Page 1

» WINTER 2012

» WINTER 2012

Orage

© Blake Jorgenson, Orage

TOMMY & LEFEBVRE MAGAZINE

THE BUCKET LIST

Helly Hansen / LIFA

Nordicacanada.com

ON SNOW MAGAZINE

Burton Photo: L'Heureux Rider: Brock Crouch

GEAR GUIDE

OUR GUIDE TO MUST-HAVE SKI GADGETS

Descenre

Burton Photo: Justin L'Heureux Rider: Shaun White

GATINEAU 530 DE LA GAPPE KANATA 499 TERRY FOX ORLEANS 250 CENTRUM BARRHAVEN 3777 STRANDHERD

COMPLIMENTARY ISSUE

© Charles Spina 10, Orage

201 2

+ COMPLIMENTARY ISSUE

EXPERIENCE . SHARE . SHOP TANDL.COM

THE BEST

PACK YOUR BAGS FOR THESE MUST-DO SKI ADVENTURES

DOWNTOWN 464 BANK © Dinno Kovic, Astis

WORLD CUP SKIER PATRICK BIGGS ON NEW FIS RULES

PREMIERE ISSUE

PREMIERE ISSUE

Fresh Faces

»SAVING FACE

PROTECTING YOUR SKIN FROM THE ELEMENTS

PLUS

SKI TIPS

A LONG OUTSIDE LEG WILL IMPROVE YOUR EDGING PERFORMANCE


Commands the road. And attention. Introducing the 2012 GLK-Class.

MAGAZINE

Powerful, yet practical – with its comfortable interior and adjustable storage space, the GLK-Class is ready for whatever life sends your way. Add to that the available award-winning 4MATIC™ permanent all-wheel drive system, standard 20” alloy wheels – and the available AMG Sport Package for an even more commanding look – and you’ll truly experience love at first drive. Visit Ogilvie Motors or mercedes-benz.ca/glk for more details.

ON SNOW

2 The 2012 GLK-Class. Total Price: $44,105*. ©2011 Mercedes-Benz Canada Inc. GLK 350 4MATIC™ model shown. *Total price of $46,305 include MSRP, freight/PDI of $1,995, dealer admin fee of $375, air-conditioning levy of $100, EHF tires, filters, batteries of $29.70 and OMVIC fee of $5. Total Price does not include GST, HST or PST, vehicle licence, insurance, registration and PPSA (if applicable).

Ogilvie Motors Ltd. 1110 St Laurent Blvd, (613) 745-9000, ogilvie.mercedes-benz.ca


Contents

On Snow Magazine » Winter 2012

34

11

Front Side Must have gear Things we love From the T&L archives

18 20 22 24 25 26 27 28 30 31 32

Gear Guide Front side carve men Front side carve women All mountain men All mountain women New school men New school women Race men and women Snowboarding men Snowboarding women Junior boys and girls

34

The Bucket List

42 43 44 50

Back Side Neck stylin’ Saving face Thinking Biggs Last Track

HOT STUFF! CHECK OUT THE LATEST AND GREATEST GEAR ON PAGE 18

MAGAZINE

25

Editor’s note

3 ON SNOW

7 9 11 12 14

10


ON SNOW

4 MAGAZINE


ON SNOW

5

MAGAZINE


MAGAZINE

CONFIDENT WHEN IT MATTERS

ON SNOW

6

Helly Hansen: The choice of professional athletes for staying dry, warm and comfortable. Anna Haag / Olympic gold medalist and pro Nordic skier


TOMMY AND LEFEBVRE PRESIDENT Kevin Pidgeon kp@tandl.com VICE PRESIDENT Natalie Tommy nt@tandl.com THANK YOU TO ALL OUR MANAGEMENT AND HUNDREDS OF COMMITTED AND HARDWORKING STAFF

WINTER 2012 ISSUE PUBLISHER Tommy and Lefebvre Inc.

Do what you love to do ... and do it with passion. Winter is our favourite time to play. Living ON SNOW, whether it’s big moun-tain skiing, playing in the park, heading for the trees, or just floating down a perfectly-groomed pitch; we are always in search of that elusive best run. That’s what makes us return time and again with family and friends. Is there really such a thing as your “best run”. Skiing Tremblant at minus 40 is a badge of honour, skiing Whistler-Blackcomb back bowls is a testament to our youthful legs of steel and nailing the Shakedown at Mont St. Sauveur brings you to your knees on several levels. This is where Tommy and Lefebvre lives and breathes and we wouldn’t want it any other way. world cup skier patrick Biggs on new Fis rules Every day, we hear stories of our customers’ best runs, where they will go next and how much they love their “new stuff.” With four ski areas within 40 minutes, our customers escape 2012 gear there every days, take a few quick runs guide on the local hills and hurry back to tell us where the best conditions are. Along with our staff, they have made us who we are today. Tommy and pack your bags for these must-do Lefebvre is a place to meet, share ski adventures stories, recant the epic crashes and Our guide tO shop for the latest equipment and must-have ski gadgets outerwear the industry has to offer. ski tiPs savIng We are passionate and committed a long outside leg will improve face your edging protecting your performance to alpine ski racing. Racing is in our skin from the elements DNA and always will be. It’s the charge that ignites the sport of alpine skiing. The new technology is infinitely lighter and faster than that which my dad (Art Tommy) and uncle Andy used in the 1958 Olympics (see page 14 for a story on our history) or competing at the World Cup level and it represents innovation at the highest level. Over the years, the Art Tommy foundation has supported ski racing to the tune of over $500,000 and 9,000 athletes from regional to national team levels. We are passionate and committed to alpine ski racing. Our business has grown over the past 50 years, but our core values have remained the same: Hire the passion and train the rest. Every year we endeavor to search out the very latest innovation at every level of the sport and deliver it to our customers at the best price without sacrificing service. Whatever you need to enjoy the outdoors you will find at Tommy and Lefebvre. Our business remains a family business with my husband Kevin Pidgeon at the helm for over 300 staff. We hope you enjoy our first issue of ON SNOW. It’s just the tip of the iceberg of what you’ll find in store and is a showcase of innovation that we see every year. We truly believe that your best day on snow is right over the next crest or around the corner, and when you are ready to give it your all we will be here for you 24/7. See you soon in the store, on snow and on facebook. Premiere issue

» WiNTer 2011/2012

PRODUCTION/EDITORIAL Snowsports Media Inc.

Editor’s Note

ART DIRECTOR Lisa Thé ASSOCIATE ART DIRECTOR Doris Cheung

T&L STORE LOCATIONS

The BuckeT LIsT

the best

+

plus

COmPLimeNTArY issue

»

Flagship Store 464 Bank Street, Ottawa (613) 236-9731 Orleans Town Centre 250 Centrum Blvd., Orleans (613) 834-2653 Barrhaven Store Opening November 3777 Strandherd Dr., Barrhaven (613) 828-4550 Kanata Signature Center 499 Terry Fox Dr., Kanata (613) 271-8524 Gatineau Store 530 De La Gappe, Gatineau (819) 568-3595 Ottawa Athletic Club Tennis And Fitness Pro Shop 2525 Lancaster Road, Ottawa (613) 260-9111 ON SNOW Magazine is a publication created for skiing enthusiasts in the Ottawa region and is a property of Tommy and Lefebvre. For more information on Tommy and Lefebvre visit TandL.com or follow via social media at:

Natalie Tommy Vice President, Tommy and Lefebvre

MAGAZINE

COPY EDITOR Don Cameron

tommy & lefebvre magazine

7 ON SNOW

EDITOR Gordie Bowles


ON SNOW

8 MAGAZINE


FrontSide

MAGAZINE

The world according to Tommy & Lefebvre > News + Vintage + Gear + Lifestyle

Winter Warmup As the fresh blankets of snow cover the Gatineau hills, we can’t help but feel the anticipation of another stellar season just around the corner. There’s nothing more exhilarating than the first run down the mountain. That moment when you check off the list: “My equipment is dialed, my body is ready, and my mind, well, I hope I remember how to turn.” A few lucky skiers have already made a few turns; the rest of us will have to wait a bit for Camp Fortune, Edelweiss, Mount Cascades and Mont Tremblant to open their gates. We look forward to seeing you in our store and on the slopes.

