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Business to Business The institute for job candidates who can’t write good 23

South Sound Selling What are you thinking? Here are a few of my thoughts 23

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INSIDE November 25, 2013 | Volume 29 No. 24

NEWS

REVALUTION

Weyerhaeuser keeps up vocal effort to boost sustainable forestry By Holly Smith Peterson hpeterson@BusinessExaminer.com As a key member of the World Business Council for Sustainable Development, Weyerhaeuser lent its endorsement this month to an announcement trumpeting the reduction of forest loss as a global societal priority. Together, the companies are focusing on ramping up endeavors to cut waste and promote green practices in forestry — or, as the partnership describes it, “committed to transforming forest-related challenges into forestbased opportunities.” Part of the WBCSD’s Forest Solutions group, these companies are also cohesively responsible for nearly 40 percent of annual world forest product, paper and packaging sales. “Our collective statement today aligns with our commitment to responsible fiber sourcing, especially from family-owned forests,” said Cassie Phillips, vice president of Weyerhaeuser’s sustainable forestry program. The announcement came after the WBCSD’s international conference in Istanbul earlier this month, an event that drew together more than 60 regional network partners in the forestry industry. Also on the agenda were discussions of the three current forestry sustainability systems: the Forest Stewardship Council, the Sustainable Forest Initiative, and the Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification. Weyerhaeuser earlier this year became an international stakeholder in the latter, the world’s largest forest certification system. As of 2013, PEFC recognizes certification systems for more than 593 million acres in 30 countries. Alone, Weyerhaeuser is one of the world’s largest private timberland

Health care companies looking for techies 5 FOCUS

Robust third quarter has Columbia Bank optimistic 12 PROGRESS

New Triwest facility to add jobs to South Hill area 17

INDEX Featured List....................................19 For The Record.................................20 People on the Move.........................22 Scene & Heard.................................21

Richard Watson, biomedical firm Revalesio push toward future By Katie Scaff

See SMALL COMPANY FIGHTS BIG DISEASES, page 3

ASSOCIATIONS

2012 Rank Rank Association 1 2 Back Country Horsemen of America PO Box 1367 Graham, WA 98338-1367 2 3 4

2

0

1

5

4

6 7

8 9

20

21

22

25

26

27

28

Ranked by number of members.

12

13

17

21 16 15

NR Thurston Co Realtors Assoc 510 Stoll Rd SE Olympia, WA 98501 Greater Seattle Chapter Int'l Facility Mgrs Association PO Box 6906 Tacoma, WA 98417 World Trade Center Tacoma 950 Pacific Ave Ste 310 Tacoma, WA 98402 Community Bankers of Washington 504 14th Ave SE Ste 100 Olympia, WA 98501

20

23 26

23

24

Phone | Fax Web site Gen Co Email

27

Fairweather Lodge No. 82 5001 S "I" St Tacoma, WA 98408

28

Commercial Relocation network PO Box 6906 Tacoma, WA 98417

(360) 491-3910 | (360) 491-1347 ThurstonCountyRealtors.org tcr@thurston countyrealtors.org (253) 265-3042 | (253) 265-3043 IFMASeattle.org aminc2@comcast.net (253) 396-1022 | (253) 396-1033 WTCTA.org info@wtcta.org

(360) 754-5138 | (360) 754-2517 CommunityBankers-WA.org brad@communitybankers-wa.org (253) 476-4368 | (253) 476-4368 Fairweather82.com genty@nventure.com (253) 265-3042 | (253) 265-3043 Officemovingcrn.com/ aminc3@comcast.net

29 Graham Business Association (360) 832-2451 | (360) 832-1564 PO Box 163 GrahamBusiness.org Graham, WA 98338 peg2@mashell.com NR BOMA South Puget Sound (253) 265-3042 | (253) 265-3043 5727 Baker Way NW Ste 200 BOMASouthPugetSound.org Gig Harbor, WA 98332 becky@aminc.org NR Tacoma Executives Association (253) 265-3042 | (253) 265-3043 5727 Baker Way NW Suite 200 TacomaExec.com Gig Harbor, WA 98417 laura@aminc.org NR WA Independent Telecommuniations Assn (360) 352-5453 | (360) PO Box 2473 352-8886 WITA-Tel.org Olympia, WA 98507 wita@wita-tel.org NR EWI (253) 404-0891 ext 11 | (253) PO Box 112332 404-0892 EWI-tacoma.org Tacoma, WA 98411 ewitacoma@gmail.com NR WA Association of Area Agencies On (360) 485-9761 | (206) 842-3518 Aging AgingWashington.org 4419 Harrison Ave NW Olympia, WA 98502 NR Foss Waterway Owners Association (253) 265-3042 | (253) 265-3043 5727 Baker Way NW Ste 200 Katie@AMInc.org Gig Harbor, WA 98332

Ranked by number of members Information is based on data

then by year established.

provided by a representative

Figures as of September

2013.

Members Year Est Employees Mission Statement Products 13,000 To perpetuate the common sense use and enjoyment of Top Exec(s), Title 1973 horses in American back country Government advocacy, 0 to work to ensure public lands and wilderness areas and education, volunteer Leave No Trace Peg Greiwe, Executive work on trails. remain open to recreation stock use. Secretary 8,100 To create an economic climate in which private sector 1904 employers, the people they Advocacy employ, & citizens can be 36 successful Don Brunell, Pres 5,500 Helping our members succeed. 1929 Leading business association 30 states hospitality industry. representing the Anthony Anton, Pres/ 2,300 CEO AIA|WA serves our members 1894 government with regard to through influencing state issues that impact the practice Advocacy before the state government, AIA 6 of architecture. Stan Bowman, contract documents, health insurance group Executive Director To inform, educate, represent, lead and serve fire districts of Washington state in the Education for elected officials preservation and protection & fire district life and property. of administrative personnel, Roger Ferris, legislative Executive Secretary representation, information To conserve and restore natural resource birds, other wildlife and their ecosystems, focusing on Educational programing, habitats for the benefit of conservation humanity and the earth's biological Krystal Kyer, advocacy, recreational bird watching diversity. Executive Director To serve as a resource center for the mutual benefit of real and local political advocate Education, legal hotline, estate agents and their clients. tech helpline, Wanda Coats, mediation, govt affairs advocacy, news, Executive Officer special events To serve as a resource center the mutual benefit of Realtors & local political advocate for & their clients Jan Ellingson, Pres $7 billion Dedicated to serving and promoting the health care engineering profession. Quality education Lianna Collinge, CAE, CEO $6 billion Promote the interest of home building industry through membership involvement, Trade Association - Home Bldg Industry. education while striving to legislative action, networking and Community involvement, Tiffany Spiers, Exec maintain the highest ethical health insurance, standards. Officer government advocacy $5 billion Advocate for quality cardiovascular care 14through education, research promotion, Advocacy, tools & resources, application of standards and development and Lianna Collinge, CAE, workforce, health information education, guidelines. technology $4 billion CEO Dedicated to protecting and independent grocery industrypromoting the interests of the Workers' Comp Retrospective in Washington state through effective legislative and regulatory Jan Gee, Pres & CEO Program; Monthly Workplace Rating advocacy before state $3 billion government. Webinars and Workshops; Safety Training Monthly Newsletter & Regulatory Alert To advance the interests of the broadcasting industry and to enhance the ability of stations to serve their communities Legislative & congressional advocacy, Mark Allen, Pres$2 professional education seminars & billion and CEO conferences To improve the construction climate in which it operates. industry and the business Home shows, Tour of Homes, government Laura Worf, Executive affairs representation, networking events, Officer $1 billion health insurance program, Dedicated to improving the etc. the success of its members automotive service industry and Medical and Garage Keeper Insurance, Retro Jeff Lovell, Pres & Safety Program, Diagnostic, Consulting, Website & BusinessManagement Technology, $0 Attorney Services Serve as a resource center and local political advocate the mutual benefit of real estate for Real estate items and tools of trade education. Rebecca agents and their clients Service to members Jarvela, Executive Officer To create an environment that supports the diverse membership of IFMA and encourages Meetings and events to educate each members' and network Lianna Collinge, growth in the areas of facility CAE, management most important to them as an individual. CEO Programs designed to stimulate international trade. Events, networking, trade research, technical Anthony Hemstad, assistance Pres/CEO To be the unified resource exclusively for the independent community banks in Washington Advocacy for banks at State State. legislature; John Collins, Pres/ provides members with professional Exec Director education opportunities, access 82 and services at favorable pricing.to products To be recognized as a relevant 1892 committed to attracting and and respected fraternity, retaining all men of high quality Freemasons of Washington fraternal 2 who strive for self improvement Kevin Gent, Secretary organization and the opportunity to make a positive difference in their community. 70 To create a network of leading Office & Industrial relocation 2003 experts that deliver best in Business referrals in USA; education of best Lianna services worldwide. We areclass corporate relocation practices. Collinge, CAE, customers by delivering highfocused on building referral CEO quality cost effective commercial relocation solutions 65 Better businesses make a better community. 1975 Monthly meetings with business speakers. 3rd Peg Greiwe, 0 Wed / month @ 7 a.m. Executive 57 Secretary To represent and promote the interests of BOMA members 1940 through leadership, advocacy Advocacy, member firm cross 0 development. This chapter and professional networking for building ownerspromotion and Lianna Collinge, CAE, is about building and managers. CEO success for owners and commercial property managers. 56 Pierce County's premier networking organization. 1917 To strengthen each member 0 Lianna Collinge, CAE, purchasing from and referringfirm by new customers CEO 17 to them. Advance and promote an environment that enables its 1915 members to provide high quality services in response to the Non-profit trade association representing the Betty 2 needs of all their customers independent telecommunications Buckley, in an evolving communications companies Executive Director marketplace. in the State of Washington. 15 EWI brings together key individuals from diverse 1986 businesses for the purpose To be a professional organization of promoting member firms, that creates Debra Padden, 0 enhancing personal and professional value for its member firms Pres and their encouraging community involvement.development, and representatives through career development, 13 business connectivity Create communities supporting people as they age. 1988 Enhance the effectiveness Public Information and Education of each AAA through a strong and 1 agenda of information, debate, Lori Brown Legislative Advocacy advocacy and education.

(360) 832-2461 | (360) 832-1564 BackCountryHorse.com ExecSecretary@backcountryhorse.com

4 Association of Washington Business (360) 943-1600 | (360) 943-5811 PO Box 658 AWB.org Olympia, WA 98507 members@awb.org 5 Washington Restaurant Association (360) 956-7279 | (360) 357-9232 510 Plum St SE Ste 200 WArestaurant.org Olympia, WA 98501 news@warestaurant.org 7 American Institute of Architects WA (360) 943-6012 | (360) 352-1870 Council AIAwa.org 724 Columbia St NW Ste 120 info@aiawa.org Olympia, WA 98501 8 WA Fire Commissioners Association (360) 943-3880 | (360) 664-0415 PO Box 134 Wfca.wa.gov Olympia, WA 98507 11 Tahoma Audubon Society (253) 565-9278 2917 Morrison Road West TahomaAudubon.org University Place, WA 98466 Contact@TahomaAudubon.org 10 Tacoma-Pierce County Association of (253) 473-0232 | (253) 473-0535 Realtors TPCAR.org 2550 South Yakima Ave Ste C Tacoma, WA 98405 NR WA Association of Realtors (800) 562-6024 | (360) 357-6627 PO Box 719 WARealtor.org Olympia, WA 98507 comment@warealtor.org WA State Society for Healthcare (253) 265-3042 | (253) 265-3043 Engineering WSSHE.org PO Box 6906 aminc2@comcast.net Tacoma, WA 98417 Master Builders Association of Pierce (253) 272-2112 | (253) 383-1047 County MBAPierce.com 1120 Pacific Ave Ste 301 info@mbapierce.com Tacoma, WA 98402 WA Chapter American College of (253) 265-3042 | (253) 265-3043 Cardiology ACCWA.org PO Box 6906 aminc1@comcast.net Tacoma, WA 98417 WA Food Industry Assn (360) 753-5177 | (866) 478-2696 PO Box 706 WA-food-ind.org Olympia, WA 98507 info@wa-food-ind.org WA State Assoc of Broadcasters (360) 705-0774 | (360) 705-0873 724 Columbia St NW Ste 310 WSAB.org Olympia, WA 98501 wa-broadcasters@earthlink.net Olympia Master Builders (360) 754-0912 | (360) 754-7448 1211 State Ave NE OMB.org Olympia, WA 98506 info@omb.org Automotive Service Association of WA (253) 473-6970 | (253) 473-6940 7403 Lakewood Dr W Ste 7 Asawa.com Lakewood, WA 98499 jeff@asawa.com

14

10

11

12

13 14 15

16 17

18 19

Export & Import Market

1,800 1948 5 1,500 1969 2 1,100 1906 4

Facts

Top 5 Exports WA to China

1,100 4

716 1988

55% change from 2010-2012

700 1945 6

2010

2011

2012

Sponsored by

25%

601 1993

550 1899 4

550 1935 5 550 1959 5 545 1984 5

47%

14%

465 1948 2 290 1994

Agricultural Products

187 1987 4 135 1989 2

Lianna Collinge, CAE, Executive Director

27,945.7

33,880.4

18,556.0 17,925.7 13,067.3

2009

2010

Blaine

42,442.1 35,354.8 19,689.0 21,966.4 10,667.7

2008

of this list to endorse the participants,

Rail Traffic in Tons (millions) Originating in WA, 2010

Rail Traffic in Tons (millions) Terminated in WA, 2010

Total tons in millions: 18.5 Source: Association of American Railroads

11%

25,268.5

20,243.1 19,793.6 11,156.6

Everett

Care for city owned property

40%

Primary Metal Manufacturing

Trade by Port

*Total imports and exports Note: All data is based on goods loaded or unloaded in Washington regardless of goods origin or destination. Data for Washington goods 43,157.4 only are not available.

