www.saobserver.net

Lakeside Realty Ltd.

Homes for Rent

R E N TA L S

Salmon Arm - Raven Subdivision 3 bedroom, 3 bath lakeview house with Garage. N/P, N/S, F/S, W/D $1750/mo. Salmon Arm – Ranchero area 2 bedroom, 1 bath, upper unit of 4 plex F/S. W/D, No smoking or pets. $850/mo. Sorrento 2 bedroom, 2 bath main floor of house with Carport. F/S. W/D, No Smoking Available December 1, 2017 $1300/mo.

Give the gift of a new home and donate today!

Adams Lake – Adams Lake Estates 2 bedroom, 2 bath House with Garage. No Smoking, some pet restrictions. Available November 1/17- April 30/18 $1000/mo.

Merry Anderson 250-833-2799 merryanderson@telus.net MANAGING BROKER

www.merryanderson.com

www.habitat.ca


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Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

Friday, November 17, 2017 Page A33

Right now, all’s quiet on the climate front GLOBAL VIEWS Gwynne Dyer “Promoting coal at a climate summit is like promoting tobacco at a cancer summit,” said Michael Bloomberg, the former New York mayor, but President Donald J. Trump did exactly that. He sent a team of American diplomats and energy executives to the annual world climate summit, being held this year in Bonn, Germany, to extol the wonders of “clean” coal. Bloomberg, now a UN special envoy for climate change, got it right. The audience at the US presentation heckled and mocked the presenters. Where people who were concerned about global warming once worried about whether the US government would dare to defy the fossil fuel lobby at home, the denialists now control the government – and it turns out not to matter all that much. There are several reasons for that. One is that global coal use has gone into steep decline as the cost of renewable energy has dropped. It’s just not competitive any more, and China and India have cancelled plans for hundreds of new coal-fired power plants this year. Even in the United States, the share of electricity coming from coal fell from 51 percent in 2008 to only 31 percent last year – and US coal companies are going bankrupt. A second reason is that Trump’s decision to pull the United States out of the 2015 Paris Climate Agreement has had zero impact internationally. The fear that other countries would also default on their commitments proved to be unfounded, and the United States is the literally the only country on the planet that does not subscribe to the treaty.

Indeed, Christiana Figueres, the UN’s chief climate negotiator, actually thanked Trump for his attempt to wreck the Paris deal. “It provoked an unparalleled wave of support for the treaty,” she said. “He shored up the world’s resolve on climate action, and for that we can all be grateful.” Finally, Trump has been outflanked by a new alliance announced in Bonn on Monday that links the fifteen US states committed to strong climate action with the Canadian and Mexican governments in a continent-wide group that concentrates on phasing out coal power and boosting clean power and transport. Much of the US contribution to emissions cuts that Trump reneged on will be covered by these state-level American initiatives. There are other causes for alarm, of course. There always are. After three years when global carbon dioxide emissions stayed steady, albeit at a very high level, they have started rising again. And there is an unexplained rise in methane emissions in the tropics, not caused by burning fossil fuels, that leads some scientists to suspect that one of the dreaded feedbacks is kicking in. Feedbacks are the spectre at the feast. You can get everything else right, your emissions are going down nicely, and you are on course to stop the warming just before the average global temperature reaches two degrees C higher – and then suddenly, the whole global system goes into overdrive. The warming that human beings have already caused has triggered some other, natural source of warming that we cannot shut off.

The consensus among scientists is that the risk of triggering feedbacks rises steeply in the vicinity of plus 2 degrees C average global temperature, which is why the world’s governments have all promised never to exceed that target. But there could be some unknown trigger in the system that would set off runaway warming at a significantly lower average

global temperature: the whole process, as they say, is “non-linear”. So we are still living dangerously, and it is still uncertain whether we can ratchet down emissions targets fast enough to stop the temperature rise in time. But there are big changes in the offing that will make it easier to cut emissions: meat substitutes and lab-grown meat, elec-

tric vehicles, and rapidly falling prices for renewables like solar and wind. There is also now a unity of purpose that was previously absent from the climate talks: the long struggle between the rich and the poor countries over who is to blame for the problem and who pays for the damage is largely over. And although President Xi did not come in person, China

is definitely taking the lead. Nobody in Bonn is celebrating the US government’s defection from the fight against climate change, but their panic is long past. The Bonn meeting is concentrating on writing the rules for measuring how countries are complying with the promises they have made on emissions cuts. They also need to figure out how to

organise the five-yearly reviews at which the countries are supposed to adopt progressively higher targets for cuts. When the conference closes on Friday, there will be no exciting new announcements of breakthroughs, but we don’t need that. The real breakthrough came in Paris in 2015, and the objective now is to keep the show on the road. So far, so good.

