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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2013

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High-level bickering continues WH meeting yields no progress on shutdown By DAVID ESPO AP Special Correspondent

MIKE McCLEARY/Tribune

Ched Phillips, a chief warrant officer in the North Dakota National Guard, stands next to his wife, Sgt. First Class Amanda Phillips, on Wednesday at their home west of Menoken. Ched Phillips is one of the many soldiers placed on furlough because of the federal government shutdown.

Couple prepared for shutdown By NICK SMITH Bismarck Tribune One area couple affected by the federal government shutdown this week said their efforts at planning ahead should help their family weather the situation if it doesn’t turn into a long-term ordeal. Sgt. First Class Amanda Phillips with the North Dakota National Guard said she and her husband, Chief Warrant Officer Ched Phillips, believe they’ll be OK financially unless the shutdown stretches through the end of the year. Ched Phillips was among the nearly 500 full-time Guard staff furloughed Tuesday when the federal government entered its first partial shutdown in 17 years. Amanda Phillips is still on duty. Amanda Phillips said she and others continuing to work will be getting their pay

after Congress resolves the budget impasse involving President Barack Obama’s federal health care law. Her husband — along with the hundreds of other North Dakotans sent home Tu e s d a y m o r n i n g — i s another story. “He is at this point laid off without pay until (this ends). He’s not even guaranteed to get back pay,” Amanda Phillips said.

Foresight The Phillipses, who have been married since 2009 and live near Menoken, made sure they prepared for a situation like what’s unfolded recently. She said after the federal budget negotiations that nearly caused a shutdown in April 2011, “we’ve been putting more in savings.” “I think we have prepared ourselves enough for us to be OK for three or four months,”

Amanda Phillips said. After that point, if Congress has been unable to resolve the shutdown, she said her husband would likely need to find part-time work. She said the financial preparation was an especially good move on their part since they have two children, ages 10 and 3. She said other staff members had gone home and were addressing their situations in their own way. She said a few people were looking into unemployment in order to ensure they’re able to pay their bills. Others had told her they’d do part-time jobs or go do work on their families’ farms. Ched Phillips has been in the Guard for 20 years, and Amanda for 14 years. She said the situation was new to them both since neither of them had been full-time federal employees at the time of the 1995-96 shutdown.

“He’s pretty well accepted it and understands it,” Amanda Phillips said. “But he doesn’t want it to last long.” Ched Phillips conducts inspections of units and facilities across the state. Being furloughed for a long period of time would create backlogs of work, his wife said. “He believes it snowballs things for months to come,” Amanda Phillips said. Amanda Phillips said she and her husband never expected the situation in Washington, D.C., to reach the point it has. Ched Phillips is one of about 800,000 federal employees across the country sent home Tuesday. “Now it really looks like there is no end in sight,” Amanda Phillips said. (Reach Nick Smith at 701250-8255 or 701-223-8482 or at nick.smith@bismarcktribune.com.)

the president nor Democrats will accept changes in the nation’s 3-year-old WASHINGTON — Pres- health care law as the price i d e n t B a r a c k O b a m a for spending legislation brought congressional needed to end the two-day leaders to the White House partial shutdown. on WednesWith the day for the nation’s abilifirst time ty to borrow since a partial money soon government to lapse, shutdown Republicans began, but and Democthere was no rats alike said sign of prothe shutgress toward down could ending an last for two impasse that weeks or has idled more, and 800,000 fedsoon oblige a eral workers divided govand curbed ernment to services Rep. John Dingell, grapple with around the both econoD- Mich my-threatencountry. The standing issues at off continued after a White the same time. House summit with chief The White House said in executives as financial a statement after the meetleaders and Wall street ing that Obama had made urged a resolution before it clear “he is not going to serious damage is done to negotiate over the need for the U.S. and world econo- Congress to act to reopen my. the government or to raise O b a m a “re f u s e s t o the debt limit to pay the negotiate,” House Speaker bills Congress has already John Boehner, R-Ohio., incurred.” told reporters after private It added, “The president talks that lasted more than remains hopeful that coman hour. “All we’re asking mon sense will prevail.” for here is a discussion and The high-level bickerfairness for the American ing at microphones set up people under Obama- outside the White House care.” reflected the day’s proBut Senate Majority ceedings in the Capitol. Leader Harry Reid of NevaThe Republican-conda said moments later, trolled House approved “We’re locked in tight on legislation to reopen the Obamacare” and neither Continued on 9A

“The American people would get better government out of Monkey Island at the local zoo than we’re giving them today,”

charges dismissed Weekend could bring Discontent Owner, manager first snow of season still face charges By BRIAN GEHRING Bismarck Tribune

If the system tracks to the south, areas along the North DakotaSouth Dakota border could see A low pressure system in Vansome snow. couver is creating a good deal of In terms of accumulations, uncertainty with what could be Simosko said it’s too early to North Dakota’s first real taste of venture a guess, but the overnight winter this season. low temperatures going into the Ken Simosko, a meteorologist weekend are expected to be around with the National Weather Service in 32 degrees and the ground temBismarck, said the system is tracking peratures are warm enough to to the southeast and expected to melt any small amount fairly move into Idaho today and Colquickly. orado on Friday — and that is where If the snow does materialize, the questions come into play. Simosko said, there will some wind “It’s still very uncertain at this associated with the system that point,” Simosko said Wednesday. could put some stress on trees He said once the system hits Col- if snow and ice builds up on orado, it’s expected to slow down, them. setting up one of two scenarios. “Right now there is still a great If the system tracks to the north- deal of uncertainty,” Simosko said. east, South Dakota and southeast “There is a 130-mile difference North Dakota could see some between the two scenarios — and snowfall by early Friday morning. we’ll have a better picture ThursBut as of Wednesday, Simosko day.” said the system is too far out to (Reach Brian Gehring at make any predictions of accumula- 701-250-8254 or brian.gehring@ tions. bismarcktribune.com.)

By JENNY MICHAEL Bismarck Tribune

A district court judge has dismissed cases against eight people accused of selling drugs and drug paraphernalia out of Discontent in Bismarck. Surrogate Judge Benny Graff dismissed the case against Nathan Wilson on Sept. 18 and the cases against Tyler Bohl, David Heid, Amanda Johnson, Nicholas Kantor, Thomas Palanuk, Edison Sprynczynatyk and Bradley Weigum on Sept. 24. All eight had faced charges of Class B felony delivery of synthetic cannabinoids and Class C felony delivery of drug paraphernalia. Burleigh County Assistant State’s Attorney Julie Lawyer moved to dismiss the charges. The motions said the defendants were “cooperating with the investigation.” Thomas Teply, the owner of the business, and Steven Johnson, the manager of the Bismarck store, still face charges. South

Fatal bus crash

Moose at large

Friday

8 killed, 14 injured when bus returning home with church group crashes — 2A

Bismarck residents spot moose as it roams about — 1B

‘Gravity’ features 90 minutes of terrifying beauty

Central District Judge David Reich has been assigned to handle their cases, and no new hearing dates have been scheduled. Teply, 60, has been charged with Class B felony conspiracy to deliver synthetic cannabinoids, Class C felony conspiracy to deliver drug paraphernalia, Class B felony possession of synthetic cannabinoids with intent to deliver and Class C felony possession of drug paraphernalia with intent to deliver.

Charges Steven Johnson, 30, has been charged with Class B felony conspiracy to deliver synthetic cannabinoids, Class C felony conspiracy to deliver drug paraphernalia, Class B felony possession of synthetic cannabinoids with intent to deliver, Class C felony possession of drug paraphernalia with intent to deliver, Class B felony delivery of synthetic cannabinoids and Class C felony delivery of drug paraphernalia. Law enforcement officers began investigating substances being sold at Discontent, 514 E. Main Ave., in January

2012 after seizing packages of synthetic substances in numerous cases, some of which involved medical emergencies brought on by the use of the substances that had been purchased at the store. Officers in June seized 10.6 pounds of synthetic substances, some of which were found to be illegal, from the store. Graff, a retired district court judge, had been assigned to handle the case because of conflicts the judges of the district had in relation to one of the defendants, who has not been identified. However, according to court filings, the dismissals of the cases against the Discontent employees cleared up the conflicts, allowing Reich to take over Teply’s and Steven Johnson’s cases. Reich will preside over the c a s e s’ p e n d i n g m o t i o n s, including motions to dismiss, to change the venue of a trial and numerous motions related to words and information to be presented at trial. (Reach Jenny Michael at 701250-8225 or jenny.michael@bismarcktribune.com.)

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2013 OPINION Sale of Frontier means change PAGE 8A

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In this aerial photo, emergency workers respond to a crash involving a passenger bus, a tractortrailer and an SUV near Dandridge, Tenn., on Wednesday. (Associated Press)

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — Delta Airlines said that a flight was diverted to Memphis International Airport because of a crack in a window. In a statement, Delta said Flight 557 was going from Detroit to Mexico City on Wednesday when crew members reported a small crack in one of the aircraft’s cockpit windows. The Airbus A319 carrying 104 passengers and six crew members landed safely. No injuries were reported. Delta said passengers were being placed on another flight.

ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — A civil rights group has accused the FBI of threatening to deport the friend of a Chechen man shot to death in his Orlando apartment by an agent during questioning about a Boston Marathon bombing suspect. The Florida chapter of the Council on American-Islamic Relations said Tatiana Gruzdeva, a friend of Ibragim Todashev, was arrested Tuesday when she showed up at an immigration office to sign papers for an extension of her work visa. The group said Gruzdeva was told she was being deported for talking publicly to Boston Magazine about Todashev, who was killed in May while FBI agents questioned him about Tamerlan Tsarnaev. FBI spokesman Paul Bresson declined to comment. A spokeswoman for the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement didn’t return an email and phone call.

Model of Picasso statue to auction C H I C AG O ( A P ) — A model of Pablo Picasso’s famed Chicago statue will be auctioned next month. Christie’s estimates it will sell for as much as $35 million. The piece is a sheet metal model of the sculpture that stands in Chicago’s downtown Daley Plaza. Picasso created the piece between 1962 and 1964. The model that goes to auction on Nov. 4 in New York is 41½ inches tall and 27½ inches wide. It was later made into the 65-foot-tall, welded-iron statue unveiled on Aug. 15, 1967. Christie’s said Picasso saved this model for himself and sent a duplicate to Chicago to be used to create the sculpture. The piece is part of a larger auction of artwork from the private collection of renowned dealer Jan Krugier.

1873

THE INSIDE STORY

Cracked window forces early landing

Bombing suspect’s friend harassed

IN

8 dead in bus crash By STEVE MEGARGEE and TRAVIS LOLLER Associated Press DANDRIDGE, Tenn. — A bus taking a church group home to North Carolina blew a tire, veered across a highway median and crashed into a sport utility vehicle and tractor-trailer Wednesday in a fiery wreck that killed eight people, authorities said. Fourteen other people were hurt in the accident in northeastern Tennessee, including eight who were in critical condition. The bus was carrying members of the Front Street Baptist Church in Statesville, N.C., which is about 140 miles east of the crash site. The group of seniors, known as Young at Heart, had been to the 17th annual Fall Jubilee in Gatlinburg, Tenn., an event featuring gospel singers and speakers. Its website described the gathering as “three days of singing, laughing and preaching” for “mature and senior believers.” Inside the Statesville church, people were crying and hugging each other. One woman whispered, “It’s going to be all right” while hugging another woman. A memorial service

was held Wednesday evening. Police for the people to be praying.” cordoned off the church to prevent Authorities said the bus crossed the reporters from talking to those who median and the cable barriers that attended. divide the interstate about 2 p.m., Following the clipped the oncomservice, Front Street ing SUV and Baptist associate slammed into the pastor Rick Cruz t r a c t o r - t r a i l e r, remarked, “This is a which burst into time of difficulty, flames. but we trust in God Several hours ... that He’s fair. ... All after the crash, your prayers are clouds of smoke appreciated.” still rose from the George Stadfeld, George Stadfeld, tractor-trailer and who has been a branches that church member tree member of the lined the highway church for eight were charred. years, said he knew everyone on the The bus was on its side next to the bus. tractor-trailer, lying across two lanes of “We’re all shaken,” he said. “As bad traffic and extending partially into the as it is, they’re all Christians and I know median. where they’re at. I’ll join them later.” The bus itself didn’t actually catch Dionne Stutts, wife of Front Street on fire, but there was some “heat expoBaptist senior pastor Tim Stutts, said sure,” Jefferson County Emergency her husband and another pastor from Management Director Brad Phillips the church were en route to the wreck said. Emergency responders were able site. to remove people who were alive rap“They had been there and they idly to get them away from the flames were on their way home today,” she and other good Samaritans provided said. “We are devastated and just ask assistance.

“As bad as it is, they’re all Christians and I know where they’re at. I’ll join them later.”

Feds pressured to fix exchanges By JULIET WILLIAMS and RICARDO ALONSOZALDIVAR Associated Press The pressure is on for the federal government and states running their own health insurance exchanges to get the systems up and running after overloaded websites and jammed phone lines frustrated consumers for a second day as they tried to sign up for coverage using the new marketplaces. In some ways, the delays that persisted Wednesday were good news for President Barack Obama and supporters of his signature domestic policy achievement because the holdups showed what appeared to

Associated Press

A page asks visitors to stay on during the log in process of the Health Care Marketplace website Wednesday. be exceptionally high interest in the overhauled insurance system. But if the glitches aren’t fixed quickly, they could dampen enthusiasm for the law at the same time. Republicans are using it as a rallying cry to keep

most of the federal government closed. “It was worse today than it was yesterday,” Denise Rathman of Des Moines said after she tried for a second day to log onto the Iowa site.

Rathman has insurance through Dec. 31 but said she is eager to sign up for a policy because of her psoriatic arthritis, which has caused her to be denied insurance in the past. David Berge, a pastor with two young children in Shoreview, Minn., tried unsuccessfully at least 10 times to create an online account on the state-run site MNsure. His highdeductible plan expires at the end of the year. “I’m anxious to see what the insurance is going to look like for my family at the beginning of the year,” Berge said. “That’s a big unknown right now. I want to figure that out as soon as possible so we can begin planning.”

NSA chief admits to testing cellphone tracking By KIMBERLY DOZIER and STEPHEN BRAUN Associated Press WASHINGTON — National Security Agency chief Gen. Keith Alexander revealed Wednesday that his spy agency once tested whether it could track Americans’ cellphone locations, in addition to its practice of sweeping broad information about calls made. Alexander and Director of National Intelligence James Clapper testified at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on proposed reforms to the NSA’s surveillance of phone and internet usage around the world, exposed in June by former NSA analyst Edward Snowden. But neither spy chief discussed proposed reforms; instead they were questioned about new potential abuses that have come to light since then. Alexander denied a report published Saturday that said NSA searched social networks of Ameri-

Protestors hold signs on Capitol Hill in Washington on Wednesday. (Associated Press)

cans searching for foreign terror connections, and detailed 12 previously revealed cases of abuse by NSA employees who used the network for unsanctioned missions like spying on a spouse. He said all employees were caught and most were disciplined.