Tacoma

N/A

Computer and Waste and Scrap Electrical Products

Source: http://www.ofm.wa.gov/databook/

Sea-Tac Int’l Airport

10 2002 0

of each company or respective Web site. PCBE Inc. dba Business Examiner makes every attempt companies, or individuals or to imply a specific level of quality to publish accurate and factual information on its lists, however, in the companies listed. Please send any updates, additions, accuracy can not be guaranteed. corrections, or deletions to It is not the intent subscribe@businessexaminer.com.

BOOK OF LISTS

Transportation Equipment

Top 5 Washington Waterborne

Seattle

Lumber & Wood

10%

Farm Products

7%

Pulp & Paper

Waste & Scrap

Total tons in millions: 59.1 Source: Association of American Railroads

13% 10%

All Other

28%

8%

Cement & Coal

31%

All Other

17%

Food Products

5% Intermodal

4%

Chemicals

Farm Products

56%

Intermodal

The definitive resource guide for professionals with more than 75 lists from a variety of industries updated throughout the year. www.BusinessExaminer.com/BookofLists

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See WEYERHAEUSER, page 9

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12 01 | Weyerhaeuser joins global efforts to ramp

11 | JPMorgan Chase reaches settlement on

up sustainable forestry

mortgage-backed securities

03 | Small company fights big diseases

12 | Robust third quarter has Columbia Bank

04 | Union machinists turn down Boeing offer

optimistic

04 | Tacoma’s Blue Mouse celebrates 90 years

14 | Cornerstone: Blending business to benefit

04 | Olympia auto dealer operator nominated

clientele

for TIME Dealer of the Year

15 | To-dos for 2014: A year-end financial

05 | Health care companies looking for

checklist for your small company

techies

16 | Uptick in business in, around South Hill Mall

06 | South Thurston aiming for STEDI business

17 | New facility to add jobs to South Hill area

development

23 | Business to Business: The institute for job

10 | Small business banking expands in

candidates who can’t read good

downtown Olympia

23 | South Sound Selling: What are you thinking? Here are a few of my thoughts


November 25, 2013  | www.BusinessExaminer.com | 3

Small company fights big diseases Pharmaceutical development company creates saline solution to treat Parkinson’s and more By Katie Scaff kscaff@BusinessExaminer.com Tiny bubbles could soon have a big effect on how we treat neurological diseases. Tacoma’s only clinical-stage biomedical company, Revalesio is developing salt water with tiny bubbles that may protect and reverse the effects of neurological diseases. The solution, known as RNS60 is nothing more than normal, medical-grade, isotonic saline processed with Revalesio’s technology — a type of “elegant, turbulent mixing process” — which creates it its unique stabilized nanobubbles. These bubbles aren’t like soap bubbles or bubbles we see in carbonated beverages. Rather, these nanobubbles — less than onethousandth the size of a strand of hair — are much more durable and have a very different function. “They act more like bullets than like bubbles,” explained Richard Watson, chief science officer at Revalesio, hinting at their durability and resiliency. “It protects cells from stress and disease and it can even reverse cell functions when they are diseased.” The power of RNS60 is in the structure of these bubbles, which are created through a combination of fluid flow, pressure, medical-grade oxygen and cavitation in Revalesio’s patented proprietary technology. The bubbles modulate cellular function

Promise for Parkinson’s patients For the last year and a half, scientists at Rush University in Chicago have been testing RNS60 on mice with Parkinson’s disease-like symptoms. “We administer a neurotoxin to the animals and we see if we can protect the brain against that neurotoxin,” Watson explained. “We were successful at that. There was not only protection, but there was some restoration after damage was done by this neurotoxin.” Dopamine levels, which are significantly lower in those with Parkinson’s disease, didn’t return to pre-disease levels, but there was a notable increase. The next step for the company is expanding its work into phase II clinical trials, with more testing on RNS60’s effects on Parkinson’s and other diseases “We’re working with a researcher in Madrid, Spain to do a second study that looks a little but deeper into that. We’ve had conversations with researchers, the Michael J. Fox Foundation, looking at an inhaled form of the product as a potential treatment for Parkinson’s disease, so administering the product by inhalation twice a day and testing it to see if it has efficacy in that disease,” Watson explained.

to protect cells from inflammation and disease by changing the way cells respond to inflammation and inflammatory signals. With RNS60, the cell’s “normal function is unaffected; it’s resistant to the disease signals,” Watson explained. Watson, along with other scientists from Revalesio and around the world, has been researching the therapeutic effects of this solution since 2006. The company was purchased by Eric Russell and brought to Tacoma in 2005. In that time, the company has tested RNS60’s effects on a number of diseases and conditions. It’s finished phase I clinical trials for Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, multiple sclerosis and acute myocardial infarction — the medical term for a heart attack. It’s in clinical phase II safety studies for asthma. It’s finished phase I clinical trials of RNS60 in both intravenous and inhalation modes of administration for acute myocardial infarctions and asthma, respectively. These studies have enabled the company to move into phase II studies for Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, multiple sclerosis and acute myocardial infarction. It’s in clinical phase II safety studies for asthma.

Not your average drug Unlike traditional treatments, RNS60 doesn’t contain active pharmaceutical ingredients, and it doesn’t have the same effects. “The chemical compounds (in traditional drugs) have these built-in side effects, because they can’t discriminate the way their mechanism of action works,” explained Watson. “So, they don’t discriminate whether they’re affecting a healthy cell or an unhealthy cell. It can have a whole lot of unintended side effects.” RNS60, on the other hand, affects cells broadly, rather than targeting a specific individual or isolated protein target. The nanobubbles affect the electrical signals on the surface of cells, but they don’t cripple healthy, normal cells and their function. “We’re not choosing just one chemical to effect (like traditional drugs),” Watson said. “The process itself produces this product, RNS60, that has the ability to impact the way cells function globally, thus it’s a much subtler effect, but it has a much greater significance on these diseases.” Studies have shown RNS60 can block damage due to heart attacks, improve nerve function and reverse Alzheimer’s-like disease in animal models. “Those things are things that have not necessarily been experienced before. In one way, the efficacy or the ability to treat the disease is somewhat unique to this product. But, combine that then with the safety profile, that’s really unparalleled for what we’re seeing in these models,” Watson said. “I think there’s a general belief that if you do good in the body, at some level you have the potential to do hugely bad in the body, and it’s just our experience with drugs. But, in this case, it seems like we’re not seeing those same sorts of side effects and we’ve done all the phase I human testing for safety that the FDA requires and have not seen

I think there’s a general belief that if you do good in the body, at some level you have the potential to do hugely bad ... But, in this case, it seems like we’re not seeing those same sorts of side effects. Richard Watson Chief Science Officer Revalesio

those side effects.”

Founder finds use for his creation In early 2012, after Revalesio had completed two phase I human safety studies with RNS60, its creator became the first ALS patient to receive the drug. Tony Wood, a retired Texas Instruments physicist, stumbled on the solution that would become RNS60 while mixing gas and liquids in his garage in the late 1990s. When he was diagnosed with ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease, in 2011, Wood — who is still is a member of the research and development team at Revalesio — wanted to contribute. In ALS, like other diseases RNS60 could potentially treat, inflammation is often an enabling system that propagates the disease. With his health in rapid decline, Wood began treatment in March 2012, under the authorization of a compassionate-use protocol with the FDA. His condition plateaued by June 2012 and he’s remained stable.

Despite the positive results, though, Revalesio scientists say they can’t be sure it’s because of the continuous treatment Wood has received. A proper clinical trial is needed to determine the potential effect of RNS60 in ALS. “ALS progresses unpredictably and uniquely with every person, so it is difficult to assess the direct impact of RNS60,” explained Thomas. “While Tony has not seen a reversal of the disease, there has been a slowing and plateau of the advancement of the disease which has been very encouraging to everyone involved.” At this point, Revalesio’s scientists are still testing how RNS60 would be administered, including intravenously and through a nebulizer or inhalation. The company has already completed phase one human safety studies of RNS60 using inhalation and intravenous routes.

Clinical trials continue The company continues to seek capital, grants and partnerships to conduct large clinical trials, including phase II clinical trials planned for acute myocardial infarction and multiple sclerosis to start in 2014. The research will cost tens of millions of dollars. “We need more human data,” Watson said. “As you can imagine, these are not small undertakings, particularly for a small company.” Revalesio is working with Mount Sinai Hospital in New York for its multiple sclerosis trial and with Duke University for its cardiovascular trial. Treatment for asthma is the most advanced in development at this time, though. “Asthma is our product that’s furthest down the line. It’s probably five to seven

See REVALESIO, page 5


4  | www.BusinessExaminer.com |  November 25, 2013

SouthSoundTimeLine Oct

11 Oct 12 Oct 13 Oct 14 Oct 15 Oct 16 Oct 17 Oct 18 Oct 19 Oct 20 Oct 21 Oct 22 Oct 23 Oct 24

FIRST REPORTED ON DAILY BUSINESS BRIEFS, NOV. 14

Union machinists turn down Boeing offer ‘No’ vote casts doubt on 777X aircraft assembly site By Arnie Aurellano arniea@BusinessExaminer.com Members of machinists’ union IAM 751, which represents more than 31,000 Boeing workers, voted to reject a proposal from the company on Nov. 13, casting doubt on where the new 777X aircraft would be built. About 67 percent of those voting turned down the offer, an eight-year labor agreement that included the cessation of pension accruals, the creation of an alternative company-funded retirement plan and a $10,000

signing bonus within 30 days of ratification. An approval from the union would have guaranteed that the wings and fuselage of the new Boeing 777X aircraft would be built by IAM members in Puget Sound. Now, though, the company has opened bidding for an assembly location. “We are very disappointed in the outcome of the union vote,” said Boeing President and CEO Ray Conner in a released statement. “Our goal was two-fold: to enable the 777X and its new composite wing to be produced in Puget Sound and to create a

See BOEING, page 7

FIRST REPORTED ON DAILY BUSINESS BRIEFS, NOV. 13

Tacoma’s Blue Mouse celebrates 90 years Historic movie house among oldest in Washington By Arnie Aurellano arniea@BusinessExaminer.com That little gust in Tacoma’s Proctor district was the venerable Blue Mouse blowing out the candles on its 90th birthday cake. The historic one-screen theater, the state’s oldest continuously operating cinema, hit the milestone anniversary on Nov. 13. Added to the country’s National Register of Historic Places in January of 2010, the movie house has endured despite many structural and technological

changes and shifts in ownership, and today retains its unique charm and place within the fabric of the Proctor district. “The community and the neighborhood has supported the Blue Mouse for so many years,” said Erling Kuester, one of 17 shareholders — there are currently 15 — who purchased the cinema from previous owner Shirley Mayo in 1993. “I mean, 90 years is truly just incredible, and that’s something to celebrate.” “We haven’t planned a party or anything,” added manager Susan Evans

See BLUE MOUSE, page 8

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Olympia auto dealer operator among the best Jamie Will nominated for TIME Dealer of the Year By Katie Scaff kscaff@BusinessExaminer.com

give back to the community.” This year was Will’s first time being nominated, but he has Jamie Will, history in the industry. president of TitusHis family has been in Will Chevrolet the automobile busiBuick GMC Cadilness since 1938, when lac in Olympia, has his uncle Leon E. Tibeen nominated tus Sr. founded a Ford for the 2014 TIME Store in Tacoma. His Dealer of the Year father, James W. Will, award. was a 50 percent ownWill is one of 56 er and the Titus-Will Will dealer nominees partnership was born. from across the country — and “We are a family business the only from Washington state and now have four generations — who will be honored at the in the mix — eight in total,” Will annual National Automobile said. Dealers Association meeting in Today, the company’s eight New Orleans Jan. 25. dealerships serve Chehalis, The program recognizes Centralia, Olympia, Tacoma new-car dealers who exhibit and Lakewood. Will oversees exceptional performance in four of them. their dealerships and perform “My partner Graham Tash distinguished community ser- and the Titus family and the vice. Will, though, attributes the Will family are all part of this,” honor to his team of employees, Will said. rather than his individual acOver the course of the last complishments. three years, the company and “We have a long history of family foundation have given giving back to the communi- more than $1 million to comties we have stores in, where we munity organizations. live and work, and I think that’s Will, 66, says one of his a big part of what the award is most meaningful philanthropic about,” Will said. “It means a lot achievements was serving as a to our employees. They’re the founding member for the Boys ones who all made it possible & Girls Clubs of Thurston Counfor us to be successful and to ty in 2001.