ON SNOW

9


FrontSide FROM THE ARCHIVES

MY EQUIPMENT

IS DIALED, MY BODY IS

READY, AND MY MIND,

MAGAZINE

WELL, I HOPE I REMEMBER HOW TO TURN

ON SNOW

10 GOOD OL’ DAYS

The Canadian alpine team during a training camp in Tignes, France, in October 1969. From left to right: Gilbert Mollard (coach), Dan Irwin, Jim Hunter, Bill Irwin, Aidan Ballantyne, Doug Temple, Peter Duncan, Rick Hunter, Peter Goodman, Peter Bellos, Reto Barrington, Derek Robbins, Keith Shepherd, Harold Harb, Mike Culver, Russell Goodman. Doug Woodcock, Paul Carson, Larry Nelles (coach), Claude Dumontier, Don Lyon (coach), Diane Culver, Kathy Kreiner, Laurie Kreiner, Judy Crawford, Carolyn Oughton, Ginny Honeyman, Diane Pratte, (hidden by) Betsy Clifford, Peter Franzen (coach). Photo courtesy Edouard J. Champagne. See more vintage ski photos at the Canadian Ski Hall of Fame and Museum: skimuseum.ca

Pleasure Stay

For your next trip to ski the hills of Alberta, you might want to consider the picturesque and intimate Paintbox Lodge, nestled in the heart of Canmore, Alberta. The rustic stay — owned and operated by former Olympians Sara Renner and Thomas Grandi — is an unpretentious lodge all of its own, featuring hand-sanded wooden beams and a state-of-the-art Miele kitchen, where guests are served fresh breakfast. The majestic ceilings and classic mountain-lodge-feel give this inn a cozy feel. The sports couple — Grandi, winner of back-to-back World Cup giant slalom races in 2005 and Renner, winner of an Olympic silver medal — have put great care into all elements of the home. The Paintbox Lodge is a place to completely get away and still enjoy the comforts of home and get to know a pair of Olympians! paintboxlodge.com

RYAN SEMPLE “For those of you who have skied [the Streif in Kitzbühel, Austria], you can relate to my experience. Something about Kitzbühel just makes you happy when you cross the finish line!”


The world according to Tommy & Lefebvre > News + Vintage + Gear + Lifestyle

2

1

BEST SKI TUNE!

MAGAZINE

Montana Robotic Ski Tuning System This ski and board tuning system lives in a world of excellence and is a sign for quality in ski and board service. Precision stone grinding, radial ski tuning and waxing for all skis and boards including World Cup stock.

11 ON SNOW

FIVE THINGS WE MUST HAVE 4 3

1 The Oakley Airbrake comes standard with two lens tints, switch-lock technology for the easiest lens changes. Designed to fit medium to large faces. 2 Comform’able footbeds help you make the right connection with your feet, footwear and your body for the ultimate in comfort and performance. This 3 POC helmet is multi-disciplinary helmet that can be used all year around. It has certification by all snowsports, water, bike and skateboard environments. Safe and functional. The 4 Thule Boxter is a staff favourite and is great for compact cars or small SUVs. It holds a whopping 18 cubic feet, or 110 pounds, of cargo and fits eight pairs of skis or six snowboards.


FrontSide 1

MAGAZINE

2

1 We love this Burton tech tee. It’s made of a fabric that is engineered to keep you dry and comfortable. You can wear it as a first layer or on its own, on or off the hill.

2 The Burton Sleeper Hoodie is the perfect travel companion made of a think soft cotton blend, complete with neck roll, toothbrush, earplugs, luggage tag, light shield and venting.

ON SNOW

12

3

4

5

3 The Arc’teryx Covert Cardigan is a breathable lightweight fleece with a regular relaxed fit jacket and casual design. Ideal for layering or on its own. 4 Lifa First Layers by Helly Hansen is a fashionable baselayer that combines Lifa hollow technology with Merino wool for a luxurious feel next to your skin. 5 We love this new distinctive Dale of Norway design. It is a feminine sweater knit with heavyweight Norwegian Heilo yarn, with a small pocket on the left arm and longer front zip for convenience.


The world according to Tommy & Lefebvre > News + Vintage + Gear + Lifestyle

7

6 With the largest lens of any PoV camera, the Contour Plus captures beautiful 1080p video. The 2.8� aperture, 170° wideangle rotating lens delivers the truest full HD imaging with minimal distortion.

6

made of the high-quality suede leather and lined with drywicking Polartec Thermal Pro High Loft to keep your hands dry and warm in all conditions

13 ON SNOW

10 THINGS WE LOVE

MAGAZINE

7 Inspired by the Cree Indian timeless mitt, Astis mittens are

8

9

9 This unique Lorpen Tri-Layer sock is for use in a performance boot. The light padding and comfort and warmth benefits of the unique design. Primaloft and Merino combine for exceptional warmth and moisture control. 8 We love this boot heater because it

simply transfers from one pair of footwear to another. Outdoor boots, riding boots, rubber boots, ski or snowboard boots.

10

10 Thermic heated gloves are the

perfect solution for those who need added warmth on cold days.


FrontSide

MAGAZINE

WELCOME HOME (below) The Canadian Alpine team is welcomed back from the 1956 Cortina Olympics. This was dad’s only Olympic appearance but Andy would go on to coach in the 1960 Olympics in Squaw Valley.

ON SNOW

14

FLAGSHIP The Tommy and Lefebvre main store, 464 Bank Street, circa 1980s. The exterior was done in barn-board from Edelweiss Valley and summer specialties were large powerboats, canoes, kayaks and lawnboys!

FROM THE

OLYMPIANS (above) The Canadian Olympic alpine Team arrives back into Ottawa by train. Hundreds came to greet them with skis and poles in 1956.

THE ROOTS (right) The first Tommy and Lefebvre store on Fleet Street, circa 1958. The store was a room in the Bytowne Inn. Reg Lefebvre (left) and Art Tommy (right) would make weekly trips to Montreal to get new stock.

ARCHIVES


MAGAZINE

The world according to Tommy & Lefebvre > News + Vintage + Gear + Lifestyle

ON SNOW

15

THE THREE BOYS Andy Jr., Fred and Art Tommy leaving the Ottawa Ski Club, circa 1951. They had to cross country in from Hull to what we know as Camp Fortune, then ski for the day.


ON SNOW

16 MAGAZINE


MAGAZINE

17

Descente

Dale of Norway

Dale of Norway

ON SNOW

Kjus

Icebreaker

Helly Hansen

Bogner

Descente

Š Blake Jorgenson, Orage

Pure

MATCHING ACCESSORY OFFER Purchase $500 regular priced Dale of Norway

ski or boardwear and get $100 in matching accessories free. * Limited time offer, details in store.

EXPERIENCE . SHARE . SHOP TANDL.COM


MAGAZINE

GEAR GUIDE ON SNOW

18

HOT NEW PRODUCTS for your winter pursuits. Reviewed and tested by our team at Tommy & Lefebvre and many exclusive to us. Another season is at our doorstep and the excitement of that first turn is just around the corner. You are no doubt looking in your garage to ensure that your gear is dialed in. Ski and snowboard apparel and equipment is quite possibly at its pinnacle. Innovations like the rocker technology in skis and boards, customized boot fitting and insulation technology have taken us into a new era. Buckle up for a great season.


MAGAZINE ON SNOW

19

Salomon BBR 8.9 The revolutionary BBR has an oversized, surfboard-shaped tip for flotation in soft snow and terrain absorption, with a narrow tail and short radius sidecut for quick, precise carving.


FRONT SIDE CARVE MEN

gearguide

1 / 12

THE GOODS

MAGAZINE

1

ON SNOW

20 5 6

Front Side Carve Report

1 Descente World

2

Cup Spanish Team Descente’s legendary World Cup performance technical apparel inspired by Spanish and Swiss team athletes. Tommy and Lefebvre exclusive.

7

2 Descente Carve

Descente World Cup performance in a regular fit, combined with four-way stretch and 40 gram insulation. Tommy and Lefebvre exclusive.

3 POC Retina Double 3

scratch resistant wideangle lens to improve reaction time and features antifog treatment. In many colours.

4 Salomon Impact 100 CS High-performance all-mountain boot for skiers who refuse to sacrifice comfort or performance. New stance position, World Cup shell technology and customizable liners. 5 Head Super Shaped

4

Magnum Head delivers World Cup construction in this fast and manageable fully equipped

speed machine that will bring your skiing experience to a new level.

6 Salomon Equipe 24

Hours Salomon brings the first rockered front side carver to the slopes for the expert skier who enjoys progressive carving and short turns. Tommy and Lefebvre exclusive.

7 POC Super Skull Comp POC, the Swedish helmet company, burst onto the race scene to create a very light flexible shelled helmet that withstands repeated hits from gates. Try one on for size, exclusively at Tommy and Lefebvre.

SKIS If groomed, steep pitches and highspeed carving are your thing then you will enjoy the skis found in the frontside category. Rocker ski technology is advancing the carving experience and based on our tests, it delivers a smooth, stable ride at high speeds and has quick edgeto-edge response without exerting much pressure. The result is a lighter, more versatile ski with a consistently smoother ride

with less leg fatigue, allowing you to take more runs. BOOTS The buzz in boot technology this year goes to the Salomon impact series because of the customizable shell and liner. The common thread with all the brands and models that we tested is that you don’t have to give up performance at the expense of comfort. If you haven’t had a new pair of boots in a while, it’s a good time for an upgrade. SKIWEAR Men’s skiwear has never looked or performed better. Most of the products has been designed to accommodate the huge advancements


FRONT SIDE CARVE MEN

gearguide

2 / 12

THE GOODS 1 Helly Hansen Stoneham Helly Hansen delivers this two-way stretch fabric, for the ultimate dynamic movement in an athletic-fitting jacket. Experience the Norwegian confidence and stay warm. 2 Helly Hansen

1

4 Rossignol 9s Oversize The Pure Mountain company delivers a quick lightning-fast ski that is stable at higher speeds and excels in the quick turns. Perfect for advanced skiers who like short radius turns. 5 Vรถlkl Tigershark

10FT The Vรถlkl Tigershark 10FT lives in all conditions. Speed and crisp turns are the signature of this precision fully cambered ski.

