__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

ELAWC ANNUAL REVIEW 2019

A Path to Hope

A trusted resource for more than 44 years, the East Los Angeles Women’s Center strives to create safe and healthy communities.

01

"Young Girl and Boy" Courtesy of Yolanda Gonzalez


JANUARY 2nd ANNUAL YOUTH EMPOWERMENT SUMMIT ELAWC's Youth Leaders brought together 150 attendees for an impactful day with inspiring speakers and action-oriented workshops.

MARCH 2ND ANNUAL HEALTH AND RESOURCE FAIR More than 500 attended and celebrated International Women's Day & National Women and Girls HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

AUGUST

SEPTEMBER

ENTREJIENDO NUESTRAS VIDAS

LUNAFEST

A symposium for Promotoras in collaboration with the Universidad Central Del Caribe Bayamón focused on mental health and trauma.

OCTOBER MUJERES DE PAZ ANNUAL CANDLELIGHT VIGIL A night filled with powerful testimonies and ceremony. More than 250 people walked to remember victims and honor survivors of domestic violence.

Short films for, by and about women; a special screening of Soledad de los Incendios and a celebrity panel discussion.  


A PATH TO HOPE | LETTER FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR ELAWC continues to walk side-by-side with survivors to forge a path to hope. In the past 44 years we have grown from a small, culturally-responsive group of volunteers devoted to responding to the crisis hotline calls of Latina survivors of sexual and domestic violence. The small group of founding volunteers then began our official agency offering support and services to survivors. Over the subsequent years, we have gradually grown in scope and strength (52 staff and over 250 volunteers) to better serve the needs of the diverse populations we see every day in our communities.

“ I was homeless for 13 years, cycling on the streets, and in shelters and recovery homes. I connected with ELAWC and I am now living in my own apartment.” — Survivor

In 2018, ELAWC embarked on a new journey to tackle the growing problem of homelessness among domestic violence and sexual assault survivors. We first opened The Hope & Heart emergency shelter in 2018, providing women and children in crisis a safe place. “The House,” a transitional housing program opened in 2019. “The House” ensures women and their children have a stable place to live for up to 18 months while learning new skills and how to become economically independent. Addressing the wider community, our housing solutions program extends to those on the brink of losing the safety of home, with a cost-effective approach to prevent homelessness. No one deserves to be homeless, to be unsheltered, to be isolated, to be violated and alone. We also embrace the many women in our communities, who have journeyed to the United States to find a better life, to only be subjected to discrimination, poverty and violence. We understand those who have endured multiple traumas and continue to face life hardships. We stand up for immigrant women who work as janitors, in hotels and in restaurants who have faced work place sexual harassment. We stand united against violence. We stand for justice and human rights for all. We believe in resiliency and the ability of individuals and communities to heal and promote recovery from trauma. Survivors are respected as they reveal their stories and are supported in their decision making, their choices and goal setting to determine the plan of action they will need to heal and move forward. ELAWC Staff are facilitators of recovery rather than controllers or enablers of recovery. We understand that healing takes place within the context of community and culture. Our programs provide a spectrum of services. From our culturally grounded Promotora program, that bridges culture, language, and eliminates barriers to traditional mental health services. As Executive Director, I am proud to carry on ELAWC’s legacy and vision. So much has been accomplished in the past 44 years, I look forward to continued growth and development, as the need is great. It is my honor to work with the dynamic staff, volunteers, and Promotoras. We are all deeply grateful to our funders and supporters who make this work possible.

Barbara Kappos, Executive Director , ELAWC

44

YEARS OF SERVICE

1976

1980

1983

1984

Irene Mendez- Banales

Expanded services to provide culturally responsive domestic violence services.

Established first Spanish-language self-defense class.

Child abuse prevention taught using Teatro throughout LA County.

and Connie Destito, along with community members, started The East Los Angeles Rape and Battering Hotline.