November 25, 2013  | www.BusinessExaminer.com | 5

Health care companies looking for techies Federal mandate for electronic health records by 2014 creating need at local level By Katie Scaff kscaff@BusinessExaminer.com The burgeoning field of health informatics has professionals like Tony Aguila hopeful he can land a new job. Aguila, an employee at Franciscan Health System’s St. Francis Hospital in Federal Way, is also a student in Pierce College’s new health information technology program. When he graduates in the spring, he’s hoping to secure one of the over 100 openings Franciscan has created since it started rolling out electronic health records at its facilities earlier this year. “It seemed like it would be something I could already do, because I’ve been with Franciscan for almost 10 years,” he said. The job prospects look good for Aguila and his 13 peers in the first class of the twoyear degree. Health care organizations across the country are in need of staff to help manage electronic health records, which are to be set up by 2014, according to the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act. HITECH, which was enacted as part of the economic stimulus package in 2009, allocates $19 billion to hospitals and physicians who demonstrate “meaningful use” of electronic medical records. The terms of meaningful use are still being determined, but could include e-prescribing, chart sharing and quality of care measurements. Those who don’t at least make the switch to electronic record systems by 2015, though, will start being penalized. “All those sorts of things require people who have at least some sort of skills,” explained Robert Marshall, chief medical informatics officer for Madigan Army Medical Center, program director for the Department of Defense clinical informatics fellowship and a member of the health information technology program advisory board at Pierce College. “It’s one of the major growth industries out there. But, the issue is it takes a fair amount of training to get there.” Pierce College’s new program is hoping to help bridge that gap, though. Its health information technology program began last year, funded by a nearly $12 million federal grant awarded to a consortium of nine community colleges, workforce, industry and labor partners. Pierce College received more than $500,000, with

REVALESIO continued from page 3 years away,” Watson said. “This process is amazingly slow. We’re just very cautious about putting products on the market that don’t have a lot of scientific data behind it. Usually the studies take a year or two to do at each level, so that would be next.” Another treatment likely to come soon would be one for Alzheimer’s disease, where the RNS60 could have a significant influence. “I think those things have the potential,

PHOTO BY KATIE SCAFF

Paul Venckus and Holly Emerson, both students in the inaugurating class of Pierce College’s health information technology program set to graduate in the spring, said they’re hopeful about finding a job in the medical industry with their new IT skills.

It’s one of the major growth industries out there. But, the issue is it takes a fair amount of training to get there. Robert Marshall Chief Medical Informatics Officer Madigan Army Medical Center

which it’s creating curriculum that leads to a certificate in healthcare database management. Students can also continue in the program for a second year to graduate with an associate degree in Health Informatics and Integrated Technology, like Aguila. “With all of the companies wanting big data, there’s a lot more to manage, hospitals included,” said Donna Moran, program manager. “They have a lot more digital components that are added besides names and addresses, and healthcare records aren’t something you wanted purged every five

if they show early promise, if we see data on some of these early studies, that they could be moved much more quickly along,” Watson said. “There’s just a desperation right now. If you look at Alzheimer’s disease, it will not only affect millions and millions of people, but it’s going to cripple our economy. There’s so many stakeholders that want to see cures, or at least successful treatments, that there are a lot of unique paths that are being carved for products to move forward.” “We are showing excellent results in these animal studies, similar studies that other compounds have looked at as well, and I think that we’re approaching it from a different angle,” Watson said. We’re very

years. It’s growing exponentially.” The industry really started taking off five to 10 years ago, Marshall said. But it was slow, with academic medical centers being among the first to join the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs, which have had electronic medical records for 25-plus years. “Probably 10 years ago, when President Bush basically said we’re going to electronic health records,” Marshall said. “Unfortunately he put no money into, so some people took off with it, but some didn’t because there was no money.” HITECH, however, provided that money. “They have dispensed billions of dollars,” Marshall said. “We went from about a 15 percent adoption rate to now we’re over 60 percent (nationally). We’re continuing to increase. There’s not only money available, but as time goes on there’s going to start to be penalties, out of Medicare at least, for not doing electronic health records.” By 2015, when the penalties start rolling out, Marshall estimates 75 to 80 percent of

organizations will be using electronic medical records. To get there, Marshall said there needs to staff to create and maintain the systems, staff to use the data to help make business and clinical decisions and staff to reach out to patients and exchange information and deliver resources. “There’s really several distinct groups you’re going to have to train,” Marshall explained. “Even when everyone is trained, guess what, there’s an upgrade and you’re going to have to retrain. There’s always going to be a need for people to do business intelligence.” Scott Thompson, spokesperson for Franciscan estimates the 100 to 200 staff members hired to help set up electronic health record systems at its hospitals and clinics, will begin phasing out late next summer or early in the fall to help implement the system at other organizations around the country. He said the company is currently hiring for at least 30 positions in the Tacoma market to provide long-term support for its database.

expectant that we will see a different result than has been seen before.”

agricultural and consumer beverage applications. “The technology very broadly is being used other places,” said Thomas. “The agricultural side is important and still part of the company and a very strong focus for what we do.” The sports beverage the company is working on, which is unique from RNS60, “has been shown to protect athletes from damage and inflammation following strenuous exercise. It improves performance, it improves training, and we’re working to develop what is the market for that and how would we move that into a commercial venture,” Thomas said.

Other applications for technology Before coming to Tacoma, the technology discovered by Wood was tested on plants in New Zealand in the early 2000s. The solution increased yields for lettuce, tomatoes, beets and spinach and reduced some diseases common to hydroponic growing. When the company was purchased by Russell, current CEO and president, scientists focused on the effects it could have on human diseases, but that’s only about 90 percent of the company’s work. The other 10 percent is dedicated to its


6  | www.BusinessExaminer.com |  November 25, 2013

South Thurston aiming for STEDI business development New Economic Development Council program aims to strengthen southern communities By Holly Smith Peterson hpeterson@BusinessExaminer.com Cities in the southern reaches of Thurston County are now being targeted for business support and investment through a new program out of the Thurston Economic Development Council. Specifically, the South Thurston Economic Development Initiative was recently inked to bring the cities of Tenino, Yelm, Rainier, Grand Mound and Bucoda together with local orga-

nizations and government programs to ensure that businesses there have the resources they need. Besides the EDC, agencies tapped to be involved with STEDI include Thurston Regional Planning Council, Olympia Lacey Tumwater Visitor & Convention Bureau, the Tenino and Yelm Chambers of Commerce, several local municipalities, and the Washington State University TeleWork program. The goal of STEDI — for which discussions began several months ago and

which will run through next spring — is to identify ways to market the lesserknown communities of South Thurston County, as well as their business networks. A key agency is the EDC’s Business Resource Center, where business owners and entrepreneurs can already receive mentoring, counseling, technical assistance and financial advice. Alan Vanell, a Town of Bucoda council member, said that STEDI members are focusing their efforts within the initiative to help those outside of the area

to realize South Thurston’s economic potential. “Managed economic development of south Thurston County is critical for the sustainability of the region,” explained Vanell. “Business owners, concerned citizens, educators and others who live and work in South Thurston deserve to be heard, (and) STEDI is a grassroots organization with a growing voice in the area.” Already, the members of STEDI over the past few months have been hard at work questioning local businesses both about their current support needs and future wishes. Surveys with cities like Tenino and Rainier happened over the summer, and final roundtables with Rochester and Yelm will occur early next year. With the services of the EDC, TRPC, Visitor & Tourism Bureau and others, members will then throughout 2014 determine ways to streamline the processes for answering the major challenges for local businesses.

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Managed economic development of south Thurston County is critical for the sustainability of the region. Business owners, concerned citizens, educators and others who live and work in South Thurston deserve to be heard, [and] STEDI is a grassroots organization with a growing voice in the area. Alan Vanell Council Member Bucoda

One initial effort of STEDI has been to test a rural telework center that provides hands-on professional development resources and services. If successful, such telework centers could save thousands of business owners travel time and expenses, as these types of resources would have local availability rather than access only through main Thurston work hubs. Currently, the “Mobile BRC” holds a presentation in South Thurston once monthly. As for the clusters of local involved, the City of Rainier, for one, already feels that the project has been successful. “STEDI has been instrumental in providing (us) with information and statistics regarding the businesses in our community,” noted Rainier mayor Randy Schleis, “(which) will bring both businesses and customers to Rainier in the future.”


BOEING continued from page 4 competitive structure to ensure that we continue market-leading pay, health care and retirement benefits while preserving jobs and our industrial base here in the region. But without the terms of this contract extension, we’re left with no choice but to open the process competitively and pursue all options for the 777X.” IAM 751, though, has defended its members rejection of Boeing’s proposal, citing the changes to the retirement benefit plan in particular. “We preserved something sacred by rejecting the Boeing proposal,” said Tom

Wroblewski, IAM District 751 directing business representative in a statement. “We’ve held on to our pensions and that’s big. At a time when financial planners are talking about a ‘retirement crisis’ in America, we have preserved a tool that will help our members retire with more comfort and dignity.” Jeffrey Johnson, president of the Washington State Labor Council, AFLCIO, released a statement late after the results of the vote went public. “This vote is in no way an indication that workers don’t want Boeing to continue to expand aerospace production in Washington State,” he said. Rather, he continued, “it is unthinkable for members to sell out a secure retirement future for current and future workers,” and that

ASSOCIATIONS

2012 Rank Rank Association 1 2 Back Country Horsemen of America PO Box 1367 Graham, WA 98338-1367 2

0

1

Phone | Fax Web site Gen Co Email

Ranked by number of members.

(360) 832-2461 | (360) 832-1564 BackCountryHorse.com ExecSecretary@backcountryhorse.com

Association of Washington Business (360) 943-1600 | (360) 943-5811 PO Box 658 AWB.org Olympia, WA 98507 members@awb.org Washington Restaurant Association (360) 956-7279 | (360) 357-9232 510 Plum St SE Ste 200 WArestaurant.org Olympia, WA 98501 news@warestaurant.org American Institute of Architects WA (360) 943-6012 | (360) 352-1870 Council AIAwa.org 724 Columbia St NW Ste 120 info@aiawa.org Olympia, WA 98501 WA Fire Commissioners Association (360) 943-3880 | (360) 664-0415 PO Box 134 Wfca.wa.gov Olympia, WA 98507 Tahoma Audubon Society (253) 565-9278 2917 Morrison Road West TahomaAudubon.org University Place, WA 98466 Contact@TahomaAudubon.org Tacoma-Pierce County Association of (253) 473-0232 | (253) 473-0535 Realtors TPCAR.org 2550 South Yakima Ave Ste C Tacoma, WA 98405 8 NR WA Association of Realtors (800) 562-6024 | (360) 357-6627 PO Box 719 WARealtor.org Olympia, WA 98507 comment@warealtor.org 9 14 WA State Society for Healthcare (253) 265-3042 | (253) 265-3043 Engineering WSSHE.org PO Box 6906 aminc2@comcast.net Tacoma, WA 98417 10 12 Master Builders Association of Pierce (253) 272-2112 | (253) 383-1047 County MBAPierce.com 1120 Pacific Ave Ste 301 info@mbapierce.com Tacoma, WA 98402 11 13 WA Chapter American College of (253) 265-3042 | (253) 265-3043 Cardiology ACCWA.org PO Box 6906 aminc1@comcast.net Tacoma, WA 98417 12 17 WA Food Industry Assn (360) 753-5177 | (866) 478-2696 PO Box 706 WA-food-ind.org Olympia, WA 98507 info@wa-food-ind.org 13 21 WA State Assoc of Broadcasters (360) 705-0774 | (360) 705-0873 724 Columbia St NW Ste 310 WSAB.org Olympia, WA 98501 wa-broadcasters@earthlink.net 14 16 Olympia Master Builders (360) 754-0912 | (360) 754-7448 1211 State Ave NE OMB.org Olympia, WA 98506 info@omb.org 15 15 Automotive Service Association of WA (253) 473-6970 | (253) 473-6940 7403 Lakewood Dr W Ste 7 Asawa.com Lakewood, WA 98499 jeff@asawa.com 16 NR Thurston Co Realtors Assoc (360) 491-3910 | (360) 491-1347 510 Stoll Rd SE ThurstonCountyRealtors.org Olympia, WA 98501 tcr@thurston countyrealtors.org 17 20 Greater Seattle Chapter Int'l Facility (253) 265-3042 | (253) 265-3043 Mgrs Association IFMASeattle.org PO Box 6906 aminc2@comcast.net Tacoma, WA 98417 18 23 World Trade Center Tacoma (253) 396-1022 | (253) 396-1033 950 Pacific Ave Ste 310 WTCTA.org Tacoma, WA 98402 info@wtcta.org 19 26 Community Bankers of Washington (360) 754-5138 | (360) 754-2517 504 14th Ave SE Ste 100 CommunityBankers-WA.org Olympia, WA 98501 brad@communitybankers-wa.org 20 27 Fairweather Lodge No. 82 (253) 476-4368 | (253) 476-4368 5001 S "I" St Fairweather82.com Tacoma, WA 98408 genty@nventure.com 21 28 Commercial Relocation network (253) 265-3042 | (253) 265-3043 PO Box 6906 Officemovingcrn.com/ Tacoma, WA 98417 aminc3@comcast.net 3

4

2

5

4

22 23

24 25

26

27

28

4

11

10

29 Graham Business Association PO Box 163 Graham, WA 98338 NR BOMA South Puget Sound 5727 Baker Way NW Ste 200 Gig Harbor, WA 98332

(360) 832-2451 | (360) 832-1564 GrahamBusiness.org peg2@mashell.com (253) 265-3042 | (253) 265-3043 BOMASouthPugetSound.org becky@aminc.org

NR Tacoma Executives Association (253) 265-3042 | (253) 265-3043 5727 Baker Way NW Suite 200 TacomaExec.com Gig Harbor, WA 98417 laura@aminc.org NR WA Independent Telecommuniations Assn (360) 352-5453 | (360) PO Box 2473 352-8886 WITA-Tel.org Olympia, WA 98507 wita@wita-tel.org NR EWI PO Box 112332 Tacoma, WA 98411

(253) 404-0891 ext 11 | (253) 404-0892 EWI-tacoma.org ewitacoma@gmail.com

NR WA Association of Area Agencies On Aging 4419 Harrison Ave NW Olympia, WA 98502 NR Foss Waterway Owners Association 5727 Baker Way NW Ste 200 Gig Harbor, WA 98332

Ranked by number of members Information is based on data

then by year established.

provided by a representative

(360) 485-9761 | (206) 842-3518 AgingWashington.org (253) 265-3042 | (253) 265-3043 Katie@AMInc.org

Members Year Est Employees 13,000 1973 0 8,100 1904 36 5,500 1929 30 2,300 1894 6

5

7

8

6

7

1,800 1948 5 1,500 1969 2 1,100 1906 4 1,100 4 716 1988 700 1945 6 601 1993

Figures as of September

2013.