Alexander and Clapper also told lawmakers that the government shutdown is seriously damaging the intelligence community’s ability to guard against threats. They said they’re keeping counterterrorism staff at work as well as those provid-

ing intelligence to troops in Afghanistan, but that some 70 percent of the civilian workforce has been furloughed. Any details on the jobs held by the furloughed employees is classified. Congress is mulling changes to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act that some believe allows the NSA too much freedom in gathering U.S. data as part of spying on targets overseas. Alexander told the committee that his agency once tested, in 2010 and 2011, whether it could track Americans’ cellphone locations, but he says the NSA does not use that capability, leaving that to the FBI to build a criminal or foreign intelligence case against a suspect and track him. “This may be something that is a future requirement for the country but it is not right now because when we identify a number, we give it to the FBI,” Alexander said. “When they get their probable cause, they can get the locational data.”

VOLUME 139, NUMBER 276 ISSN 0745-1091. Published daily. ABOUT US Established in 1873, the Bismarck Tribune is the official newspaper of the state of North Dakota, county of Burleigh and city of Bismarck. Published daily at 707 E. Front Ave., Bismarck, N.D. 58504. Periodicals postage paid at the Bismarck Post Office. Member of The Associated Press. SUBSCRIBER SERVICES Delivery deadline: 6 a.m. Mon.Sat.; 7 a.m. Sun. Redeliveries in BismarckMandan: 10 a.m. Mon.-Fri.; 11 a.m. Sat.-Sun. Call 701-250-8210. Please note that the home delivery of our Thanksgiving Day edition will be priced with an added premium rate of $2. Home delivery subscribers will see a reduction in their subscription length to offset these premium rates. TO SUBSCRIBE Call Customer Service at 701250-8210 or 877-590-6397 from 4:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mon.-Fri. and from 4:30 to 11 a.m. Sat.-Sun. SHARE YOUR NEWS News . . . . . . . . . . . 701-250-8247 Obituaries. . . . . . . . 701-250-8240 Sports . . . . . . . . . . 701-250-8243 Hometown . . . . . . . 701-250-8242 Capitol Bureau . . . . 701-223-8242 BILLING QUESTIONS For billing concerns with retail and classified ads, call 701-2232500, ext. 312 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mon.-Fri. PLACING AN AD To place an ad, phone the appropriate number from 7:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Mon.-Fri.: Classified, 701-258-6900 or 866476-5348; Display, 701-250-8290. MANAGEMENT Brian Kroshus, publisher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 701-250-8299 Terry Alveshere, online manager . . . . . . . . 701-255-2127, ext. 231 Ken Bohl, circulation manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 701-250-8203 Stace Gooding, systems administrator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 701-355-8800 Chad Kourajian, human resources manager . . . . . . . . 701-250-8272 Libby Simes, financial services manager . . . . . . . . . 701-250-8202 Kristin Wilson, advertising director . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 701-250-8285 Stacey Lang, marketing manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 701-250-8201 Steve Wallick, city editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 701-250-8247 Ken Rogers, editorial page editor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 701-250-8250 Dan Tipton, post-press manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 701-355-8808 Mike Severson, press manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 701-355-8808 POSTMASTER Send address changes to: Bismarck Tribune P.O. Box 5516 Bismarck, N.D. 58506-5516 CORRECTIONS If you spot an error that significantly changes the meaning of any Tribune news story, call the city editor at 701-250-8247.

JOB: Wednesday’s Page 1A story on the resignation of the Tax Commissioner Cory Fong should have said he is going to be Odney’s senior public affairs consultant. Shane Goettle is the head of the firm’s public affairs department. PAY: Tuesday’s Page 1A story, “Shutdown hits N.D.,” should have said that excepted employees working during a shutdown will receive back pay when Congress passes a new appropriations bill. Furloughed employees are only able to receive back pay if Congress specifically authorizes it for them. NORTH DAKOTA LOTTERY POWERBALL Wednesday: 4-6-25-42-51 Powerball: 17 Jackpot: $70 Million MEGA MILLIONS Tuesday: 7-10-30-37-53 Mega Ball: 1 Jackpot: $189 Million HOT LOTTO Wednesday: 5-20-35-36-37 Hot Lotto: 8 Jackpot: $1.8 Million WILD CARD Wednesday: 3-8-22-24-30 Wild Card: Ace of Hearts Jackpot: $280,000 2BY2 Wednesday Red Balls: 3-15 White Balls: 7-20


4A Thursday, October 3, 2013

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PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF BURLEIGH COUNTY, STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA In the Matter of the Estate of Rose L. Rounds, Deceased. Probate No. 08-2013-PR-00204 NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above estate. All persons having claims against the deceased are required to present their claims within three (3) months after the date of the first publication or mailing of this notice or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to Roberta J. Schlatter, personal representative of the estate, at 2051 S. Grandview Lane, Bismarck, ND 58503, or filed with the Court. Dated this 23rd day of September, 2013. /s/ Roberta J. Schlatter ROBERTA J. SCHLATTER Personal Representative 2051 S. Grandview Lane Bismarck, ND 58503 First publication on the 26th day of September, 2013. 9/26, 10/3 & 10 - 20680608 REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS CONSTRUCTION MANAGER AT-RISK (CMAR) BISMARCK STATE COLLEGE Bismarck State College is preparing for construction of a new Communications and Creative Arts Center to be built on the campus of Bismarck State College in Bismarck, North Dakota. Construction costs for the center, including all paving, infrastructure, and building are anticipated to be approximately $12.7 Million. The delivery method for this project will be through a Construction Manager at Risk as defined by NDCC 48-01.2 including specific criteria required by the owner. The successful CMAR for this project must be able to comply with the requirements set forth in NDCC 48-01.2 as well as the schedule and other specific criteria established by the owner. Responses to the request for qualifications are due Friday, October 25, 2013 at 4 p.m. CST. Information regarding the project as well as the Request for Qualifications may be obtained by contacting the following: Bismarck State College Attn: Dave Clark 1200 Schafer Street Bismarck, ND 58501 Tele: 701.224.5434 Email: David.Clark@bismarckstate.edu 10/3, 10 & 17 - 20681812 IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF BURLEIGH COUNTY, STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA In the Matter of the Estate of Anthony Francis Zupet, Deceased. Probate No. 08-2013-PR-00141 NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Special Administrator of the above estate. All persons having claims against the deceased are required to present their claims within three (3) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to Guardian and Protective Services, Inc., Burleigh County Public Administrator, 316 N 5th Street, Bismarck, ND 58501, or filed with the Court. Dated this 16th day of September, 2013. /s/ Judy Vetter Guardian and Protective Services, Inc. Burleigh County Public Administrator, By Judy Vetter,Administrator Patricia E. Garrity PATRICIA E. GARRITY, PC Attorney for Special Administrator P.O. Box 2255 Bismarck, ND 58502-2255 (701) 751-1922 First publication on the 19th day of September, 2013. 9/19, 26 & 10/3 - 20679422 NOTICE OF HEARING N.D. INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION OIL AND GAS DIVISION The North Dakota Industrial Commission will hold a public hearing at 9:00 a.m. Wednesday, October 23, 2013, at the N.D. Oil & Gas Division, 1000 East Calgary Ave., Bismarck, N.D. At the hearing the Commission will receive testimony and exhibits. Persons with any interest in the cases listed below, take notice. PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES: If at the hearing you need special facilities or assistance, contact the Oil and Gas Division at 701-328-8038 by Thursday, October 10, 2013. STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA TO: Case No. 21021: Application of Bakken Western Services, LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43-02-03-51 authorizing the construction of a treating plant to be located in the SWSW of Section 5, T.151N., R.95W., McKenzie County, ND and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21022: Application of Patriot Separation, LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43-02-03-51 authorizing the construction of a treating plant to be located in the SENW of Section 2,T.148N., R.102W., McKenzie County, ND and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 20888: (Continued) Application of Earthworks, lnc., in accordance with NDAC § 43-02-03-51, for an order authorizing the construction of an oilfield waste treating/recycling facility to be located in the S/2 SE/4 Section 1, T.146N., R.96W., Dunn County, ND for the purpose of salvaging, treating and recycling upstream petroleum wastes, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21023: Proper spacing for the development of the Pembroke-Bakken Pool, McKenzie County, ND, redefine the field limits, and enact such special field rules as may be necessary. Continental Resources, Inc.; HRC Operating, LLC; Kodiak Oil & Gas (USA) Inc.; Newfield Prod Case No. 21024: Application of Kodiak Oil & Gas (USA) Inc. for an order amending the applicable orders for the Twin ButtesBakken Pool to establish two new 1280acre spacing units described as Sections 13 and 24, T.147N., R.92W.; and Sections 18 and 19,T.147N., R.91W., Dunn County, ND, and authorize up to ten horizontal wells to be drilled thereon, or granting such other relief as may be appropriate. Case No. 21025: Application of Kodiak Oil & Gas (USA) Inc. for an order amending the applicable orders for the South ForkBakken Pool to establish two new 1280acre spacing units described as Sections 2 and 11; and Sections 3 and 10, T.148N., R.93W., Dunn County, ND, and authorize up to ten horizontal wells to be drilled thereon, or granting such other relief as may be appropriate. Case No. 21026: Application of Kodiak Oil & Gas (USA) Inc. for an order amending the applicable orders for the Heart ButteBakken Pool to establish two new 1280acre spacing units described as Sections 7 and 18; and Sections 8 and 17, T.148N., R.92W., Dunn County, ND, and authorize up to ten horizontal wells to be drilled thereon, or granting such other relief as may be appropriate. Case No. 20881: (Continued) Application of Kodiak Oil & Gas (USA) Inc. for an order amending the applicable orders for the Banks-Bakken Pool to create two laydown 1280-acre spacing units consisting of Section 1, T.153N., R.98W. and Section 6, T.153N., R.97W.; and Section 12, T.153N., R.98W. and Section 7, T.153N., R.97W., McKenzie and Williams Counties, ND, and authorize up to ten horizontal wells to be drilled thereon, and such other relief as is appropriate.

Case No. 21027: Proper spacing for the development of the Sandrocks-Bakken Pool, McKenzie County, ND, redefine the field limits, and enact such special field rules as may be necessary. Hess Corp.; Murex Petroleum Corp.; Newfield Prod Co.; Statoil Oil & Gas LP. Case No. 14935: (Continued) Application of Hess Corp. for an order suspending, and after hearing revoking, a permit issued to Continental Resources, Inc. for the drilling of the Foster #1-28H well on a drilling unit consisting of Sections 28 and 33, T.153N., R.99W., Williams and McKenzie Counties, ND; and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21028: Application of Hess Corp. for an order revoking the permit issued to Continental Resources, Inc. to drill the Stang #1-11H well, with a surface location in the SWSE of Section 11,T.157N., R.94W., Mountrail County, ND, or alternatively designating applicant as operator of said well, and for such other relief as the Commission may deem appropriate. Case No. 21029: Application of Hess Corp. for an order amending the applicable orders for the Blue Buttes-Bakken Pool to establish an overlapping 2560-acre spacing unit consisting of Sections 3, 4, 9 and 10, T.150N., R.95W., McKenzie County, ND, for the purpose of drilling one or more horizontal wells on the common spacing unit boundary; and granting such other and further relief as may be appropriate. Case No. 21030: Temporary spacing to develop an oil and/or gas pool discovered by the Jordan Exploration Co., LLC, #10-21 Lawrence, NWSE Section 21, T.162N., R.94W., Burke County, ND, define the field limits, and enact such special field rules as may be necessary. Case No. 21031: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC to consider the temporary spacing to develop an oil and/or gas pool discovered by the Nevis 6092 12-18H well located in the NENW of Section 18, T.160N., R.92W., Burke County, ND, define the limits of the field, and enact such special field rules as may be necessary. Case No. 21032: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order amending the applicable orders for the Tyrone-Bakken Pool to establish four overlapping 2560-acre spacing units consisting of Sections 16, 17, 20 and 21; Sections 26, 27, 34 and 35; and Sections 27, 28, 33 and 34, T.156N., R.101W., Williams County, ND, and allow one or more horizontal wells to be drilled thereon, or granting such other relief as may be appropriate. Case No. 21033: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order amending the applicable orders for the Squires-Bakken Pool to establish two overlapping 2560-acre spacing units consisting of Sections 5, 6, 7 and 8; and Sections 17, 18, 19 and 20, T.155N., R.102W., Williams County, ND, and allow one or more horizontal wells to be drilled thereon, or granting such other relief as may be appropriate. Case No. 21034: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order amending the applicable orders for the Robinson Lake and Alkali Creek-Bakken Pools to establish an overlapping 2560-acre spacing unit consisting of Sections 6 and 7, T.154N., R.93W., and Sections 1 and 12, T.154N., R.94W., Mountrail County, ND, and allow one or more horizontal wells to be drilled thereon, or granting such other relief as may be appropriate. Case No. 21035: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order amending the applicable orders for the Baker-Bakken Pool to establish an overlapping 2560-acre spacing unit consisting of Sections 17, 18, 19 and 20, T.153N., R.100W., McKenzie and Williams Counties, ND, and allow one or more horizontal wells to be drilled thereon, or granting such other relief as may be appropriate. Case No. 21036: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order authorizing up to fifteen horizontal wells to be drilled on some or all of the 1280-acre spacing units currently existing in the Alkali Creek-Bakken Pool, Mountrail, Williams, and McKenzie Counties, ND; to alter the definition of the stratigraphic limits of the pool; or granting such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21037: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order authorizing up to twelve horizontal wells to be drilled on some or all of the 1280-acre spacing units currently existing in the Cow Creek-Bakken Pool, Williams County, ND; to alter the definition of the stratigraphic limits of the pool; or granting such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21038: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order authorizing up to fifteen horizontal wells to be drilled on some or all of the 1280-acre spacing units currently existing in the Enget Lake-Bakken Pool, Mountrail County, ND; to alter the definition of the stratigraphic limits of the pool; or granting such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21039: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order authorizing up to fifteen horizontal wells to be drilled on some or all of the 1280-acre spacing units currently existing in the Sorkness-Bakken Pool, Mountrail County, ND; to alter the definition of the stratigraphic limits of the pool; or granting such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21040: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order authorizing up to fifteen horizontal wells to be drilled on some or all of the 1280-acre spacing units currently existing in the Tyrone-Bakken Pool, Williams County, ND; to alter the definition of the stratigraphic limits of the pool; or granting such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21041: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order authorizing up to fifteen horizontal wells to be drilled on some or all of the 1280-acre spacing units currently existing in the Viking-Bakken Pool, Burke County, ND; to alter the definition of the stratigraphic limits of the pool; or granting such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21042:Application of Petro-Hunt, LLC for an order amending the applicable orders for the East Tioga-Bakken Pool, to establish a 1280-acre spacing unit consisting of Sections 10 and 15, T.158N., R.94W., Mountrail County, ND, and authorize up to seven horizontal wells to be drilled thereon, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21043: Application of Marathon Oil Co. for an order amending the applicable orders for the Reunion Bay and the Big Bend-Bakken Pools to establish five overlapping 2560-acre spacing units consisting of Sections 1, 2, 11 and 12; Sections 2, 3, 10 and 11; Sections 3, 4, 9 and 10; Sections 4, 5, 8 and 9; and Sections 5, 6, 7 and 8, T.150N., R.93W., Mountrail, McKenzie, and Dunn Counties, ND, and allow one or more horizontal wells to be drilled thereon, or granting such other relief as may be appropriate. Case No. 21044: Application of Marathon Oil Co., for an order amending the applicable orders for the Chimney ButteBakken Pool, Dunn County, ND, to allow up to two horizontal wells to be drilled on two 2560-acre spacing units described as Sections 1, 2, 11 and 12; and Sections 14, 15, 22 and 23, T.146N., R.95W., Dunn County, ND; granting relief from any policy or provision requiring such wells to be drilled within a 500 foot corridor in the center of such 2560-acre spacing unit; and granting such other relief as may be appropriate. Case No. 21045: Application of Marathon Oil Co., for an order amending the applicable orders for the Chimney ButteBakken Pool, Dunn County, ND, to either allow up to two horizontal wells to be drilled on a 2560-acre spacing unit described as Sections 2, 3, 10 and 11,