1


A PATH TO HOME

Housing Solutions

Planting Seeds of Hope A safe and permanent home is essential for the development of healthy families. Our new transitional housing project is a safe place for survivors and their children to grow and heal. Opened in early 2019, “The House” gives residents a stable place to live for up to 18 months, providing life skills and a chance to attain economic autonomy. Residents participate in a range of restorative activities at “The House,” including Seeds of Hope, a therapeutic ministry of the Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles. Horticultural therapy is a time-proven practice that uses plants and gardening to improve mental and physical

"My life has changed in so many ways, going from uncertainty to stability. My most cherished gifts are my children and now we have a home. I am whole, secure, and connected.” — Irma

health and well-being. With the guidance of trained horticultural therapists, residents grow and nurture plants that provide beauty and food — for the table, and the soul. Partnerships with Goodwill Industries of Southern California and American’s Job Center of California (AJCC) help residents discover career opportunities and a path to economic empowerment.  Through on-site workshops and career counseling, residents identify employment goals and enroll in industry-recognized certification or higher education programs. With all residents employed today, this is a place where women find courage, confidence, financial independence,  and eventually, a permanent place to call home. It is a path to hope, a path to home. 

IRMA Meet Irma, Mother of 4 Domestic violence drove Irma and her children from their home. Irma initially stayed at a relative’s home, where they were subjected to unfair treatment. After the death of her mother, Irma reached to substances as a coping mechanism. Pregnant with her fourth child, a baby girl, Irma became determined to turn her life around and entered the Hope + Heart shelter and enrolled in a recovery treatment program. The therapeutic and healing environment of the shelter brought a sense of stability and the confidence to take her life to a new, positive place. With ELAWC’s help, Irma moved her growing family to a sweet, safe apartment. Many kind donors helped equip Irma’s home with the essentials she needs to start her new life, where she loves cooking lasagna on Sundays for her growing children. One other positive outcome is Irma’s new-found passion for helping others. We are delighted she will be leading a Narcotics Anonymous (NA) group at ELAWC for women, recovering from past substance abuse.

1986

1997

2008

2011

2013

2014

Established AIDS Infoline.

Launched Promotoras en Accion Contra el SIDA, the first in the nation focused on immigrant Latinas.

Promotora Contra

24-Hour Domestic Violence Response Team began offering crisis intervention at the Emergency Center at LAC+USC.

ELAWC co-located at the Wellness Center @ LAC+USC with 23 other organizations to provide services, training & education.

Launched the Promotora Institute and trained more than 1,200 Promotoras in 5 states.

La Violencia: Promotora model expanded to include sexual and domestic violence with first federal grant.

02


A PATH TO PEACE

GEORGINA

SPOTLIGHT ON Industrial Workers

Meet Georgina, Mother of 8 Georgina arrived in the United States from Puebla, Mexico more than 11 years ago. At first, she worked as a janitor in movie theaters. Working up to 11 hours a day, 7 days a week, she earned a fixed wage of only $400. After a time, she left and began cleaning offices, where she also endured wage theft, sexual harassment, and sexual assault. The lack of dignity and justice took a deep toll on Georgina’s well-being. Looking to find relief, fairness, and safety at work, she contacted The Maintenance Cooperation Trust Fund (MCTF) a union-affiliated watchdog group and an ELAWC partner. Nationally-recognized, MCTF works to eliminate illegal and unfair business practices in the janitorial industry in California.  Recognizing she was a sexual assault survivor, Georgina was referred to ELAWC’s Promotoras Contra La Violencia program for help. She says, “The conversations made me feel comfortable and safe, I could share my story without being judged or blamed." Georgina’s path to freedom was not easy, but it led her to an empowered life.  Now a lead Promotora for ELAWC, she shares her story as part of training more than 200 women across the community. Taking the hard lessons of her earlier years to heart, Georgina founded an industrial cleaning business, giving her employees a safe, fair, and healthy workplace. Georgina is an inspiration to all. 

Community Engagement

Promotoras Contra La Violencia

"Thanks to the staff and the therapy I received at ELAWC I have more confidence. I no longer feel broken, I feel free.”

turning our attention to also working in industrial sectors, serving women janitors and

— Georgina

ELAWC’s pioneering Promotora model is widely recognized as an effective outreach model to deliver culturally and linguistically-specific education to underserved communities.  Initially focused on reaching immigrant communities today we are housekeepers, restaurant and factory workers, and others. As members of an underserved community, Promotoras are uniquely positioned to bring vital resources to their community. They educate community women on women's health, on domestic and sexual violence, and raise awareness of sexual harassment at the workplace. Most importantly, they mobilize communities to end gender-based violence and link individuals to ELAWC for a range of supportive services.