Mission Statement Products To perpetuate the common sense use and enjoyment of Top Exec(s), Title horses in American back country Government advocacy, to work to ensure public lands and wilderness areas and education, volunteer Leave No Trace Peg Greiwe, Executive work on trails. remain open to recreation stock use. Secretary To create an economic climate in which private sector employers, the people they Advocacy employ, & citizens can be successful Don Brunell, Pres Helping our members succeed. Leading business association states hospitality industry. representing the Anthony Anton, Pres/ CEO Advocacy before the state government, AIA Stan Bowman, contract documents, health insurance group Executive Director

Export & Import Market

AIA|WA serves our members government with regard to through influencing state issues that impact the practice of architecture. To inform, educate, represent, lead and serve fire districts of Washington state in the preservation and protection life and property. of

Education for elected officials & fire district administrative

Krystal Kyer, Executive Director

Wanda Coats, Executive Officer

Advocacy, tools & resources, workforce, health information education, technology

Top 5 Exports WA to China

Jan Ellingson, Pres

$7 billion

55% change from 2010-2012

Lianna Collinge, CAE, CEO $6

Tiffany Spiers, Exec Officer $5 billion

14%

BOOK OF LISTS

27,945.7

18,556.0 17,925.7 13,067.3

2009

42,442.1 35,354.8 19,689.0 21,966.4 10,667.7

2008

Rail Traffic in Tons (millions) Terminated in WA, 2010

Total tons in millions: 18.5 Source: Association of American Railroads

Lumber & Wood

10%

Farm Products

7%

Pulp & Paper

Waste & Scrap

Total tons in millions: 59.1 Source: Association of American Railroads

13% 10%

All Other

28%

8%

Cement & Coal

31%

All Other

17%

Food Products

5% Intermodal

South Sound Source for Business, known as the Book of Lists, is the definitive resource guide for professionals and includes more than 75 lists from a variety of industries updated throughout the year.

33,880.4 25,268.5

20,243.1 19,793.6 11,156.6

2010

Blaine

of this list to endorse the participants,

Rail Traffic in Tons (millions) Originating in WA, 2010 11%

40%

Primary Metal Manufacturing

Trade by Port

k/ *Total imports and exports Note: All data is based on goods loaded or unloaded in Washington regardless of goods origin or destination. Data for Washington goods 43,157.4 only are not available.

Seattle

Lianna Collinge, CAE, Executive Director

Computer and Waste and Scrap Electrical Products

Source: http://www.ofm.wa.gov/databoo

Everett

Care for city owned property

Transportation Equipment

Top 5 Washington Waterborne

Tacoma

N/A

2012

47%

Agricultural Products

Sea-Tac Int’l Airport

10 2002 0

2011

25%

Lianna Collinge, CAE, $4 billion CEO

Dedicated to protecting and independent grocery industrypromoting the interests of the Workers' Comp Retrospective in Washington state through effective legislative and regulatory Jan Gee, Pres & CEO Program; Monthly Workplace Rating advocacy before state $3 billion government. Webinars and Workshops; Safety Training Monthly Newsletter 550 & Regulatory Alert To advance the interests of the broadcasting industry and 1935 to enhance the ability of stations to serve their communities Legislative & congressional advocacy, 5 Mark Allen, Pres$2 professional education seminars & billion and 550 CEO conferences To improve the construction 1959 climate in which it operates. industry and the business Home shows, Tour of Homes, government 5 Laura Worf, Executive affairs representation, networking events, 545 Officer $1 billion health insurance program, Dedicated to improving the etc. 1984 the success of its members automotive service industry and Medical and Garage Keeper Insurance, Retro 5 Jeff Lovell, Pres & Safety Program, Diagnostic, Consulting, Website & BusinessManagement Technology, 465 $0 Attorney Services Serve as a resource center and local political advocate 1948 the mutual benefit of real estate for Real estate items and tools of trade education. Rebecca agents and their clients 2 Service to members Jarvela, 290 Executive Officer To create an environment that supports the diverse 1994 membership of IFMA and encourages Meetings and events to educate each members' and network Lianna Collinge, growth in the areas of facility CAE, management most important to them as an individual. CEO 187 Programs designed to stimulate international trade. 1987 Events, networking, trade research, technical Anthony Hemstad, 4 assistance 135 Pres/CEO To be the unified resource exclusively for the independent 1989 community banks in Washington Advocacy for banks at State State. legislature; 2 John Collins, Pres/ provides members with professional Exec Director education opportunities, access 82 and services at favorable pricing.to products To be recognized as a relevant 1892 committed to attracting and and respected fraternity, retaining all men of high quality Freemasons of Washington fraternal 2 who strive for self improvement Kevin Gent, Secretary organization and the opportunity to make a positive difference in their community. 70 To create a network of leading Office & Industrial relocation 2003 experts that deliver best in Business referrals in USA; education of best Lianna services worldwide. We areclass corporate relocation practices. Collinge, CAE, customers by delivering highfocused on building referral CEO quality cost effective commercial relocation solutions 65 Better businesses make a better community. 1975 Monthly meetings with business speakers. 3rd Peg Greiwe, 0 Wed / month @ 7 a.m. Executive 57 Secretary To represent and promote the interests of BOMA members 1940 through leadership, advocacy Advocacy, member firm cross 0 development. This chapter and professional networking for building ownerspromotion and Lianna Collinge, CAE, is about building success for and managers. CEO owners and commercial property managers. 56 Pierce County's premier networking organization. 1917 To strengthen each member 0 Lianna Collinge, CAE, purchasing from and referringfirm by new customers CEO 17 to them. Advance and promote an environment that enables its 1915 members to provide high quality services in response to the Non-profit trade association representing the Betty 2 needs of all their customers independent telecommunications Buckley, in an evolving communications companies Executive Director marketplace. in the State of Washington. 15 EWI brings together key individuals from diverse 1986 businesses for the purpose To be a professional organization of promoting member firms, that creates Debra Padden, 0 enhancing personal and professional value for its member firms Pres and their encouraging community involvement.development, and representatives through career development, 13 business connectivity Create communities supporting 1988 Enhance the effectiveness of people as they age. Public Information and Education each AAA through a strong and 1 agenda of information, debate, Lori Brown Legislative Advocacy advocacy and education.

of each company or respective Web site. PCBE Inc. dba Business Examiner makes every attempt companies, or individuals or to imply a specific level of to publish accurate and factual quality in the companies listed. Please send any updates, additions, information on its lists, however, accuracy can not be guaranteed. It is not the intent corrections, or deletions to subscribe@businessexaminer.com.

2010

billion

Promote the interest of home building industry through membership involvement, Trade Association - Home Bldg Industry. education while striving to legislative action, networking and Community involvement, maintain the highest ethical health insurance, standards. government advocacy

Advocate for quality cardiovascular care 14through education, research promotion, application of standards and development and guidelines.

550 1899 4

Facts

Roger Ferris, Executive Secretary

personnel, legislative representation, information To conserve and restore natural resource birds, other wildlife and their ecosystems, focusing on Educational programing, habitats for the benefit of conservation humanity and the earth's biological advocacy, recreational bird watching diversity. To serve as a resource center for the mutual benefit of real and local political advocate Education, legal hotline, estate agents and their clients. tech helpline, mediation, govt affairs advocacy, news, special events To serve as a resource center the mutual benefit of Realtors & local political advocate for & their clients Dedicated to serving and promoting the health care engineering profession. Quality education

4%

Chemicals

Farm Products

56%

Intermodal

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November 25, 2013  | www.BusinessExaminer.com | 7

We preserved something sacred by rejecting the Boeing proposal. We’ve held on to our pensions and that’s big.

Tom Wroblewski Directing Business Representative IAM District 751

the vote “is also a reflection of having to respond to a complex set of issues in one week’s time.” “The IAM 751 and the Washington State Labor Council, AFL-CIO absolutely believe that the business case for build-

ing the 777x is here in Washington State,” Johnson continued. “The knowledge base, skill level, and dedication of our machinists is unparalleled in the United States. We have decades of experience building the 777 and we have the infrastructure for building the 777x. “Our State Legislature, supported by the labor community, just passed two major bills incentivizing Boeing to expand production in Washington State … But it is also our hope that the company will do the reasonable thing and sit down with IAM 751 and bargain a contract that can be accepted. A contract that respects the skill and dedication level of the rank and file workers and one that helps the Boeing Company continue to gain market share and profitability.”


8  | www.BusinessExaminer.com |  November 25, 2013

BLUE MOUSE continued from page 4 with a laugh, “but it’s a huge milestone for any small theater — any small business — to be operating for 90 years. “We’ve stayed consistently steady since we made the switch in April. I think things have ticked up a bit, although it varies with your movies. I think business has picked up. We’ve picked up a lot of new people. More people are finding out about us, and they’re coming and they’re visiting and they like us and they come back.” The switch, as Evans called it, was a conversion to a digital projector earlier

this year, a change necessitated by Hollywood’s decision to stop distributing 35mm films after 2013. During the tail end of 2011, Evans said she started receiving letters from various studios informing the theater that they would cease moving 35mm movies. Faced with a choice to upgrade or close the theater’s doors, Evans and the Blue Mouse’s board of directors sprang into action, organizing a Kickstarter campaign to raise the funds to buy the needed projector. “It was a campaign I worked for months on prior to it launching last year,” Evans said. Over 1,000 people contributed to raise $84,194 in 57 days, a true testament to the importance of the Blue Mouse to Tacoma’s community

We haven’t planned a party or anything, but it’s a huge milestone for any small theater — any small business — to be operating for 90 years. Susan Evans Manager Blue Mouse Theatre

identity. “We couldn’t have done that without community and worldwide support, you know?” said Evans. “We wouldn’t have

made it to our 90th had we not done the fundraiser. The letters were coming out from the studios that said we either switch or they won’t supply film anymore. … At our board of directors’ meeting in April of 2012, I said to the board, ‘This (Kickstarter campaign) is what we have to do. We’ve done in-house fundraisers, and we’ve spent thousands of dollars to make a few thousand back.’ We needed ‘x’ amount of dollars, and we just weren’t going to make it unless we put together a campaign that went viral.” Evans’ campaign, though, did exactly that, reaching its initial $75,000 goal — the money needed to acquire the digital projector — 16 days early. “Within the first 13 hours or so, we had gotten $10,000 of donations,” Evans said. “Within 15 days, we were up to $30,000. So after we hit our goal, we said, ‘Well, we have 16 days. We can do so much more. Let’s not quit.’” With the remainder of the money raised, the Blue Mouse was outfitted with all-new acoustics and a few of what Evans called “gifts for the theater,” including, for example, booster seats for kids. It’s an apt turn of phrase given tomorrow’s big anniversary, but gifts from the leftover Kickstarter funds aren’t the only upgrades the Blue Mouse will see in its 90th year. The movie house’s new website — bluemousetheatre.com — launched on Nov. 12, provided pro bono by local firm Marketing Puget Sound for the milestone moment. A release from the company touts the new site’s “more modern look, while maintaining the historic integrity of the Blue Mouse Theatre.” More improvements for the site are planned, such as the capability to sell tickets and gift cards online. “It’s just another example of how much the community comes together to support us,” said Kuester of Marketing Puget Sound’s gift. “We love the new site. I think it really shows off all the personality of the Blue Mouse while being an updated, modern website. Along with the digital projector, I think it shows the commitment we have to keeping the Blue Mouse old but new, so to speak.” As for the business side of things, Kuester echoed Evans in saying that the theater is doing quite well, although he was quick to add that, in the Blue Mouse’s case, revenues and profits take a back seat to the cultural importance the business has to the area. “We’ve been successful in preserving the theater as a historic building and as a business,” he said. “That’s been our claim to fame, our success if you will. It’s been a great ride for us the last 20 years. “This is a theater that’s more about the community than anything else. It’s not about owning and profiting and making money as a business. It’s an operation that’s holding its own. It’s maintaining, making a bit but not a lot, and that’s not the intention or the spirit with which we came into purchasing the theater. “This was preservation. This was community-building. That was our intent, and to help the Blue Mouse get to 90 years, that’s a good feeling for us.”


November 25, 2013  | www.BusinessExaminer.com | 9

PHOTO COURTESY OF WEYERHAEUSER

Steve McCormick (left) of the Moore Foundation and Paul Polman (center), Unilever CEO, discuss sustainable forestry with one of the delegates at the World Business Council for Sustainable Development in Istanbul earlier this month.

