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Arundel Cathedral Cornerstone Newsletter summer:Layout 1

6/8/10

FRIENDS of ARUNDEL CATHEDRAL

CORNERSTONE Summer 2010

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Renaissance-style silver asperges bowl for holy water, made around 1810, still much in use in Cathedral services


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Dear Friends This issue of Cornerstone continues the tradition of illustrating aspects of the design and decoration of the Cathedral, in this case focusing on the Cathedral’s treasures. Our cover shows two beautiful little seventeenth century chalices, used continuously by the Norfolk family during recusant times, possibly at Worksop, and later presented by the family to the Cathedral. These and other Cathedral treasures are not only fine objects in their own right, but represent enduring links with people and events significant to the Cathedral’s history. Numerous items – chalices, crosses, candlesticks and suchlike – have been presented to the Cathedral since its foundation nearly 140 years ago, and many are used regularly during its services. In addition to these objects there are items not on general display, including a variety of splendid reliquaries, ornate receptacles for the display of the relics of saints. In an ideal world the Cathedral would have its own small museum, giving the public the opportunity to appreciate the artistry and craftsmanship involved in these and other objects of devotion. Many people experience a degree of ambivalence about extravagant display in places of worship. In Victorian times John Ruskin addressed the issue in his Seven Lamps of Architecture: ‘It has been said that a better and more honourable offering is made to our Master in ministry to the poor, in extending the knowledge of his name, in the practice of the virtues by which that name is hallowed, than in material presents to his temple’. But Ruskin goes on to insist that the question is not between God’s House and His poor; one is not instead of the other. We must attend to both. The selection of items illustrated represents only a small part of the collection as a whole. I am most grateful to Michael Rycroft (see page 12) for his guidance and assistance in preparing this issue. Oliver Hawkins Editor


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Silver-gilt chalice (English 1872) presented to Bishop Butt, first parish priest of Arundel, on his appointment as Bishop of Southwark; and given back to Arundel by his successor Bishop Bourne.


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The Cathedral’s finest chalice, in regular use; silver-gilt, originally believed to be early eighteenth century Spanish, but now thought to be mid-seventeenth century Dutch or Flemish. Bought by Duke Henry in 1873.


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Large silver-gilt cross, made in Aachen, presented to the Cathedral by Captain Kent of Lyminster in 1884. The cross is decorated with precious and semi-precious stones, and shows Christ in the centre, with the four evangelists. Below Luke is a small figure of St Philip Neri.


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Reverse face of large cross, showing Our Lady with the child Jesus

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A MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIRMAN OF THE FRIENDS Arundel Cathedral is a gem of a building, but much more than that, as it stands atop the hill at Arundel, it preaches a sermon in stone to all who pass on the plain below. And when we are drawn inside, we have probably all had that experience of being swept up into the glorious space that envelops us and drawn into the beauty of the carvings and the stained glass which reinforce the sensation of being at the heart of the community of faith. We are immensely fortunate to have a gift like this at the heart of our worshipping community in the Diocese. It is Our Lord himself who reminds us, in the Gospel story of the precious ointments, that to dedicate precious things to God, even while we are busy with our works of faith and charity, is an important part of keeping a balance in life. Our Cathedral stands as a symbol of the unity of our Diocese gathered around the seat of our Bishop: no wonder that it is a holy place for which many people have a great affection. And that is why the Friends exist: the Cathedral congregation itself is small, but what the Cathedral stands for is very significant. Please pray for its special place in our ministry to the world just as, in the Cathedral, we pray for the Diocese and its parishes every week - and please encourage your friends to join with you in offering some financial support so that we can care for it and keep its witness burnished bright. If every Friend were to recruit just one additional member to be a Friend, our resources would be doubled overnight! It’s a special way in which we can contribute to the life and liveliness of our Church in Arundel and Brighton and associate ourselves more closely with its mission. Patrick Burgess


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Two large thuribles, for dispensing incense. On the right, English nineteenth century silver plate. On the left, a contemporary copy of a fourteenth century original in the V&A Museum.