T.146N., R.95W., Dunn County, ND with relief from any policy or provision requiring such wells to be drilled within a 500 foot corridor in the center of such 2560-acre spacing unit or alternatively allow one of the seven wells authorized for the 1280acre spacing unit consisting of all of said Sections 3 and 10 to be drilled closer than 500 feet to the east line of Sections 3 and 10; and granting such other relief as may be appropriate. Case No. 21046: Application of Burlington Resources Oil & Gas Co. LP for an order amending the applicable orders for the Elidah-Bakken Pool to establish five overlapping 2560-acre spacing units consisting of Sections 27, 28, 33 and 34, T.152N., R.97W.; and Sections 2, 3, 10 and 11; Sections 3, 4, 9 and 10; Sections 14, 15, 22 and 23; and Sections 15, 16, 21 and 22, T.151N., R.97W., McKenzie County, ND, for the purpose of drilling one or more horizontal wells between the existing 1280acre spacing units; and granting such other and further relief as may be appropriate. Case No. 21047: Application of Whiting Oil and Gas Corp. for an order amending the applicable orders for the Beach-Red River Pool to establish a 640-acre spacing unit consisting of all of Section 5, T.141N., R.105W., Golden Valley County, ND, and authorize the drilling of a horizontal well on such spacing unit, and granting such other relief as may be appropriate. Case No. 21048: Application of Whiting Oil and Gas Corp. for an order amending the applicable orders for the Delhi-Red River Pool to establish a 640-acre spacing unit consisting of all of Section 24, T.141N., R.105W., Golden Valley County, ND, and authorize a horizontal well to be drilled thereon, or granting such other relief as may be appropriate. Case No. 21049: Application of Whiting Oil and Gas Corp. for an order amending the applicable orders for the Camel Hump-Red River Pool, Golden Valley County, ND, (i) to include the N/2 of Sections 35 and all of Section 36, T.141N., R.104W., within the Camel Hump Field; (ii) to establish a 240acre spacing unit consisting of the SE/4 and the S/2 NE/4 of Section 25, T.141N., R.104W., and authorize the drilling of a vertical well on said lands; (iii) to establish a 560-acre spacing unit consisting of the S/2 of Section 26 and the SW/4 and S/2 NW/4 of Section 25, T.141N., R.104W., and authorize the drilling of a horizontal well on said lands; (iv) to establish a 320-acre spacing unit consisting of the N/2 of Section 35, T.141N., R.104W., and authorize the drilling of a horizontal well on said lands; (v) to establish two 480-acre spacing units consisting of the N/2 of Section 36,T.141N., R.104W., and the NW/4 of Section 31, T.141N., R.103W.; and the S/2 of Section 36, T.141N., R.104W., and the SW/4 of Section 31, T.141N., R.103W.; (vi) to authorize the drilling of a second vertical well on a 320acre spacing unit described as the W/2 of Section 22, T.141N., R.105W.; and (vii) granting such other relief as may be appropriate. Case No. 21050: Application of OXY USA, Inc. for an order amending the applicable orders to allow wells completed in the St. Anthony-Bakken Pool, Dunn County, ND, to produce at a maximum efficient rate and flare gas produced in association with oil, or for such other relief as may be applicable. Case No. 20858: (Continued) Application of SM Energy Co. for an order amending the applicable orders for the Phelps BayBakken Pool to terminate a 960-acre spacing unit consisting of all of Section 13 and the NE/4 of Section 24,T.153N., R.95W. and the NW/4 of Sections 19, T.153N., R.94W., McKenzie County, ND; and establish a 640-acre spacing unit consisting of all of said Section 13, and authorize the drilling of up to eight horizontal wells on such spacing unit, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 20607: (Continued) Application of QEP Energy Co. for an order amending the applicable orders for the Van HookBakken Pool to allow up to sixteen wells to be drilled on a 3200-acre spacing unit described as Sections 26, 27, 28, 29 and 30, T.150N., R.92W., Mountrail and Dunn Counties, ND, or for such other relief as may be appropriate. Case No. 21051:Application of North Plains Energy, LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43-02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 27 and 34, T.160N., R.100W., Divide County, ND, Smoky Butte-Bakken Pool, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21052:Application of North Plains Energy, LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43-02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 28 and 33, T.160N., R.101W., Divide County, ND, Sioux Trail-Bakken Pool, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21053: In the matter of the petition for a risk penalty of Bakken Hunter, LLC, requesting an order authorizing the recovery of a risk penalty from certain nonparticipating owners as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08 in the drilling and completion of the Tundra #3130-4H well located in a spacing unit consisting of Sections 30 and 31, T.164N., R.98W., Ambrose-Bakken Pool, Divide County, ND, pursuant to NDAC § 43-02-03-88.1, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21054: In the matter of the petition for a risk penalty of WPX Energy Williston, LLC requesting an order authorizing the recovery of a risk penalty from certain non-participating owners, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08 in the drilling and completing of the Dora Smith #5-8HC well located in a spacing unit described as Sections 5 and 8, T.150N., R.92W., Van Hook Bakken Pool, Mountrail County, ND, pursuant to NDAC § 43-02-03- 88.1, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21055: In the matter of the petition for a risk penalty of WPX Energy Williston, LLC requesting an order authorizing the recovery of a risk penalty from certain non-participating owners, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08 in the drilling and completing of the State of ND #10-3H well located in a spacing unit described as Sections 3 and 10, T.150N., R.92W., Van Hook Bakken Pool, Mountrail County, ND, pursuant to NDAC § 43-02-03-88.1, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21056: In the matter of the petition for the risk penalty of WPX Energy Williston, LLC requesting an order authorizing the recovery of a risk penalty from certain non-participating owners, as provided by NDCC§38-08-08 in the drilling and completing of the State of ND #103HC well located in a spacing unit described as Sections 3 and 10, T.150N., R.92W., Van Hook-Bakken Pool, Mountrail County, ND, pursuant to NDAC § 43-02-03- 88.1, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21057: In the matter of the petition for the risk penalty of WPX Energy Williston, LLC requesting an order authorizing the recovery of a risk penalty from certain non-participating owners, as provided by NDCC§38-08-08 in the drilling and completing of the State of ND #103HZ well located in a spacing unit described as Sections 3 and 10, T.150N., R.92W., Van Hook-Bakken Pool, Mountrail County, ND, pursuant to NDAC § 43-02-03- 88.1, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21058: In the matter of the petition for the risk penalty of WPX Energy Williston, LLC requesting an order authorizing the recovery of a risk penalty from certain non-participating owners, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08 in the drilling and completing of the George Evans #11-2HD well located in a spacing unit

described as Sections 2 and 11, T.150N., R.92W., Van Hook-Bakken Pool, Mountrail County, ND, pursuant to NDAC § 43- 02-03-88.1, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21059: In the matter of the petition for the risk penalty of WPX Energy Williston, LLC requesting an order authorizing the recovery of a risk penalty from certain non-participating owners, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08 in the drilling and completing of the George Evans #11-2HC well located in a spacing unit described as Sections 2 and 11, T.150N., R.92W., Van Hook-Bakken Pool, Mountrail County, ND, pursuant to NDAC § 43- 02-03-88.1, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21060: In the matter of the petition for the risk penalty of WPX Energy Williston, LLC requesting an order authorizing the recovery of a risk penalty from certain non-participating owners, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08 in the drilling and completing of the George Evans #11-2HZ well located in a spacing unit described as Sections 2 and 11, T.150N., R.92W., Van Hook-Bakken Pool, Mountrail County, ND, pursuant to NDAC § 43- 02-03-88.1, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21061: Application of North Dakota SWD #1, LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43-02-03-88.1 authorizing the conversion to saltwater disposal into the Dakota Group of the North Dakota SWD #1 well, NESE Section 1, T.146N., R.96W., Corral Creek Field, Dunn County, ND, pursuant to NDAC Chapter 43-02-05 and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21062: Application of SM Energy Co. for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 4 and 9, T.161N., R.99W., Garnet-Bakken Pool, Divide County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21063: Application of SM Energy Co. for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 27 and 34, T.162N., R.100W., West AmbroseBakken Pool, Divide County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21064: Application of SM Energy Co. for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 26 and 35, T.162N., R.100W., West AmbroseBakken Pool, Divide County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21065: Application of SM Energy Co. for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 25 and 36, T.162N., R.100W., West AmbroseBakken Pool, Divide County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21066: Application of SM Energy Co. for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 2 and 11, T.161N., R.100W., Alexandria-Bakken Pool, Divide County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21067: Application of SM Energy Co. for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 1 and 12, T.161N., R.100W., Alexandria-Bakken Pool, Divide County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21068: Application of SM Energy Co. for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 6 and 7, T.161N., R.99W., Musta-Bakken Pool, Divide County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21069:Application of Petro-Hunt, LLC for an order amending the applicable orders for the Stockyard Creek-Bakken Pool,Williams County, ND, to authorize up to six wells to be drilled on the 640-acre spacing unit described as all of Section 16, T.154N., R.99W., and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21070:Application of Petro-Hunt, LLC for an order amending the applicable orders for the Powers Lake-Bakken Pool, Mountrail County, ND, to authorize up to seven wells to be drilled on the 1280-acre spacing unit described as Sections 3 and 4, T.158N., R.94W., and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21071:Application of Petro-Hunt, LLC for an order amending the applicable orders for the North Tioga-Bakken Pool to authorize up to seven wells to be drilled on twelve 1280-acre spacing units described as Sections 28 and 33,T.160N., R.94W.; Section 31, T.160N., R.94W. and Section 6, T.159N., R.94W.; Section 32, T.160N., R.94W. and Section 5, T.159N., R.94W.; Sections 3 and 10; Sections 4 and 9; Sections 7 and 18; Sections 8 and 17; Sections 15 and 22; Sections 16 and 21; Sections 19 and 30; Sections 20 and 29; and Sections 28 and 33, T.159N., R.94W., Burke County, ND, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21072:Application of Petro-Hunt, LLC for an order amending the applicable orders for the East Tioga-Bakken Pool, Burke and Mountrail Counties, ND, to authorize up to seven wells to be drilled on nine 1280-acre spacing units described as Sections 26 and 35; and Sections 27 and 34, T.159N., R.94W.; Sections 6 and 7,T.158N., R.93W.; and Sections 1 and 12; Sections 2 and 11; Sections 13 and 24; Sections 14 and 23; Sections 21 and 28; and Sections 22 and 27,T.158N., R.94W., and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21073: Application of Hess Corp. for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit for the Big Butte-Bakken Pool described as Sections 4 and 9, T.156N., R.94W., Mountrail County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21074: Application of Hess Corp. for an order amending the applicable orders for the Truax-Bakken Pool to authorize up to eight horizontal wells to be drilled on a 1280-acre spacing unit described as Sections 14 and 15, T.153N., R.98W., Williams County, ND; and granting such other and further relief as may be appropriate. Case No. 21075: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 1 and 12, T.160N., R.94W., Viking-Bakken Pool, Burke County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21076: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 13 and 24, T.160N., R.94W., North Tioga-Bakken Pool, Burke County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21077: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 2 and 11, T.160N., R.93W., Gros Ventre-Bakken Pool, Burke County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21078: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 4 and 9, T.160N., R.93W., Gros Ventre-Bakken Pool, Burke

County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21079: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 5 and 8, T.160N., R.92W., Lucy-Bakken Pool, Burke County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21080: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 6 and 7, T.160N., R.92W., Lucy-Bakken Pool, Burke County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21081: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 13 and 24, T.160N., R.93W., Gros Ventre-Bakken Pool, Burke County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21082: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 15 and 16, T.160N., R.93W., Gros Ventre-Bakken Pool, Burke County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21083: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 17 and 20, T.160N., R.93W., Gros Ventre-Bakken Pool, Burke County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21084: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 18 and 19, T.160N., R.93W., Gros Ventre-Bakken Pool, Burke County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21085: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 21 and 28, T.160N., R.93W., Gros Ventre-Bakken Pool, Burke County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21086: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 25 and 36, T.160N., R.93W., Gros Ventre-Bakken Pool, Burke County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21087: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 27 and 34, T.160N., R.93W., Gros Ventre-Bakken Pool, Burke County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21088: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 29 and 32, T.160N., R.93W., Gros Ventre-Bakken Pool, Burke County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21089: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 30 and 31, T.160N., R.93W., Gros Ventre-Bakken Pool, Burke County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21090: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 5 and 8, T.160N., R.92W., Cottonwood-Bakken Pool, Burke County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21091: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 6 and 7, T.160N., R.92W., Cottonwood-Bakken Pool, Burke County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21092: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 11 and 14, T.160N., R.92W., Cottonwood-Bakken Pool, Burke County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21093: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 24 and 25, T.160N., R.92W., Cottonwood-Bakken Pool, Burke County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21094: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 26 and 35, T.160N., R.92W., Cottonwood-Bakken Pool, Burke County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21095: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 27 and 34, T.160N., R.92W., Cottonwood-Bakken Pool, Burke County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21096: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 14 and 23, T.159N., R.92W., Cottonwood-Bakken Pool, Burke County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21097: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 15 and 22, T.159N., R.92W., Cottonwood-Bakken Pool, Burke County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21098: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 16 and 21, T.159N., R.92W., Cottonwood-Bakken Pool, Burke County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21099: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 26 and 35, T.159N., R.92W., Cottonwood-Bakken Pool, Burke County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate.