WEYERHAEUSER continued from page 1 owners and managers, with some 7 million acres in the U.S., 14 million in Canada, and 300,000 in Uruguay. The company has received attention and accolades earlier this year for its long-term efforts in Uruguay in particular, where for over a decade, Weyerhaeuser-affiliated scientists in the la Corona Watershed have taken water samples daily to examine the effects of forests planted on land that once was used as pasture. The research was brought about by concerns that the watershed would be affected once trees were planted. Weyerhaeuser’s research teams, then, cultivated relationships across two continents, from North Carolina State University to the Instituto Nacional de Investigación Agropecuria, Uruguay’s national agricultural research institution. Their work has yielded a host of conclusions, from the observation that the trees haven’t reduced water flow as much as expected to conclusion that the trees’ shelter and shade have helped ranchers’ cattle gain weight. For Weyerhaeuser, though, all the effort circles back to the primary goal of boosting sustainable forestry, as well as the end goal of reducing forest loss. “Having wood come from sustainablymanaged forests is important to our customers and consumers,” Phillips said. “This commitment is shared by the more than 13,000 Weyerhaeuser employees who work and serve our customers worldwide.”


BANKING & FINANCE

Sponsored by

10 | www.Business Examiner.com | November 25, 2013

Small business banking expands in downtown Olympia

Thurston First Bank to move into former Department of Personnel building next summer By Holly Smith Peterson hpeterson@BusinessExaminer.com It’s taken a decade, but one of Olympia’s hometown business banks is ready to double its size and taken the next growth steps. That’s Thurston First Bank, currently tucked into cozy quarters on Pear Street, from where next summer it will move into part of the former Washington State Department of Personnel building at 600 Franklin Street. “We outgrew our space,” president Jim Haley said. “We’re very happy to have this opportunity to move into downtown, and to become part of the revitalization of this area.” The 6,200-square-foot space into which Thurston First expects to move into next “June-ish” is room aplenty compared to the bank’s current 3,100-squarefoot site. When all is said and done, Haley plans to slowly increase employees to at least double the current 17, but only as assets increase. Those, he’s prepared to have double — or more — from the current $112 million, as well. And the new bank site will actually be just one tenant in the latest renovation project by Walker John, the local developer who previously revamped the Fourth Avenue and Adams Street building into a mixed-use destination. He’s also partnered with developer Casey Roloff on classic sites like coastal Seabrook. The former state office building, a 26,000-square-foot edifice constructed in 1951, is being converted into a mixeduse site with 19 loft-style apartments, as well as Thurston First, Three Magnets Brewing Co., and a 5,000-square-foot brew pub and bar run by Darby’s Cafe owners Nate and Sara Reilly. An interesting component to the deal is that both John and Roloff are current Thurston First clients, and worked exclusively with the bank to make the deal happen. The bank also providing funding for the State building renovations, as it has done for other projects by the team. Thurston First is a committed community partner, emphasized Haley, and seeks out ways to help neighbors in dif-

BUSINESS EXAMINER MEDIA GROUP ARCHIVE PHOTO

Thurston First Bank’s mobile banking unit will soon be deploying from a new location: the bank is moving into a new 6,200-square-foot space in the summer.

ferent ways. One recent effort was the bank’s funding plan for construction of the community’s new Hands on Children’s Museum. The bank bridged the

We outgrew our space. We’re very happy to have this opportunity to move into downtown, and to become part of the revitalization of this area. Jim Haley President Thurston First Bank

final financial gap so that development could begin. The bank’s new headquarters, he adds, will not only make the bank more visible, but it will be part of the overall endeavor to bring life to downtown. According to John, the property is large enough to build a second structure on site, and when finished will offer 80 parking spaces as well. Haley said that, after the move, the bank will continue to operate from its sole “global headquarters,” and doesn’t at this time plan to add a second branch anywhere. Thurston First’s two roving delivery vehicles, which are sent out upon request by businesses and other clients to pick up deposits, deliver bank materials, and provide other services, will also be part of the new operations.

A peek inside The rather ghastly former state building’s upgrade will enhance space and light, with a clean exterior and more window features. Inside, the spaces will have a “contemporary industrial” ambience, with wooden beams, exposed brick and other details. Loft-style apartments will have vaulted ceilings and oversize windows. For the brew pub, which will have an attached 15-barrel craft brewing system, the look will be open and spacious, with the brewery and kitchen visible throughout the dining area.


November 25, 2013  | www.BusinessExaminer.com | 11

JPMorgan Chase reaches settlement on mortgage-backed securities Largest-ever government payout results in $13 billion penalty to one of world’s oldest, largest financial institutions By Holly Smith Peterson hpeterson@BusinessExaminer.com A $13 billion settlement in principle between JPMorgan Chase & Co. and the President’s RMBS Working Group of the Financial Fraud Enforcement Task Force will resolve potential and actual civil claims for residential mortgage-backed securities activities against Chase by a number of national and state banking agencies. Under the settlement, JPMorgan Chase will pay $9 billion in cash and provide $4 billion in borrower relief to agencies including the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, the Department of Justice, the National Credit Union Administration, the Federal Housing Finance Agency and several U.S. state Attorneys General. Other financial institutions affected by the RMBS decision are Washington Mutual and Bear Stearns. “We are pleased to have concluded this extensive agreement with the President’s RMBS Working Group,” said Chase chairman and CEO Jamie Dimon, “as well as to have resolved the civil claims of the Department of Justice and others. Of the $13 billion settlement, a $2 billion civil monetary penalty and a $7 billion compensatory payments portion will be provided in cash. A previously announced $4 billion payment to resolve FHFA’s litigation claims will be in cash as well.

Expect the Exceptional

Borrower relief will be in the form of principal reduction, forbearance and other direct benefits from a selection of relief programs. JPMorgan Chase has committed to complete delivery of the promised borrower relief before the end of 2017. “Today’s settlement covers a very significant portion of legacy mortgagebacked securities-related issues for JPMorgan Chase, as well as Bear Stearns and Washington Mutual,” Dimon said. Altogether, the settlement concludes and terminates all residential mortgage

securitizations civil litigation claims brought by FDIC, FHFA and NCUA relating to loans by JPMorgan Chase, Bear Stearns and Washington Mutual. Terms also conclude and terminate pending RMBS civil enforcement investigations from all agencies. JPMorgan Chase regional office spokeswoman Darcy Donahoe-Wilmot, when contacted by the Business Examiner for a reaction as to how the settlement will affect local branches and workers, responded that the company is not at this

time commenting on the issue. Post-settlement, JPMorgan Chase said that it will continue to cooperate with the ongoing criminal investigation by the Department of Justice. JPMorgan Chase & Co., one of the top global financial services firms, currently holds assets of $2.5 trillion via its consumer and commercial banking and asset management operations. A component of the Dow Jones Industrial Average, the company serves consumers and businesses worldwide.

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12  | www.BusinessExaminer.com |  November 25, 2013

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Robust third quarter has Columbia Bank optimistic Acquisition, loan production drives progress By Holly Smith Peterson hpeterson@BusinessExaminer.com For Columbia Bank, “high rise” refers to more than its former 11th Avenue and Broad Street building, which was auctioned off to Bellevue mega-investor F. Kemper Freeman, Jr. earlier this year. Now, it also refers to the bank’s net income, which shot up 12 percent in the third quarter, compared with the same time period in 2012. Although diluted earnings per share of $0.25 were down $0.03 from the previous quarter, overall net income was up $13.3 million. Part of that uptick was Columbia’s recent acquisition of West Coast Bankcorp, a 145-branch deal that picked up 80 Washington sites and 60 in Oregon, and closed April 1 of this year. “We continued to make significant progression our integration of West Coast, and are seeing the anticipated benefits of that acquisition materialize,” said Columbia president and CEO Melanie Dressel. “We had a solid quarter resulting in an expanded net interest margin and increased loan originations.” However, to counter the net income rise, acquisition-related expenses of $7.6 million, combined with FDIC acquiredloan accounting impacts, lowered earnings per share by $0.14. Columbia earnings

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were also reduced by $0.05 per share as a result of a $4.3 million pre-tax provision for the allowance for loan losses related to the acquired West Coast portfolio. Dressel emphasized, though, that the provision is not the result of deterioration in the deal’s overall quality, but rather the result of transitioning from initial acquired loans to the bank’s standard allowance methodology. In addition, Columbia’s net interest margin increased to 5.37 percent for the latest quarter, a spike of 5.19 percent over the Q2. The rise was primarily due to a 21 basis point increase in yield on the securities portfolio, as well as a prepayment charge of $1.5 million on Federal Home Loan Bank advances incurred during that quarter. A similar charge was not made in Q3. As for operating net interest margin, Columbia increased that to 4.41 percent for the latest quarter, up from 4.34 percent from the most recent measurement. Operating net interest margin also peaked, due to increased yield on the securities portfolio, although it was relatively flat compared to 4.40 percent over the same time last year. The company also continued to see good loan production during Q3, as it re-

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November 25, 2013  | www.BusinessExaminer.com | 13

Your Ideal Life.

PHOTO COURTESY OF COLUMBIA BANK

Columbia CEO Melanie Dressel pointed to “significant progression” in the bank’s acquisition of West Coast Bankcorp among the positives in the bank’s third quarter.

COLUMBIA continued from page 12

mained focused on developing new relationships while deepening our existing ones, Dressel said. “Our organic loan growth was muted by cyclical pay-downs in sectors affected by slowing residential mortgage originations,” she explained. “While it didn’t translate into substantial bottom-line growth, I’m pleased with the loan production this quarter because our originations were up slightly over the prior quarter, during which we showed substantial portfolio growth.” At September  30, 2013, Columbia’s total assets were $7.15 billion. That’s an increase of $79.8 million from June 30 of this year, although an increase of $2.24 billion from December 31, 2012, primarily due to the acquisition of West Coast.  Non-covered loans were $4.19 billion at the end of last quarter, up $12.7 million from the end of June, and up 66 percent ($1.67 billion) over $2.53 billion at the end of 2012. Securities, including FHLB stock, were $1.60 billion at Q3’s end. That’s an increase of $61.4 million, or 4 percent, over $1.54 billion at the end of Q2. Total deposits were also a key factor in the bank’s positive report. As of Q3, the total was $5.95 billion, an increase of $201.1 million, or 3 percent over Q2’s $5.75 billion. Core deposits comprised 95 percent of total deposits, or $5.66 billion.

During the third quarter, the company obviously experienced a general improvement in the quality of its loan portfolios, said chief credit officer Andy McDonald. However, he added, non-performing assets continued a downward trend, and net non-covered loan charge-offs hit the lowest quarterly level since before the start of the recession. That said, McDonald added that he’s still pleased with the positive trends Columbia’s credit metrics displayed. “But, as the numbers indicate, we still have room for improvement to get to our pre-2008 levels,” he said. Additional highlights of the latest report include the bank’s net interest income, which for Q3 was $80.4 million. That was an increase of $23.2 million from $57.3 million for the same quarter in 2012, primarily due to the interest and accretion income related to the West Coast acquisition. And, compared to Q2, net interest income increased $426,000, mostly due to lower interest expense. Total noninterest income was $7.6 million for Q3, compared to a $911,000 loss in Q2. A $5.7 million increase in service charges and other fees due to the increased West Coast customer base was the cause of the bounce. “We continue to make progress with improving our operating leverage,” said Dressel. “We are well down the path toward full integration, with the planned branch consolidations, core operating and other critical system conversions completed.”

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Columbia saw an increase of $201.1 million in total deposits between the second and third quarters of 2013.

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14  | www.BusinessExaminer.com |  November 25, 2013

Cornerstone: Blending business to benefit clientele Downtown Tacoma partnership teaming financial strategies with insurance services

By Holly Smith Peterson hpeterson@BusinessExaminer.com In downtown Tacoma, Cornerstone Financial Strategies is making history. Well, actually partnering with history, perhaps, in a new deal that brings on the services of the 118-year old Pilkey, Hopping & Eckberg, Inc. insurance brokerage team. “This helps make [our] client relationship even more fruitful than it already is,” said Cornerstone co-owner and partner Bill Pickles. “We’re really thrilled to be partnering with such a fantastic company … It’s a great relationship.” The oldest family-owned insurance agency in Tacoma, Pilkey, Hopping & Pickles Eckberg opened its doors the same year that Henry Ford released the first automobile. Discussions about the company’s current deal began earlier this year, although the process was somewhat drawn out due to PHE Financial Strategies certified financial planner Laci Moyer’s transition to joint business custodian LPL Financial. Besides Pickles and partner Brad

This helps make [our] client relationship even more fruitful than it already is. We’re really thrilled to be partnering with such a fantastic company ... It’s a great relationship. Bill Pickles

Co-Owner & Partner Cornerstone Financial Strategies

PHOTO COURTESY OF CORNERSTONE FINANCIAL STRATEGIES

The Cornerstone Financial Strategies team recently partnered services with 118-year-old firm PHE.

Berger, Moyer will remain the primary advisor contact for the two firms’ “joint clients.” Together, by blending their talents and capabilities, the companies are embracing the goal of providing “valuesbased financial planning and coordinated asset management services.” And while Cornerstone is a newer en-

trant in the Tacoma market, PHE has been around since 1896, when policemen Frank Ekberg opened his Frank Ekberg & Company Insurance Agency. That was just six years before the similar W.P. Hopping & Company was also founded in Tacoma. Nearly 80 years later, the two agencies merged. However, Pickles said, CFS and PHE

aren’t exactly merging. Rather, they’re blending resources to provide more comprehensive local “affiliated advisor” services for their respective clientele. Cornerstone currently also parters with three other affiliated advisors across the U.S. And, from the get-go, the recent partnership has been flourishing, according to Pickles. Cornerstone and PHE are already working with a number of shared clients, and will continue to work with others to bring new deals on board. “For the partnership, we’re actually already seeing some strong activity, and we expect that to only continue and grow,” he said.