Rocker technology is advancing the

6 Nordica Fire Arrow

CARVING EXPERIENCE

2

and based on our tests it delivers a smooth, stable ride. in fabrics and insulations. The emphasis here is on two-and four-way stretch in both jackets and pants, all but guaranteeing a more comfortable experience on snow

all day. The top brands: Descente, Kjus, Goldwin, Colmar, Spyder and Helly Hansen are proven performers and are the choice of the T&L buyers and customers.

F4 The Nordica Fire Arrow is a completely new design to address the needs of performance skiers wanting greater lateral precision, progressive flex and more speed more often.

7 Giro Seam The

Seam is the perfect all-mountain helmet with an improved Stack Vent, to keep your temperature under control and your goggles clear.

3

7

5 4

6

21 ON SNOW

3 Oakley Splice Shattered Hi Definition Optics, an Oakley signature, comes standard in this goggle. Features include a lens that is easily changed and a flexible chassis.

MAGAZINE

Legend The Helly Hansen Legend pant is a staple at Tommy and Lefebvre. Waterproof and insulated with Primaloft, it is adjustable at the waist and is a regular fit.


FRONT SIDE CARVE WOMEN

gearguide

3 / 12

THE GOODS

MAGAZINE

1

ON SNOW

22 5 6

Front Side Carve Report

1 Descente Vancouver

2

Descente’s luxurious four-way stretch fabric in a one of a kind black foil milk print is luxury and performance all in one.

7

2 Descente Struts

These pants have insulated four-way stretch and are a staple and perhaps one of Descente’s most perfect fits. In sizes 4-16, short to tall.

3 Giro Amulet The

3

Amulet goggle is a new from scratch, women’s goggle. The full-size frame features are backed up 110% by Giro’s Optics by Carl Zeiss Vision spherical lenses.

4 Salomon Quest Access 70W A light, warm, comfortable boot designed to make getting to the lift as easy as skiing. Easy to put on, easy to walk in, super warm, and great performance for every skier. 5 Nordica Amber XCT 4

This is a perfect ski

up to the advanced level and will deliver a fun experience and support advancing technique and physics. Exclusively at Tommy and Lefebvre.

6 Head MYA5 Head’s

answer for women skiers who are looking for an all-mountain ski that is wider, delivering more stability at higher speeds.

7 Giro Sheer This women’s-specific helmet is lightweight and warm for women who want performance and style. The Stack vent will keep you comfortable and your goggles clear all day long.

SKIS Women’s performance skis have clearly delivered over the last few years. Picture yourself carving at a good speed on groomed runs — with the occasional off-piste run. What you want is a ski that is responsive, on demand. Is there really such a thing for women? Yes! The skis in this category will make good skiers become great skiers with very little effort. Light and more responsive than their predecessors, the women’s testers like

the stable feeling underfoot at speed and the pop back when the short radius turns were initiated. These skis are definitely next-level stuff for women. BOOTS The boots in this category focus on customization of the liners, warmth and lightweight materials that are more pliable than their male counterparts. It is important to note that the height and volume of women’s-specific boots are entirely different than the men’s boots and once you’re fit properly you will see what a difference it makes in your confidence and control of your edges on the snow.


FRONT SIDE CARVE WOMEN

gearguide

4 / 12

THE GOODS 1 Colmar jacket Colmar is synonymous with Italian style and performance. This four-way stretch fabric and bodyconscious design will both flatter and keep you warm. Exclusively at Tommy and Lefebvre. 2 Colmar pants

Colmar’s insulated, waterproof four-way stretch pant will hug your every curve. Italian attention to detail will satisfy the performance skier.

4 Rossignol Attraxion 6 Echo This ecofriendly ski delivers secure edge grip and stability on a variety of groomed terrain. The ski uses sustainable wood grown in renewable tree farms. 5 Völkl Estrella Völkl

brings women’s skis to the next level to deliver women’s-specific cuts. Stance and flex with power-grip construction will provide absolute edge hold. For women of all sizes.

The skis in this category will make good skiers

6 Tecnica Viva Max10

boot Winner of SKI magazine’s gold medal. This boot is redesigned to accommodate wider calves, thicker feet and the air bladders will make this boot more comfortable.

2

BECOME GREAT SKIERS

7 Salomon Custom Air

(women) This is a stylish all-mountain helmet for women with Custom Fit Air system and stylish leather cover effect.

with very little effort. SKIWEAR The skiwear in this category can be sophisticated (allblack stretch from Descente), or a classic in a stretch outfit (Colmar) in navy, red and white. If the brights are more your speed than hot pink, teal

3

greens, magenta and Caribbean blue solids are a great choice. If you are a woman who loves to ski and wants to be out on snow for as many days as possible, you will find styles and insulation solutions inside the walls of Tommy and Lefebvre.

7

5 4

6

23 ON SNOW

1

MAGAZINE

3 Oakley Stockholm High-definition optics, soft frame (for easy on and off), plus Caia Koopman artwork, will make these goggles the envy of the lift line. All-day performance in all conditions.


ALL MOUNTAIN MEN

gearguide

5 / 12

THE GOODS

MAGAZINE

1

ON SNOW

24 5 6

All Mountain Report

1 Salomon Fantasy

2

Relaxed long-fitting waterproof, insulated jacket with technical features and variety of colours options, making this jacket great for riding and cool for every day.

7

2 Salomon Reflex The

Salomon Reflex pant is a lightly insulated waterproof pant with removable suspenders and an easy loose fit.

3

3 Oakley A Frame Jewel The Oakley A frame has anti-fog, is optically correct, vented and shuts down 100% of all harmful rays including blue light. It’s a skier’s choice for a goggle. 4 Salomon Quest

Access 80 Access 80 Salomon Quest 80 is a light, warm, comfortable boot, designed to get you to the lift easily. Three-buckle boot with My Custom Fit Sport Wool metal liner.

5 Salomon BBR 8.9 4

The BBR has an oversized, surfboard-shaped

tip for flotation in soft snow and terrain absorption, with a narrow tail and short radius sidecut for precise carving.

6 Rossignol Experience 78 This is a revolutionary all-mountain ski designed for advanced skiers. Stable, forgiving and quick edge to edge for confidence on any terrain type. 7 Salomon Allium Custom Air Helmet The next generation in all-mountain helmets brings temperature regulation and features a removable liner and ear pads.

MEN’S SKIS All-mountain skis have always been difficult to nail for ski innovators. Let’s face it, we demand a lot of an all-mountain ski. It has to be a good ski on ice, in powder, off piste, in the park and on groomed terrain. Thanks to the new rocker technology we see this formula in many brands ... and the fun factor became a whole lot better. We invite you to experience these skis — they are often described as versatile and playful thanks to the twin-tip design

and they also hold an edge very well. MEN’S BOOTS Boots in this category are plentiful and customizable. With more than five times as many boot models than 10 years ago, you’ll need to see an experienced boot fitter. T&L books appointments and guarantees boot fits for the year, allowing you to come back to get refit any time in that first season. MEN’S SKIWEAR This category embraces layering as it was intended. Gore-Tex shell jackets, insulators and variable insulations make all-mountain winter dressing a breeze. Start with a first layer from Lifa, and a


ALL MOUNTAIN WOMEN

gearguide

6 / 12

THE GOODS 1 Salomon Brilliant Salomon Brilliant jacket is an active- fitting, insulated sport jacket with print pattern on a four-way stretch climapro storm fabric. Air vent and removable hood. 2 Salomon Brilliant

Salomon’s Brilliant pant is a four-way stretch climapro storm insulated pant with feminine style and features an activefit style.

3 POC Retina WO

4 Salomon Origins Bamboo The Salomon Origins Bamboo ski will take strong skiers for a great all-mountain experience. This is a stable, versatile and solid ski for high-end performance. 5 K2 Supersmooth

Merino sweater from Icebreaker, followed by an insulator and a waterproof shell with venting. The best part of keeping warm is that individually these pieces will serve you well all year. WOMEN’S SKIS All-mountain skis for women have come a long way in the last two years. Big brands have developed their own special formulas to take you from ice to snow, groomed trails and even into the park when you want to play. They are multitasking on skis at its highest level and perform beautifully on hard packed conditions at good speeds. WOMEN’S BOOTS Boots are now built

ERP 10.0 The K2 Supersmooth is a light yet stable ski that will enhance the ski experience as you gain confidence and improve your technique and control.

with women’s-specific lasts that focus on performance, comfort and warmth. A good boot fitter will be able to ensure you choose a model and brand that works with your feet and skiing needs. Heated liners and footbeds are on the shelves at T&L as well. WOMEN’S SKIWEAR Dressing for allmountain skiing is tricky but layering will make it easier to regulate your temperature. First, layers are key, as well as good socks. Then choose stretch waterproof fabrics — with large hoods that fit over helmets — and you will have an outfit that will be comfortable in all conditions.