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RELICS AND RELIQUARIES The Cathedral has a large collection of relics and reliquaries – the often ornate mounts on which relics are displayed. The veneration of relics has been an essential characteristic of the Church from earliest times. By the fourth century St Augustine felt it necessary to warn against abuses relating to relics, but the sixteenth century Council of Trent encouraged the practice. The focus on relics, and their display, has of course diminished, not least in the wake of Vatican Two, and it is now unusual to see relics on show. Best known at Arundel are of course the relics of our own St Philip Howard (1557-95), patron saint of the Cathedral, whose own altar is located in the north transept, and whose portrait sculpture, complete with faithful dog, is a favourite with visitors of all ages. There are numerous relics too of the church’s original patron, St Philip Neri (1515-95), founder of the Oratorians, ranging from a substantial portion of bone to a tiny fragment of cloth from one of his garments, and also of Duke Henry’s other great inspiration, St Henry, Holy Roman Emperor (973-1024). Other saints whose relics are held at Arundel represent a wonderful variety of periods and concerns – the earliest, St Hubert (d. 727) of the mythical stag, the patron saint of hunters; St Thomas of Canterbury (1118-70), archbishop and martyr, killed in his own cathedral; St Dominic (1170-1221), founder of the Black Friars (see page opposite); St Peter the Martyr (1205-52) the first martyr of the Dominican order; St John Leonardi (1542-1609), Italian apothecary dedicated to the reform of clerical life; St Andrew Bobola (1591-1657), Polish aristocrat and Jesuit, murdered by Cossacks; St John Berchmans (1599-1621), a Jesuit novice who lived only 22 years; St Paul of the Cross (1694-1775), specially interested in the reconciliation of England to the Holy See; St Benedict Labre (1748-83) the patron saint of tramps and vagrants; and most recently St Pius X (1835-1914), whose wish to live and die poor sat uneasily with the pomp of the Vatican..


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Detail of reliquary showing a tooth of St Dominic, displayed in an Italian mount of around 1840, with angels and precious stones.


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Bishop’s crosier for the diocese of Arundel & Brighton, presented to Archbishop Godfrey on his appointment as Apostolic Delegate in 1939; then given by him to David Cashman, whom he had originally ordained, on Cashman’s appointment as first Bishop of Arundel & Brighton.

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Silver-gilt crosier belonging to the late Archbishop Couve de Murville, originally a priest of Arundel & Brighton, who returned to live in the diocese on his retirement. The crosier shows the paschal lamb with cross and pennant.


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Michael Rycroft, a sacristan and server at the Cathedral since 1975, the unofficial archivist and curator of the Cathedral treasures, with a large silver-gilt ciborium, bought by Duke Henry in 1883, and still used at Maundy Thursday and Good Friday services. Michael has been responsible for a number of exhibitions of the Cathedral’s treasures, and is currently up-dating the 1883 inventory.


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NOTICE OF MEETING Notice is hereby given that the twelfth ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING of the Friends of Arundel Cathedral will be held at St Mary’s Hall, London Road, Arundel, West Sussex on Sunday 17 October 2010 at 4.30pm. AGENDA 1. Welcome 2. To consider and approve the Minutes of the AGM held on 18 October 2009 3. To receive the Report and Accounts for the year ended 30 June 2010 4. To appoint C B Edwards & Co as reporting accountants, and to authorise the Council to fix their remuneration. 5. To hear the views of members on the prioritisation of projects to be funded. 6. To elect members of the Council. 7. Any other business. Tea will be served before the meeting. J F Brotherton Secretary August 2010 In accordance with the Articles of Association, Mr M Harlock and Mr J F Brotherton retire from the Council at the AGM; and offer themselves for re-election. Nominations, in writing are invited for other members who wish to stand for election to the Council: they should be addressed to the Secretary of the Company at the Friends Office to arrive before the meeting, please. Nominees must be members of the Friends and have given their consent.

ANNUAL MASS IN HONOUR OF ST. PHILIP HOWARD The Mass will be celebrated in the Cathedral at 3.00pm on this day for the intentions of the members of the Friends.


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Large silver-gilt morse, or cope fastening, used at Corpus Christi, decorated with amethysts and aquamarines; made in Brighton in 1883 and given to the Cathedral by Captain Kemp.

The Friends of Arundel Cathedral registered as a company Limited by guarantee and not having a share capital (No 3792834). Registered Charity No 1078149 The Friends’ Office, Cathedral House, Parsons Hill, Arundel, West Sussex BN18 9AY Telephone: 01903 884567 Email: aruncathfriends@btconnect.com website: www.arundelcathedralfriends.org


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