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EVE too November 25, 2013  | www.BusinessExaminer.com | 15

To-dos for 2014

A year-end financial checklist for your small company By Arnie Aurellano arniea@BusinessExaminer.com

With all the everyday tasks it takes to keep a small business thriving, it’s no wonder that many entrepreneurs find it tough to plan for the year ahead. With that year just around the corner now, David Winters, a Wells Fargo Business Banking manager in Tacoma, shared some words of advice for small business owners looking to get a head start on 2014. “Think about what you hoped to achieve in your business at the beginning of 2013,” said Winters. “Did you meet your goals? If not, now is the time to create a strategy that will drive your business toward success in 2014.” Here’s a financial checklist, per Winters, that every small business owner should complete: • Meet with your accountant. Review your projected 2013 budget compared to your actual 2013 budget to ensure you’re tracking all costs and adjusting prices accordingly. Are you making a profit? Are there purchases that need to be made before the end of the year? Your accountant can help determine whether you are on track. • Prepare for year-end tax reporting. Be sure that your business’s tax records for the year are in order and make sure you know filing dates so you can plan ahead. Find out if there’s anything you can do to minimize the taxes you’ll owe before the end of the year. For example, do you need to purchase any equipment this year? Temporary tax incentives available to business owners through Section 179 of the 2012 Taxpayer Relief Act are scheduled to expire on Dec. 31. For business owners, it may be more cost efficient to upgrade or purchase new equipment in 2013 than waiting until January. • Create your 2014 budget and sales projections. Develop your annual business

budget and update your sales projections for next year. The most important thing to understand is how many sales you need to make every 30 days to cover expenses and earn a profit. This 30-day sales goal can help put your revenues into perspective by showing you the amount of money you need to make each month. • Meet with your banker. Discuss your current business needs and review your accounts with your banker. Anticipate how your sales goals might impact your need for a new a deposit account, loan or line of credit. If you’re looking to add employees, it might make sense to investigate a new business payroll service. • Analyze your business’s cash flow. One of the most important things you should do is analyze your business cash flow. Review how much cash your business took in and how much you spent. If you have trouble maintaining a steady cash flow, develop a plan to remedy the issue. Make sure you understand and can forecast cash flow, especially if you have a seasonal business. While you’re completing the financial checklist, one more item to complete is to gather feedback from your customers. Take the time to nurture relationships with existing customers. Thank them for choosing to do business with you and solicit ideas from your best customers to determine how you can serve them even better in the coming year. If you create a strong financial plan for 2014 and take time to gather input from your valued customers, you’ll be far more likely to hit the ground running and accomplish your business goals from day one. The end of the year is a great time to reflect on your business successes, so celebrate your accomplishments. Take pride in what you achieved in 2013 and strive to create new goals that build on your accomplishments in the new year.

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New TriWest facility Veterans Affairs customer contact and support center will add jobs to South Hill area. 17

PROGRESS

SOUTH HILL / GRAHAM

16 | www.Business Examiner.com | November 25, 2013

Uptick in business in, around South Hill Mall Spike in residential investments plus new stores, restaurants equals revenue for retailers By Holly Smith Peterson hpeterson@BusinessExaminer.com It’s been three years since South Hill Mall received a complete image overhaul, but changes to the wildly popular Puyallup-area shopping site just keep on coming. In fact, while the majority of that 2010 renovation included physical revamps, like flooring and lighting, following the previous addition of a new wing, the bulk of the most recent changes have to do with new restaurants and retailers that the mall is attracting. “There’s a lot of new business,” agreed Joe Bell, spokesman for Cafaro, the mall’s parent company. Case in point for the 1.02 million-squarefoot mall are the recent openings of major national retailers like Aveda and Torrid inside, as well as restaurants like Panera and BJ’s Brewhouse adjacent to the site. Bell said that the “food segment” is particularly diverse, as the mall’s exterior includes both Bell a range of well-known stand-alone restaurants and drive-through chains, while the inner food court holds a cross-cultural mix of inexpensive global cuisine that by itself is an attractor to the main customer niches. The demographic the mall seeks in particular is the general residential community around greater Puyallup: middle-class families. And that market has been growing at a stellar pace, said Puyallup-Sumner Chamber president Shelly Schlumpf. “There’s been an uptick in business growth all around the mall, with the openings of things like Firestone Tires, Kohl’s and Red Robin,” she said. “Other areas have been just as busy as well, as a response to the housing investments.” Melissa McGuire, South Hill Mall mar-

PHOTO COURTESY OF SOUTH HILL MALL

There’s “a lot of new business” at South Hill Mall, according to a spokesman for the facility’s parent company, Cafaro. Recently, the mall welcomed national retailers Torrid and Aveda inside, as well as Panera and BJ’s Brewhouse locations adjacent to the site.

keting director, concurs with the residential and business spike, one that’s led to a 10 to 25 percent revenue bump for most of the retailers there. Little wonder, then, why South Hill Mall is the top-grossing retail site in the region. So, to draw in this main residential market and keep them coming back, McGuire said, the mall hasn’t only tweaked its mix of shops to cater to under-18s and their parents but it’s also embraced major technological efforts. The team is active on Facebook and Twitter, as well as in marketing through traditional broadcast venues. Specific tech tools they’ve tried include a Me-Ality personal jeans fitting station (now partnered with Bloomingdale’s), and the mall currently has in development a host of apps for v . On-site

promotions are key to bringing in shoppers as well, as are discounts and freebies through the mall’s “Exclusive Guest Rewards” card program. One of the newest businesses there, Wiggle Works, opens next to the MultiCare Good Samaritan Play Park and rue 21 teen clothier next week. For a nominal fee, the 4,500-square-foot, soft mat-lined indoor playground and birthday party center provides families with an expanse to let kids under 48 inches romp during inclimate Northwest weather. Owner Elaina Herber, the mother of two small children herself, said that she designed the space to accommodate the parenting and caregiver market. “I wanted to create a new standard in the

community for children’s play: a clean, safe space (that offers) small children a unique, interactive opportunity in a schedule-free environment,” she explained. “I also wanted a place to meet and celebrate, one that provides comfort for high-energy children as well as caregivers who may just need a break.” And there’s more in the works for the mall, Bell said, especially given the thriving economy of the neighborhoods surrounding the South Hill site. That competitive retail market has in the past decade seen major players like Walmart, Target and Kohl’s opening second locations to accommodate both residential growth and retail demand. “We’re always looking for the next trend,” he said, “as well as the right retail blend to complement our demographic mix.”

South Hill Mall at a glance... Aeropostale All Star Sports NW Alley Kat American Eagle Outfitters Applebees AT&T AT&T/Activate Auntie Anne’s® Hand-Rolled Soft Pretzels Aveda Bath & Body Works BJP BJ’s Restaurant & Brewhouse Buckle CellAXS.com CellAXS.com CenturyLink Champs Sports Charming Charlie Chase Bank The Children’s Place

Christopher & Banks Cinnabon CJ Banks Claires Community Room Competitive Edge Crazy 8 Dairy Queen/Orange Julius Dick’s Sporting Goods Empire Today Etiquette Euro Alterations Express Famous Dave’s Famous Footwear Foot Locker Fox Hollow Coffee Fred Meyer Jewelers Fuego Game On

GameStop Gateway Realty Gene Juarez Salon & Spa Ghost Armor GNC Gymboree Heavenly Beauty Heavenly Beauty Kiosk Hot Topic Impressions by J’s Formal Wear Jack in The Box jcpenney (Home Store/ Men/Salon) jcpenney (Women/Children/Sephora) jcpenney Optical jcpenney Portrait Studio jcpenney Salon Journeys Journeys Kidz Just Sports Justice For Girls

Kay Jewelers Kiddie Koncept Rides Kitchen Collection Lady Foot Locker Lane Bryant LensCrafters Lids Macy’s MasterCuts Max Rider Okee Dokee Grill Old Country Buffet Old Navy Olive Garden Restaurant, The Olympia Olive Oil Company Pac Sun Panera Bread Payless ShoeSource Pearle Vision Perfume World

Piercing Pagoda Play Live Precision Time Prime Steak & Gyros Quality Watch & Clock Repair Quiznos Radio Shack Red Robin Regal Cinemas at South Hill Mall Regis Salon Romy rue21 Sbarro Italian Eatery Sears Sears Auto Center Sears Optical Sephora (Inside jcpenney Women & Children) The Shirt Shack Kiosk Spencer’s

Sprint Sunglass Hut Super Jump Party Zone Target Things Remembered Thorium T-Mobile Torrid Toys-R-Us Unlimited Imports Verizon Wireless Victoria’s Secret Vitamin World Weisfield’s Jewelers Wet Seal WOK This Way World Nails Yankee Candle Zales Zumiez


November 25, 2013  | www.BusinessExaminer.com | 17

New facility to add jobs to South Hill area

TriWest Healthcare Alliance to open new Veterans Affairs customer contact, support center By Holly Smith Peterson hpeterson@BusinessExaminer.com The South Sound will soon get a business boost with the opening of a new Veterans Affairs customer contact and support center by TriWest Healthcare Alliance, as part of a five-year, $4.3 billion contract with the Department of Veterans Affairs. “This is the first partnership of its kind,” explained TriWest spokesman Scott Celley. “It’s going to be a really effective means to respond to the workload, and to serve all of the veterans seeking health care.” Only last year, in a major blow to the company, TriWest lost a major portion of its military clientele to United Healthcare. That contract change involved the exit of tens of thousands of Joint Base Lewis-McChord customers, as well as the closing of TriWest’s downtown Tacoma office. Now, however, for the next five years TriWest will be administering the VA Patient-Centered Community Care program, which serves nearly 50 percent of U.S. veterans eligible for health care. For customers in Washington and 27 other states, TriWest will have its 14,000-square-foot call center up and running on the 92acre campus of the South Hill Business and Technology Center at the first of the year. The focus of this particular site will be to ensure high-quality management

PHOTO COURTESY OF THE BENAROYA COMPANY

The South Hill Business + Technology Center will soon be the site of TriWest Healthcare Alliance’s new local facility.

of health care facilities for veterans, as well as to provide referrals, track patient records, and coordinate patient appointments, admissions and discharges. And that suits Phoenix-based TriWest well, said president and CEO David McIntyre, as the company already has a strong familiarity and top service record with clientele from JBLM. “TriWest is delighted to be back in the Puget Sound, and especially in Pierce County,” he said, “to continue our mission to serve our nation’s heroes.”

The major side benefit of the new site, though, is at least 50 new, full-time jobs for South Hill. Over time, Celley said, the company could add as many as 250 more by the end of 2014. But why South Hill? “TriWest originally reached out to the Tacoma-Pierce County Economic Development Board with their needs because of timeframe of the contract was coming up quickly, and they needed to get a site in place,” Celley said. “The EDB and the Puyallup-Sumner Chamber made it easy

to get it permitted and everything else, so that they could get the doors open by the beginning of next year.” The Benaroya Company, which owns the three-building, repurposed former wafer chip manufacturing plant property, is also thrilled to have TriWest join current Business and Technology Center tenants like Parametrix, Westwood Shipping, Group Health and Marvell Technology. “Our park-like campus provides an exceptional quality of life, and is perfect for corporate office headquarters, high tech, financial and medical services, back-office administration, government and education,” president Larry Benaroya Benaroya said. He added that approximately 194,000 square feet of Class A office space is still available there, which means there’s indeed room for TriWest to grow those 250 additional jobs. As far as adding anything else to the current business mix for the area as a whole, though, Benaroya emphasized that it’s perfect just as it is. “South Hill offers a fantastic and abundant array of retail, restaurant, recreation, transportation, housing and education amenities and facilities to attract even more employers into the area,” he said.

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18  | www.BusinessExaminer.com |  November 25, 2013

AroundtheSound TUESDAY, NOV. 26

Morning Networking Bonney Lake Chamber of Commerce Morning Networking, 8-9 a.m., Hop Jack’s Restaurant, 21290 Hwy. 410 E., Bonney Lake.

WEDNESDAY, NOV. 27

Executives Association Tacoma Executives Association, 11:30 a.m.-12:45 p.m., 3017 Ruston Way , Tacoma. Founded in 1917, The Tacoma Executives Association is composed of leading non-competing businesses in the Tacoma-Pierce County area, each represented by a key executive. The sole function is to increase the sale of goods and services of its members through the exchange of business information or leads.

Fife Business Network Fife Business Network, 11:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., Poodle Dog Restaurant, 1422 54th Ave. E., Fife. The group’s goal is to put the Fife business community on the Pierce and King County map. Attend if you are a business in Fife or would like to do business in Fife. The network is looking to generate quality referrals and relationships with other business owners in Fife, Milton, Edgewood, Puyallup, Sumner, Federal Way, Auburn, Tacoma and others.

MONDAY, DEC. 2

Tacoma Roundtable Tacoma Roundtable, 8-9 a.m., Forza, 317 S 72nd Street, Tacoma. A group of business professionals looking to help

Far North Values, NatioNwide serVice

each other succeed though networking. Be ready to set goals, share goals, be held accountable with those goals and help others achieve their goals. There will also be open sessions where people can bring their challenges to the group in business and, through discussion, the roundtable can help to overcome those challenges.