6 Head Dream 10.5 One The Head Dream 10.5 One will keep up with women’s high expectations: thoroughly fitted to the female anatomy with womenspecific flex, design and performance features.

2

7 Salomon Poison Custom Air This freeski helmet accommodates a standard or a beanie liner and has removable faux fur ear pads and visor. Available in several colours.

3

7

5 4

6

25 ON SNOW

1

MAGAZINE

The POC Retina WO is a double lens wide-vision goggle, with an anti-fog and anti-scratch surface. Comfort and performance guaranteed.


NEW SCHOOL MEN

gearguide

7 / 12

THE GOODS

MAGAZINE

1

ON SNOW

26 5 6

2

1 Armada Silence Jacket Armada started with a group of skiers who wanted the tools to advance in the park and pipe. It’s everything you need and what skiing will become.

New School Report 7

2 Armada

Shambles Pant The Armada shambles is a standard-fit, two layer waterproof vented pant with reinforced cuffs.

3

4

3 Oakley Simon Dumont Signature Series Splice This goggle, inspired by Simon’s Native American heritage illustrations, comes with your choice of a Fire Iridium or Persimmon lens and all the Oakley signature features. 4 Salomon SPK85 The Salomon SPK85 boot is the evolution of the boot that started it all and SPK is the choice for dedicated freestylers at every level.

5 Armada AR7

This ski performs on the mountain and in the park. AR50 sidewalls, positive camber and S7 base make this a durable and stable ski.

6 Salomon Suspect

The Salomon Suspect is durable and a proven high-performance park and pipe ski with great all-mountain behaviours.

7 Salomon Brigade This helmet has an innovative translucent shell with freezing visual effect to create a totally unique look. The exterior is sturdy and the liner is removable.

SKIS If Canadians JP Auclair, Phil Casabon and Maude Raymond have it their way, skiing will continue to reach new heights and directions with every run and competition. American Tanner Hall is an icon for the freeski and park movement. Collectively, athletes like these are pushing the innovators to come up with new solutions to take their game to new levels and the brands are rising to the challenge. The suppliers in this

category live in the extreme. This equipment must endure hard landings, crashes and rails. The edges, bases, woodcores, sidecuts and camber profiles are designed specifically for the park. If you are looking to play in the park more than anything else, get a ski that is engineered for the park. You’ll have a lot more fun and progress more quickly. BOOTS For boots, leading the charge in this category are Salomon and Full Tilt. These boots are different in volume, height and flex from boots in the other mountain categories. Adjustable spoilers, shin pads and heel


NEW SCHOOL WOMEN

gearguide

8 / 12

THE GOODS 1 Orage Kaya Pro The Orage Kaya pro model offers an extralong cut that can walk the line on the slopes or in the streets. Fully insulated, waterproof with unique ski features. 2 Orage Bella The

Orage Bella pant features sleek new pocket designs, full insulation with venting and waterproof fabrics. Great comfort and functionality.

1

3 Von Zipper Chakra, Secret Garden This minimalist goggle fits small-to medium-size faces. Dual anti-fog coated lens, adjustable strap and 100% UV protection. MAGAZINE

4 Völkl Ledge The Ledge features a symmetrical shape that rides equally well switch or forward, as well as a soft jib zone in the forebody. Performs well all over the mountain.

27

5 Line Afterbang

Athletes are pushing the

6 Full Tilt Drop Kick

INNOVATORS ,

2

to come up with new solutions ... and the brands are rising to the challenge. cushioning systems will add comfort on the landings! SKIWEAR The outerwear selection here is alive and bright. Long slim fits to baggy style all live here. Orage, Armada, Cross, Salomon and

Oakley pro models are available in full and variable insulations and reinforcements and venting come standard. These features are a necessity to deliver the functionality needed to withstand the rigors of the sport.

ON SNOW

The Afterbang is Line’s best-selling feestyle ski. Skatedeck construction, fun and playful make this ski a jibtastic good time on snow and in the park.

A new freestyle-line boot is born. Ultralight with a nimble feel and performer intuition liner, this boot will take you through the park to stomp those tricks.

7 RED Aletta II The RED Women’s Aletta II helmet protects your skull and the streamlined fit and molded visor help keep out moisture and direct sun.

3

7

5 4

6


RACE MEN & WOMEN

gearguide

9 / 12

THE GOODS

MAGAZINE

1

28 ON SNOW

7 4

Race Report

5

2

1 Spyder Speed Freaks Canadian Team The Canadian team giant slalom suit is constructed with removable pads and is anatomically designed to give the best gate protection, versatility and performance.

6

2 Spyder Speed

Freaks Performance GS (women) This performance giant slalom suit is for women who want to ski with the boys but not look like one. Stand out in this updated suit with stunning sublimated print.

3 POC Palm Padded

Racing Mitts POC performance in a mitten is perfect for cold days. Comfortable interior with separate pockets for the fingers, top insulation and leather.

4 Head IRD Slalom This slalom ski features World Cup sandwich construction and is perfect for super-fast racers and steep slopes. 3

5 Rossignol 9s World

Cup Rossignol 9s series was designed for World Cup skiers. These radical race skis deliver ultimate performance both in and out of the gates.

6 POC Sinuse SL

This slalom helmet is equipped with POC’s patented doubleshell system, providing full ventilation and protection, chin bar detachable.

7 Leki World Cup Trigger S The Leki World Cup race pole has a carbide tip and trigger system for the ultimate in performance and convenience.

SKIS Racing is part of T&L’s DNA and the equipment selected for the store has been tested by World Cup champions as well as our youngest K2 racers right here in the Ottawa-Gatineau region. Tommy and Lefebvre is proud to be the exclusive choice of our suppliers for the authentic limited-production skis and boots. Only a highly skilled coach and technician is able to select the exact flex pattern for a specific skier. It’s an exact science that places the very best on the podium.

BOOTS Customizing boot fit through heated liners, footbeds and a series of intricate shimming and canting is a learned skill we are known for. World Cup and performance skiers, as well as people with foot problems, all converge to our boot pits for solutions. We are proud to have some of the country’s best boot fitters right here in Ottawa. ACCESSORIES POC helmets, body armour and poles round out the mix. When hundreds of seconds matter, choose Holmenkol wax, featuring nano-CFC and a state-of-the-art race tune courtesy of the Montana tuner at our Bank St. location.


MAGAZINE

READY FOR 2012.

ON SNOW

29

HEAD‘S WORLD-CUP REBELS ARE READY DIDIER CUCHE, MARIA HÖFL-RIESCH, ANJA PÄRSON, AKSEL LUND SVINDAL, TED LIGETY, ANNA FENNINGER, LINDSEY VONN, ELISABETH GÖRGL


SNOWBOARDING MEN

gearguide

10 / 12

THE GOODS 1 Analog Alder, Danny Davis Signature The Analog Davis Signature insulated jacket with cord hood and zipoff sleeves comes in a standard fit and fits most sizes and body types. 2 Analog Gravel Pant

The Analog Gravel Pant in Black Denim features waterproof fabric and is a regular fit with venting. Super functional and fun.

1

3 Anon Hawkeye Goggle The Hawkeye goggle fits a mediumsize face, uses a duallens construction and solar shield hardcoated spherical lens technology allowing better vision and carefree maintenance.

MAGAZINE

4 ThirtyTwo Lashed The ThirtyTwo Lashed boot remains a popular boot. It’s warm, fits snuggly and with its durable flex level of 5/10 it will satisfy your need search for bigger, higher.

30

5 Ride DH2 The Ride

ON SNOW

DH2 board delivers a surfy feel and the

5

Snowboarding Report

2 7

micro camber zone between the feet will maintain the snap and amplify the pop factor.

3

6 Burton Process

Flying V Board The Flying V is an allterrain flying vehicle. It has great smooth ride with a kick. It’s consistent whether it’s day 1 or day 100.

4

6

7 RED Trace Raw RED Raw helmets deliver all the performance and safety you need in a helmet, paired down and streamlined. Raw is simplicity, elevated.

BOARDS Whether you are a beginner, an advanced progressive rider or someone who does it all including the park and rails, there is always something new to try in equipment for snowboarding. With hundreds of options available in a multitude of cambers, shapes and widths, the task of choosing a new board can seem daunting. That’s where we come in. All you need to know is what type of riding you do mostly or what new style you would like

to try, where you ride mostly and what you like or don’t about the equipment you have. If you have never taken a ride on a snowboard, our team riders will help make it easy. BOOTS Comfort, warmth and fit are key for the boots. You will have to try several to find the right pair for your foot shape and then add custom footbeds if you need to. There are dozens of models, with different heights, lasts and flex. It is an important piece of the performance puzzle, so leave it to the experts in the store to fit you properly OUTERWEAR What to wear? Choose a down jacket


SNOWBOARDING WOMEN

gearguide

11 / 12

THE GOODS 1 Cappel Blackmail jacket The Cappel Blackmail jacket is insulated and features waterproof fabric with critically taped seams delivering the performance you need and the style you want. 2 Burton Candy Pant The Candy pant from the White Collection is a slim-fit classic jean styling. With adjustable leg lifts it’ll protect your hems from the muddy parking lots. 3 Burton Lux Rocker The Burton Lux Rocker snowboard is good on all terrain and features women- specific flex, feel and function.

