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2014 Media Kit

TRUEEXCELLENCE 30 INDUSTRY AWARDS IN 2013 2ND Canada

1ST viewpoint British ABBOTSFORD NEWS I Friday, February 24, 2012

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QUESTION OF THE WEEK

Random attack

BUYERS

Do you approve of the Liberals’ latest provincial budget?

Brewsers have never ever been a gang nor are involved in any kind of gang business. Really a bunch of friendly beer drinkers who love rock and roll, skateboards and a good time. Kudos to Const. MacDonald for acknowledging that fact in this article. Dave Gambill

GU I D E

To answer, go to abbynews.com

I thought this town was beginning to grow beyond attacks based on image and stereotypes ... but maybe that is just because I’ve spent some time with the Brewsers and have learned to understand there are groups of like-minded people in this world that just don’t care where you come from, what you look like, or what you do. Too bad that lesson hasn’t been learned by others. Jaime Wilson

ST TIME

N. America

Published and printed by Black Press Limited 34375 Gladys Avenue, Abbotsford.

LAST WEEK, WE ASKED:

2013

Should council approve a request for more slot machines at Chances? 300 RESPONDED:

That is brutal! Just down the street from where I live! Logan James Pelletier

YES: 63% NO: 37%

Ecstasy, with a good chance of death In Cheryl’s case, it was ostensibly to help with weight control. But that’s the problem with ecstasy, or MDMA, and its even more unpredictable imitators. They often do far more than what they’re supposed to do. Taking ‘E’ is playing chemical roulette. You could do it once, and feel good. You could do it a lot, and stay lucky. Or, you could do it one more time – or just once in your life – and lose. Eighteen young people have died in B.C. in the past 14 months due to this drug, or some concoction sold as ecstasy. That’s the other big issue with the little pills with the cute names such as hug drug, candy, beans, scooby snacks, pingers, thizz and care bears. Like the party snack Bits & Bites – you get something different in every handful. Crystal meth, cocaine, LSD, OxyContin, ketamine (an anesthetic used by veterinarians), GHB (a daterape drug), and a long list of other highly toxic, wild-card substances are thrown into the recipes by the

Andrew

Holota

On Point

ABBOTSFORD IN

ACTION

Tyler Miller, 20, of Abbotsford. Died Nov. 27/11. Cheryl McCormack, 17, of Abbotsford. Died Dec. 22/11.

PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE

Kato Burgess, 16, of Langley. Died Jan. 15/12. Three young people. Three random, tragic deaths. One thing in common. They all took ecstasy. And it killed them. One was an accomplished figure skater and rugby player. Another was a budding musician. All had lives full of promising potential ahead of them. And it was all snuffed out, due to a little pill that was supposed to make them feel good.

Abbotsford is a healthy city, both in terms of its economy, and its health care system. Fuelled by a $2-billion agriculture sector, steady industrial growth and energetic residential and commercial development, the city continues to enjoy growth and prosperity. In the third annual edition of Abbotsford in Action, The News examines the city’s economic engines, and provides a special, in-depth look at the city’s health care facilities and programs, from the Abbotsford Regional Hospital and Cancer Centre, to support groups, seniors’ care and hospice services.

1ST

North America

North America

HUNDREDYEARS ROTARYBC

COPYRIGHT

WATER

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Andrew Franklin Publisher 604-851-4538

publisher@abbynews.com

Andrew Holota Editor 604-851-4522

aholota@blackpress.ca

Alana Green Creative services 604-851-4516

alana@abbynews.com

Harv Toews Creative services 604-851-4542

harv@abbynews.com

Copyright and/or property rights subsist in all advertisements and in all other material appearing in this edition of The News. Permission to reproduce wholly 2009 WINNER or in part and in any form whatsoever, particularly by a photographic or offset process in a publication, must be obtained in writing from the publisher. Any unauthorized reproduction will be subject to recourse in law.

SWITCHBOARD 604.853.1144 I CIRCULATION: 604.870.4595 I CLASSIFIED: 604.851.4537

SATURDAY OPEN HOUSE CELEBRATES NINE DECADES Abbotsford News opens its doors to dignitaries and the public to help mark its 90th anniversary of covering the community.

A B B O T S F O R D

MAY 26, 2012

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2012 WINNER

abbynews.com

Online all the time. In print prin Tuesday, Thursday & Friday

HOT

Three clubs serving our city: Rotary Club of Abbotsford

>

Tuesday, Noon

Rotary Club of Abbotsford Sumas

>

Wednesday, 7:00 am

Rotary Club of Abbotsford Matsqui

>

Thursday, 6:15 pm

One person can make a difference. Together we can change the world.

ONE CAUSE. ONE WORLD. ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF SERVICE ABOVE SELF. A

publication

WIN $5,000 IN CASH

RELAX Your Fave Spa

OR THIS

HARLEY DAVIDSON!

RONALD ALLAN

ROTA PLAST

Sweet Bike Trails Abbotsford New

Proud supporters of Rotary International

Foundations for a great future It’s been 90 years since the Abbotsford News first appeared on local doorsteps. And like the community it serves, the local paper has seen many changes. In 1922, Gerald H. Heller purchased a struggling community paper called the Abbotsford Post and changed the name to the Abbotsford Sumas and Matsqui News. Situated in Abbotsford, the new newspaper covered the municipalities of Sumas and Matsqui. It also covered the

Abbotsford district, which, in 1927, was incorporated into a village. Under the leadership of Heller, the paper was produced once a week and averaged between six and eight pages an edition. In 1938, Heller sold The News to Lang Sands of New Westminster. Sands had a background in the newspaper industry, having worked in Chilliwack as an assistant editor, and later at the Columbian paper in New Westminster.