Case No. 21100: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 27 and 34, T.159N., R.92W., Cottonwood-Bakken Pool, Burke County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21101: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 28 and 33, T.159N., R.92W., Cottonwood-Bakken Pool, Burke County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21102: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 29 and 32, T.159N., R.92W., Cottonwood-Bakken Pool, Burke County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21103: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 30 and 31, T.159N., R.92W., Cottonwood-Bakken Pool, Burke County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21104: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 2 and 11, T.158N., R.92W., Cottonwood-Bakken Pool, Mountrail County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21105: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 3 and 10, T.158N., R.92W., Cottonwood-Bakken Pool, Mountrail County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21106: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 4 and 9, T.158N., R.92W., Cottonwood-Bakken Pool, Mountrail County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21107: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 5 and 8, T.158N., R.92W., Cottonwood-Bakken Pool, Mountrail County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21108: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 13 and 24, T.158N., R.92W., Cottonwood-Bakken Pool, Mountrail County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21109: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 15 and 22, T.158N., R.92W., Cottonwood-Bakken Pool, Mountrail County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21110: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 16 and 21, T.158N., R.92W., Cottonwood-Bakken Pool, Mountrail County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21111: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 17 and 20, T.158N., R.92W., Cottonwood-Bakken Pool, Mountrail County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21112: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 25 and 36, T.158N., R.92W., Cottonwood-Bakken Pool, Mountrail County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21113: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 6 and 7, T.157N., R.92W., Cottonwood-Bakken Pool, Mountrail County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21114: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 8 and 9, T.157N., R.92W., Cottonwood-Bakken Pool, Mountrail County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21115: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 12 and 13, T.157N., R.92W., Cottonwood-Bakken Pool, Mountrail County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21116: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 17 and 20, T.157N., R.92W., Cottonwood-Bakken Pool, Mountrail County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21117: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 18 and 19, T.157N., R.92W., Cottonwood-Bakken Pool, Mountrail County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21118: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 29 and 32, T.157N., R.92W., Cottonwood-Bakken Pool, Mountrail County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21119: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 7 and 18, T.158N., R.91W., Kittleson Slough-Bakken Pool, Mountrail County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21120: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 13 and 24, T.157N., R.93W., Sorkness-Bakken Pool, Mountrail County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Continued on Pg. 5A


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Mexico storm death toll goes up MEXICO CITY (AP) — The Mexican government said searchers have found eight more bodies of victims from twin storms that struck the Pacific and Gulf coasts at the same time last month. The Interior Department said the death toll now stands at 155. Statistics of civil protection authorities sent to The Associated Press on Wednesday say that nearly 175,000 homes were affected by floods and landslides, mostly in the southern state of Guerrero. The biggest known tragedy was a mudslide that swept into a remote mountain village in Guerrero and left dozens missing. Only some of their bodies have been recovered. President Enrique Pena Nieto has ordered an investigation to find which officials gave permits for building homes in banned areas such as riverbeds, which put residents in danger during the storms.

Police blamed for slum killing RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Investigators in Rio de Janeiro are asking that 10 police officers be charged in the torture and killing of a slum dweller. Police investigators said Wednesday that the officers are suspected of torturing and killing Amarildo de Souza in the Rocinha slum. He was a bricklayer and the father of six children. Investigators believe the officers later discarded Souza’s remains, which have not been found. Under Brazilian law, prosecutors now have 30 days to decide whether to file charges against the officers. The case sparked outrage in Brazil, with protesters taking to the streets demanding that police be held accountable in the case. Souza was last seen in police custody in the slum. The officers say they let him go shortly after taking him in for questioning about gang activities.

Waste facility management faulted ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A project to replace an aging and degrading radioactive waste treatment facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory is 11 years behind schedule and its price tag has nearly tripled because of ineffective management, according to a government audit released Wednesday. The report from the Department of Energy’s inspector general said the National Nuclear Security Administration and Los Alamos have spent $56 million since 2004 on plans to replace its 50-year-old and sometimes failing Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility. But design work is still not complete and the project’s two phases now won’t be finished until 2017 and 2020 at the earliest. According to the audit, the facility that treats and disposes of low-level and transuranic waste has degraded and sometimes fails, leaving the lab with no way to process radioactive liquid waste while repairs are being made.

Expert: Cuban able to sell shares DALLAS (AP) — A financial expert is telling jurors in Mark Cuban’s insider-trading trial that he talked to the billionaire about a transaction that would lower the value of one of his stock holdings. Arnold Owen testified Wednesday that he didn’t think Cuban was barred from selling his shares in Momma.com or required to keep their 2004 phone call confidential. Owen was working for an investment bank hired by the search-engine company to find investors for a stock offering. The offering lowered the value of the company’s previous shares, including 600,000 that Cuban owned. The Securities and Exchange Commission said Cuban avoided $750,000 in losses by using inside information to sell his shares. Cuban, who owns Dallas Mavericks, said he never promised not to trade on information he learned while Momma.com’s biggest shareholder.

Embassy in Libya attacked, 1 dead

U.N.: Humanitarian access to Syria By EDITH M. LEDERER Associated Press UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The U.N. Security Council moved quickly Wednesday to follow through on its newfound resolve to deal with Syria, issuing an urgent appeal for immediate access to all areas of the country to deliver desperately needed humanitarian aid to millions of civilians enduring the 2½year-old conflict. The council adopted a presidential statement addressing what it described as “the significant and rapid deterioration of the humanitarian situation in Syria” five days after unanimously approving its first legally binding action since violence erupted in Syria — a resolution ordering the elimination its chemical weapons. British Ambassador Mark Lyall Grant called the international focus on Syria in recent days “a very welcome, positive step after years of paralysis in the Security Council.” He cited the humanitarian statement, the chemical weapons resolution and agreement to hold a peace conference on Syria in mid-November. The statement, aimed at helping the nearly 7 million Syrians affected by the fighting, urges the Syrian government to facilitate “safe and unhindered human-

itarian access to people in need through “If the commitments and practical the most effective ways, including steps in this statement are implementacross conflict lines and, ed, humanitarian workw h e r e a p p r o p r i a t e , “If the ers will be able to reach across borders from over two million people neighboring countries.” who have been unreachcommitments Without urgent able for many months,” increased humanitarian and practical Amos said.“Our operaaction, the council war- steps in this tions will be faster and ned that the lives of sevmore effective, delivereral million Syrians “will statement are ing more supplies — like be at risk.” lifesaving medicines, A presidential state- implemented, food for children, and ment is a step below a humanitarian chlorination tablets to resolution. Some diploprovide clean water — to mats consider presiden- workers will be more people in need.” tial statements legally Australian Ambasbinding but others do able to reach sador Gary Quinlan, who not. drafted the statement over 2 million U.N. humanitarian with Luxembourg envoy c h i e f Va l e r i e A m o s people who Sylvie Lucas, said they praised the council for decided to move quickly addressing “the horrify- have been to address the humaing humanitarian situa- unreachable for nitarian crisis after Frition in Syria.” day’s first united action She said she would many months.” by the council on chemihave preferred a resoluValerie Amos, U.N. cal weapons. tion, and still hopes the Quinlan praised the humanitarian chief council’s “strong, unified council will pass one, but negotiations on a resolu... unanimous message tion take much more time and speedy to all parties in Syria ... that humanitaraction was critical as the humanitarian ian access, humanitarian assistance situation deteriorated. must not be impeded.”

Bomb scare evacuates Jacksonville airport By BRENDAN FARRINGTON Associated Press JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — As passengers took off their shoes and waited to go through security at the Jacksonville International Airport, a man in a coat, boots and sunglasses tried to bypass the checkpoint, then told an agent he had a bomb in his backpack, authorities and a witness said. In the end, it was a hoax Tuesday night, authorities said. All Zeljko Causevic had in his camouflage backpack was a small luggage scale, a couple of batteries, a microchip and a cellphone. But the scare was enough to evacuate the airport and strand travelers on planes on the tarmac for hours. Catherine Swan-Clark, who is seven months pregnant, was waiting to get a patdown when she saw security agents gather around a man she believed to be Causevic, a U.S. citizen who is originally from Bosnia. “So you’re telling me you

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TRIPOLI, Libya — An armed mob broke into the Russian Embassy compound in the Libyan capital of Tripoli on Wednesday, climbing over walls, breaking down a metal gate and shooting in the air. One of the attackers was killed by the gunfire, and four more were wounded, Libyan officials said. The Russian Foreign Ministry confirmed the attack and said none of the embassy staff was wounded. Libyan officials said they believed the break-in was in response to the death of a Libyan air force pilot, who they said was killed by a Russian woman. Wednesday’s violence briefly raised fears of a repeat of last year’s deadly attack on a U.S. compound in the eastern city of Benghazi, in which the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans were killed.

Causevic approached a TSA agent Tuesday night, saying he had a device in his backpack that was “supposed to be a bomb, but it’s not.” He also told authorities he had a “detonator,” which was a remote control device. It was unclear whether Causevic was getting onto a flight, and authorities have not released a motive. The Joint Terrorism Task Force interviewed Causevic and the FBI, airport police and the Jacksonville sheriff ’s Associated Press office are continuing to investigate. Jacksonville International Airport police officer Tim Phone numbers listed for Hodges walks around the terminal with a bomb dog at Causevic were disconnected. Jacksonville International Airport on Wednesday. There was no answer at the door of the one-story house have a bomb?” Swan-Clark hoax bomb. heard a Transportation SecuAccording to a Jacksonville where Causevic lives in a rity Agency agent ask him. Sheriff’s Office arrest report, large subdivision. “And he responded yes, ‘I have a bomb.’” Causevic, 39, was being held on $1 million bail Wednesday. He remained silent during his brief hearing before Duval County Court Judge Russell Healey on charges of making a false report about planting a bomb and possessing a

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Case No. 21121: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 1 and 12, T.156N., R.104W., Bull Butte-Bakken Pool,Williams County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21122: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 14, 15, 22 and 23, T.156N., R.104W., Bull Butte-Bakken Pool, Williams County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-0808, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21123: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 25, 26, and 27, T.156N., R.104W., Bull Butte-Bakken Pool, Williams County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21124: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as the E/2 and the E/2 W/2 of Section 35, T.156N., R.104W., and the E/2 and E/2 W/2 of Section 2, T.155N., R.104W., HebronBakken Pool, Williams County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21125: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 15 and 22, T.156N., R.102W., Bonetrail-Bakken Pool, Williams County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21126: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 26 and 35, T.156N., R.102W., Bonetrail-Bakken Pool, Williams County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21127: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling

all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 2 and 11, T.155N., R.102W., Squires-Bakken Pool, Williams County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21128: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 5 and 8,T.155N., R.101W., Missouri Ridge-Bakken Pool,Williams County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21129: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 6 and 7,T.155N., R.101W., Missouri Ridge-Bakken Pool,Williams County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21130: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as all of Section 34 and the W/2 W/2 of Section 35, T.154N., R.104W., and all of Section 3 and the W/2 W/2 of Section 2, T.153N., R.104W., Painted Woods-Bakken Pool, Williams County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21131: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 22 and 23, T.153N., R.104W., Fort Buford-Bakken Pool, Williams County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21132: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 17 and 18, T.153N., R.100W., Baker-Bakken Pool, McKenzie and Williams Counties, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21133: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 11 and 12,T.153N., R.93W., SanishBakken Pool, Mountrail County, ND, as

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provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21134: Application of Oasis Petroleum North America LLC for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 2 and 11, T.150N., R.102W., Foreman Butte-Bakken Pool, McKenzie County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-0808, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21135: Application of Kodiak Oil & Gas (USA) Inc. for an order amending the applicable orders for the Truax-Bakken Pool, McKenzie and Williams Counties, ND, (i) to authorize up to fourteen horizontal wells to be drilled on four 1280-acre spacing units described as Sections 28 and 33,T.154N., R.98W.; Sections 16 and 21; and Sections 17 and 20, T.154N., R.97W.; and Sections 6 and 7, T.153N., R.98W.; (ii) to authorize up to eight horizontal wells to be drilled on ten 1280-acre spacing units described as Sections 1 and 12; Sections 2 and 11; Sections 13 and 24; Sections 14 and 23; Sections 15 and 22; and Sections 16 and 21, T.154N., R.98W.; and Sections 4 and 9; Sections 5 and 8; Sections 6 and 7; and Sections 18 and 19,T.154N., R.97W.; (iii) to authorize up to six horizontal wells to be drilled on seven 2560-acre spacing units described as Sections 1, 2, 11 and 12; Sections 13, 14, 23 and 24; and Sections 15, 16, 21 and 22, T.154N., R.98W.; Sections 6 and 7, T.154N., R.97W., and Sections 1 and 12,T.154N., R.98W.; and Sections 18 and 19, T.154N., R.97W., and Sections 13 and 24, T.154N., R.98W.; and Sections 4, 5, 8 and 9; and Sections 5, 6, 7 and 8,T.154N., R.97W.; and (iv) granting such other relief as may be appropriate. Case No. 21136: Application of Kodiak Oil & Gas (USA) Inc. for an order amending the applicable orders for the Eightmile-Bakken Pool to authorize up to ten horizontal wells to be drilled on a 1280-acre spacing unit described as Sections 2 and 11, T.152N., R.103W., McKenzie and Williams Counties, ND; and for such other relief as may be appropriate. Case No. 21137: Application of Burlington Resources Oil & Gas Co. LP for an order amending the applicable orders for the Elidah-Bakken Pool to authorize up to ten horizontal wells to be drilled on a 1280acre spacing unit consisting of Sections 27

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Thursday, October 3, 2013 ■ Page 5A

and 34, T.152N., R.97W., McKenzie County, ND, and granting such other and further relief as may be appropriate. Case No. 21138: Application of Burlington Resources Oil & Gas Co. LP for an order amending the applicable orders for the Elidah-Bakken Pool to authorize up to nine horizontal wells to be drilled on a 1280acre spacing unit consisting of Sections 3 and 10, T.151N., R.97W., McKenzie County, ND, and granting such other and further relief as may be appropriate. Case No. 21139: Application of Burlington Resources Oil & Gas Co. LP for an order amending the applicable orders for the Elidah-Bakken Pool to authorize up to eleven horizontal wells to be drilled on a 1280-acre spacing unit consisting of Sections 15 and 22, T.151N., R.97W., McKenzie County, ND, and granting such other and further relief as may be appropriate. Case No. 21140: Application of Burlington Resources Oil & Gas Co. LP, for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43-02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 5, 6, 7 and 8, T.152N., R.96W., Westberg-Bakken Pool, McKenzie County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Case No. 21141: Application of Marathon Oil Co., for an order amending the applicable orders for the Wolf Bay-Bakken Pool, Dunn County, ND, to allow up to four horizontal wells to be drilled on two 1280acre spacing units described as Sections 5 and 8; and Sections 6 and 7, T.146N., R.92W., or granting such other relief as may be appropriate. Case No. 21142: Application of Marathon Oil Co. for an order pursuant to NDAC § 43 02-03-88.1 pooling all interests in a spacing unit described as Sections 1 and 12, T.144N., R.95W., Murphy Creek-Bakken Pool, Dunn County, ND, as provided by NDCC § 38-08-08, and such other relief as is appropriate. Signed by, Jack Dalrymple, Governor Chairman, ND Industrial Commission 10/3 - 20681532

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Page 6A ■ Thursday, October 3, 2013

WEIRDLES

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Morning

Briefing (Weirdles is drawn by Tim Leer and appears weekdays on Morning Briefing and at www.bismarcktribune.com/ weirdles. See previous Weirdles online at www.weirdles.com.)