New Voice, New Vision. You Deserve a Say in BC’s Future. Please join me on Novemberƫ22nd in Salmon Arm. Like you, I believe the leadership race boils down to a simple choice between the past and the future. As I’ve traveled across the province, BC Liberals and BC voters have told me loud and clear that our free enterprise party needs a new voice and a new vision to win the next election. With our party’s economic record, we should have won the election in May. But, too many British Columbians felt disconnected from our strong economy, balanced budgets and triple A credit rating. They believed their government had stopped listening to the important things they had to say. I want to change that. With your help I want to make sure that we are, once again, the party of hard working families in resource communities and urban centres right across British Columbia. I believe you and your family deserve a say in BC’s future. Please join me and find out more at www.diannewatts.ca.

Meet and Greet with Dianne Watts

BC Liberal Leadership Candidate

1:00pm - 2:00pm, November 22 Chestor’s House of Cinnamon 1151 10 Ave SW, Salmon Arm Everyone is welcome.

FIND OUT MORE | GET INVOLVED � 1-604-265-9846 | 1-844-591-8700 | � info@diannewatts.ca � DianneWatts4BC | � DianneWattsForBC

www.diannewatts.ca


Page A34 Friday, November 17, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

THIS HOLIDAY SEASON...

Shop Local,

Shop the Shuswap

You Could Win 900 $

in Merchant Gift Certificates 1. Save all your receipts when you shop at any of these participating merchants. 2. On Monday, December 18, 2017 everyone who shows up at the Salmon Arm Observer office with $300 or more (before taxes) in participating merchant receipts will be entered into a draw to win $900 in Merchant Gift Certificates. You may enter the draw for the Merchant Certificates prior to December 18th, but you must appear in person on the 18th to be eligible for one of the 20 Gund teddy bears. The first 20 people who provide proof of purchase from these participating merchants, totalling $300 or more (before taxes) will receive ONE Auburn Bear - a limited edition GundTM Teddy bear.

Meet Auburn Bear

The LIMITED EDITION GUNDTM TEDDY BEAR The Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News are pleased to announce Auburn Bear, a limited edition GUNDTM Teddy Bear.

(Proofs of purchase must be dated between November 10 & December 17, 2017 3. One bear per family

Participating Merchants: 3901 11th Ave. NE, Salmon Arm

Shuswap

450 Trans-Can. Hwy.

102 Hudson Ave. NE, Salmon Arm

Shuswap Optometric Centre

Service Department 3710 Trans Canada Hwy. SW

AUTO DETAILING

1250 Trans-Canada Hwy. SW

Jacobson

Auburn Bear will be a great addition to anyone’s teddy bear collection. By shopping at the participating merchants during this promotion you could receive ONE of 20 Auburn teddy bears to take home with you!

1771 10th Ave. SW, Salmon Arm

The Mall at Piccadilly

#3 160 Trans-Can. Hwy., Salmon Arm (Complex by Java Jive)

The Mall at Piccadilly

MOUNT IDA PHARMACY

Your Neighbourhood Drug Store

& WINDOW TINTING

BOWLING

410 - 5th Street SW Salmon Arm

Salmon Arm 250-832-3946

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118 Lakeshore Dr. NE, Salmon Arm