1

4 Ride Promise

3

6 Burton Emerald

CUSTOMIZED INSULATION SYSTEM ...

The Burton Emerald boot is the ultimate in comfort and warmth combined with Speed Zone lacing and heatmoldable liner.

2

7 The RED Pure Helmet This helmet features an integrated Air Pad Fit system and onehanded vent controls. It is clean, comfortable and lightweight.

but with your own sense of style rules. or a customized insulation solution system but with your own sense of style rules. Long slim fits and variable insulations, for men and women, are prevalent this year. Brands

such as 686, Burton, Analog, ThirtyTwo, Bonfire and Quik’s Pro Ride for adults and teens, are authentic and built to the team riders’ specifications to guarantee performance.

31

5 Anon Majestic Anon’s Majestic goggle is the perfect fit for small faces and will deliver wide-angle vision for a safer ride and great venting and dual-lens construction.

ON SNOW

Choose a down jacket or a

MAGAZINE

The Ride Promise snowboard is a good all-round performance board for all mountain or all-mountain freestyle. It’s the perfect ride no matter where the day may take you.

5

7

4

6


JUNIORS BOYS & GIRLS

gearguide

12 / 12

THE GOODS 1 Descente Swiss Team junior Descente’s Swiss Team junior insulated jacket features a removable hood, critical seam sealed waterproof fabric and a powder cuff. 2 Rossignol Girl Fire (girls) The Rossignol Fire print jacket is a warm waterproof, mid-length ski jacket, perfect for all conditions on the hill and off. 3 686 Bricks (boys) The 686 Bricks jacket is a favourite because it is fully insulated and chalk-full of features, including a hood that will accommodate a helmet. 1

5

4 RED Defy Youth

MAGAZINE

The RED youth team backs the brim design and versatility for yearround, snow, skate and bike protection.

5 Burton Chopper Star Wars The Burton Chopper has the softest flex possible for even the youngest riders to master balance and board control.

ON SNOW

32

7 8

6

6 Rossignol Avenger

Pro X1 The Rossignol Avenger Pro X1 ski is perfect for the novice to intermediate boys who charge down the hill weaving in and out of trees and groomers.

Juniors Report

7 Rossignol Scimitar 2

The Scimitar ski is a staple at T&L. It is easily adaptable and ensures a solid base for the future rippers!

8 Head MoJo JR

The Head MoJo JR is perfect for the youngsters who are starting to rock the park, but still want to ski groomed slopes and improve their skills.

4

3

SKIS/BOARDS The biggest single factors to keeping your child in skiing or snowboarding are staying warm and having fun. The equipment chosen for the young children is light and designed to make the experience both easy on the parent and the child. The boots are easy to walk in and mostly feature one buckle ... so doing them up is quick and easy. The ski sidecuts are designed for easy improvement once kids begin to build confidence and complete the turns. After

mastering the beginner stage, they begin to improve quickly and their boot fit and ski choice will become more specific. On the board side you will see the same. Softer boards and softer boots make it easier for the beginner to initiate turns and after a few weekends we often see children coming down the hills on their own. BOOTS Tommy and Lefebvre’s junior half-back program for boots means they get a good fit for less. The boot is an important key to control and safety. ACCESSORIES Speaking of safety, helmets are a must at any age but training

kids to wear one at an early age will meet with less resistance as they get older. Children’s helmets need to be fit properly and chances are they will need a new one almost every year. We invite you to bring in your helmet for an inspection and a fit check any time. Another key to success: Be prepared when it comes to children. Don’t leave home without hand and toe warmers, extra mitts, toque, socks, goggles and a face mask. Always layer up enough to stay toasty but not so much they can’t move. Get out there with them and it will make it just that much better as they will do what you do!


MAGAZINE

chaud imperméable respirable sécuritaire durable lavable

33 ON SNOW

warm waterproof breathable safe durable washable


Morten Anderson

ON SNOW

34 MAGAZINE


the BUCKET LIST ↓

These adventure suggestions will take some time to complete — and a bucket full of buckets — but it will be more than worth it to peg some of these off this winter, or at least in this lifetime. These dream trips, daring quests, must-see-or-do adventures and, of course, spectacular skiing in the West, on a tight (and loose) budget, will make you a better you. BY GORDIE BOWLES

(#1) NATIONAL LAMPOON'S CHRISTMAS BIG WHITE VACATION Big White Resort, B.C. / Cost: $2,598.30 (before tax) for family of five (two adults, three children), based on 7-night stay (two bedroom condo) and 6 days of skiing.

Big White is a family destination. Does this mean rope tows and flat, boring skiing? Hell no! Big White has some fantastic skiing on 118 runs and five alpine bowls, but the essence of this Okanagan resort revolves around family fun. And there’s no better time for family activity — and some great Okanagan snow — than at Christmas. Both lodging packages and special events are available. A new promotion for the 2011 season offers 10 percent off for the whole family if you bring the grandparents. And throw in an extra $335 and you will have the full-blown Christmas set-up waiting for you in your condo or hotel, including a fully decorated christmas tree, stockings, Santa photo-op passes and a two-hour tubing pass. The scaled-down version with the tree and christmas decorations is $229. See bigwhite.com for all details.

(#2) WITNESS THE BEST CITY VIEW IN CANADA Gold medal view / Cypress Mountain, Vancouver.

The view of Vancouver from Cypress Mountain — site of the freestyle and snowboarding events at the 2010 Games — is worth its weight in Olympic gold. From 610 metres (highest of the three North Shore mountains), the night-skiing view of Canada's largest West coast city from Mount Strachan is staggering.


Sun Peaks

The Bucket (West) List

(#4) KOOTENAY 5-IN-5 (WITH 5 FRIENDS) Fernie, Panorama, Golden, Whitewater and Red Mountain / Cost: $750-$1,000 per person.

This epic adventure through the heart of the Kootenays requires marathon-like stamina and legs of steel (see fit2ski. com) or at least some great planning, bravado and equipment. The “Kootenay 5-in-5-with-5” is the epic Western Canada adventure. If you don’t like powder, stop reading now and move on to the next adventure. This is certainly the trip for the fatties. And by “fatty” I’m not referring to your four mates who will be alongside for this ride (Side note: Pick your team wisely). You will ski ridge lines, bowls and chutes that are the stuff of dreams, and if you’re lucky and timing is right, an epic amount of pow-pow. These high-elevation mountains and nearby towns are chalk full of traditions and small-town culture, anchored by authentic pubs, general stores, coffee shops, chalets and B&B’s. Here’s how the trip works: Day 1: Kicking Horse Resort Start in the East Kootenays and work west. Kicking Horse is a great place to get this party started. But remember to pace yourself, especially on the first day, unless you don’t mind watching the last two days from the lodge. Where to stay: Highland Lodge, 150 metres from the gondola (highlandlodge.net). Skiing highlights: With some of the very best Canadianroasted coffee that money can buy, start with an energy blast of Kicking Horse roast before heading up to the resort. This steep and craggy mountain is intimidating at times and slopes are best suited to expert skiers. For a nice little “warm-up,” start

at the White Wall and ski all the way back to the gondola; that's hundreds of feet of uninterrupted bumps and steep vertical in one run. Après: The end of Day 1 must be celebrated with a pint of Guinness at The Local Hero, a small Scottish Pub beside the Highland Lodge at the resort. Again, alternate designated driver as someone needs to drive the 2.5 hours to Panorama that night. Day 2: Panorama Mountain Resort After arriving at Panorama Resort the night before, sleep in until 9:00 a.m., load the lift by 10. Start your day at Lusti's Cappuccino Bar.

DAY 3 MIGHT BE THE HIGHLIGHT OF YOUR TRIP SO BE READY FOR SOME OF THE STEEPEST TERRAIN YOU’LL EVER SKI INBOUNDS.

Where to stay: Stay on-hill for two nights; you don’t want to slog up and down the treacherous winding road from Invermere, especially first thing in the morning. Skiing highlights: This is a perfect place to stretch your legs (they’re likely a bit sore from Kicking Horse). Panorama is a groomer and cruising mecca. Once you’re warmed up, hit the Taynton Bowl and try the Extreme Dream Zone, as long as you’re cool with moguls and scattered trees. At the bottom, find the nearest hot tub and enter. Après: Try the semi-casual dining at the Wildfire Rustic Grill. Chef Brian Vallipuram (pictured) offers a freshly prepared fusion-style cuisine. It’s located right smack at the base of the mountain, so impossible to miss. Start dinner early, say 6 p.m., hit up the T-Bar next door for a pint or two afterward and aim to be in bed by 10 at the latest. You can stay in Panorama this night and start very early to Fernie (2.5-hour drive). Day 3: Fernie Alpine Resort Day 3 might be the highlight of your trip, so be ready for some of the steepest terrain you’ll ever ski in-bounds (out of bounds is pretty sweet, too). Just four kilometres from the classic Kootenay

Sun Peaks Resort / Adam Stein; Red Mountain Resort

MAGAZINE ON SNOW

Make like Hermann and ski the OSV.