Sands’ plan was to turn The News, which featured local and international news, into an all-home print publication. Within two years the paper was eight pages of all local news and was produced entirely in Abbotsford. By this time, the circulation had hit 1,000 customers. In 1949, The News was again sold, this time to Cecil Hacker, who came from the Chilliwack Progress. In 1962, the Liverpool Daily Post and Echo Limited purchased The News along

CARLY RAE JEPSEN

Pictured riding the Harley is Bart Por from MSA Ford

Your Favourite Local Singer

What’s inside: 03 03 04 06 08 09 10 12 14

A N OT O T H E R G R E AT AT N E WS W S R E A D E R CO CONT

Favourite Designer Clothing Store

JOHN MORROW

Pg. Pg. Pg. Pg. Pg. Pg. Pg. Pg. Pg.

2ND British Columbia

EATS

The Abbotsford Grand Squares brought their square-dancing talents to The News’ 90th anniversary celebration today. A Message From The Presidents New Generations The Power Of Yes Investing In Our Community Together We Can Rid The World Of Polio The Value Of Becoming A Rotarian Strawberry Sales Fund Programs Serving Through Festivals More Than 15,000 Patients Helped By Rotaplast

1st Time Home Buyers Guide

WHAT YOU LOVE ABOUT ABBOTSFORD

North America

EPONLID O

SCHO

STADIUM

HOME DECORATING HOME IMPROVEMENT LEGAL/MORTGAGES GRANTS/REBATES LANDSCAPING REALTORS

Ecstasy, with a good chance of death

2ND KIDS

That encourages users to take another dose, and maybe even more after that. And then suddenly, in some users, the body boils over. If the temperature remains high for more than an hour, the chance of death or permanent brain damage is 75 per cent. MDMA/PMMA was responsible for five of the B.C. ecstasy deaths last

34375 Gladys Avenue Abbotsford, B.C. V2S 2H5

Abbotsford in Action 2012

BC SCHOOLS

Like the party snacks Bits & Bites, you get something different in every handful.

year. Tyler was one of them. Eventually, the PMMA tainted pills might disappear off the street. Losing one’s buyers isn’t good for the drug trade, after all. But, as emergency room doctors point out, that will just leave the rest of the ecstasy variants out there, and the dying will continue. It doesn’t have to be this way, of course. There is a way to end the twisted, ugly irony of this drug called ecstasy. Young people can listen to the messages being delivered by police, and medical authorities, and school officials, and hopefully, every parent and caregiver out there. That message is simple. Say no. Or, you don’t have to listen to the police and doctors and teachers and parents. Just listen to Tyler and Cheryl and Kato. But that’s impossible, you say. They’re dead. That’s right. Listen to their silence. It says everything.

MEMBER OF B.C. PRESS COUNCIL

The Abbotsford News is a member of the B.C. Press Council, a self-regulatory body governing the province’s newspaper industry. The council considers complaints from the public about the conduct of member newspapers. Directors oversee the mediation of complaints, with input from both the newspaper and the complaint holder. If talking with the editor or publisher does not resolve your complaint about coverage or story treatment, you may contact the B.C. Press Council. Your written concern, with documentation, should be sent to B.C. Press Council, 201 Selby St., Nanaimo, B.C. V9R 2R2. For information, phone 888-687-2213 or go to www.bcpresscouncil.org Authorized as second class mail by the Post Office Department Second class mail registration no. 1246

TALS ITA HOSPIT

backroom, bathtub chemists. The latest, deadliest ingredient to lace the alphabet soup of ecstasy is PMMA. It’s another synthetic stimulant, five times more powerful than MDMA, and slower to react.

ENTER ER FOR YOUR YOUR R CHANCE TO W WIN!

YOUR FAVE SHOPS

with two other community papers, the Chilliwack Progress and Mission’s Fraser Valley Record. That formed the nucleus of the MetroValley Newspaper Group. Hacker was named president of the three papers. On Jan. 1, 1997, The Abbotsford News, and MetroValley, became part of Black Press. Today, the Abbotsford News publishes Tuesday, Thursday and Friday, delivering more than 45,000 copies each issue.

Simply visit MSA Ford in the Fraser Valley Auto Mall at 30295 Automall Drive and take a picture of this cool bike in the store. Email your photo along with your name and phone number to:

feeltherumble@abbynews.com Abbotsford International 61 YEARS

Proud to sponsor THE NEWS SPECIAL 90TH EDITION

Celebrating 100 Years of Rotary

BRITISH COLUMBIA Ad Campaign Award: Gold Columnist Award: Gold Community Services Award: Gold Special Section Award: Gold

90th Anniversary Open House

The Abbotsford News A-List 2012

Advertising - Print: Silver & Bronze Special Section: Silver & Bronze Magazine: Silver & Bronze Digital Innovation: Gold & Silver

Newspaper Marketing & Promotion: Gold, Silver & Bronze

61

YEARS

Feel the Rumble

Best Front Page: Honourable Mention Best Special Section: Gold Best New Local Contest: Silver Best Community Event Promotion: Silver

NORTH AMERICA

Best Wildcard (Niche Product): Gold

Best Special Section: Bronze

Best Real Estate or Homes Pub: Gold

Website and Online Innovation: Gold

CANADA

SINCE 1951

Best Entertainment/Lifestyle Section: Bronze

Best Event Marketing:

Best Opinion Column: Silver

Gold & Honourable Mention

Best Sports Writing: Gold

Best ROP Advertising Section: Bronze

The News is consistently recognized for industry excellence, receiving 25 awards in 2010-2011-2012.

your life your community.

34375 Gladys Ave, Abbotsford, BC | t: 604.853.1144 | f: 604.850.5426 | mediainfo@abbynews.com | abbynews.com

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