Odds and ends ■ Helena, Mont.

‘Mutt-ilated’ currency A Montana man who painstakingly gathered and reassembled parts of five $100 bills eaten by his golden retriever has been reimbursed by the U.S. Treasury for the “mutt-ilated” currency. Wayne Klinkel of Helena received a $500 check on Monday . Klinkel’s 12-year-old dog, Sundance, downed all but half of one of the bills in December. Sundance, a rescue from a Wyoming animal shelter, snacked on the cash left in the family vehicle while Klinkel and his wife ate at a restaurant, but left a $1 bill untouched. They were on a road trip to visit their daughter in Colorado. Klinkel, a newspaper graphic artist, carefully picked through the dog’s droppings over the next several days to recover parts of the bills and his daughter recovered more when the snow melted in the spring. Klinkel cleaned and carefully reassembled the bills, put them in plastic bags and sent them to the U.S. Treasury in April with an explanation. He got a receipt for the bills 10 days later, and didn’t hear from the Treasury until he received the check. “I gave Sundance a pat, showed it to him and told him not to eat it,” said Klinkel. He said there wasn’t any correspondence with the check, but the memo section in the bottom left read: “MUT.CURR REFUND.” ■ Pittsburgh

‘Spider man’ mistake Prosecutors dropped a robbery charge against a Pennsylvania college student who dressed as Spider-Man after a store clerk testified he believed the incident was just a “silly mistake.” Jonathan Hewson, a 21-year-old senior finance and economics major at the University of Pittsburgh, was released Tuesday from jail in Pittsburgh, where he has been held since shortly after his arrest Sept. 20. Hewson’s friends later said he’s an enthusiastic fan of the Spider-Man character created by Steve Ditko and Stan Lee, who made his first appearance in Marvel’s “Amazing Fantasy” No. 15 in 1962. Among other things, Hewson is known to wear the costume at a rock-climbing wall and the offcampus neighborhood where he lives. Prosecutors agreed to drop the robbery charge Tuesday after Patel told a judge he didn’t want to testify against Hewson. “I don’t want to ruin his career. He’s on his last year of college and he’s going to a good school. He just made a silly mistake,” Patel told District Judge Hugh McGough. The clerk said he reconsidered pressing charges after hearing Hewson’s friends describe his SpiderMan fandom. “When somebody comes in, in the middle of the night, wearing a SpiderMan suit and asking for money, I’m thinking it’s a robbery,” Patel said. “He just made a mistake.“ Defense attorney Michael Santicola, said he hopes to get Hewson’s arrest record expunged and Hewson readmitted to Pitt, which suspended him from classes after his arrest. He also said Hewson’s Spider-Man days are likely over. “It was, I would say, a college prank gone awry,” Santicola said. “Spider-Man is not a robber.” From wire reports

Quote in the news “Now it really looks like there is no end in sight.” Amanda Phillips, whose husband, Ched, was among nearly 500 North Dakota Guard staff furloughed due to the government shutdown See story on Page 1A

Classifieds deal of the day

People and personalities AEG link to Jackson death is rejected LOS ANGELES (AP) — A jury cleared a concert promoter of negligence on Wednesday in a case that attempted to link the 2009 death of Michael Jackson to the company that promoted his ill-fated comeback shows. The panel rejected a lawsuit brought by Jackson’s mother claiming AEG Live was negligent in hiring Conrad Murray, the doctor who killed Jackson with an overdose of a hospital anesthetic the singer used as a sleep aid. The five-month trial provided the closest look yet at Jackson’s drug use and his battles against chronic pain and insomnia. It also took jurors behind the scenes in the rough-and-tumble world of negotiations with one of the world’s most famous entertainers looking to solidify his legendary status after scandal interrupted his career. With its verdict, the jury also delivered a somewhat surprising message: Jurors did not believe Murray was unfit or incompetent to perform his duties involving Jackson. “That doesn’t mean we felt he was ethical,” jury foreman Gregg Barden said after the verdict was read. He said the panel knew many people would not agree with the verdict but explained that the jury followed the language of the verdict form and instructions. AEG Live’s lawyers framed the case as being about personal choice, saying Jackson made bad choices about the drug that killed him and the doctor who provided it. They said he was the architect of his own demise and no one else can be blamed. “We, of course, are not happy with the result as it stands now,” said Kevin Boyle, an attorney for Katherine Jackson. “We will be exploring all options legally and factually and make a decision about anything at a later time.”

Farrow: It’s possible her son is Sinatra’s NEW YORK (AP) — Mia Farrow says in an interview with Vanity Fair that it’s possible her son with Woody Allen is instead

pagne were also found in the room. “Mr. Monteith was found in a collapsed position the hotel room floor,” the report said. “It appeared that Mr. Monteith had been dead for several hours.” Hotel video footage showed him returning alone to his room at 2:16 a.m. on July 13.

Clooney hopes govt. shutdown ends soon

VERDICT: incent Woods, a Michael Jackson fan, holds up a portrait of Jackson after the AEG Jackson trial verdict Wednesday in Los Angeles. A Los Angeles jury rejected a negligence lawsuit by Jackson’s mother, Katherine Jackson, against AEG Live LLC. Frank Sinatra’s. Farrow told the magazine that she and Sinatra “never really split up” and when asked if Ronan Farrow might actually be Sinatra’s son, she answered, “Possibly.” Ronan Farrow tweeted WednesFarrow: Sinatra’s son? day: “Listen, we’re all *possibly* Frank Sinatra’s son.” A representative for Allen told The Associated Press, “The article is so fictitious and extravagantly absurd that he is not going to comment.” Mia Farrow was married to Sinatra for 18 months. Asked about the Sinatra family’s relationship with Ronan, the singer’s daughter, Nancy Sinatra Jr., told the magazine he “is a big part of us, and we are blessed to have him in our lives.” Farrow and Allen had a 12-year relationship but split in 1992, when the actress discovered the director was having an affair with her adopted daughter from another marriage, Soon-Yi Previn, now Allen’s wife. A lengthy custody battle followed for Ronan and the couple’s two other children, in which Farrow accused Allen of sexually abusing another adopted child. Allen’s attorney continued to deny the allegations in a statement to the magazine.

Ronan Farrow graduated from college at 15 and went to Yale Law School before becoming a Rhodes scholar and special adviser to the Secretary of State for global youth issues.

Monteith died of heroin, alcohol mix VANCOUVER, British Columbia (AP) — The British Columbia Coroners Service said Wednesday investigators found a spoon with drug residue and a used hypodermic needle in the hotel room where “Glee” actor Cory Monteith was found dead in July. The coroner’s final report confirmed initial findings that Monteith died from using intravenous heroin combined with alcohol. The 31-yearold Canadianborn actor was found dead in a Vancouver hotel room July 13. “I classify this Monteith death as accidenHeroin death tal,” coroner Claire Thompson said in her report. Monteith had checked into the hotel on July 6 and when he didn’t check out as expected on July 13, hotel staff entered his room and found him unresponsive on the floor. Two empty bottles of cham-

NEW YORK (AP) — George Clooney knows the country is going through a tough time with the partial government shutdown. But the actor is optimistic that “cooler heads will prevail” and things will get back to normal. He applauded Rep. Peter King, a New York Republican, as one of the “guys on the right,” saying King is trying to get the government back up and running. Clooney said, “I know for a fact that there’s a lot of Clooney: Hopes it ends guys on the right, Peter King, for instance, and some people like that, who are also doing the best they can to stop this from happening or to put an end to it.” He added: “You just hope that it happens soon.” King has spoken out against Republican Sen. Ted Cruz, a tea party conservative from Texas who delayed action on the temporary spending bill. His latest comments came at the New York premiere of his new film, “Gravity.”

Minn. Orchestra conductor resigns MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Minnesota Orchestra conductor Osmo Vanska has resigned amid a labor impasse that has dragged on for more than a year as management pushed for deep cuts to musicians’ salaries. The renowned Finnish maestro released a statement saying he was giving notice of his immediate resignation from the orchestra he has fostered to world-class status and garnering critics’ praise the world over.

Photo of the day SEASON OF THE SCARECROW: This photo sent in by Ann Knecht of Napoleon shows Napoleon celebrating Corn Days with a scarecrow and corn as a delicious fall blend. (Want to submit a photo to be considered for publication as photo of the day? It’s easy. Just go to www.bismarck tribune.com/submi tphotos. You will need to enter your login info for the Tribune website and will be taken to a form where you can submit your photo, title and caption. Please include the place where the photo was taken and your own address.)

Bobcat hunting guide needed this fall in the western half of North Dakota. Call 701-223-3697. Classifieds, 5C-10C


Bismarcktribune.com ■ Bismarck Tribune

Thursday, October 3, 2013 ■ Page 7A

DEATHS Magdalen Barth

Raymond Schiwal Helen Wiest

DICKINSON — Magdalen “Maggie” Barth, 90, Dickinson, passed away with her family by her side on Sept. 30, 2013, at St. Benedict’s Health Center, Dickinson. Funeral Mass will be held at 10 a.m. MDT Friday, Oct. 4, at Queen of Peace Catholic Church, Dickinson, with the Rev. Shannon Lucht celebrating. Burial will be at St. Patrick’s Cemetery.

MOTT — Raymond Schiwal, 59, Mott, passed away on Oct. 1, 2013, at St. Alexius Medical Center, Bismarck. Mass of Christian burial will be held at 2 p.m. MDT Friday, Oct. 4, at St. Vincent’s Catholic Church, Mott, with the Rev. Charles Zins officiating. Burial will be at Sunnyslope Cemetery, Mott.

Magdalen “Maggie” Barth

Visitation will be held from noon to 8 p.m. MDT today at Stevenson Funeral Home, Dickinson, with a rosary and vigil service being held at 7 p.m. MDT. Magdalen “Maggie” Frank was born March 19, 1923, in Dickinson, the daughter of Sebastian and Anna (Klein) Frank. She was raised on the family farm 15 miles south of Dickinson. She attended school at Schefield and graduated from high school at Schefield in 1941. After graduation, she spent a few years at home, helping her parents on the farm. On June 6, 1944, Maggie married Willie Barth at Schefield. The couple moved to the Mott area, where they farmed and raised their four children, Erv, Ed, Elaine and Mel. In 1960, the family moved to Dickinson. Maggie then worked for Dickinson State College from 1961-79, at which time she retired because of ill health. Her husband, Willie, passed away three months later. Maggie’s hobbies included various crafts, making quilts, crocheting, playing cards, volunteering and traveling with her friends. She also enjoyed being a part of a sewing club. Maggie especially enjoyed her grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Maggie was a charter member of the Queen of Peace Catholic Church, where she ser ved as a Eucharistic minister, reader and commentator. She was also a member of the Christian Mothers and the Catholic Daughters. She was a memb e r o f St . P i u s Ve re i n of Schefield, RSVP and AARP and the Singles Club of Dickinson. Maggie loved to dance and it was while attending the Singles Club that she met Mike Glaser, who became her constant companion for the next 18 years. Maggie is survived by her children, Ervin (Paulette) Barth, Dickinson, Edwin (Patricia) Barth, Beulah, Mel (Lucy) Barth, Bismarck, and Elaine Little, Bismarck; one brother, Christ (Lorraine) Frank, Dickinson; one sister, Rose Binstock, St. Cloud, Minn.; 12 grandchildren; and 14 great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her parents; her husband, Willie Barth; six brothers; and five sisters. Remembrances and condolences may be shared with the family at www.stevensonfuneralhome.com.

Danine Henderson Danine K. (Bjerke) Henderson, 37, formerly of Bismarck, died Sept. 28, 2013, in Elmira, N.Y. Local arrangements are pending.

