Page 1

KLEMET

CREATIVE TEAM Idea: Kjell Joar Petersen-Øverleir Inger Lise Pettersen, Kjell Joar Petersen-Øverleir, Jon Arne .Jacobsen, Merethe vatshaug, Anne Karen Vasdal Playwright: Stig Bang Composer: Kjell Joar Petersen-Øverleir Annas Joik: Frode Fjellheim Other joiks: Simon Marainen Regi/choreography: Ada Einmo Jørgensen, Åarjelhsaemien Teatere (ÅST) Land Art/scenograf: Hans Petter Bjørnådal, Bjørnådal Arkitektstudio Costumedesign: Kari Britt Niisen Musical leader: Tor-Petter Aanes Regi/choreography-assistent: Ole Henrik Bjørkmo Lifjell Sørsamisk translation: Eli O. Kappfjell Makeup: Tove Solbakk Scene technician: Per Rasmussen, Nordland Teater Light: Kjell Vestermo, Nordland Teater Sound: Ume Audio AS & Magnar Skreslett Local producer: Elisabeth Ødegård Rehearsal: Synnøve Ødegård, .John Hallvard Hjerpbakk, Mette Hoem Evensen Costumes/crafters: Unni Jerpset, Liv Marit Fjelldal, Silja Flostrand,Gerda Brendmo, Anny Lorentsen, Sissel Sandmo, Liv Vassdal, Iris Tuven. Scene & arena: Per Jomar Hoel, Einar Solhaug, Charles Skreslett, Odd Lillemo, m.fl. Requisita: Jon Reinåmo og Unni Skjefstad Jamtjordmartnaden: Marie Sjøgård, Esther Ødegård, Geir Valla, Grete Langseth, Hilde Line Bergvik, Anja Behsen, Kathrine Fløtnes, Christer Amundsen mfl Security and transport: Hilde Tverrå, Bjørn Einar Valla m.fl. Marketing: Merethe Vatshaug, Sissel Torgersen, Anne Karen Vasdal, Karin Flostrand, Sølvi Bente Skaga, Grete Bang, Jon Arne Jacobsen. Accomodation: Elsa Hoel Photo: Ketil Bern, Fabrice Milochau Board:

ACTORS Simon lssåt Maralnen Anna Persson: AnnaÅsdell Stor Nila: Sven Henriksen Klemet´s children: Adrian Vassdal, Marie Lund Aas, Kristine Petersen-øverleir, Håkon Monsen Valla, Ju)ian Ellingsen, Linas Vatshaug Nygaard Reindeer/children: Andrea Tuven, Linn Solhaug, Silje Kristin Fjelldal, Carina Tverå, Maia Oksfjellelv, Live Marie Skreslett, Johanne Petersen~øverleir, Kristina Skreslett, Nils Magnus Håland, GudBjørn Derås, Olvar Derås Youth: Markus Johansen, Egil Christiansen, Ane Katrine Skreslett, Emma Odden, Solveig Anita Bygdåsmo, Sigrid Marie Rydsaa, Nanna Odden, Anne Line Øren Lill Docka: Emma Marshal Musician: lvarTolkmo Daniel Mortensson: lngebjørn Nygaard Geologist: Arnulf Skreslett Englishman: Nils Arne Aakvlk Johannes: Odd Einar Trettbakk Farmers: Otto Johnny Derås, Sten Oddvar Solhaug Farmers wifes: Hilde Karin Skreslett, Sissel Lifjell, Ranveig Klemetsen, Kari Reinåmo, Elsa Hoel, Tone Bygdåsmo, Trine Lise Skreslett, Elisabeth Linvik, Hilde Haugen, Hanne Johansen Voice Glømt and Sajvhi: lrja Kappfjell Klemet Persson:

MUSICANS Tor-Petter Aanes Ole Martin Hjerpbakk Trumpet: Jon Bjarne Ervik Guitar: Magnus Løkken Jacobsen Drums /percussion: TageVedal Jan Arild Hjerpbakk Saxofon: Ragna Håland Kapellmeister: Bass:

Photo: Fabrice Milochau


OVERVIEW Environmental theater scene in Hemnes, Norway for a play about the dramatic life of the Sami Klemet turning the whole valley into a shaman drum. Around year 1900 Klemet was living in between the Okstindan glacier on the mountains and the farmers in the valley. He was a Sami, torn between living the traditional nomadic Sami way of life and the life of the farmers. Klemet was decendant of a noide /(shaman) family. He knew how to survive under hard conditions in artic nature, and had great knowledge in healing animals and people with plants and herbs. The stories and myths about Klemet are still very alive in the valley. The samis call him ”Lihpien Kleamma” Klemet under the cliff. Despite living as an outcast under a rock “heller”, his memory among the farmers is still very strong. The village people also claimed he had the magical power to put spell on people and animals. Farmer children were often threatened by their parents: If you don’t behave Klemet will put a spell on you. Not many years ago the “heller” was blown to pieces in an act of cultural sabotage. The spirit of Klemet had never left the farmers in peace. The environmental drama of the Klemet theater play aims into the psychological liberation of the valley. The whole community was playing a part, either as actors or producers of the play. Klemet lived with his wife and children under a rock in a nest built of moss, trees and grass following the local knowledge of the Sami environmental building techniques. His rock, the “heller”, was one of many in the valley left behind by the retreating Okstindan glacier during the iceage. Klemets rock even had running water – a stream conveniently running from the glacier above. The scenography moves freely in-between land-art and theatre following Klemets life, which was a constant environmental drama tied with the visual and subconscious layers of nature and human nature as part of nature. The stage opens up in different layers: the natural stage is the surrounding mountains, farms and the river running down from the glacier. This natural setting is focusing on a temporary collage of a constructed stage setting with elements from Klemet’s life and the life of the villagers. All the construction materials used in play are recycled from the valley. STAGE TOWERS - These are the sticks of the shaman drum casting light and sound into the play and overlooking the audience as a reminder of some greater power. The construction material is recycled from abandoned houses. HAYSTACKS - Representing the farmers’ natural habitat - cultivating the earth. Multiple function in the play acting as houses, fences, curtains and in general backing up the choreography. HELLER - The stone under which Shaman Klemet lived. This is the magical object where Klemet found his home, and which subsequently was blown to pieces in a cultural sabotage. Realized as a mixture of glacier, stone and traditional Sami building techniques. SEATS - Made of tree stumps from local sawmills

Hemnes, Norway 2013/2015

THE OTHER SIDE ”DREAMWORLD” HAYSTACKS 5

Location: Completed:

Photo: Ketil Born

3 2 1 0

HELLER

24 m

DRUM

8m

STAGETOWERS

MEETING OF THE TWO WORLDS ACTION TAKES PLACE

STAGETOWERS

ORCHESTRA

SECTION

Hans-Petter Bjørnådal Ada Einmo Jürgensen Kjell Joar Pettersen Øverleir Stig Bang Tor Petter Ånes

8m

Architecture & Scenography: Stage-and artistic director Consept idea and composer Playwright/script Musical director

4

8m

REALITY WORLD HERE AND NOW

A production by: ”Klemetspelet” www.klemetspelet.no in co-operation with Nordland Teater www.nordlandteater.no and Åarjelhsaemien Teatere (South Sámi Theater) www.asteatere.no

MIX

Photo: Ketil Born


LANDSCAPE The Environmental Theatre in Hemnes is located near the Okstindan mountain range in northern Norway. The mountain range and its glacier is a central natural form visible both from the sea and inland areas. The peak of Oksskolten is the highest in northern Norway and the short distance from the mountain to the sea is one of the most stunning features of this region. The region has two main cultures, both of which are very close to nature. One is based on fishing and farming and cultivating the land, while the second is more nomadic, and is based on hunting and reindeer, using their resources according to seasons. The shaman Klemet was caught between these two cultures. There are two traditional trading routes that meet in this region. The first one is by sea and goes north and south, trafficking fish and goods as far south as Portugal and north up to the Russian border. This follows the costal landscape, which is much the same all the way thanks to the Gulf Stream. Also worth mentioning are the boat builders situated in the valley, making boats that can sail all the way to Newfoundland. Then there are the traditional Sami land routes that stretch out to the east and west, along the rivers of Sweden and all the way into Russia. The Okstindan are considered to be holy mountains by the Samis and places of offering sometimes contain jewellery from Russia. All this is made possible by the short distance between the mountains and the sea. The coastal landscape and the mountain landscape gradually become part of the forest belt that continues into Sweden, Finland and Russia, stretching all the way to the Pacific Ocean. This coming together of landscapes is also the point where the two cultures meet, and where the drama about Klemet and the farmers unfolds.