The Mall at Piccadillly

1701 10 Ave SW Salmon Arm

2350 TCH NE

Centenoka Park Mall 250 832-5333

330 Alexander St., NE 250-832-2113


Around Town

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

FRIDAY, NOV. 17

SUNDAY, NOV. 19

THE HIVE LIVE – The Hive at 4940 Canoe Beach ART EHIBITION – The Salmon Arm Art Gallery presents True North, a juried exhibition of Shuswap Dr. NE hosts a Seinfeld trivia event at 6:30 p.m. artists, with an opening receptionat 7 p.m. Gallery hours are 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday to Saturday and Family MONDAY, NOV. 20 HISTORY – The Salmon Arm Branch of the OkanaSaturdays, a drop in art program takes place from 11 gan Historical Society meets at 7 p.m. on the third a.m. to 3:30 p.m. COMMUNITY ARTS – An Arts BC Community Monday of the month in the boardroom at the Mall Cultural Forum takes place from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. in at Piccadilly. LEGAL HELP – A free half-hour consult with a council chambers at Salmon Arm city hall. ROMEO & JULIET – Shuswap Theatre presents one lawyer is available for those who qualify. Phone 250of Shakespeare’s best-loved plays over three weekends to 832-3272 for an appointment. Nov. 18 at Shuswap Theatre on Hudson Avenue. Evening performances are at 7:30, Sunday shows are at 1:30 p.m. TUESDAY, NOV. 21 SPIRITUALIST CHURCH – Hosts a spiritual healing The first performance features the Opening Night Gala, with food and refreshments after the show, along with service at 7 p.m. on the third Tuesday of the month at the Seniors’ Drop-in Centre on the corner of Hudson a chance to talk with the cast and crew. CHRISTMAS SALE – The Parkinson group’s third Avenue and Shuswap Street. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. annual Christmas Craft and Home Business Sale from Must be 19 years of age or have parental consent. For 3 to 8 p.m. Friday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Nov. more information, go to www.spiritualistchurchofsal18 at the Salvation Army Church at 191 Second Ave. monarm.com. NW across from the cenotaph. The Parkinson group meets from 9:30 to noon on the first and third Wednes24 EQUAL MONTHLY day of the month at First United Church, featuring exercise, discusPAYMENTS ON sions and information sessions. ANY SERVICES OR SLEIGH OF HOPE – The 26th annual Sleigh of Hope opens at 9:40 PURCHASES OVER a.m. at the Mall at Piccadilly, with $200. STOREWIDE a wide variety of entertainers until 7:30 p.m. Take non-perishable food items for the Salvation Army Food NO FEE, Bank. Unwrapped gifts for children NO INTEREST FINANCING up to age 16, gifts for single moms and cash or cheque donations for on approved credit the Salvation Army Kettles are also welcome.

SATURDAY, NOV. 18 SUNNYBRAE CRAFT SALE – Local crafters will be featured Nov. 18 & 19, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Homemade pea soup will be served. Sunnybrae Seniors Hall, 3585 Sunnybrae Canoe Pt. Rd. For further information, or to rent a table, call Gail 250-463-3889. HOLLY TEA – A Holly Tea and Bake Sale takes place from 1 to 3:30 p.m. at St. John’s Anglican Church, 170 Shuswap St. 26th ANNUAL SLEIGH OF HOPE – Supporting the Salvation Army, fill the sleigh with non-perishable food items, gifts for single moms, unwrapped gifts for infants to 16 years, and donations to the kettles from 9:40 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. CHRISTMAS CRAFT SALE – Carlin Hall’s craft sale will be held from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Table rental is $15. Phone Joan 250-835-0104. OPERA – Live from the Met it’s British composer Thomas Ades’ surreal fantasy The Exterminating Angel at 9:55 a.m. on the big screen at the Salmar Classic. GIFTS & GOODIES – an Artistry Christmas Gift & Bake Sale takes place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Nov. 19 at Blind Bay Community Hall, 2510 Blind Bay Road. Upper hall and Reedman Gallery. FUNDRAISER – The Sorrento and Area Community Health Centre hosts a Name That Tune event at Sorrento Memorial Hall at 7 p.m. Tickets are available at Lighthouse Market in Sorrento, Munro’s IDA pharmacy or at the Sorrento & Area Community Health Centre. This is a fun evening of music, food (pulled pork on a bun), a bar, and a silent auction.

Friday, November 17, 2017 Page A35

THURSDAY, NOV. 23 ART SPEAK – Artist talks and demonstrations take place with artist previews from 1 to 8:30 p.m. at Teyjah’s Art Den, 751 Marine Park Dr. NE. Demonstrations take place from 7 to 8:30 with featured artist Cynthia Langford. GREEN THUMBS – Shuswap Garden Club meeting hosts its Christmas potluck at 7 p.m. at the Scout Hall, 2460 Auto Rd. Members to bring something sweet or savoury; don’t forget plate/mug/cutlery. Everyone is welcome. For more information, call Trish Toms at 250-832-1965. DINE & SHOP – The Barley Station Brew Pub hosts an evening of food, drinks and Christmas shopping while supporting the food bank. Local artisans will be displaying their works from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Take a non-perishable donation and receive a five per cent discount off your purchase.