Sun Peaks Resort has been the early season training venue for the Austrian national team since 2005, on a dedicated training run called OSV — Österreichischer Skiverband, aka Austrian Ski Federation — prior to the North American World Cup openers in Colorado and Lake Louise, Alberta. The resort makes snow and prepares the slope, which is hard and fast. The best person to show you around is, of course, the legendary Nancy Greene, who lives a few feet or so from the bottom of the run in the Sun Peaks village. The national senator and former Olympic champion (1968) takes guests on complimentary mountain tours on most weekends. The tours depart at 1 p.m. from the top of the Sunburst chair. Park the fatties and bring out the carvers for this one. The Austrians alpine and snowboard teams prepared for the 2010 Winter Olympic Games at the B.C. interior resort for the past five seasons. It was also a rare opportunity for the world's most successful alpine team to train in relative obscurity.

36

(#3) SKI RIDICULOUSLY FAST


Henry Georgi; Whistler-Blackcomb

Fernie

town of Fernie that is ripe with legend, folklore and great shops and dining options. When passing through town, pick up some coffee at Moguls, site of the old town library. Where to stay: There is no shortage of accommodation options at the resort and in Fernie. Try skifernie. com/accommodation. For those who prefer a low-key inn with central location, try Barbara Lynn’s Country Inn (tell her I sent you, she’s the author’s mom). Skiing highlights: The snow can be feather light and extremely deep if you get the timing right. Crowds are minimal as the mountain shifts the burden between the “old” and “new” sides of the mountain.

Start out with a few runs on the Cedar and Lizard Bowls, and when you’re warmed up, hit the Currie Bowl for endless glade and tuckaway chute options. Après: Griz Bar. This is a must and a perfect way to kick-start the after hours portion of this trip. Order the “Mogul Smoker” and a burger. Note: DD should rally the troops for the Nelson drive by 6 p.m. (3.5-hour trip). Day 4: Whitewater This is where you’re likely to have the most down to earth and real skiing of this trip. With an average snowfall of 40 feet (yes, you read that correctly) and 2,045 feet of steep and deep underneath

the Ymir Peak, Whitewater rarely disappoints. Skiing highlights: The lift-accessed backcountry skiing is the stuff of legends. Look at the map and know where you’re going. Where to stay: Nelson is a real gem of a city, a culture (or counterculture) centre and is a mere 15 minute drive from the hill. There’s a collection of unique inn, hotels and guest homes, see whitewater.com. Après: Grab a burger at the Fresh Tracks Cafe. The Whitewater Burger Sauce is incredible. Day 5: Red Mountain Compared to other West resorts, Red Mountain Resort is rather small at 1,585 acres but don’t let the numbers

fool you. This is one of those times that you park the machismo and carry a trail map with you, at all times. Where to stay: Unlike the old days of Red where accommodation was sparse and average at best, the new Red has options galore, all within a few feet or so of the ski hill. Skiing highlights: The tree skiing is phenomenal, and if you know where you’re going (Hint: Saddle up with a local in the lodge in the morning), this might be the highlight of this five-day trip. Après: Rock Cut pub and restaurant is a few hundred metres from the highway turnoff to the hill, and the Flying Steam Shovel (classic saloon style) is located downtown.

MAGAZINE

37 ON SNOW

HINT: SADDLE UP WITH A LOCAL IN THE LODGE IN THE MORNING.


(#5) A MILLION MILES AT MICA

MAGAZINE

Whistler-Blackcomb

ON SNOW

38

WITH 12 ALPINE BOWLS, THREE GLACIERS, AND MORE THAN 200 MARKED TRAILS, YOU'LL BE RED LINING BY 2 P.M.

(#6) SKI THE OPEN GLADES OF SUN VALLEY

Sun Valley’s wide-open glades make for an isolated feeling, almost like the localsonly ski resorts of old. The top-to-bottom leg burners remind you that could have worked a little harder in the off-season to prepare for the season but the carefully prepared groomers ease the impact and make you feel like a hero. The mountain also boasts exceptional on-mountain gourmet dining, like the Seattle Ridge and the Roundhouse which offer anything from trout to filet mignon. This really is the place where you go to pamper yourself and live the fine life.

(#7) TRACK YOUR ALTITUDE AT WHISTLER-BLACKCOMB Whistler-Blackcomb (Whistler, B.C.) Cost: Altimeter watches starting at $125. www.altimeterstore.com.

It doesn’t take long to rack up crazy amounts of vertical on a mountain that rises up out of the Whistler Valley with 5,280 vertical feet and more than 8,100 acres of prime skiable terrain. With 12 alpine bowls, three glaciers and more than 200 marked trails, you’ll be red lining by 2 p.m. with thoughts of the Longhorn Pub taking control of your mental state. But before those bubbly thoughts become reality (and they will), consider tracking your vertical on an altimeter watch. New gadgets can track not only your current elevation on the mountain, but also how many vertical feet you've ascended and descended. Most of the new altimeter watch models also have barometers, compasses and even heart-rate monitors into one instrument. Savor this opportunity for some great water-cooler bragging rights.

Paul Morrison; Damian Cromwell

The Bucket (West) List

The purest-of-the-pure champagne powder. Revelstoke is circled on many a maps these days as a “must-visit-next” destination. But why stop at just in-bounds skiing? B.C. has quickly become the world’s capital for heli-skiing and this is the epicentre of that dream. The reason is simple: consistently deep and dry powder. Mica Heli-Skiing is a relatively young outfit, entering its eighth season, and the snow they seek has seen very few skis. Untapped shall we say. They are situated deep in the backcountry, about one and a half hours north of Revelstoke between the Rockies and the Monashees Mountains, and is serviced by helicopter to the main lodge. Gourmet meals, spa, satellite TV are a few of the high-end amenities that service a high-end clientele. On the very few days that the weather is inconsistent or risky for flight, they have a convenient back-up plan; cat-skiing. The bottom line is that once you get a taste of this champagne there’s no turning back. The tours start at $4,990 with private’s starting at $18,250.


MAGAZINE

Wiegele's

ON SNOW

39

(#8) THE HIGH-LIFE AT WIEGELE'S

John Schwirtlich / Mike Wiegele Helicopter Skiing

Mike Wiegele Helicopter Skiing (near Blue River, B.C.) / Cost: Starting at $3,654 for 30,000 vertical feet. www.wiegele.com

A couple of hours north of Kamloops in the heart of the Monashee and Cariboo mountains near the forestry town of Blue River sits one of the classic skiing and riding destinations on the planet — Mike Wiegele’s. Offers more than 1.2 acres of skiable terrain that can be accessed by the helicopters and an annual snowfall of 10 metres, as well as majestic mountain backdrops among steep trees and the best view in the house — the helicopter. This is a serious trip for serious skiers.

(#9) ENJOY THE CHARM OF SUNSHINE VILLAGE

Avoid tough decisions, try all three. Boasting three top-shelf ski resorts in Mount Norquay, Sunshine Village and Lake Louise, options are plenty near Banff. The rugged beauty, unspoiled landscapes and mountain ranges seem to go on forever ... and the skiing is quite epic too. Sunshine Village is the closest to Banff and offers hundreds of kilometres of marked trails, from beginner to expert. Even the trek up the mountain in the gondola is an experience. You will rarely wait in line on this mountain that has one of the longest seasons in the West from mid-November to late May. With an annual snowfall of 30 feet, skiers and riders will have powder shots more often than not over the 12 lifts and three mountains (Goat’s Eye, Standish and Lookout). The freeride zones, like Delerium, have some great pitches and tough terrain (peeps, shovel and probe required) and new tracks are easy to find. For those looking for park options, the terrain park covers 12 acres of terrain and features many boxes, rails and jumps. The on-mountain accommodation ranges in functional to rustic elegant and when you stay on the mountain you really feel like you’re “unplugged and away from it all”.

THIS IS A SERIOUS TRIP FOR SERIOUS SKIERS. 1.2 ACRES OF SKIABLE TERRAIN AND AN ANNUAL SNOWFALL OF 10 METRES.


Sun Peaks

The Bucket (West) List

MAGAZINE

(#10) CELEBRATE NEW YEAR'S AT A SKI RESORT. BING, BANG, BOOM

There is no better way to bring in the new year than at a ski hill. And guess what? No lift lines on New Year's day, especially in the morning. With January being the best month for powder, the chances are solid that you could hit it just right. Sun Peaks Village, for example (pictured), is a great spot to party into the wee hours and then brace yourself for first load in the morning. Hint: start at Bottom’s Bar and finish at MackDaddy's Nightclub. Good thing there are a few choices for a quick breakfast as cafés line the village stroll when you stumble to the chairlift.