TUESDAY, DEC. 3

Morning MIXXer Thurston County Chamber of Commerce Morning MIXXer, 7:30-8:30 a.m., Habitat for Humanity Restore, 400 Cooper Point Rd., Olympia. Join the Chamber for Morning Mixxer, a networking opportunity solely geared to helping business people connect. This month’s event will be hosted by Habitat for Humanity Restore at its new west side location. The Restore staff will be on hand to give tours of their 23,000-square-foot store, called the South Puget Sound Habitat for Humanity Store, which sells recycled building materials.

Investments; Steve Murphy, senior advisor, Latin America, Pacific NW Advisors; Andrea Holtan, president, Rafiki Trade Group; and Ben Paganelli, senior consultant, Viable International Applications (VIA) Unlimited.

Connecting for Success Auburn Chamber of Commerce “connecting for Success” Breakfast, 8-9 a.m., Chamber Office, 108 S. Division, Suite B, Auburn. The speaker this month will be Doug Lein, economic development manager for the City of Auburn, and the topic will be “Networking Over the Holidays.”

Coffee & Connections Tacoma-Pierce County Chamber South County Branch, 8-9 a.m., location TBD. Held on the first Wednesday of every month. Enjoy a cup of coffee while utilizing your networking skills in this friendly, informal, and focused networking environment.

Federal Way Chamber Going Global Without Membership Luncheon Going Broke Federal Way Chamber of Commerce WEDNESDAY, DEC. 4

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World Trade Center Tacoma/Seattle Joint Panel Discussion, 7:30-10 a.m., World Trade Center Seattle, 2200 Alaskan Way, Suite 410, Seattle. There are many highly qualified, local area private sector resources that can provide indepth, focused assistance tailored to the specific needs of your business. Discussion topics will include how to: utilize direct and/or indirect financial resources; understand the power of local/cultural value vs. direct expenses in penetrating global markets; leverage free trade agreements; comply with the ever-changing Anti-Terrorism Export Laws; and find helpful hints on negotiating through the International Trade Compliance laws. Panelists include Jesse Tam, president and CEO, Mega Pacific

Monthly Membership Luncheon, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., Twin Lakes Golf & Country Club, 3583 SW 320th St., Federal Way. The largest business luncheon in Federal Way.

MONDAY, DEC. 9

AFWA Tacoma Accounting & Financial Women’s Alliance Tacoma, 5:30-8:30 p.m., LaQuinta Inn, 1425 East 27th Street, Tacoma. The mission of AFWA is to enable women in all accounting and related fields to achieve their full personal, professional and economic potential and to contribute to the future development of their profession.

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November 25, 2013  | www.BusinessExaminer.com | 19

WATransportationMarketFacts State Boarding and Alighting at Amtrak Cascades stops in stops 2012 WA State Boarding and Alighting at station Amtrak Cascades station in 2012 Source: Amtrak Government Affairs November 2012 Source: Amtrak Government Affairs November 2012

1,322,652 672,351 123,063 99,363 64,091 62,773 61,322 44,576 32,896 26,759 26,560 25,535 23,331 18,561 15,895 12,751 4,237 3,874 3,147 1,567

Washington Seattle Tacoma Vancouver Bellingham Spokane Olympia Everett Edmonds Tukwila Kelso-Longview Pasco Centralia Mount Vernon Wenatchee Leavenworth Stanwood Ephrata Bingen-White Salmon Wishram

ST STExpress ExpressBoardings Boardingsby byRoute RouteQ4 Q42012 2012

ST Express Express Boardings ST Boardings by by Route Route Q4 Q4 2011 2011

Source: Sound Transit Service Delivery Quarterly Performance Report, Fourth Quarter 2012 Source: Sound Transit Service Delivery Quartely Performance Report, Fourth Quarter 2012

Source: Sound TransitService ServiceDelivery Delivery Quarterly Fourth Quarter 20122012 Source: Sound Transit Quartely Performance PerformanceReport, Report, Fourth Quarter

Seattle - Federal Way/Puyallup

Seattle - Federal Way/Puyallup

221,504

Auburn - Overlake

147,502

176,972

Auburn - Overlake

125,853

Lakewood - SeaTac

Tacoma - U District

176,708

38,405

Bonney Lake - Sumner

35,217 Lakewood/Tacoma - Seattle

Bonney Lake - Sumner

402,855

Tacoma Link Light Rail Boardings Tacoma Link Light Rail Boardings Q4 2011 and Q4 2012

31,214,095

31,455,292

31,764,100

31,455,509

19,962,581

20,102,896

20,242,894

20,093,110

11,251,513

Source: Sound Transit Service Delivery Quarterly Performance Report, Fourth Quarter 2012. Source: Sound Transit Service Delivery Quarterly Performance Report, 4th Quarter 2012.

Boardings by Service Type

Q4 2011

Q4 2012

% Change

ST Express Bus

3,456,884

3,964,648

15%

Sounder Commuter Rail

684,766

763,136

11%

Central Link

1,958,315

2,172,849

11%

Paratransit

20,269

15,257

-25%

Tacoma Link

270,958

264,098

-3%

Total Boardings

6,391,191

7,179,987

12%

Average Weekday Boardings

86,001

95,171

11%

Urban

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2012

2011

2010

2009

Sounder Commuter Commuter & & Special Sounder Special Rail Rail Boardings Boardings Q4 2011 2011 and and Q4 Q4 Q4 2012 2012 2008

2012

11,352,596 2011

11,521,205 2010

11,362,399

19,754,004

30,741,644

Source: Washington State Department of Transportation, 2012 Annual Traffic Report.

2009

377,728

Sounder Service Delivery Performance Sounder Service Delivery Performance Overview Overview Q4 2011 and Q4 2012 Q4 2011 and Q4 2012

Q4 2011 and Q4 2012

10,987,639

Lakewood/Tacoma - Seattle

0

Source: Washington State Department of Transportation, 2012 Annual Traffic Report.

2008

164,358

Tacoma - U District

20,943

Rural

Lakewood - SeaTac

Total

Annual Vehicle Miles of Travel is the number of miles traveled by all vehicles on a given portion of road network in a year. Vehicle miles traveled have historically increased annually. However, the rate of increase has slowed in recent years, culminating in a decline in 2008 and only partial rebounding in the years since. Although the table suggests that there was a small decrease from 2003 to 2004, the drop was actually the result of the 2004 introduction of a more sophisticated methodology for calculating AVMT. In reality, the number of miles traveled in 2004 was likely slightly greater than in the prior year.

Source: Sound Transit Service Delivery Quarterly Quarter 2012. Source: Sound Transit Service Delivery QuarterlyPerformance PerformanceReport, Report,Fourth 4th Quarter 2012.

Boardings by Service Type

Q4 2011

Q4 2012

% Change

Sounder Commuter Rail

565,312

636,114

13%

Special Rail

39,104

49,204

26%


20  | www.BusinessExaminer.com |  November 25, 2013

FortheRecord New Business Announcements Dickey’s Barbecue Pit 3932 S. Meridian, Puyallup 98373 Tim Barrans, franchise owner (253) 845-5061 Authentic Texas barbecue in a family-owned local franchise restaurant. Brothers Ted and Tim Barrans along with their wives Tami and Deborah welcome you to this, their second location serving slow smoked pulled pork sandwiches and much more. Pearl Chiropractic 5929 Westgate Blvd. Ste C, Tacoma 98407 Romi Epstein (253) 970-5077 Nationally board-certified in acupuncture brings her education in sports medicine, structural integration, psychological stress and PTSD to local chiropractic office. WildSide Pets 3615 Steilacoom Blvd. SW, Ste. #1, Lakewood 98499 Cindy Taylor & Cari Aida, co-owners Relocation from Puyallup for full-service pet store with exotic animals and specialty services. Women-owned family operated nearly 10 years is USDA licensed to carry and sell unusual animals as well as common domestic pets. “Only store of its type in the state.”

Bankruptcy Filings

Listings are selected from files at Clerk of U.S. Bankruptcy Court, Western Washington District, Tacoma. Commercial and business bankruptcy filings from the local area are reported here. Chapter 7 is business liquidation. Chapter 11 is for reorganization. Chapter 13 is an individual debt repayment plan. David R. Brown dba Brown’s Tap Service 4060 Lloyd St., Tumwater Secured Debts: $119,312 Priority Debts: $130,000 Unsecured Debts: $204,975 Assets: $202,762 Chapter 7 Case #13-46904 11/4/2013 Aleksey Zitarov fdba A Z Siding 5206 158th Ave. E, Sumner Secured Debts: $0 Priority Debts: $0 Unsecured Debts: $171,365 Assets: $10,917 Chapter 7 Case #13-46958 11/7/2013 Jason L. Nepsund fdba Complete Contracting Co. 3904 267th St. E, Spanaway Secured Debts: $11,963

Priority Debts: $0 Unsecured Debts: $433,476 Assets: $21,426 Chapter 7 Case #13-46987 11/8/2013 James S. Norem dba Great Harvest Bread Co. dba Comet Enterprises LLC PO Box 12479, Olympia Secured Debts: $306,000 Priority Debts: $16,700 Unsecured Debts: $401,215 Assets: $341,620 Chapter 7 Case #13-47040 11/12/2013 Trago Olympia LLC 625 Black Lake Blvd. #530, Olympia Secured Debts: $50,000 Priority Debts: $72,000 Unsecured Debts: $203,552 Assets: $79,009 Chapter 11 Case #13-47069 11/13/2013 Lawrence C. Emery dba Emery Graphic Systems Inc. dba Emery Business Systems & Forms dba Emery Systems fdba Sand Paper and Ink Inc. PO Box 11730, Olympia Estimated Liabilities $100,001-$500,000 Estimated Assets $100,001-$500,000 Chapter 7 Case #13-47075 11/14/2013

Lawsuit Filings

These cases involving local businesses have been filed in Superior Courts. Plaintiff is listed first. Readers are cautioned that claims in actions have not been proven; they are alleged to be causes for action and truth will be determined at trial. Information is from public record, as maintained by Clerk of Superior Court.

Thurston County

Patriot Separation LLC vs Oiltrap Environmental Products Inc., Dyad Environmental LLC In May 2013, parties agreed Dyad would provide equipment and services for water and solid waste treatment on property in Montana and North Dakota. Parties had a project near Bainville, Mont., for $324,695 in April, then another in June for $612,000. Oiltrap will not release equipment under instructions from Dyad. Lawsuit claims failure to deliver despite receiving four payments. Also alleges further equipment was withheld despite payment of $300,000 in installments. Breach of contract claim seeks damages of $624,347.50 and delivery of equipment ordered, plus other damages. 11/5/2013

Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corp. vs Tabula Rasa LLC Complaint seeks custodial receiver to manage secured real estate at 1840 54th Ave. SW, Olympia, that is related to $17 million 2008 loan for multi-unit housing. Filing states loan is delinquent in amount of $1,166,394 plus interest, attorney’s fees and other costs. 11/7/2013

Pierce County

Scott M. Heagle vs South Meridian Properties LLC Plaintiff leased commercial space in retail mall at 18810 Meridian Ave. E, Puyallup, in March 2013. Lawsuit claims landlord defendant did not make required changes so space could be used as a restaurant and bar under Pierce County building codes. Also allege a proper front door was not installed until June 2013 and common wall separating from neighboring tenant was not complete until Sept. 2013. Plaintiff also learned that back door and lock were inadequate when someone broke in and stole tools worth $4,000. Because of delay in required improvements, plaintiff has paid three months rent for time space could not be occupied for intended purpose. Asks court to order refund of rents paid until the work is done and permit to occupy is issued. Also seeking attorney fees and costs. 11/4/2013 Topline Counters LLC vs Tacoma Counter Tops Inc., Kimberly C. Bryant-Runyan Collection filing seeks $16,498.16 unpaid balance due on account, plus interest, costs and fees. 11/5/2013 Miles Sand and Gravel Co., Construction Testing Laboratories Inc. vs Looker & Associates Inc. Lawsuit filed to collect $9,899.91 allegedly due for construction materials supplied by plaintiff Miles. Also seeks payment of $3,089 plus interest due on account with plaintiff CTL. 11/6/2013 Milgard Manufacturing Inc. vs Aspen Industries Inc., Rhonda L. Cowley, Steve M. Korh Abstract of King County judgment recorded to collect $8,954.55 for default judgment principal, interest, costs and attorney fees. 11/6/2013 Balhar Ghuman, Panjab Pacific LLC vs Joginder Dhanoa, Panjab Pacific LLC Filing states that parties agreed in Aug. 2007 to build a gas station together and purchased property at 174 Stewart Dr. Rd. SW, Pacific, for a Chevron business where plaintiff expected to be employed. He quit full-time job as a commercial driver and sold his commercial vehicle to invest and focus on developing the new business. Plaintiff claims he contributed one-third of $662,050.59 land purchase price and otherwise contributed approximately one-third of all development costs. Parties formed operating agreement for Panjab Pacific LLC in July 2007 with defendant Dhanoa and plaintiff Ghuman as 67 percent and