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Expanded services for human trafficking outreach and substance abuse recovery.

Established Domestic Violence Task force at LAC+ USC and collaborated with SEIU USWW to empower janitors by providing Promotora training.

After 26 years, ELAWC begins a new journey and moves to another location in East Los Angeles.

Established the 1st U.S. hospitalbased emergency shelter for women & families impacted by violence.

Opened transitional housing for 6 families. Certified to provide substance abuse treatment.

03


A PATH TO SAFETY

Intimate Partner Violence

Finding Esperanza, Finding Hope Intimate partner violence (IPV), also known as domestic violence (DV) is recognized as a serious national public health problem. In the United States, 1 in 4 women will be exposed to physical violence, sexual violence, and/or stalking during their lifetime.   To better understand the experiences of Latina survivors living in Los Angeles,  ELAWC conducted a study examining the intersection of homelessness and IPV and compounding factors.The assessment expands upon previous victim and community level assessments conducted by ELAWC and will be released in the summer of 2020. Helping IPV survivors is a core competency of ELAWC. We support survivors with comprehensive culturally-responsive and trauma-informed services including  24 hour emergency response, individual and group therapy, case management, crisis intervention, safety planning, advocacy, healing groups, community awareness, linkages, and resources. Our approach is grounded in a strength-based empowerment model, designed to help survivors identify and build upon their individual strengths and skills.  Our goal is

“I was broken, I was lost,

to help women achieve economic and personal empowerment so they can establish

I never thought I would

safe and nurturing environments for themselves and their children. Our mission is to

be where I am now.

help women find Esperanza or Hope in their lives.

I am confident. I am proud of myself. I am here. I am better” — Janet

JANET Domestic Violence Survivor, Mother of 4 For two decades, Janet normalized the intimate partner violence she endured. The abuse initially took the form of psychological manipulation, later becoming physical. In order to isolate her from her friends and family, her abuser took away her phone and transportation and prohibited her from attending important family events, like her son’s graduation. To survive, she appeased him and remained silent. During her pregnancies, his anger escalated to physical abuse, putting her unborn children at risk. When her youngest children, twins, were just babies, Janet finally found an opportunity to change her life path. Attending a family event, her husband became outwardly violent and abusive in front of others. With threats of police intervention, he left the event. Janet refused to leave with him, giving her an opportunity to break her silence. Relieved to have a support system to rely on, Janet found the courage to gather her children and belongings and leave. Janet also found the strength to report the ongoing abuse to the authorities, who provided referrals to help her heal. Janet and her children came to ELAWC for therapeutic services. The support she received at ELAWC transformed her life. Today, Janet and her children are thriving. She is an intern in the Human Resources department of a local job center and has a source of financial support. Her knowledge of domestic violence also allows her to help other survivors in her community.

04


Staff Stories We are constantly inspired by the committed staff that over the years have become family. Meet the women who help us complete our mission and fill us with Hope for the future.

WHAT INSPIRES YOU?

THELMA DIRECTOR OF HIV HEALTH SERVICES | 24 YEARS

“Hope allows me to continue working so that sexual violence ends one day. I believe working together, supporting one another is the key.”

SONIA DIRECTOR OF SEXUAL ASSAULT SERVICES | 21 YEARS

“What inspires me to continue are the stories of healing. My hope is that we continue to be the place where silence is heard."

SANDRA PROMOTORA EDUCATION SPECIALIST | 22 YEARS

“My passion and commitment to the anti-rape movement inspires my work everyday.” 05


A PATH FORWARD

Male Engagement

A Restorative Justice Approach With an emphasis on mental, physical, emotional, and spiritual well-being, ELAWC’s Male Engagement programs give men a safe place to come together, share and process past experiences and traumas, and explore ways to repair and heal relationships with themselves and others. In collaboration with Jerry Tello and the National Compadres Network, men with a history of unhealthy relationships are invited to participate in Talking Circles to gain insight into their own past harmful behaviors and discover new ways to establish healthy

“I believe joining a men’s

relationships with others.

circle is one the greatest

Led by men from the community, Circulos give men a chance to hear the personal

thing a man can do. It

stories of other men, reflect on their own lives and relationships, process personal

has changed my life for

traumas, and develop new skills for coping with stress and conflict. Circles support

the better.”

and embrace men without judgment, helping men become more invested in positive — Alex

relationships with themselves, their partners, children, family, and community.

