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AIR Dimitri Blazos 2013


AIR

Dimitri Blazos Tutors: David and Adam 2013


Table of Contents ....................................................................................1 ....................................................................................2 ....................................................................................3

AIR


About ME Dimitri James Blazos





















CAD

My name is Dimitri, I am a current student of Melbourne University studying a Bachelor of Environments. I began my journey at a polytechnic school in 2010, studying a Bachelor of Architecture. I familiarised myself with freehand drawing, drafting, model making, sculpture, AutoCAD etc. After completing my first year, I transfered interstate and studying Bachelor of Architecture at the University of Canberra. Here I further studied design and architectural history, also taught myself Revit to help with the conceptualisation of my designs. In Canberra our design focus was to not treat physical models as something precious, rather as a tool for improvement. This involved moving parts, cutting and glueing. After completing a semester in Canberra and finding out I was accepted into the University of Melbourne I packed my bags and headed home. After completing second semester 2012, and having to do first year core subjects I further learnt more about computer design. Virtual Environments taught me a lot about Rhino which allowed me to create forms which would have been much more difficult in Revit or AutoCAD.

Freehand drawing has always been something I have used in the inital stages of conceptualisation. In partnership with models , simple forms I find are much quicker to do by hand which I guess had become an intuitive part of my designing. After completing Virtual my perception began to change, about the usefullness of CAD in the conception process. With plug-ins such as Grasshopper, the manipulation of a form can help to simulate that of freehand drawing, which I believe is a very useful tool.

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About ME Past Work

2nd Year: University of Canberra 2013 My work in second year at the University of Canberra was a step up from my previous studies at a polytechnic design school in Melbourne. The assignment (fig 1.1, fig 1.2) was to design a house which was constrained to 100m^2, which attempted to adapt to its landscape. This assignment focused on ideas of circulation and how one would arrange the spaces of a house (e.g. Work, Rest, Play). This design was a modification of an initial design which was inspired by a snake and its articulated properties. As far as using computation it wasn’t manditory but I felt that it would help with conceptualising the space. Having known the skills now of Rhino, I think I would have used them because constraints such as the 100m^2 did change the outcome of my design. By using parametrics this would have allowed me to manipulate the form later in the design process, not allowing those sorts of parameters to determine my design. Having completed my first semester of second year in Canberra I moved back to Melbourne where I completed some first year subjects at the University of Melbourne - most beneficial being Virtual Environments. Virtaul Environments introduced us to Rhino as a modelling tool for forms, I utilised panelling tool plug-ins to creating geometries on the surface of my form.

First year: Virtual Environments 2012 fig 1.1

fig 2.1

fig 2.2

fig 1.2

fig 2.3

The surface contained a point attractor which varied the size of the openings along the surface. The design itself was inspired by a sound wave and the properties which make up any wave (peak, trough, amplitude). By using a three point pipe command I created the surface to express a change in amplitude of a wave. The spikes along the surface expressed the intensity change with the change in amplitude (fig 2.2). Virtual Environments gave me the fundermentals I needed for Design Studio Air, as the fabrication process introduced us to Grasshopper in order to create tabs along the fabricated sheets of paper. The photograph shows the final fabricated panel, which became one of 36 pieces which formed my design. The image underneath shows the A1 paper layouts of the “unrollings�.


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architecture as a discourse

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01 WEEk


Computation Vs Computerisation The increasing and revolutionary inclusion of computational design within architecture, has transformed the way we discourse about architecture, as well as the approach to design. This innovative and exciting transitifion from traditional approaches, of rectalinear buildings which do not represent real life, create a new dimension and approach to the design proccess. Dr. Roudavski in his lecture spoke about this design process approach which begins before the brief is assigned, allowing for a generation of computational ideas which have the capability for later manipulation to fit the brief of the client. Kalay reflects on this idea, with the use of geometric puzzles. Where a â&#x20AC;&#x153;desired solution can be formulated prior to and independently of the search for the solution that satisfies them. These ideas are further discusses in the Woobury reading on the ideas of the design space. Kalay further emphasises the power of computational utilisation and the abilities of discourse between allied building and engineering professionals. This approach allows for inputs to be made, such as structural analysis, goal setting, as well as devising actions that might accomplish them.

02 WEEk


Architecture and the design space Design space in refernece to computing, is the idea that design involves the analysis and manipulation of design to create alternatives. This design space, which is organised into cell like structure, isolates the separate components which make up the design space. Designers who initate some sort of form, use this as a guide to aid for evaluation and re-configuration of a concept. An undiscovered design often is linked and its derivation is often determined by the amount of pathways it has. Figure 1 outlined in Woodburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reading, illustrates how multiple design solutions (discovered designs) help to determine an undiscovered design solution. This suggests that with exploration, possible parametres could be set which can help to form a solution. With my work using grasshopper, generating ideas helped me formulate a solution - as it worked as a progressive realisation, of the capabilities to progress a design from an initial motivator. The interesting thing about architecture is that it is becoming less static and computerisation allows designers to amplify idea, which may be to difficult and complicating to conceptualise and manipulate by freehand as well as brief and client constraints. Similar to figure 1, figure 2 outlines this application of the design space to the real word and the design constraints.

This idea is very relevant to the gateway project and the ability to form a concept which can later be alternated when a design brief and certain constraints are given.