(#12) GET LOST AT JACKSON HOLE

(#11) WATCH AN ALBERTA WORLD CUP

LL Winterstart and COP freestyle Canadian freestyler Kristi Richards, a former world champion, celebrates her win in the moguls finals at the 2010 freestyle nationals at Canada Olympic Park in Calgary.

Jackson: Hard-core skiers' paradise. Jackson Hole dropped its pass rates by 25 percent for the lowest prices since the late 1980s, making this legendary Wyoming destination even more attractive to Canadians. Teton Village and Jackson Hole Mountain Resort rise from a great “hole,” 12 miles northwest of the town of Jackson, boast 2,500 acres of in-bound terrain and taunt the mountain's 4,139-foot vertical (the greatest continuous rise in the U.S.). There are two mountains — Apres Vous and Rendezvous — and an open backcountry gate system giving skiers and free-heelers access to more than 3,000 additional acres of high-country magic. There are 111 named trails and many other unnamed routes known only to local skiers. Twelve lift systems serve the mountains which is truly the crème de la crème for hard-core skiing. This is a place you have to experience yourself. Can you say “Delta Airlines”?

(#13) ALTA— NO-FRILLS POWDER

Low key, no frills, great snow. Alta is one of those one-track-mind destinations; and that track leads to one place: powder. The Utah resort — a short drive from Salt Lake City — sits on 2,200 acres of glade-ridden bowls and lowangle fields. Often rated near the top of the best powder destination lists, Alta is a low-key and rare breed of resorts that cater to the hardcore, no-frills crowd. The groomers are not good but that is not why you come to Alta.

Alta

Adam Stein / Sun Peaks Resort; Alta Resort; Mike Ridewood/ CFSA

ON SNOW

40


ON SNOW

41

MAGAZINE


BackSide

NECK STYLIN’

ON SNOW

42

There are two schools of thought on the touchy subject of neckwear in the world of snowsports. One school has a negative view that equates the wearing of cold weather accoutrements like fleece neck warmers or scarves to weakness, or more precisely “wimpiness,” on the part of the shivering wearer. The other school — one based on good old-fashioned common sense — sees the wearing of heat-conserving neck gear as a more-than-acceptable solution to the problem of losing body heat from your naked neck. Having spent a fair amount of my ski life ripping on the frigid slopes of my home province of Quebec, I have always been a supporter of any kind of clothing that makes me feel warmer when I stubbornly want to soldier on after finding out the gondola at Mont-Tremblant has been shut down because of minus-67 Celsius windchill gale-force winds. Olympic gold medallist Julia Mancuso is often seen sporting a bad-ass bandanna and is a supporter of the common-sense school of thought, the one that puts staying warm first and looking good second. Mancuso’s bandanna was a game-changer — a very cool-looking neckerchief that keeps warm air in, cold air out — and a bonus — the sun’s harmful rays away when you pull it up to cover your face. But to be truthful, the bandanna’s main attraction for me is the West Coast gangsta-chic vibe it exudes. No one who looks like a Crip, Blood or Latin King on the slopes will ever be mistaken for a wimp or wussy — and they’ll be muy caliente to boot! This is currently my neckwear of choice on extremely chilly days. But if you’re not into looking like an SG (slope gangsta), thankfully there are other options for keeping your neck warm and stylish at the same time. — Michael Mastarciyan

Swen Carlin / Red Bull Photofiles

MAGAZINE

Athletes on the runway of anti-freeze fashion


The world according to Tommy & Lefebvre > Health + Fitness + Pros + Tips

In the winter, while the rest of your body is bundled up and protected from the elements, your mug takes quite a beating from the sun and wind, and cold, dry weather. Dr. Jason Rivers, a Vancouver-based dermatologist and director of the dermatology residence training at the University of British Columbia, helps us pick the products you need to keep from looking like a bright red raisin.

SUNSCREEN In 2010, the Environmental Working Group, a Washington, D.C.-based consumer watchdog, started kicking and screaming, claiming that a test by the group showed that certain chemicals used in sunscreen disrupt hormones. But a host of dermatologists struck back: The test had been done on

The skin on your lips is about 75 percent thinner than the rest of the skin on your face, making it three times as vulnerable to the elements. For most skiers, that makes a stick of lip balm a constant companion (racing legend Daron Rahlves is known to keep a tube in many of his pockets). But not just any balm will do. Make sure yours has an SPF of 30 or greater to ward off sunburn, and uses some kind of mineral oil to trap in your body’s natural moisture, preventing dry, cracked lips. And if you think you’re just avoiding pain, you’re wrong. Lips are quite vascular, so when they crack, it’s easier for viruses to enter your body through your blood stream, making you sick and ending your ski trip. — Gordy Megroz

MAGAZINE

Protect your skin — and face — from the elements

LIP BALM

43 ON SNOW

SAVING FACE

mice, a species far more susceptible to toxins, and they had been exposed to more of the chemicals than are in sunscreen. Furthermore, the compounds the EWG claimed were toxic— Octinoxate, Oxybenzone, Homosalate and Octisalate—are the ones that protect best against UVA and UVB rays. Skiers, due to sun reflection off snow and the fact that ultraviolet radiation increases by 2 percent for every 1,000 feet you rise above sea level, happen to be one group most exposed to these harmful rays. But by using a sunscreen that protects against both UVA and UVB rays, has an SPF of 30 or higher, and applying a good amount of it every four hours, you can stave off premature aging and cancer.


MAGAZINE

BackSide

ON SNOW

44

THINKING BIGGS

Can’t miss’ Ontario slalom racer re-energizes his charge for greatness For most of us, modest goals suffice. Climb the corporate ladder, make smart investments, get to the gym, take a longer vacation, spend more time with your family. But for Ottawa-based ski racer Pat Biggs, his goal — which can be summed up in a mere six words — is a monster: Be the best in the world. If this slalom ace was fresh off the junior circuit or was a newly minted Whistler Cup or Trofeo Topolino winner, you might just believe him. But Biggs, 29, who returns for his sixth season on the World Cup tour, has his work cut out for him. In 2005, Biggs was the “it” racer on the tour. In his first-ever World Cup race in Chamonix, France, starting with bib No. 59, he blazed to a 10th-place finish. The next week, he finished 10th again in Wengen, Switzerland, and shortly after followed that with a 17th-place finish in Schladming, Austria, and an impressive ninth place at the World Championships. It was a banner season ... the only problem was repeating it. The next four years had highs and lows for Biggs — injuries, equipment issues, confidence challenges — but entering the 2012 campaign, the Orleans native feels all the pieces are in place for a return to winning form. Tommy & Lefebre, which has been a strong supporter of Biggs throughout his career, tracked him down this fall before his season-opening race Oct. 13 in Levi, Finland.

by gordie bowles

Tommy & Lefebre: Your status with the Canadian ski team has been in flux the last few years. Where are you at today with the team? Pat Biggs: I’ve had a lot of support from the coaches, and I guess all the way up to the program directors, to try to get me back to where I was and scoring top-10 results, and hopefully podiums, in the future. It’s been really exciting to be back with the group. T&L: What’s the morale like with the Canadian men’s slalom team? PB: I think we have a really positive


The world according to Tommy & Lefebvre > Health + Fitness + Pros + Tips

TIDBITS

T&L: What are your thoughts on the major FIS equipment changes this season? There are rumours that the athletes may even protest. What is the word out there and what is your opinion on the process FIS is taking to make the sport safer? PB: I support the fact that there’s now an entity that wants to make ski racing safer. But I don’t feel FIS has done the proper due diligence to make the changes where they need to be made initially. They lost a lot of respect from the athletes when they made the first batch of changes a few years ago. And they seem to be making another series of changes but they’re not really getting the opinions of the athletes ... or even showing any research, or backing, to why they’re making these changes. They made changes before this without advice or input from the athletes, and the results were not conclusive that they made it safer — in fact there were more injuries afterwards. I just feel they have to open the lines of communication with the athletes, the coaches and with a greater field of input, and not a closed-door room of officials. T&L: Has the technique changed with the new equipment? PB: For the slalom side of things, it is about the same as about five years ago. Slalom won’t have the same impact as GS technique. I watched a few of the (giant slalom) guys and it was pretty drastic. There was a lot of stepping and jumping and strange moves. I think when you change something that quick and that drastically, I don’t know if you’re making it safer. I’d be willing to bet there’s going to be more issues as we will be trying to get a ski to turn in a way it wasn’t designed for.