The Okstindan glacier

After the withdrawal of the glaciers in Scandinavia, the valleys and tundra were ripe for cultivation. The glacier revealed fertile land, as well as boulders carried down by the huge masses of ice. One of these boulders was used as shelter by the nomadic Sami. The Sami people had an understanding of the landscape that we often lack in today’s modern society. This landscape served as the basis of the interplay between the two cultures. The river running from the glacier played a part in shaping the valley, and it also created a natural amphitheatre that we used as a location for the play. On this site, we had the concept of making the theatre’s stage a circle in the shape of a Sami drum. The drum carries the drama into creation. Traditional southern Sami drums have moving figures from the upper world, the human world and the underworld on them, but in contrast to northern Sami drums, these figures move in circles. This is also mirrored in the feminine dramaturgy of the play, where the drama unfolds in circles that slowly reveal the story. The landscape becomes part of the play through the use of different layers: - The mountains and the valley that make up the backdrop. - The river that encircles the stage area and provides the background sound. - The slope that makes the natural amphitheatre. - The drum that forms the stage.

Rocks left by the glacier

Klemet´s heller


SITE

5

HAYSTACKS 4

8m

0

1

2

3

8m

HELLER 24 m

8m

STAGETOWERS

DRUM

STAGETOWERS

ORCHESTRA

SECTION

The valley and the glacier

MIX

The river and the natural amfi


CONCEPT - DRUM

THE OTHER SIDE ”DREAMWORLD”

The symbols on the traditional drum was attributed magic power and represented the noaidi (shaman) world and all his interests. The symbols were painted with red juice of alder bark, sometimes mixed with reindeer blood. None of the drums are equal, but some symbols are repeated, such as the various gods, sun, moon, reindeer etc.

5

HAYSTACKS

(Drum No.. 8 by Friis) Caption: Drum drawn by unknown author who also wrote down explanations of symbols. Reprinted by J.A. Friis in 1871: Fence Hunting Buoida, Hermelin Tents Pineforrest Squirrel Drum Visiting Sami Fishing boat with yarn Bear hunting Bear Bird eggs Sami wife Bountains storehouse Sami houses The wolf is chasing reindeer God the Holy Spirit Wolf has done damage in another Sami village Moose God the Father Fergebåt Son of God Cow Horse and Rider Gandflue that harm cattle Church Beaver Gandflue that harm People Reindeer sleigh Sami grave in mountains Sami Wife Men guarding reindeer Sami looking for lost Reindeer devil Reindeer, which has been lost in mountains Sun if it will be good weather Gand-Finn, who has learned to send sorcery Lynx Fence Sources: Friis, J. A., 1871: Lappisk Mythologi.

4 2 1 0

24 m

DRUM

SCENETOWERS

MEETING OF THE TWO WORLDS ACTION TAKES PLACE

ORCHESTRA

SECTION

The traces of Klemets life are drummed into existence but like all sami trace they slowly disappear.

HELLER

8m

The story about Klemet is like figures and signs on a drum. The actions together form the story about Klemets life. These stories is told through a circular dramturgi, also called feminin as it works in cycles, layers upon layers, as opposed to an linear storytelling, also called masculin storytelling,; with a clear beginning, a climax and a clear (closed) ending.

8m

As Sami were influenced by Christianity, was also painted symbols including the Holy Trinity on drums

8m

3

On drums from South Sami area is the Sun, Biejjie (Southern Sami), painted centrally on the drum and other symbols around it. Farther north the drum was divided into three or five horizontal fields. It can symbolize several worlds. In some areas in the southern and northern traditions the drums are both divided into sections and have a sun symbol.