Helen Sherlock Wiest, 74, Earlsboro, Okla., died from ovarian cancer on Sept. 27, 2013, at her home. Services will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5, at St. Martin Lutheran Church, Anamoose. She is survived by four children, Donna Gregson, Asher, Okla., Natalie Slouffman, Anchorage, Alaska, Dan, Earlsboro, and Paula Wiest, Konawa, Okla.; four grandchildren; three greatRaymond grandchildren; and her sib“Ray” lings, Donald Sherlock, Schiwal Alexander, Agnes Sherlock, Anoka, Minn., and Lester Sherlock, Manassas, Va. (Hertz Funeral Home, HarVisitation will be held vey) from 1 to 6 p.m. MDT today at St. Vincent’s Catholic Church with a wake service Sylvia Lerbakken, 92, to follow at 7 p.m. MDT. Puyallup, Wash., formerly of Raymond “Ray” Paul rural Wildrose, died Sept. 29, Schiwal was born Nov. 10, 2013, at her residence. A 1953, to Mike and Georgia memorial service will be (Schaff) Schiwal in Mott. He held at 11 a.m. Saturday, was raised on the family Oct. 5, at Fulkerson Funeral farm north of town until Home, Williston. Burial will 1964, when they moved into be at Corinth Cemetery. town. He graduated from She is survived by three Mott Lincoln High School in children, Lalon Penka, Taco1971. ma, Wash., Merrilee Nielsen, Ray was joined in marGrand Forks, and Rikki, riage to Judy Ann Krug on Puyallup; five grandchilJan. 11, 1974. Together, they dren,; and five great-grandhad two children, Tesha and children. Branden. Ray had many jobs throughout his life, including landscaper, meat-cutter, Leif E. Bakken, 69, elevator operator, football Wibaux, Mont., died Oct. 1, coach and, most recently, a 2013, at Fallon Medical bar owner. Complex, Baker, Mont., after Ray enjoyed deer hunt- a battle with cancer. Services ing, golf, horseback riding, will be held at 10:30 a.m. watching sports and playing MDT Saturday, Oct. 5, at softball in his younger years. Wibaux County Fairgrounds Even though Ray moved to Exhibit Hall, Wibaux. Further town at the age of 9, the arrangements are pending ranching life never left him. with Silvernale-Silha Funeral He always looked forward to Home, Wibaux. the opportunity to work cattle with anyone who asked him to help. Ray was very DICKINSON — Martha much family-centered and any mention of his grand- Meduna, 92, Dickinson, died children brought a big smile Oct. 2, 2013, at St. Benedict’s Health Center, Dickinson. to his face. Ray passed away from an Services will be held at all-too-fast battle with can- 10 a.m. MDT Tuesday, Oct. 8, cer in the early morning a t St . M a r y ’s C a t h o l i c hours of Oct. 1, 2013, at Church, South Heart. FurSt. Alexius Medical Center in ther arrangements are pendBismarck surrounded by his ing with Stevenson Funeral Home, Dickinson. family. Grateful for having shared in his life are his wife, Judy; his daughter, Tesha (Jeremy) Frances E. Marttila, 93, Jahner; his son, Branden Aberdeen, S.D., formerly of (Nicole) Schiwal; his grand- Ellendale, died Oct. 2, 2013, children, Madison, Bailey at Mother Joseph Manor, and Ava Jahner and Abby Aberdeen. Services will be and Cooper Schiwal; his held at 2:30 p.m. Monday, brothers and sisters, Mike Oct. 7, at Christ the King (Genie) Schiwal, Rosalee Lutheran Church, Ellendale. (Hank) Geray, John Derrek, Further arrangements are Linda (Rich) Lindemann, pending with Hoven Funeral Dave Schiwal, Donny Schiw- Chapel, Ellendale. al, Becky (Dean) Lutz, Berny (Brian) Kilzer and Michelle (Dion) Ottmar; his mother, Veronica Hopfauf, 86, BisGeorgia Schiwal; and many marck, died Oct. 1, 2013, at nieces and nephews. Ray was preceded in Baptist Home, Bismarck. death by his father, Mike; his Services will be held at 1 p.m. father-in-law, John Krug; his Friday, Oct. 4, at Weigel mother-in-law, Florence Funeral Home, Mandan. Survivors include one sisKrug; his mother-in-law, Margie Krug; one brother- ter, Hilda Klos, San Diego; in-law, Curtis Krug; and one and one brother, Richard, sister-in-law, Sharon Allen. Wilton. (Evanson-Jensen Funeral Home, Mott) NAPOLEON — Elsie Draeger, 88, Napoleon, died Charles Robert Ham- Sept. 30, 2013, at Wishek mond, 97, Mandan, died Community Hospital. SerOct. 1, 2013, at the Mandan vices will be held at 11 a.m. Care Center. Services will be S a t u r d a y , O c t . 5 , a t held at 1 p.m. Saturday, Dahlstrom Funeral Home, Oct. 5, at Mandan United Napoleon. Further arrangements are pending. Methodist Church. In lieu of flowers, the family prefers memorials to the Central Dakota Humane BOTTINEAU — Victor Society, Lions Club, or Man- Bachmeier, 67, Bottineau, dan Methodist Church. Fur- died Oct. 1, 2013, at a Botther arrangements are pend- tineau hospital. A memorial ing with Buehler-Larson service will be held at 10 a.m. Funeral Home, Mandan. Saturday, Oct. 5, at Nero Funeral Home, Bottineau. Further arrangements are pending.

Sylvia Lerbakken

Leif Bakken

Martha Meduna

Frances Marttila

Veronica Hopfauf

Elsie Draeger

Bob Hammond

Victor Bachmeier

Clinton Flory Clinton “Clint” Flory, 66, Rapid City, S.D., formerly of Williston and Minot, died Oct. 2, 2013, at his home. Arrangements are pending with Everson Funeral Home, Williston.

HEAR WHAT MATTERS Ernie Falcon TO YOU. FIND OUT HOW. TRENTON — Ernie Fal“Open up to brilliant sound, in total style and comfort”

con, 73, Trenton, died Oct. 2, 2013, at his home. Arrangements are pending with Everson Funeral Home, Williston.

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Wilfred Wipperling JAMESTOWN — Wilfred “B u d” W i p p e r l i n g , 8 9 , Jamestown, formerly of New Rockford and Carrington, died Oct. 2, 2013, at his home under the care of Jamestown Regional Medical Center Hospice. Services will be held at 10:30 a.m. Monday, Oct. 7, at Grace Lutheran Church, Carrington. Further arrangements are pending with Evans Funeral Home, Carrington.

Cornelius Hopkins Cornelius Hopkins Jr., 30, B i s m a rc k , f o r m e r l y o f White Shield, died Sept. 30, 2013, at a Bismarck nursing home. Services will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, Oct. 4, at Ralph Wells Jr. Memorial Complex, White Shield. Further arrangements are pending with Thompson Funeral Home, Garrison.

Ivy Heggen WATFORD CITY — Ivy F. Heggen, 93, Watford City, formerly rural Alexander, died Oct. 1, 2013, at Good Shepherd Nursing Home, Watford City. Services will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, Oct. 4, at First Lutheran Church, Wa t f o r d C i t y. F u r t h e r arrangements are pending with Fulkerson Funeral Home, Watford City.

Melvin Schindler McCLUSKY — Melvin O. Schindler, 90, McClusky, died Oct. 1, 2013, at Community Memorial Hospital, Turtle Lake. Services will be held at 10 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 5, at Assembly of God Church, McClusky. Further arrangements are pending with Her tz Funeral Home, McClusky.

Wesley Hoffman ELLENDALE — Wesley Hoffman, 63, Ellendale, died Oct. 2, 2013, at Manor Care, Aberdeen, S.D. Services will be held at 10:30 a.m. Monday, Oct. 7, at Presbyterian United Methodist Church, Ellendale. Further arrangements are pending with Hoven Funeral Chapel, Ellendale.

Myrna Robinson LEEDS — Myrna Robinson, 79, Leeds, died Oct. 1, 2013, at her home under the care of Mercy Hospice. Services will be held at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 5, at Leeds Lutheran Church. Further arrangements are pending with Nelson Funeral Home, Leeds.

FUNERALS TODAY Nancy Brown, 62, Fargo, 11 a.m., Washburn United Methodist Church. (Goetz Funeral Home, Washburn) Ro g e r E m e r s o n , 7 4 , Chaseley, 2 p.m., United Methodist Church, Chaseley. (Nelson Funeral Home, Fessenden) Tyler Gleave, 30, Tioga, 11 a.m., First Lutheran Church, Tioga. (Fulkerson Funeral Home, Tioga) Almont Kisse, 80, Dickinson, 10 a.m. MDT, St. John Lutheran Church, Dickinson. (Stevenson Funeral Home, Dickinson) Hedy Nagel, 55, Hillsboro, 11 a.m., Our Savior’s Luthera n C h u r c h , H i l l s b o r o. (Wildeman-Boulger Funeral Home, Hillsboro) Lois Rasmussen, 79, Bismarck, 2 p.m., Assembly of God Church, Cando. (Bismarck Funeral Home) Magdalena Reule, 93, Harvey, 2 p.m., Bethel Baptist Church, Harvey. (Hertz Funeral Home, Harvey) Lorraine Schneider, 76, Minot, 10:30 a.m., Bethany Lutheran Church, Minot. (Thompson-Larson Funeral Home, Minot) Dorothy Stahlecker, 90, Ellendale, 10:30 a.m., Zion Lutheran Church, Ellendale. (Hoven Funeral Chapel, Ellendale) Samuel White Owl, 23, New Town, 11 a.m., Johnny Bird Veterans Memorial Hall, Ne w Tow n . ( L a n g h a n s Funeral Home, Parshall)

Associated Press

Tom Clancy, the bestselling author of "The Hunt for Red October" and other wildly successful technological thrillers, has died.

Novelist Tom Clancy dies Reagan as “my president,” Clancy broke through commercially during a tense periNEW YORK — In 1985, a od of the Cold War, and with year after the Cold War thriller the help of Reagan himself. In 1982, he began working “The Hunt for Red October” came out, author Tom Clancy on “The Hunt for Red Octowas invited to lunch at the ber,” drawing inspiration Reagan White House, where from a real-life 1975 mutiny he was questioned by Navy aboard a Soviet missile frigate. He sold the manuSecretary John Lehman. Who, the secretary wanted script to the first publisher he to know, gave Clancy access tried, the Naval Institute Press, which had never to all that secret material? Clancy, the best-selling bought original fiction. In real life, the mutiny was novelist who died Tuesday in Baltimore at 66, insisted then, put down, but in Clancy’s book, a Soviet and after, that his submarine skipinformation was per hands his strictly unclassivessel over to the fied: books, U.S. and defects. interviews and Someone papers that were thought enough easily obtained. of the novel to Also, two submagive it to Reagan rine officers as a Christmas reviewed the gift. The presifinal manuscript. dent quipped at Government a dinner that he officials may was losing sleep have worried because he how Clancy couldn’t put the knew that a book down — a Russian submastatement Clanrine spent only cy later said about 15 percent helped put him of its time at sea on the New York or how many SSTimes best-sellN-20 Seahawk er list. missiles it car“What hapried. But his Tom Clancy, pened to me was pure dumb luck. extreme attennovelist I’m not the new tion to technical He m i n g w a y,” detail and accuracy earned him respect Clancy later said in an interinside the intelligence com- view with the American munity and beyond and Movie Channel. “Of course, fortune does helped make Clancy the most widely read and influential favor the brave. In battle, you military novelist of his time, forgive a man anything one who seemed to capture a except an unwillingness to shift in the country’s mood take risks. Sometimes you away from the CIA misdeeds have to put it on the line. that were exposed in the What I did was take time 1970s to the heroic feats of away from how I earned my Clancy’s most famous cre- living. My wife gave me hell. ation, CIA analyst Jack Ryan. ‘Why are you doing this?’ But A number of his high-tech, she doesn’t complain anygeopolitical thrillers, includ- more.” Clancy said his dream had ing “The Hunt for Red October,” “Patriot Games” and been simply to publish a “Clear and Present Danger,” book, hopefully a good one, were made into blockbuster so that he would be in the movies, with another, “Jack Library of Congress catalog. Ryan,” set for release on His dreams were answered many times over. Christmas. His novels were depend“Fundamentally, I think of myself as a storyteller, not a able hits, his publisher estiwriter,” Clancy once said. “I mating worldwide sales at think about the characters more than 100 million copies. “He did help pave the way I’ve created, and then I sit down and start typing and for a lot of thriller writers,” see what they will do. There’s said David Baldacci, author a lot of subconscious thought of “Absolute Power” and that goes on. It amazes me to many other best-sellers. He find out, a few chapters later, said Reagan “had it right” why I put someone in a cer- about “The Hunt for Red tain place when I did. It’s October.” Baldacci called it “a great yarn.” spooky.” “He was able to balance A tall, trim figure given to wearing sunglasses that storytelling with a lot of made him look like a fighter research,” Baldacci said. pilot, Clancy had such a sure “Research often bogs down a grasp of defense technology story, but that didn’t happen and spycraft that many read- with him. He didn’t write a flip ers were convinced he served book, where authors have all in the military. But his experi- this research they’re so proud ence was limited to ROTC of, and they just stick it in classes in college. Nearsight- somewhere.” Clancy’s publisher, Penedness kept him out of active guin Group (USA), duty. A political conservative announced his death but did who once referred to Ronald not give the cause. By HILLEL ITALIE AP National Writer

“... I think of myself as a storyteller, not a writer. I think about the characters I’ve created, and then I sit down and start typing and see what they will do.”

STATE DEATHS ABERCROMBIE — Betty Bjerke, 75. ANETA — Mary Sears, 89. DEVILS LAKE — Marie Timm, 93. FARGO — Ann Anderson, 99; Sister M. Anne Louise Hablas, 87; Judith Segal, 73; Iver Solhjem, 82. FINGAL — Mary Schlagel, 85. GRAND FORKS — Alice

Hanson, 73; M. Arnold Thompson, 86. HATTON — Thor Lonne, 103. L a M O U R E — L a Vo n Smith, 100. MINOT — Beaeda Berg, 92. NOONAN — Mark Rosenquist, 54. SHELDON — Gale Wayman, 64.


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2013

8A

“Seeking to find and publish the truth, that the people of a great state might have a light by which to guide their destiny.” — Stella Mann, Tribune publisher, 1939

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TRIBUNE EDITORIAL

EDITORIAL BOARD Brian Kroshus . . . . . . . Publisher Ken Rogers . . . . . Opinion editor Libby Simes . . . . . . . . Controller Steve Wallick . . . . . . . City editor

OTHER VOICES: Excerpts from editorials around the region

Tell truth about ‘War on Coal’ Casper Star-Tribune In Wyoming, we keep fighting the coal battles and believe somehow that we’re winning the war. And the “War on Coal” seems like a very real thing. The truth may be: Wyoming hasn’t taken it seriously enough, believing that press releases with strongly-worded statements from politicians would be enough to frighten the Environmental Protection Agency or the Obama administration into easing off the coal restrictions. And if it’s true that Wyoming has not taken the war on coal seriously enough, we don’t believe the country has taken it seriously enough either. The perception of coal consumption in America is tall smokestacks belching thick, black smoke. The perception of coal is dirty, dusty and oily. But perception is a lot different than reality. Coal has become cleaner and utility companies have spent small fortunes on technology that makes emissions better. Much of the smoke coming from stacks isn’t actually smoke, but steam. True enough: Coal is not completely clean. The only coal that has zero impact or that is clean is that which still is in the ground. However, opponents of coal-fired power plants have an easy sell to the public when coal is the enemy. They play off a perception, not a reality. We’ve heard plenty from the EPA and the Obama administration about the dramatic new rules for coal-fired plants. The administration is asking the impossible, essentially banning coal without using those words. Technology simply doesn’t exist to implement the so-called “clean coal” standards economically. And energy producers know it. Now is the time to quit talking about how we wish things were and start discussing how they might actually be.