ALEX Meet Alex, Father of 3, Husband, Son After years of unhealthy relationship patterns, Alex made the brave decision to find help to heal from past childhood sexual trauma. With the help and support of his wife, yet filled with the fear of the unknown, Alex stepped into the Center where he was surprised when “no one judged me or gave me any type of pity.” Alex joined the Men’s Circles, attending every session for seven months, including a transformative retreat held by the National Compadres Network. “I believe joining a men’s circle is one the greatest thing a man can do. It has changed my life for the better. The fatherhood circle made me realize I was missing out on the affection and love of my family. I feel safe in the circulo and I keep coming so I can be a better husband, father, and son.”

MEN'S CIRCLES Men's circles offer men a path to begin repairing the harm caused by intimate partner violence. Circulos give men a safe space to reflect and share life experiences; to learn how to establish and maintain positive, healthy relationships; and to master coping and conflict resolution skills. By shifting the paradigm from punitive to restorative, participants learn how to create, and sustain, lives without violence.

06


2019 HONOREES

2019 Mujeres de Paz Annual Awards Dinner We shared a glorious night on May 17th at the Omni Hotel, celebrating with supporters, sponsors, donors, volunteers, friends and family at our signature fundraising event, the Mujeres de Paz Annual Awards. We toasted the exemplary achievements of honorees Nora Phillips, co-founder & legal director of Al Otro Lado; MARISOL, a short film written and directed by Juan Escobedo; Kaiser Permanente’s leadership in healthcare; and Antoinette “Toni” Harris trailblazing success as college football athlete and scholarship recipient. Your generous support raised nearly $100,000 of critical unrestricted funds for ELAWC programs. With these contributions we will continue to serve our diverse community, offering dignity, hope, and respect to women, girls, and their families seeking peace, safety, and personal well-being. HONOREES

MUJERES DE PAZ AWARD Nora Phillips Co-Founder and Legal Director of Al Otro Lado

CORPORATE SPIRIT AWARD Kaiser Permanente Honoring Health Excellence

ARTS AND CULTURE AWARD MARISOL A short film written and directed by Juan Escobedo

ARTS AND CULTURE AWARD Antoinette “Toni” Harris Female College Football Trailblazer & Scholarship Recipient

Karla Jimenez Teran, Lead Industrial Promotora, brought the entire house to their feet with her powerful testimonial about her personal journey, and by inviting everyone to "Please rise, if you or someone in your family immigrated, and contributed, to this country" Over 400 people stood up!

07


OUR INTERCONNECTED MODEL OF SERVICES

OUR IMPACT Serving Over 8,000 Community Members Across a Spectrum of Services

CORE INTERVENTION SERVICES

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

The East Los Angeles Women’s Center is a leading voice and advocate for

HEALTH INNOVATIONS

survivors and their families affected by sexual and intimate partner violence, and HIV/AIDS.

YOUTH SERVICES

ELAWC delivers innovative, comprehensive, culturally-responsive

An interconnected model of services that is culturally responsive and trauma informed.

services that build on a foundation of trauma-informed, evidence-based

HOUSING SERVICES

practices designed to heal, support, protect, and empower the communities we serve.

4,000+ CRISIS CALLS ANNUALLY

350 UNSHELTERED

WOMEN received outreach and distribution of backpacks with essential goods.

1,700

Survivors of domestic and sexual violence received bilingual counseling, advocacy and safety planning.

500+

HOSPITAL

MALE ENGAGEMENT

319 EMERGENCY RESPONSES

60 MEN JOINED

accompaniments supporting survivors of sexual and domestic violence.

AT LAC+USC MEDICAL CENTER

MEN'S CIRCLES

4,000

28

8,640

COMMUNITY MEMBERS REACHED IN SIX PROMOTORA COLLECTIVES

90%

TRANSITIONED FROM A SHELTER TO A SAFE ENVIRONMENT

PROMOTORA WORKSHOPS

2,264

COMMUNITY WOMEN & INDUSTRIAL WORKERS TRAINED STATEWIDE

80% of clients improved their quality of life with resources and economic autonomy

BED NIGHTS

58

INDIVIDUALS SHELTERED AT HOPE & HEART

30% TREATED FOR TRAUMA AND SUBSTANCE ABUSE.