REALITY WORLD HERE AND NOW

MIX

SCENETOWERS


PLAYING THE DRUM REINDEER 5

K

5

4

8m

3

8m

0

2

0

K

X

X X X X 24 m

8m

24 m

K

A X

X

24 m

24 m

1

8m

0

8m

X

X

X

8m

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X X X X X X

A

SECTION

B

X

X

SECTION

SECTION

REINDEER

Movement and Event

Movement and Event

Movement and Event

Movement and Event

Photo Fabrice Milochau

Photo: Hedda Hiller Elvestad

SECTION

A

X X X X X X

X

X

1

1

X X X X X

2 3 2

8m

4

8m

3

5 4

8m

8m

X X X X X

X

8m

8m

Photo Fabrice Milochau

Photo: Hedda Hiller Elvestad


HELLER Klemet lived with his wife and children under a rock in a nest built of moss, trees and grass following the local knowledge of the Sami environmental building techniques. His rock, the “heller”, was one of many in the valley left behind by the retreating Okstindan glacier during the ice-age. Klemets rock even had running water – a stream conveniently running from the glacier above. This is the magical object where Klemet found his home, and which subsequently was blown to pieces in a cultural sabotage. Realized as a mixture of glacier, stone and traditional Sami building techniques. The construction is a wooden frame with rusted steelplates. These plates has then been treated with heat to create the natural patterns. The base is made from branches, moss etc. braided together following traditional sami building techniques

1 200

5 300 1 200

10´

1 000

96´

98´

6 400

1 000

75´

88´

48 x 198 48 x 198 48 x 198 stålplater OSB-Plater 1000x2400 / tremmer 22x200

95´

Photo Fabrice Milochau

600 820

580

925

1 000

6 900

1 000

450

790

1 300 880

10´

30´

20´

Section

Elevation 3 360 stålplater OSB-Plater 1000x2400 / tremmer 22x200

1 500 900

48 x 198 48 x 198 48 x 198

5 300

Plan

Photo Fabrice Milochau

Photo Fabrice Milochau


STAGE TOWERS These are the sticks of the shaman drum casting light and sound into the play and overlooking the audience as a reminder of some greater power. The construction material is recycled from abandoned houses.

Photo: Ketil Born

Elevation

Elevation

Section

Elevation

Elevation

Plan

Photo Fabrice Milochau


HAYSTACKS Representing the farmers’ natural habitat - cultivating the earth. Multiple function in the play acting as houses, fences, curtains generally backing up the staging of the play

Photo Fabrice Milochau

Photo Fabrice Milochau

Photo Fabrice Milochau

Photo Fabrice Milochau


ECOLOGY The traditional Sami building forms has rarely led to intervention in the landscape. The culturally conditioned landscape changes are therefore modest, and often difficult to see for those who have no prior knowledge. The visible traces today is usually fire, but one can also find traces of the entrance. Many of the Sami cultural relics are also small and inconspicuous, while other cultural turf huts, capture, sacrifice rings and mazes are easier to identify in the landscape. The border between nature and culture can be fluid: Clean natural formations can also be cultural - as distinct blocks of terrain that has served as sacrificial places (sieidi). Locations also have conservation value because they are associated with traditions. Traditions can be linked to ancient religious practices, traditional resources, and everyday life as well as the mythical events. One skilled in the Sami cultural heritage points out that the protection of Sami landscape reflects a separate Sami landscape understanding. A Sami landscape does not have to be exclusively a landscape where the Sami have left their mark. The scenery is something one moves in and is part of, a cultural concept and an inextricable part of the Sami culture. In the making of Klemet there has been an effort to continue this tradition. The only marks on the field which houses Klemet, is the concrete platforms of the towers. All else are put to storage, so that the farmers can collect heir hay from the fields. The haystacks of the play are produced by similar traditional farming techniques, and become a symbol of real physical labour on the fields. The hay is then used to feed the animals. All of the materials used in the play are originated in the valley. Either wood from abanded houses, wood and treestumps from the forrest, rocks from the river, cloths from the farms etc. Total budget of the play was around 200.000â‚Ź, including stageconstruction, technical support, actors, musicians and costumes.

Simon Izzat Marainen playing Klemet, teaching his son, played by HĂĽkon M Valla, how to make a fire in the mountains where you have no wood. (The teaching is done by song and chanting the traditional sĂĄmi yoik) Photo Fabrice Milochau


Millions discover their favorite reads on issuu every month.

Give your content the digital home it deserves. Get it to any device in seconds.