LETTERS & CONTACT INFO The Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. Writers must include their address and both day and night telephone numbers. This information will be used only for verification and will not be printed. We cannot verify letters via tollfree numbers. Letters of 300 words or fewer are preferred. All letters are subject to editing. No more than two letters per month, please. Letters of thanks are discouraged.

Email may be sent to letters@ bismarck tribune.com. Mail letters to the Bismarck Tribune, Letters to the Editor, P.O. Box 5516, Bismarck, N.D. 58506. Ken Rogers, opinion editor, can be reached by phone at 701-250-8250 or by email at ken.rogers@bismarck tribune.com.

Sale of Frontier means change An agreement to sell Frontier Airlines to an investment group headed by the former CEO of Spirit Airlines was announced Tuesday. Bill Franke of Indigo Partners LLC agreed in principle to buy Frontier from Republic Airlines. He said he intends to turn the new purchase into a cut-rate or ultralow cost airline like Spirit or Allegiant. Frontier serves Bismarck, along with Allegiant, Delta Airlines and United Airlines. What that means to BismarckMandan is uncertain. Part of the attraction of Frontier for people living and working here is convenience; its hub is located in Denver. Although Franke said Denver will remain the airline’s hub, industry

analysts have been speculating that to compete, Frontier will have to reduce its presence at the Denver International Airport. Frontier has already established secondary operations at Trenton-Mercer Airport in New Jersey and New Castle Airport in Delaware, which give fliers access to key urban areas without the hassle of big urban hubs. A cut-rate airline translates into lower basic ticket prices, less leg room and fees for extras that used to be free. The sale has conditions, in particular the need for approval from Frontier pilots and flight atten-

dants. Expectations are the sale could be finalized before the end of the year. Just last week, the Bismarck airport received a $500,000 grant to help entice an airline to add a new destination — possibly in Texas or to Chicago. The development seems to be particularly good news given the unknowns associated with Frontier sale, although Frontier’s present passenger count through Bismarck would seem to make the case for maintaining service. Frontier’s new owner has said he intends to aggressively expand

Attracting new air service becomes more important

service outside of Denver. That could be very good news in terms of making low-cost connections from Bismarck to Denver and points beyond. Bismarck-Mandan benefits from expanded air service and an increased number of connections. Certainly the advent of the oil boom has generated substantial traffic, making flights in and out of North Dakota more profitable for all carriers. As air fares continue to go up, travelers tend to be willing to accept tighter cabins and fewer free extras in exchange for lower ticket prices. It’s our hope Frontier will continue to serve North Dakota and will prosper.

VOICES OF THE PEOPLE Residency: It’s a matter of law

divisions but question the “top dressing approach.” Western communities say current funding By C.T. MARHULA addresses only mainteGrand Forks nance rather than building infrastructure. School sysNorth Dakota has about tems are nervous about the five legislators who no prospect of future funding longer reside in the district by the Legislature and many they represent. are looking to increase mills I know two of them, Rep. because of the uncertainty. Curt Kreun, R-Grand Forks, The Legislature appeared to Rep. Cory Mock, D-Grand have a mandate to address Forks, and consider them the issue of property tax — competent, decent people. and, looking at the state Both would make great cancoffers, anyone would have didates for mayor of Grand expected prompt and adeForks should Michael quate property tax reform Brown choose not to run. and relief. Those legislators know Infrastructure needs better. Once they moved across the state are in the from their districts, they are billions. And yet the Repubno longer eligible to serve. licans spent their energy on The attorney general’s lowering revenue from office has opined that “the income, corporate, and oil requirements to have a name extraction taxes. That was placed on the ballot are not Democratic-NPL Party held wasn’t addressed until the their former district, but at not only untimely, but also the same as requirements for the same time they can run discussions around the state very last day of the session. unwise from the perspective the office ... A change of resi- for a seat from the district in over the past month. CitiMany participants in the of many North Dakota residence would actually which they currently reside. zens sent a resounding mes- listening sessions stated dents. It is especially true for amount to abandonment of sage: “Invest more in North that Measure 2 (to abolish Wow. And I thought the one time resource: oil. the office and creation of a property taxes) will come Anthony Weiner had chutz- Dakota’s communities.” The North Dakota Legisvacancy (AGO 70-207).” Even after the state Leg- back because the Republipah. lature received a low passIt follows the majority islature increased spending, can controlled Legislature ing grade, not the high opinion across the nation. It and the Republican superignored the serious need grade the Republicans is not about whether they are majority claimed credit for for property tax reform. claim. Much remains to be capable of representing their “a job well done,” citizens Funding for infrastrucdone in North Dakota, and district. I am sure they are. It still question the direction ture was repeatedly stated on this we agree with our By KENTON ONSTAD is about the rule of law. the Legislature is taking. as inadequate. Folks in participants. Parshall Some legislators have Property taxes were the western North Dakota were (Kenton Onstad is the suggested that not only can buzzwords entering the 2013 appreciative of increased Democratic House minority The North Dakota they continue to represent session and yet the issue funding for the political sub- leader.)

Assessing the Legislature’s job

For the GOP in 2016, some medicine WASHINGTON — “If Reince Priebus from Kenosha, Wis., is the Republican ‘establishment,’ God help us,” says the chairman of the Republican National Committee, Reince Priebus. His physical presence is almost as unprepossessing as James Madison’s was, and his demeanor is self-deprecating. But with meticulous — Madisonian, actually — subtlety, he is working to ameliorate a difficulty that has existed for two centuries and in 2012 wounded the GOP. The Constitution’s Framers considered the presidential candidate selection process so important they made it one of the four national institutions they created. Three were Congress, the Supreme Court and the presidency. The fourth was the presidential selection system based on the Electoral College, under which the nomination of candidates and the election of the president occurred simultaneously. Since the emergence of parties in the 1790s — something the otherwise prescient Framers did not

tered and financially depleted. Debates must be numerous enough to give lesserGEORGE known and modestly WILL financed candidates opportunities to break through. They must not, however, be so numerous as to prolong, with free exposure, hopeless candidacies. Or to foresee — nominees have excessively expose the canbeen selected by the pardidates to hostile media ties’ congressional caucusdebate managers. Or to es, next by national conleave the winner’s stature ventions controlled by the parties’ organizations, then reduced by repetitive conby conventions leavened by frontations. The GOP’s 2016 selection popular choice (state pricalendar might be commaries and caucuses). pressed at both ends, creatFinally, because Hubert ing two intense months in Humphrey won the 1968 March and April. There will Democratic nomination likely be no Republican delwithout entering any priegate selection events — maries, the primaries, caucuses or conselection of ventions — prior to Feb. 1. nominees has The four prima donnas — been entirely Iowa, New Hampshire, by popular South Carolina and Nevada choice since — probably will have Feb1972. Priebus’ per- ruary to themselves because this entitlement, ilous, and like all entitlements, is probably thankless, task immortal. The Republican convenis to rally a tion could come as early as fraying party late June, so the nominee behind rules can have more time and that will solve two entangeneral election contribugled problems — the delegate selection calendar and tions to build momentum entering autumn. Furtherthe number of candidate debates. The delegate selec- more, perhaps 10 days could be added to the curtion process needs to be rent requirement that all long enough to test the delegates must be selected candidates’ mettle but not 35 days before the convenso protracted that it leaves tion. The last delegates the winner politically bat-

Problems with the GOP delegate selection calendar and debates

would be selected no later than mid-May. There will be severely enhanced penalties for state parties that jump to the head of the line, into February. Previously, line jumpers were penalized half their delegates; now the penalty could be severely enhanced. For example, one senior Republican — not Priebus — involved in rethinking the rules says Florida could go from more than one hundred to nine. Currently, beginning March 1, states’ primaries can award delegates proportionally or winner-takeall. In 2016, through the first three weeks of March, allocation should be proportional to prevent an avalanche that unduly truncates the selection process. (In 2008, more than 40 percent of all delegates were selected on one day in February.) This should please everyone wary of a calendar that would allow the richest, best-known candidate to run the table early. About debates, the new rules, not yet fully formulated, will be the first rules. The object is to prevent a recurrence of the jungles of 2007-2008 (21 debates) and 2011-2012 (20 debates). In 1980, there were six, which Priebus thinks is about optimal. Marginal candidates with minimal financial resources,

for whom debates are the oxygen of free publicity, will resist any restrictions. Suppose they accept invitations to unauthorized debates. Will more plausible candidates be tempted to join them? Not if any candidate who participates in unauthorized debates is, before the convention begins, denied a substantial portion of whatever delegates he or she has won. Priebus, who must placate fractious party factions, won admiration across the party spectrum when he said that if NBC and CNN proceeded with their proposed electionyear miniseries and documentary, respectively, about Hillary Clinton, neither organization would be allowed to sponsor an authorized debate. By this he earned some deference for his changes. Madison crafted our constitutional architecture of incentives — principally, the separation of powers — to encourage self-interested people to be moderate and compromising. Priebus’ Madisonian revisions of the incentive structure of the nominating process could protect the party, and presidential candidates, from its current penchant for selfdestructive behavior. (George Will writes for the Washington Post. His syndicated column appears Sundays and Thursdays.)


Bismarcktribune.com ■ Bismarck Tribune

Thursday, October 3, 2013 ■ Page 9A

High-level bickering continues Continued from 1A nation’s parks and the National Institutes of Health, even though many Democrats criticized them as part of a piecemeal approach that fell far short of what was needed. The bills face dim prospects in the Senate, and the White House threatened to veto both in the unlikely event they make it to Obama’s desk. “What we’re trying to do is to get the government open as quickly as possible,” said the House majority leader, Rep. Eric Cantor of Virginia. “And all that it would take is us realizing we have a lot in agreement.” Earlier, an attempt by Democrats to force shutdown-ending legislation to the House floor failed on a 227-197 vote, with all Republicans in opposition. That left intact the tea party-driven strategy of demanding changes to the nation’s health care overhaul as the price for essential federal financing, despite grumbling from Republican moderates. The stock market ended lower as Wall Street CEOs, Europe’s central banker and traders pressed for a solution. Chief executives from the nation’s biggest financial firms met Obama for more than an hour Wednesday, some of them plainly frustrated with the tactics at play in Congress and with the potential showdown coming over the debt limit. “You can re-litigate these policy issues in a political forum, but we shouldn’t use threats of causing the U.S. to fail on its obligations to repay its debt as a cudgel,” Lloyd Blankfein, CEO of Goldman Sachs, said after the meeting.

ABOVE: House Democrats rally behind Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., center, as they tell the Republican majority they want a vote on reopening the government without clamping any restrictions on President Barack Obama’s health care law, at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday. LEFT: House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, speaks to reporters following a meeting with President Barack Obama at the White House in Washington on Wednesday. Obama and congressional leaders met at the White House on the second day of a partial government shutdown. Boehner said it was a nice conversation, but suggested little progress was made. (Associated Press)

Reactions Democrats were scathing in their criticism. “The American people would get better government out of Monkey Island at the local zoo than we’re giving them today,” said Rep. John Dingell of Michigan. The Republican National Committee announced it would pay for personnel needed to reopen the World War II Memorial, a draw for aging veterans from around the country that is among the sites shuttered. In a statement, party chairman Reince Priebus challenged Democrats “to join with us in keeping this memor ial open.” Democrats labeled that a stunt. “We’ve already been working on a plan to open the Memorial — and the entire government — after the GOP caused them to close,” said party spokesman Mo Elleithee. “It’s called a clean” spending bill. As it turned out, more than 125 World War II veterans from Mississippi and Iowa who were initially kept out of the memorial Tuesday were escorted to the site with the help of members of Congress. Officials made further arrangements to allow veterans groups into the memorial during the shutdown. A sampling of federal agencies showed how unevenly the shutdown was felt across the government. The Environmental Protection Agency and Depart-

ment of Housing and Urban Development listed only 6 percent of their employees as essential, and therefore permitted to work during the impasse. James R. Clapper, director of national intelligence, said about 70 percent of civilian employees in agencies under his control had been sent home. By contrast, about 86 percent of employees of the Department of Homeland Security remained on the job, and 95 percent at the Veterans Affairs Department. One furloughed employee, meteorologist Amy Fritz, said, “I want to get back to work.” At a news conference arranged by congressional Democrats, the 38-year-old National Weather Service employee said she has more than $100,000 in student loan debt and is looking at ways to cut her budget. In an interview with CNBC before meeting with

lawmakers, Obama said he would not negotiate with Republicans until the government is reopened and Congress votes to raise the debt limit. “If we get in the habit where a few folks, an extremi s t w i n g o f o n e p a r t y, whether it’s Democrat or Republican, are allowed to extort concessions based on a threat (to) undermine the full faith and credit of the United States, then any president who comes after me, not just me, will find themselves unable to govern effectively,” he said. “The White House said Obama would have to truncate a long-planned trip to Asia, calling off the final two stops in Malaysia and the Philippines. The shutdown also intruded into the race for governor of Virginia. Te r r y Mc Au l i f f e, t h e Democrat, said he support-

ed legislation to guarantee retroactive pay for furloughed federal employees. The Republican contender, Ken Cuccinelli, called on members of Congress to decline their pay as long as the shutdown lasts.

Legislative action The House sidetracked legislation Tuesday night to reopen some veterans programs, the national parks and a portion of the Washington, D.C., municipal government. All three bills fell short of the two-thirds major ity needed when Democrats voted overwhelmingly against this. Republicans tried again, this time under rules requiring only a simple majority. The parks measure was approved on a vote of 252-173, with 23 Democrats breaking ranks and voting in favor. The vote to reopen NIH was 254-171. The House

also voted to allow the Washington, D.C., government to use the taxes it collects to operate programs. Votes were deferred on more bills, one to assure pay for members of the National Guard and Reserves and another to allow some veterans programs to resume. The NIH bill was added to the day’s agenda after Democrats had said seriously ill patients would be turned away from the facility’s hospital of last resort, and no new enrollment permitted in experimental treatments. Democratic Rep. Louise Slaughter of New York said the Republican response was a ploy. “Every time they see a bad headline they’re going to bring a bill to the floor and make it go away,” she said. Some Republicans took obvious pleasure in the rough rollout Tuesday of new

health insurance markets created under Obama’s health care law. Widespread online glitches prevented many people from signing up for coverage that begins in January. Rep. Trey Radel of Florida said a 14-year-old could build a better website “in an afternoon in his basement.” At issue is the need to pass a temporary funding bill to keep the government open since the start of the new budget year on Tuesday. Congress has passed more than 100 temporary funding bills since the last shutdown in 1996, almost all of them without controversy. The streak was broken because conservative Republicans have held up the current measure in the longshot hope of derailing or delaying Obamacare, just as the health insurance markets at the heart of the law opened on Tuesday.