08


PREVENTING HOMELESSNESS FOR 84 FAMILIES DOMESTIC VIOLENCE HOUSING FIRST DVHF is an innovative and cost-effective approach to rapidly house DV survivors and families in crisis. Clients on the verge of homelessness collaborate with caseworkers to identify solutions to secure stable housing. This may be as simple as paying for rental application fees or by investing in 2 or 3 months' rent for a family, while also receiving ongoing therapeutic and support services.

CY

|

CO

M

M

U

RI

|

SUR

G AG E M E N T

V I VO R - D

EN

DVHF PILLARS

Y

VE

IT

N

N

A

D

V

A OC

2019

BY THE NUMBERS

G

| U

SE

OF

FLEXIBLE

N FU

D

IN

Women & Children Helped Households Served Average Time Spent Per Household

MONTHS

Average $ Spent Per Household Total Flex Funds Invested

09


BOARD OF DIRECTORS

ADVISORY BOARD

Marilyn Ladd, Chair

Norma Bastidas, Athlete

East Los Angeles College, Emeritus

Spokesperson on Human Trafficking

Katherine D. Emerson, Secretary

Linda Fischer, Author, Public Speaker

DPA, MSW, Consultant

Jerry Tello, CoFounder of the National

Gerri Guzman, Member

Compadres Network, Director of Training

Educator, Consultant

and Capacity Building, and Author

Dr. Irma Licea, Member

Connie Destito, MSW, LCSW, Co-founder

Los Angeles County Metropolitan

East Los Angeles Women's Center

Transportation Authority Silvia De La Riva, Member Private Practice, School Neuropsychologist Yvette Rodriguez, PhD, Member Engineer, Department of Defense Beatriz Zaragoza, Member Allstate Insurance  Moses Castillo, Member Los Angeles Police Department

Diane Araujo, Ed.D, Founding Member East Los Angeles Women’s Center Elvira Valenzuela, Vice President, EastWest Bank, Corporate Development and Legislative Affairs Georgia N. Kezios, Attorney Law Offices of Georgia N. Kezios Dr. Melora Sundt, Chief Academic Officer Noodle Partners Yolanda Gonzalez, Artist, Sculptor, Creator

10


•

FINANCIALS INCOME BY CATEGORY

EXPENSES BY CATEGORY

$4,726,007

$4,139,032

Government Grants

Salaries

Foundation Grants

Other

Unrestricted Donations

Donated Services

Fundraising Income

Other

Fringe Benefits

Rent

Professional Fees

Volunteer Hours

THE MISSION of the East Los Angeles Women’s Center is to ensure that all women, girls and their families live in a place of safety, health, and personal well-being, free from violence and abuse, with equal access to necessary health services and social support, with an emphasis on Latino communities. 11


Thank You Anna Alvarado

ELAWC

PLANT SEEDS OF HOPE

Your beautiful gift of art for our year-end campaign truly captures the spirit of giving, and we are grateful. We invite you to support Anna's work at: www.artbyannaalvarado.com

artist: Anna Alvarado

IN-KIND DONORS In-kind or non-monetary contributions are items, products, or services provided free of charge to East Los Angeles Women’s Center. These are dollars saved that we are able to apply directly to support our programs and services.

SWIM SOCIAL

ROSIE JANE

VERONICA M. WHOLESALE

JOSE BOLAÑOS

FAM BRANDS

LIL’ LIBROS

BIG SUNDAY

LD TUTTLE

YOLANDA GONZALEZ

12


FRIENDS OF THE EAST LOS ANGELES WOMEN’S CENTER Government Funding

California Office of Emergency Services US Dept. of Justice Office on Violence against Women CA Dept. of Public Health – Office of AIDS

$100,000+

Anonymous Blue Shield of California Foundation

Dept. of Public Health, Office of Women’s Health

City of Los Angeles AIDS Coordinator's Office (ACO)

Emergency Food and Shelter Program

Los Angeles CountyDepartment of Public Social Services

Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority

J.B & Emily Van Nuys Charities

$50,000+

Rose Hills Foundation

Anonymous

$10,000+

All State Foundation

Kaiser Permanente Los Angeles

Dan Goldfarb & Jenny Landers Don Cheadle John Dwyer

$5,000+

Martinez Family Foundation Maurice & Paul Marciano Art Foundation

LA County Dept. of Public Health- Division of HIV and STD Program

Community Services Block Grant (CSBG) California Dept of Public Health LA County Department of Mental Health