FRIDAY, NOV. 24

CRAFT SALE – A Christmas Gift & Craft Sale takes place at St. Joseph’s Church Hall at 60 First Street SE on Friday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday, Nov 25 from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. FAMILY POT LUCK – We are having a family pot luck supper at Gleneden Hall at 6 p.m. Take your favourite dish. Buns, tea, coffee and ice tea will be supplied. For more information, call 250-804-0220. MEET THE AUTHOR – The Shuswap Writers’ Group hosts an afternoon with author Ernie Birginshaw, who will read from his mystery novels in the Goliath series from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Blue Canoe Cafe and Bakery. The group’s regular coffee houses will be held from 2 to 4 p.m. on the fourth Friday of the month during the winter months. SHUSWAP JAMMERS – Take an instrument or your dancing shoes to the new school district building on Shuswap Street for an Full Service Auto Centre Open Monday - Saturday evening of music, dancing and singSani Dump On Site ing, featuring door prizes, a 50/50 draw and lunch from 7 to 10 p.m. For more information, call Dean at 250-804-9219. 1151 10th Ave. SW • The Mall at Piccadilly, Salmon Arm

Canadian Tire Store hours: Mon. to Wed. 8 am - 6 pm ~ Thurs. to Fri. 8am - 9pm ~ Sat. 8am-6pm ~ Sun. 9am-5pm

250-832-9600 • Locally Owned & Operated

NUCLEAR WEAPONS – ‘Green Space at First’ and KAIROS-Salmon Arm host “It’s Time to Ban Nuclear Weapons: What Can We Do?” a talk by Calgary lawyer, Bev Delong on progress toward banning nuclear weapons, what needs to be done now, and how we can help, at 7 p.m. First United Church. For more information, call 250- 833-5773. TOPS – Take Off Pounds Sensibly, a weight loss support group for all ages, meets from 9 to 11 a.m. every Tuesday in the basement of St. John’s Anglican Church, 170 Shuswap Street SE. For information, call Carolyn at 250-832-8416.

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 22 WRITERS’ NOOK SEMINAR – Interested in writing a book but not sure how to start? If so, the Writers’ Nook is hosting a presentation by local author E. A. Briginshaw that may be right for you. Event takes place from 10 a.m. to noon at the Blind Bay library. There is no charge to attend.

SATURDAY, NOV. 25

MUSIC ON THE HILLS – Music in a variety of styles, performed by local musicians will be held at 7:30 p.m. at Grandview Bench Hall. Admission by donation. THE HIVE LIVE – The Hive at 4940 Canoe Beach Dr. NE present music with Brand New Empire at 7:30 p.m. ARTISAN MARKET – Shop for handmade items at the Christmas Artisan Market from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Cedar Heights Community Centre, 2516 Lakeview Dr. in Blind Bay. Hearty, homemade soup available for lunch. SENIORS CELEBRATE – Sorrento Lions Club Annual Seniors’ Christmas Party and Silent Auction takes place from 6 to 9 p.m. Free admission to all seniors, entertainment by the Sorrento Glee Club and Al Welland Proceeds from the silent auction will go the Shuswap Lions Manor.

SUNDAY, NOV. 26 PHOTO ARTS – World renowned wildlife and nature photographer John Marriott, originally from Salmon Arm, presents wildlife photography and launches his most recent book, Tall Tales – Long Lenses, at 2 p.m. at the Fifth Avenue Seniors Activity Centre.

Call us at 250-832-2131, drop in to our office, or use our new, easy to use calendar online. You can now upload your own events on our website…AND IT’S EASY!! Simply go to www.saobserver.net, go to CALENDAR, and click on Add Your Event.


Page A36 Friday, November 17, 2017

Salmon Arm Observer/Shuswap Market News

www.saobserver.net

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Lakeshore News, November 17, 2017  
Lakeshore News, November 17, 2017  

November 17, 2017 edition of the Lakeshore News