33 percent members respectively. In summer 2013, plaintiff took planned three week vacation to visit family in India and upon return was informed he would not be able to return to work. Filing claims defendant paid himself, his son and/or his wife over $36,000 during period while plaintiff was away from business. Lawsuit also alleges defendant Dhanoa as managing member hired illegal workers, paid employees cash under the table without corresponding payroll tax or other regular with-holdings. Since Sept. 2013, plaintiff has been excluded from all business activities and information and bank accounts. Under breach of contracts, fraud waste and misappropriation of assets, oppression of minority interest holder and other allegations, lawsuit seeks damages and court order to return employment and access to plaintiff. As alternative, seeks appointment of a receiver and/or LLC should be dissolved, liquidated and an accounting provider to members. 11/7/2013 YMCA of Pierce-Kitsap County vs Century Link, Pacific Utilities Contractors Defendant Century Link supplies telecommunications service to plaintiff ’s Tacoma Center YMCA building through a cable from the adjacent alley into the structure. Lawsuit claims that defendant Pacific was hired by Century to install a concrete vault through with the cables would exit to building in a conduit, but failed to seal the channel surrounding the cable. In early morning hours of Jan. 9, 2013, there was a substantial rainfall in downtown Tacoma and water entered the underground vault, then exited by way of the conduit that went directly into plaintiff ’s building causing substantial damage. Under claim of negligence, lawsuit seeks unspecified damages with costs and fees. 11/7/2013 Thurston First Bank vs Ryan C. McGowan, McGowan Rentals LLC Breach of contract complaint seeks enforcement of commercial guarantee to collect on commercial loan, plus interest, costs and fees after foreclosure in Dec. 2012. Property was sold leaving deficiency of $54,955.74 that this action asks to collect. 11/8/2013 Thurston First Bank vs Clark R. McGowan, McGowan Rentals LLC Breach of contract complaint seeks enforcement of June 2009 commercial loan guarantee to collect deficiency, plus interest, costs and fees after foreclosure in Dec. 2012. Seeks $16,201.99 plus interest, costs and fees. 11/8/2013 Cheryl Berg dba Besko Properties vs Theodore Whitehurst, Katrena Richards Complaint for breach of Jan. 2012 lease for commercial premises at 12209 Pacific Hwy. S., Tacoma. Defendants allegedly removed fixtures causing damages and owed $41,160.85 in unpaid rents and other charges. Filing seeks $38,160.85 plus interest, costs and attorney fees. 11/8/2013

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November 25, 2013  | www.BusinessExaminer.com | 21

SceneandHeard 1. Tacoma Goodwill online sales appraiser Jazlan Grigsby holds up a bead and cowrie Kuba Mukenga tribal mask. The Kuba Kingdom artifact, representing the power of the elephant through a trunk-like extension.

1

2. Lynnae Schneller and Aly Cullinane of Lynnae’s Gourmet Pickles hand out prize baskets at the company’s family-friendly happy hour at The Harmon following its second annual National Pickle Day pickle jar hunt on Nov. 14. Prize baskets ranged in value from $500 to $1,000. 3. Past Kent Chamber of Commerce presidents Jim Berrios (left) and Ken Sharp (right) are honored by Chamber executive director Andrea Keikkala at the organization’s November membership luncheon.

2

3

Scene & Heard is a feature in the Business Examiner that strives to promote business and community events as well as community awards around the South Sound. Photos submitted for this section are used on a space-available basis. Be sure submitted photos include caption information that describes the event and lists the names of the people in the photos. Photo credits are also appreciated. Submit items to the Business Examiner, 1702B Tacoma Ave. S., Tacoma, WA 98402, Fax: 253.404.0892, or by email (preferred) to news@BusinessExaminer.com. Highlight the local connection if it is not obvious. For additional information, call 253.404.0891.

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22  | www.BusinessExaminer.com |  November 25, 2013

PeopleontheMove ADDITIONS n Bob Kagy, owner of ABC Printing in Lacey, has joined Print NW after the two companies merged to give Print NW a foothold in the growing southwest Washington market. Kagy will lend his expertise to Print NW out of the existing ABC Printing facility in Lacey until buildout of Print NW’s new Thurston County facility is completed early in 2014. n Attorney General Bob Ferguson announced he has selected Olympia attorney Nancy Krier to serve full time as the Attorney General’s Office’s open government assistant attorney general. Prior to pursuing her law degree at the University of Washington, Krier worked several years as a reporter. She most recently served as General Counsel to the Public Disclosure Commission and previously worked as the Division Chief for the Attorney General’s Licensing and Administrative Law Division. n Troy Johnson, CSI, has joined the Pacific Northwest Region of Adolfson & Peterson Construction. He will serve as a project manager with a focus on senior living and health care. Troy Johnson comes from Marathon Development and has more than 20 years of experience in the industry.

PROMOTIONS n Justin Kessel has been promoted to regional controller for Adolfson & Peterson Construction’s Pacific Northwest Region. Justin has 11 years in the industry, and has been with A&P since March of Kessel 2013. He graduated from the University of Washington with a BA in business administration with a concentration in finance.

NEW OWNERSHIP n Dr. Joseph Schneider, DDS, MAGD, has purchased South Hill Family Dentistry in Puyallup and assumed ownership effective September 1. Schneider, a family practice and cosmetic Schneider dentist, has been associated with South Hill Family Dentistry for the past three years. Schneider is a recent recipient of a Mastership in Academy of General Dentistry (MAGD) and

serves on the Executive Council of Seattle King County Dental Society.

ACCOLADES & APPOINTMENTS n Anderson Appraisal, Inc., in Olympia has announced that Derek Jolliff has been awarded the Appraisal Institute’s coveted MAI designation. This designation is Jolliff held by appraisers who are experienced in the valuation of commercial, industrial, residential, and other complex real property, and who advise clients on real estate investment decisions. In order to earn the MAI designation, an appraiser must meet rigorous requirements including specialized education, testing, field variety experience, successful submission and grading of a “demonstration” type report, culminating in a comprehensive examination of subject matter. Jolliff has been actively engaged in real estate valuation and consulting since 2006. n Edward Alvarez Gonzales recently completed an intensive training workshop preparing him to assume responsibilities at the Edward Jones office in Lakewood. The workshop is designed for experienced brokers who joined Edward Jones from other financial-services firms. n Doug Darling, a maintenance technician at Mason General Hospital & Family of Clinics, was recently honored by his peers as Employee of the Month for November. He has been with the HospiDarling tal for eight years: his first two years in grounds maintenance, and the last six years working inside on maintenance, repairs, and setting up for special events. n Tacoma travel agent Kim Johnston of Travel Leaders has been honored with the “Employee of Excellence” for going above and beyond on behalf of her clients and because of her expertise in mentoring other agents. Johnston was presented with her award at the 2013 Travel Leaders National Meeting held at the Hyatt Regency Atlanta. Johnston started working in a family-owned travel agency over 30 years ago. n Pat Schueler, owner and operator of Schueler Automotive, has been announced as Rotary Club of Tumwater’s Business Person of the Year. Schueler started the company over 15 years ago as a backyard shop in south Thurston County, and over time, has guided his business to steady growth. The company is now located near Olympia Regional Airport.


November 25, 2013  | www.BusinessExaminer.com | 23

BusinesstoBusiness The institute for job candidates who can’t write good Anybody else remember diagramming a sentence in middle school? I do. It was a huge pain in the rear, quite possibly the most frustrating thing I ever had to learn in 12 years of primary and secondary education. It was also, quite possibly, the most important thing I ever learned how to do — from a career standpoint, anyway. Granted, proper sentence structure is an inherently important job skill for journalists, so it’s a bit of a biased declaration. In a baser sense, though, it’s painfully clear that writing and communication skills are eroding among many (especially youth) in the job market, and it appears to be a trend that’s frustrating employers. Industry notwithstanding, surveys are turning up complaints from employers that job applicants — everyone from blue-collar workers to business school graduates — are exhibiting a startling inability to read and write clearly. For example, a 2013 Bloomberg Businessweek survey of 218 corporate recruiters who hire undergrad students

By Arnie Aurellano Business Examiner Media Group Content Manager

cited weakness in writing aptitude as a top gripe among employers. The grouse is echoed in a survey by the Society for Human Resource Management, in which about half of responding employers said that 2013 graduates with a bachelor’s degree or higher lack writing skills. (True story: Once, a friend of mine in human resources showed me a cover letter she got with a sentence that started with “BTW.” For a job as a paralegal. From somebody with a degree.) A friend in Missouri, additionally, pointed me toward the State of the St. Louis Workforce Report, which showed that 44 percent of responding employers indicated that lack of writing skills was a major concern. Of course, this is a sample from an entirely different part

of the country, but I think the geographic discrepancy just underscores that it’s a fairly deep national problem. It’s something to keep an eye on, given that the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported earlier this month that roughly 204,000 jobs were created in October, ahead of economists’ projections. The jobs are apparently there, waiting for folks who know the difference between “there,” “their” and “they’re” to grab ‘em. So what’s with the disconnect, then? Why have we apparently abandoned the need to write at a professionally adequate level? The most convenient theory is sitting in all of our pockets. The smartphone generation is raised on texting shorthand, and with every “OMG u r so gr8 LOL” is a subconscious assent that it’s totally okay to communicate with just a reasonable facsimile of proper writing skills. We’re going to go the Family Feud route again here, but survey after survey has noted that HR professionals and academics alike have pointed to texting as one of the chief assailants to proficiency

in written communication. Mind you, I’m a big texting fan, myself; my day feels weird if I’m not having at least three text stream conversations happening simultaneously and constantly. At the risk, though, of sounding like the old guy on his stoop waving his fists at trick-or-treaters, might I suggest that kids these days could benefit from a little casual nudge about texting at, like, not a third grade level? I mean, I sent a text with two semicolons (used properly, even) in it once. We all don’t have to go that far, clearly, but the fewer times the word “late” has an 8 in it, the better we are as an American people, I figure. I don’t know what the job market’s going to be like in 2030 or whenever, but if “BTW” is a normal thing on cover letters by then, I’m frankly going to have no clue what to do with myself. Arnie Aurellano is the content manager at Business Examiner Media Group. He can be reached online at arniea@ businessexaminer.com.

SouthSoundSelling What are you thinking? Here are a few of my thoughts The minute I get a thought, I capture it. For the past year or so, I’ve been texting myself through voice dictation. It works. It’s the same way I am writing this column. Voice to text. It works. I’m about to show you, and share with you, some of those random thoughts. They are in no particular order, and as I paste them into this word document I’m reading them aloud and altering them. (That’s how I edit.) I’m reading them and expanding them on the spot so they become even more valuable and applicable to a salesperson. You. On questions: When someone asks you a question, ask yourself, “Why are they asking this, and what does this mean in terms of this person moving toward a purchase?” There’s a motive behind every question a prospect asks. And that motive is the sales driver. In reality they’re thinking to themselves, if this function works, I can increase my sales. That’s the motive, not the function. For example, they may ask you, “Can this function take place?” If you answer, “Yes,” then you’ve gone right past sale. If you answer yes and then ask, “What will this function lead to?” or “What makes this function important to you?” you will then uncover the real buying motive. In sales this is known as the hot button. The reality is, it’s your money. What are you thinking? • In sales, the largest chasm is the dif-

By Jeffrey Gitomer Buy Gitomer President

ference between knowing and doing. You already know everything; the problem is you’re not doing it. • How many of you cannot afford to buy what it is you are selling? And how does that affect your belief system? And how does that affect your passion to close the sale? • Whoever said, “Thoughts are things,” only had it partially correct. The better statement is, “Thoughts become things when plans are made, belief is strong, and action is taken.” • In a game of “sales chess” you have to be thinking at least two moves ahead or you’ll likely lose your queen. What do they really want? Your customer doesn’t want to buy a ball bearing. They want to keep their plant producing. Customers want outcome, not product. Your customer does not want a can of paint, brushes, and rollers. Your customer wants a beautiful room or a updated look to the exterior of their home. Sell outcome, not product. Be specific: Is your presentation full of generaliza-

tions or customization? If you only generalize for the enterprise and generalize about the business, you will lose. But if you customize for your customer, or their customer, they can visualize what’s in it for THEM, and they will buy. Show me the money, not the percentage: Don’t give me a percentage. Give me a dollar amount. Example: You say, “We lost 7 percent of our customers this year.” Really? How much is that in dollars? That will make you mad. Large companies refer to this as “churn.” I define churn as management’s inability to keep customers loyal. And these same companies who call it churn only present it as a percentage. Our churn rate is 3.2 percent. Why doesn’t management have the intestinal fortitude to present that as a dollar amount? Answer: They don’t want anyone to know, and it places the burden on salespeople to replace the 3.2 percent in order to get to last year’s numbers. Not good. What’s the real challenge with CRM? Customer relationship management is the most purchased, least-used, and least-adopted software in the history of computers. Why? The salesperson looks at it as management’s tool for accountability. CRM adoption rates would triple if salespeople viewed it as something that could help them make a sale. If you have CRM software for your

sales and service people, and you have a 72% adoption rate, that means 28% of your sales team, and/or your service team, did NOT adopt it, and most likely hate it. I feel reasonably certain that of the 72% that did adopt it, a high percentage of them look at it as something they “had to do” rather than something that would help them. On imagination and ‘Wow!’ factor: Salespeople are missing huge opportunities for engagement and opportunities to gain response from customers by not being imaginative or creative in their communications. • Show me a sales script, and I’ll show you a boring message. • Show me a slide deck prepared by marketing, and I’ll show you a boring message. • Show me an email prepared by a salesperson, and I’ll show you a boring message. Where’s the value? Show me the value. Where’s the WOW? Show me the WOW! If you show me WOW and value, I will respond, I will engage, I will connect, and I will buy. Those are my thoughts and ideas of the moment. All captured the second they occurred to me. Hope they get you thinking, taking action, and capturing yours. Jeffrey Gitomer is the author of twelve best-selling books including The Sales Bible and The Little Red Book of Selling. 


24  | www.BusinessExaminer.com |  November 25, 2013

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