The California Endowment

Michael & Irene Ross Endowment Fund of The Jewish Community Foundation of Los Angeles

Sisters of St. Joseph's Healthcare Foundation

Goldsmith Legacy Foundation

Thug Kitchen

Verizon Wireless, Hopeline Grant

AHF - Latino Outreach and Understanding Division (LOUD)

AltaMed Health Services

$250+

Christiane Garcia

Evan Goldberg

Marilyn Ladd

SEIU - Local 721

AC & M Group

Christina Lee

DCast Music

Martin Diaz

Sikhi Alpha Foundation

Adelaida Ibarra

Claudia Powell

Michael Gordon

Silvia De La Riva

Aman Abraham

Constance Lopez

Michael Lens

Ana Interiano

Daniel Ruiz

Evergreen Avenue School - Penny Harvest Club

Supervisor Mark Ridley - Thomas

Arthur J. Gallagher & Co.

DCast Music

Astrid Heppenstall Heger

Davon House

Barry Gribble

DaVita Inc.

Beatriz Zaragoza

Dealey, Renton & Associates

Bertha Aguirre Bram Briggance Brianne Amato Buffalo Exchange California Water Service Carolyn Desai Charles & Diane Araujo

Special Thanks

to our Monthly Sustainers and Embajadoras de Paz

Det. Moses Castillo Dr. Irma Licea Dr. Ricardo Puertas & Mrs. Olivia Valdepeña East West Bank Elizabeth Bowns

Estey & Bomberger Attorneys at Law

Eunsuk Kim Garo Mardirossian

Supervisor Hilda L. Solis

Mr. and Mrs. Patrick James Grey

George Platter

Neighborhood Legal Services

Hensiek & Caron CPA

Nick Bachman

Human Services Association

Protech Staffing Services

Hye Min Shin Janice Oshiro Karli Baumgardner Kathleen Kyriacou Leticia Chacon-Rosado Louis Provost

Anonymous

Tadin Herb & Tea Co. Teatro Luna West The Wellness Center Toyota of Downtown LA

Ricardo De La Riva

Unincorporated Coffee Roasters

Robi Stovitz

Weingart Foundation

Ron Geiger

Women's Law Association USC Gould School of Law

Rosie Ramos Savannah Ramirez Scott Tuft

Yvette Torres-Rodriguez Zach Negin

Danielle Surra

Erickka Gonzalez

Marisol Tafolla

Sally & Lawrence Martin 3

Emily Coursen

Jason Orellano

Mark McGrath

Teresa Contreras

Emily Stoll

Katherine Emerson

Natalie DeJohn

We have taken great care to ensure the accuracy and completeness of this list, and regret any errors or omissions. Should corrections be necessary, please contact Heidy Rodriguez at 323-526-5819

13


How You Can Help • DONATE at www.elawc.org • VOLUNTEER to become a Hotline Advocate

• JOIN our Embajadoras de Paz Membership Network

• ATTEND our annual Mujeres de Paz awards dinner

• SPONSOR a family in need during our Holiday Giving Campaign

• INVITE ELAWC to speak at your

school, workplace or service club

• SHARE the great work ELAWC provides on your social media channels

• FOLLOW us on Twitter and like us on Facebook

• JOIN our advisory committee or refer a colleague

• GIFT new, unused clothing

and essential goods to women and children for the Hope & Heart Shelter

• WALK with us at AIDS Walk LA and the Mujeres de Paz Vigil

www.elawc.org

1431 South Atlantic Boulevard Los Angeles, CA 90022 office  323 . 526 . 5819  |  fax 323 . 526 . 5822  |  email  info@elawc.org Crisis Hotline 800 . 585 . 6231  |  The Wellness Center 213 . 481 . 6035

Profile for barbara kappos

ELAWC Annual Review 2019  

A Path to Hope A trusted resource for more than 44 years, the East Los Angeles Women’s Center strives to create safe and healthy communities...

ELAWC Annual Review 2019  

A Path to Hope A trusted resource for more than 44 years, the East Los Angeles Women’s Center strives to create safe and healthy communities...

Profile for bkappos