Patrick Biggs was born in Berwick, Australia, to an Australian father and Canadian mother, and he grew up skiing in the mountains of Victoria before his family moved to Ottawa when he was 5. He started skiing at Camp Fortune for the Ottawa Ski Club, “spending as much time skiing in the trees as on the hills.” Biggs won the Skimeister title at age 7 and went on to represent Canada at the Whistler Cup in 1996. After three years of skiing with the National Capital Division Ski Team in Ottawa, he was selected to the Ontario Ski Team. He suffered a serious knee injury in his second season with the Ontario team and decided to attend an NCAA school in the U.S. (Dartmouth), where he competed with the Division 1 ski team. This put him on the radar for the Canadian Alpine Ski Team, but he didn’t reach full team status right away. Eventually, he was given a shot with the team, and he made good use of it, winning back-to-back Europa Cup slalom races to earn a spot on the World Cup tour. In his first World Cup start, he blazed to a 10th-place finish. The next week, he finished 10th again in Wengen, Switzerland, and followed those efforts by placing 17th in Schladming, Austria, and ninth at the 2005 World Championships at Bormio, Italy.

MAGAZINE

group of guys. Over the past three years they’ve shown that they can be contenders for wins and podium finishes but haven’t really done it consistently to the full 100 percent. The morale is really high. T&L: What should we expect from the team this season? PB: The goal is to have a team member in the top five and on the podium at each race. And that’s the kind of sense I get with the team, and it’s really exciting to be training at that level. We had a race in New Zealand and timed training with other nations — Americans and Germans in particular — and we’re stacking up pretty strong against them. For me, things are moving in the right direction. At the Continental Cup in New Zealand there was probably a third of the top 30 there and I was fourth after the first run, so it was a good opener for me to see where things are. T&L: You were on fire in the 2005-06 season, challenging for podiums consistently. Where are you in comparison to those days and what will it take to get you back there? PB: It’s tough to say exactly. I’ve worked on the mental side a lot last year and coming back from injury, I just never felt like I was putting myself into position that when I was in a start gate, knowing that I could win the run. But I think I’m getting back to that point, almost five years later, where I look around and know that I can beat all the guys, which is a great feeling to have. There are so many factors involved in slalom. Equipment is a big part and I just started working with Völkl again and Nordica boots, and I think that’s a big part of it. It’s going in the right direction and I’m getting back to that point.

QUICK BIO

45 ON SNOW

Personal motto: Go Biggs or go home TV shows worth watching: Entourage, The Office Top of iTunes list: Citizen Cope, Bedouin Soundclash Sports of interest: Golf, surfing, tennis Foods (and vices): All the things I’m not supposed to eat, ice cream in particular Ski club: Ottawa Ski Club What do you do in your free time? I like building stuff ... Japanese tea houses, custom projects. I also like grooving to good tunes, or exploring new places. But most of all, spending time with friends and family. Who do you look up to? All those who never stopped living their dream when obstacles were thrown their way. What do you like about ski racing? I love everything about the sport. It constantly challenges my mental and physical boundaries. Skiing is a sport which has no boundaries. Someone can always go faster than the fastest in the world. What are your goals in ski racing? To be the best in the world.


BackSide

The world according to Tommy & Lefebvre > Health + Fitness + Pros + Tips

Years of training, unbelievable core

STRENGTH , thousands of leg MAGAZINE

squats and flexibility that would make your local yoga instructor jealous!

ON SNOW

46

CLOSE TO THE EDGE

A long outside leg will crank up your edging performance by josh foster I remember standing among some of the best Canadian ski racers of the time at the top of Ken Read’s Breath of Life Challenge race course at Lake Louise one April. Skiing stars such as Read, Nancy Greene, Jungle Jim Hunter, Lisa Savajarvi, the Bosinger brothers and Brian Stemmle, among others, were all there to support the cause. It was an awesome experience, hanging out as the starter and listening in on some of the smack talk as well as a few interesting insights on technique, tactics, line and going fast in a giant slalom course. I have many memories from that race, but the thing that stuck with me most is what Stemmle said to his sister Karen: “GS is about a long outside leg.” That concept remains with me because it seemed a bit different than what some coaches at the time were preaching about stance width and ski performance. Back then, it was about a really wide stance and a “switch” between the turns. As I watched as these guys shredded up the race course I saw was exactly what Stemmle said — just as the racer passed a gate, he or she had a long outside leg and a bent inside leg, but when you looked at the width of the racer’s stance, in most cases the outside knee was actually touching the inside boot! I realized that stance width on a pair of skis is not so much about horizontal width as it is about vertical width. If you look at a photo of a skier passing a race gate, the skier’s legs are pretty close together (if not touching), but feet are quite far apart in a vertical sense — one is much higher than the other.

But how can you get the ski performance and edge grip of a World Cup ski racer? Years of training, unbelievable core strength, thousands of leg squats and flexibility that would make your local yoga instructor jealous! But next time you’re out for a ski, try this simple adjustment in your stance and you just might be surprised with the result. As you’re moving through the middle of the turn, try to stretch your outside leg while pulling your inside knee up toward your inside shoulder. This will “shorten” your inside leg. You’re going to need a bit of speed for this so you can move to the inside of the arc; the speed gives you something to balance against, because without it you’ll just fall over (a similar feeling would be that of riding a bike around a corner — you lift the inside pedal up while keeping the outside pedal down). The adjustment in your stance width in a vertical sense while on skis allows you to increase what’s called “edge angle.” This will let you tip your skis up on their sides a bit more because you’re now to the inside of the arc that your skis are traveling on, no just standing on top of it, and that helps you get better grip. It also puts more of your weight on your outside ski, and that’s just better for balance overall. Try this tip and it might help you beat downhill world champion Erik Guay or get you the hole shot over ski cross world champion Kelsey Serwa. OK, maybe not, but it’ll make you feel like a champ when it comes to edge and ski performance.


MAGAZINE ON SNOW

47

Mike Hornbeck

Armada is Tanner Hall - JP Auclair - Jacob Wester - Phil Casabon - Riley Leboe - Mike Hornbeck - Gus Kenworthy - Torin Yater-Wallace

armadaskis.com


ON SNOW

48 MAGAZINE


ON SNOW

49

MAGAZINE


LastTrack

The world according to Tommy & Lefebvre > Health + Fitness + Pros + Tips

WHAT’S OLD IS NEW AGAIN

MAGAZINE

Ski fashion trends come and go and this year brings another exciting lineup of ski wear. With a plethora of styles and trends, some pointing back to the après-ski couture (such as this vintage poster from the 1930s, featuring Maurice Milliere in a La Vie Parisienne promotion), Tommy and Lefebvre will outfit you in stylish and functional wear that will represent your individual taste.

ON SNOW

50

12C


MEN’S

MAGAZINE

ULTIMATE SETUPS

That board press in the background is one of the many custom-built machines in Craig’s, our NEW in-house proto facility. No company devotes more energy and R&D developing boards,boots, and bindings that perform as one. The fit, flex, and finish— not just how it works, but how it looks.

ON SNOW

51

BOARD: BLUNT 155 BINDINGS: CUSTOM BOOTS: MOTO

BOARD: HERO 155 BINDINGS: MISSION EST BOOTS: RAMPANT

BOARD: METHOD 158 BINDINGS: DIODE EST BOOTS: SLX

SHOP TANDL.COM

DOWNTOWN 464 BANK 613 - 236 - 9731

GATINEAU 530 DE LA GAPPE 819 - 568 - 3595

12CC_HG_Setups_Mens_OnSnowMag_TandL.indd 1

KANATA 499 TERRY FOX 613 - 271 - 8524

ORLEANS 250 CENTRUM 613 - 834 - 2653

BARRHAVEN 3777 STRANDHERD DR. 613-828-4550 10/12/11 3:33 PM


» WINTER 2012

» WINTER 2012

Orage

© Blake Jorgenson, Orage

TOMMY & LEFEBVRE MAGAZINE

THE BUCKET LIST

Helly Hansen / LIFA

Nordicacanada.com

ON SNOW MAGAZINE

Burton Photo: L'Heureux Rider: Brock Crouch

GEAR GUIDE

OUR GUIDE TO MUST-HAVE SKI GADGETS

Descenre

Burton Photo: Justin L'Heureux Rider: Shaun White

GATINEAU 530 DE LA GAPPE KANATA 499 TERRY FOX ORLEANS 250 CENTRUM BARRHAVEN 3777 STRANDHERD

COMPLIMENTARY ISSUE

© Charles Spina 10, Orage

201 2

+ COMPLIMENTARY ISSUE

EXPERIENCE . SHARE . SHOP TANDL.COM

THE BEST

PACK YOUR BAGS FOR THESE MUST-DO SKI ADVENTURES

DOWNTOWN 464 BANK © Dinno Kovic, Astis

WORLD CUP SKIER PATRICK BIGGS ON NEW FIS RULES

PREMIERE ISSUE

PREMIERE ISSUE

Fresh Faces

»SAVING FACE

PROTECTING YOUR SKIN FROM THE ELEMENTS

PLUS

SKI TIPS

A LONG OUTSIDE LEG WILL IMPROVE YOUR EDGING PERFORMANCE

Profile for Fresh Air Productions

On Snow Magazine  

Tommy and Lefebvre magazine

On Snow Magazine  

Tommy and Lefebvre magazine

Profile for bkmedia1
Advertisement