02 WEEk


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Precedents

ICD/ITKE Research Pavilion 2012

03 WEEk


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Parametric Modelling and scripting cultures

Designers and architects are constantly under the spotlight, to create new ways of designing and thinking - forcing them to explore new ways of representing ideas, constructing ideas and fabricating ideas. It has only been in the last decade where parametric design has really changed and evolved the way architecture is constructed and perceived. Robert Woodbury’s analysis of the new paradigm, suggests that the modern day designer, needs to be a “designer, a computer scientist and a mathematician”. He suggests that the task of being a designer in itself is difficult enough for the individual. In my opinion, this statement suggests that designers need to grasp concepts well beyond mere aesthetics and form creation. The modern day designer is required to critically understand concepts of programming, algorithms and geometry all branches of mathematics. This shift eliminates the capabilities of utlising conventional design techniques (T squares, set squares), and rather assist the cognitive limitations of humans to generate more complex geometries. This statement though is challenged in Mark Burrys’ reading, that parametric design allows for the simplification of geometry. But further discourse into parametric design suggests that an understanding of how parametric systems operate or work is unnecessary. An understanding which scrapes the surface and doesn’t delve into the ‘nitty gritty’ mathematics/programming associated with the scripted language. Mark Burry refers to this idea as scripting culture which is said to be as “the implications of lower-level computer programming”. In contrast to Woodbury’s views, Burry suggests and reinforces the importance of designer engagement with scripting, and having the ability to “completely reconfigure software”.

To further analyse this shift from conventional methods, this process of constant improvement and if you like, assistance, is helping design as a whole. Woodbury demonstrates this concept through ideas of pen and paper, then to incorporating T square, triangle, which made drawings more accurate. This shift is very similar to making models which initially are ‘easy’ to construct, but ultimately difficult to manipulate and change its dimensions and compositional properties. This often causes problems because it may limit the exploration and effectively restrict the design. As a student I have come across these limitations, in attempt to create complex geometries. Even in an attempt to create them, designs have become inaccurate or very time consuming to complete.

Similarly to Woodbury, Burry recognises this constant debate and tension between computer design as practical “aide-de-camp” (assisting), and computer as “digital design agent”.

old

New

03 WEEk


BOXEL Students of Detmolder Schule

This parametric temporary structure created by university students of Detmolder Schule, designed this structure from beer boxes. It was designed as a pavilion project for the students of the architecture department. It functions as a presentation area, concert stage and gathering area of events. The project was created under the digital design course, where students were asked to create a mock up in scale 1:1, using digital design and fabrication tools. The freeform geometry created with 2000 beer boxes was created with the Grasshopper plug-in for Rhino. This sort of software allowed students to control the positioning of boxes in relation to its overall geometry. Something which would have been ultimately very difficult to do with conventional methods of design. Students could use stress analysis to determine the loads of the structure and its overall performance. Similar in my own exploration, creating a surface which expresses contours and then assignining geometry to that contoured surface which you can see in the photos below. A continuation of this would then be an extrusion of those geometries on the surface to creat something similar to the BOXEL project. Of course the BOXEl uses much more complex geometry as it twists laterally as well.

The discourse surrounding pavilions is an interesting topic to look at seen as though I have also reviewed the ICD/ITKE Research Pavilion 2012. In analysing these two structures it is important to understand why the designer (student) came to a certain design and what was the overall intent. In evaluating the two, their intentions seem to be similar but branch off in different directions. As both create a shelter for people to circulate through the form, this suggests that an initial design involved a skin (or a surface) which was then later manipulated to create very specific contextual and cultural information. Especially with the BOXEL project, to me, the beer boxes resembles a facination with alcohol amounghts students within the university environment, a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;cultureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; which appeals to students. As for the Reasearch Pavilion, its intent wasnt as much contextual rather material exploration in robotics and exoskeletal structures. Regardless of their different intents both perform a similar task and abide by the clients (the projects) outlines.

03 WEEk


Capital Gateway Abu Dhabi

Having looked at small scale projects through my exploration into parametric design and modelling. How does this apply to very large scale and indeed revolutionary buildings to architecture? In understand the basics of computer programming and scripting culture, designers can use these techniques to apply to very large scale projects. Allowing them to do very complex stress analysis of structures (such as the one on the left) which would have been practically impossible or very time consuming in the past. When searching parametric architecture you get a range of projects and proposals designed by famous architects and students. But if I was to challenge parametric and its meaning, it is difficult to give it a clear and generic meaning. If a simple way to express parametric design as merely being ‘change’ as Woobury says in his article, how does that change the way architecture is produced? For large scale projects such as the Leaning Tower of Abu Dhabi, this ‘changability’ means that a set of parameters or constraints set by the client, allow for small adjustments to be made to the form or structure. Other ideas of change could be that the triangulation on the surface which may have been produced when/if the building was linear doesnt need to be regenerated when changes are made to the model. For many, such as Michael Meredith, believe that this movement to parametric design is “The mastering of hi-tech engineering software” which is used to produce architecture which is ornate and decorative. His views suggest that parametric is superficial and still skin-deep and maybe “lacking framework of referents, narratives, history and forces”.

03 WEEk


Algorithmic Exploration


Conclusion


Learning Outcome


References

Week 3 progression  

My work for air

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