Minn.man convicted of killing wife unintentionally ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — A jury Wednesday convicted a Minnesota man in the slaying of his wife, whose body was found in the Mississippi River months after she disappeared, though jurors decided he did not intend to kill her. In the second day of deliberations, the jury convicted Jeffery Trevino on one count of second-degree unintentional murder. The St. Paul man was acquitted on a second count that alleged he intended to kill his 30-yearold wife, Kira Steger. Steger’s body was found in the river in May, more than two months after she went missing. Prosecutors alleged Trevino was angry that his wife was having an affair and wanted a divorce. The defense attorney contended the forensic evidence did not add up.

Associated Press

From left, Kira Steger’s father, Jay Steger, stands with his daughter, Keri Anne Steger, and Ramsey County Victim Advocate Jennifer Mallinger, while Marcie Steger speaks to the news media outside the Ramsey County Courthouse in St. Paul, Minn., on Wednesday after the verdict in Jeffery Trevino’s trial was announced. Ramsey County Attorney “The bottom line is we got John Choi said he was satis- the conviction. We’re very fied with the verdict. pleased about that,” Choi

told The Associated Press. He noted the difficulty in getting a conviction in a circumstantial case. Steger was last seen alive Feb. 21. Her abandoned car was found in a parking ramp at the Mall of America, where she was co-manager of a clothing store, on Feb. 25. Bloodstains were found in the trunk, and a search of the couple’s rental home uncovered blood evidence, leading to Trevino’s arrest. Steger’s father, Jay Steger, said he was happy with the conviction but unhappy Trevino doesn’t face more prison time. Prosecutors plan to seek the maximum sentence of 20 years in prison. “I don’t think it’s enough,” Steger, 49, of Marshfield, Wis., told the AP. “I feel no matter how much time he gets, it’s not enough because it’s not

bringing my daughter back.” Defense attorney John Conrad would not say if he plans to appeal “Obviously we’re disappointed with the conviction,” Conrad said. But he noted that Trevino faces about half the prison sentence he would have faced had he been convicted of second-degree intentional murder.

Arguments In closing arguments, the prosecution contended Trevino killed Kira Steger after becoming fed up with her texting a co-worker with whom she was having an affair. But the defense questioned whether Steger’s marijuana use may have led to her death. A bag containing marijuana was found in her

purse, but a retired St. Paul police sergeant testified it was worth only about $20. Jay Steger said it was hard to sit through testimony about his daughter’s affair and marijuana use. “That devastated me because they (the defense) were trying to attack her character and that’s not the type of girl she is,” he said. “I think it’s a tragedy they tried to smear her character ... It was very hard for our family to take that all because we know that’s not (her).” Trevino did not testify in his own defense, and his attorney did not call any witnesses. Sentencing is scheduled for Nov. 25. Trevino will be held without bail until sentencing; he has been jailed on $1 million bail since being charged in February.


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2013 Williams County inmate still on the loose

Search begins for Fong replacement

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Burleigh building official hired Ray Ziegler has been hired as the Burleigh County building official for the new county planning department. His salary will be $66,914.

LEANN ECKROTH

Ziegler will start his duties on Oct. 28. He previously served as county/city building official for 13 years, where he also performed county inspection work. He resigned as city building official in mid-September. An inspector and office staff person also may be hired for the new department, according to the county human resources department. The action is to prepare the county for when it runs its own county planning department, separate from the city. The county had used planning staff from the city of Bismarck since the 1970s. In related action, county commissioners approved an extraterritorial jurisdiction agreement that eliminated joint jurisdictions between the county and the city of Bismarck. A Bismarck City Commission decision is still pending on the jurisdiction proposal. To view the draft jurisdictional map, visit burleighco.com. The purpose of separating jurisdictions was to speed up the time it takes developers to get plats and get lots on the market, according to County Engineer Marcus Hall. Hall will oversee the new planning department. The planning department office will be located on the first floor of the City/County Building in Bismarck, where the human resources office is now located. County human resources will be moved to the county-owned Provident building.

CAT bus Capital Area Transit (the CAT bus) has launched its “How to Ride” video, giving new riders an easier way to learn about getting around the Bismarck-Mandan area on the CAT buses. The “How to Ride” the CAT bus video gives new riders detailed information and instructions about the CAT’s history and how to board and depart the bus. Riders may choose to watch one or all 10 chapters at once on the CAT YouTube Channel or website. “We have noticed an increase in the number of calls to our office from new riders who have just moved to the area,” said Robin Werre, transit director. “The CAT operates differently than a bus system in a much larger metropolitan city.” She said the videos will be “a great learning tool for those newcomers to see how it works.“ “We also encourage local individuals who have never ridden the CAT before to watch the videos and give the CAT a try,” she said. The videos can be found at www.youtube.com/ BismarckCATBus and www.thecatbus.com/videos.

Fire week parade The Mandan Fire Department will hold its annual Fire Prevention Week parade and open house on Tuesday. The parade of fire trucks and other emergency apparatus will leave at 6:30 p.m. from the Mandan Rural Fire Department Station at 3014 34th St. N.W., go to Old Red Trail and Collins Avenue and finish at the Mandan Fire Department Station No. 1 at 110 Collins Ave. The Fire Department open house at Station No. 1 begins at Continued on 6B

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Another bedroom intruder reported By JENNY MICHAEL Bismarck Tribune Another woman has reported that a man walked into her bedroom early in the morning and stole her wallet. The burglary Wednesday morning is the third such report of women in their 20s spotting a man in their bedrooms early in the morning. Officer Pat Renz said a 27-year-old woman on the 1100 block of Memorial Highway reported at 4:24 a.m. Wednesday that she woke up minutes earlier when a man walked through her unlocked front door, through her apartment and into her bedroom. The intruder took the woman’s wallet, “mumbled something fairly incoherent” when she confronted him, then left the apartment, Renz said.

She described the man as being in his mid30s or 40s, wearing a black shirt. The previous two incidents occurred on Saturday, one at approximately 7:30 a.m. on the 2400 block of North Eighth Street and one at approximately 8:05 a.m. on the 2400 block of North Ninth Street. In the case on North Ninth Street, the burglar pried open a door. The woman on North Eighth Street described the person who entered her room as being a “muscular” white man in his 30s, approximately 5 feet, 8 inches tall and 180 pounds, with “crew cut” brown hair. She said he was wearing a baseball cap, work shirt, blue jeans and boots. The woman on North Ninth Street described the man who was in her room as wearing dark clothing. Anyone with information about the cases

should call Bismarck Police at 701-223-1212 or Bismarck Area Crime Stoppers at 701-224-8477 (TIPS). Bismarck and Mandan police investigated additional home burglaries, though authorities are unsure if they are related to the other incidents. ■ Someone stole cash, a DVD player and prescription medication from an apartment on the 100 block of East Bismarck Expressway. Renz said the woman who lives in the apartment left her home at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday and returned at 5:39 p.m. to find her door, which had been unlocked and closed, was open. She went in the apartment and noticed the items missing. ■ Someone broke a window to enter a home Continued on 6B

Moose is still roaming Authorities keep track while it goes through Bismarck By BRIAN GEHRING Bismarck Tribune Wildlife officials and Bismarck police are keeping a close watch on a young bull moose roaming through the city. The spiked bull was first reported to police late Monday in the area of the Pebble Creek Golf Course. By Tuesday evening, it had attracted a large crowd of onlookers. The moose had bedded down during the day, and Jeb Williams, assistant wildlife chief for the North Dakota Game and Fish Department, said an attempt to haze the animal out of town was partially successful. He said between the Game and Fish Department and police, the moose had moved east toward Hay Creek. “We hoped it would follow the natural drainage, and he did for a while,” Williams said. But by Wednesday morning, the moose had turned and wandered back into town. People on social media sites were commenting and posting photos of the moose. Williams said the moose is moving in the general direction of the Missouri River and could make an escape there. But there are a lot of obstacles between it and the river. Meanwhile, people are urged to give the moose plenty of space and not to disturb or harass the moose,

TOM STROMME/Tribune

A young male moose relaxes on the lawn outside Winkler Chiropractic in north Bismarck on Wednesday morning. The moose apparently wandered into town and has been followed by a number of people on social networks. Law enforcement is also monitoring its whereabouts. which could cause it to bolt into traffic or worse, Williams said. The moose sighting has drawn quite a bit of attention, but that could be a bad thing for the animal. “It’s in an area where there is very little margin for error,” Williams said.

He said tranquilizing the bull is not an option because even with a good hit with a dart, it would take about 10 minutes for the animal to go down. “In the meantime, it will bolt,” he said. Young bull moose often get pushed out of their home range

Navigator: Some in North Dakota are ‘ecstatic’ over health care law By JAMES MacPHERSON Associated Press Donene Feist has adopted a shoe company’s trademark slogan in her effort to help people get insurance through the nation’s new health care law. “I feel like I should be in a Nike commercial,” Feist said Wednesday. “Just do it.” Feist is among North Dakota’s 17 so-called navigators whose job is to find uninsured residents and inform them of their options under the Affordable Care Act championed by President Barack Obama. The certified health guides are

meeting with people individually or with groups at town hall meetings, encouraging them to enroll in the online marketplaces that opened Tuesday, where consumers can compare plans and buy health insurance. “We’re out there pounding the pavement as much as we can,” said Feist, who also is the executive director of Family Voices of North Dakota, a nonprofit advocacy group based in Edgeley, in the southeastern part of the state. “There are those out there who are Associated Press very much interested in having Donene Feist of Edgeley is one health insurance. Some are ecstatof 17 North Dakota Affordable ic.” Continued on 2B Care Act navigators.

Mandan closer to liquor license change By LEANN ECKROTH Bismarck Tribune The Mandan City Commission on Tuesday approved the first reading of an ordinance that lifts limits on all liquor license classes. That would flip the city commission decision 18 months ago to allow new licenses based on how many new households there were. Before that the city issued liquor licenses by gauging the 10-year census. With a final approval on Oct. 15,

the ordinance will eliminate the competitive bidding process for liquor licenses in Mandan unless the city commission decides that a bid is needed. The new ordinance specifies that the city may issue “an unlimited number of alcohol licenses in any class.” City Commissioner Dot Frank said most other liquor licenses had been unlimited before in the city, but the new ordinance affects on and off liquor establishments, off-sale beer and wine, and off-sale beer and liquor licenses.

The ordinance also requires that applicants of Class A liquor licenses (on and off sales) have buildings with a seating capacity of at least 30 people. In the draft ordinance, the city w o u l d re q u i re a m i n i m u m issuance fee for certain types of liquor licenses. “What happened is we’ve seen unprecedented growth,” said Frank. She said the commission decided 18 months ago to add new licenses for every 500 households Continued on 2B

during the fall in search of a mate. Williams said the best scenario would be for the moose to backtrack to the Hay Creek area where there are fewer obstructions. (Reach Brian Gehring at 701250-8254 or brian.gehring@bismarcktribune.com.)

Late spring factors into drop in state taxable sales revenue By JESSICA HOLDMAN Bismarck Tribune Because of weather, taxable sales have dropped by $157.3 million in the state compared to last year. “This is the first quarter (time) in quite a few years we’ve been down,” said Deputy Tax Commissioner Ryan Rauschenberger, referring to the second quarter numbers. Taxable sales and purchases for North Dakota during the second quarter were $6.293 billion compared to $6.451 billion for the same quarter in 2012. A late spring blizzard and rains affected certain industries, and Rauschenberger said if the weather had been nicer, he predicts taxable sales would have grown rather than shrunk. “We think the weather was a determining factor in growth being slower than anticipated,” he said. ���After preliminary looks at the third quarter, we feel we’re going to have a good third quarter.” Rauschenberger predicts future growth will be in the single digits, like the 1.6 percent of the first quarter of 2013 rather than Continued on 6B


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Man accused of embezzling $75K A Bismarck man faces a felony charge alleging he stole more than $75,000 from his former employer by adjusting his monthly bonuses. Douglas Pete Miller, 40, was charged Sept. 25 with Class B felony misapplication of entrusted property. He made his initial court appearance on Tuesday, where South Central District Judge Gail Hagerty set his bond at $1,000. Miller has posted the bond. His next court hearing is scheduled for Oct. 31. According to court documents, Miller was the manager at Dakota Family Dental. During a salary review, officials there discovered Miller had been altering his monthly bonus from July 2008 to February 2013, with a total amount of loss to the company of $76,201.97. Documents say Miller was fired and later was asked to repay the money. He wrote a check for $20,158.97, and his parents wrote one for $64,000, an affidavit said. — Jenny Michael

Police warn of scam utility call Mandan police are warning the public that a business received a scam call from someone claiming to be a utility company seeking $1,900. A business reported that a person claiming to work for “Excel Energy” called and told the owner he had not paid his last energy bill, so his power would be turned off unless he paid $1,900. The business owner ended the call and called MontanaDakota Utilities. MDU told him it has no affiliation with any entity known as Excel Energy, and it never notifies a client of missed payments and shut down power in such a short amount of time. Mandan Police Sgt. Jay Gruebele said the caller specified being with “Excel Energy,” not “Xcel Energy,” which is a real company. Anyone who receives such a call should hang up and notify local law enforcement and the North Dakota Attorney General’s Office. — Jenny Michael

College student charged in murder VALLEY CITY (AP) — A North Dakota college football player who was a standout athlete at a Minnesota high school has been charged with fatally shooting a man outside a Minneapolis bar over the weekend. Cedric Chappell Jr. was arrested Tuesday at Valley City State University. He is charged in Hennepin County, Minn. with second-degree murder and attempted second-degree murder. He’s being held in the Barnes County jail. Twenty-two-year-old Willie Smith of St. Paul was fatally shot outside the Blue Nile restaurant and bar about 2 a.m. Saturday. Another man was shot in the leg. A criminal complaint said a fight started inside the bar, spilled out into the parking lot and two groups started shooting at each other. Chappell was a standout athlete at Washburn High School in Minneapolis.

Man arrested for human trafficking BURLINGTON (AP) — The sheriff’s department in Ward County said a Minot man is accused of trying to trade drugs for sex with a 14-year-old girl. The agency said 54-year-old Gaylen Paul Rufus was arrested as part of a human trafficking investigation after an officer in the Internet Crimes Against Children unit set up a meeting with him. He is charged with human trafficking, possession of drugs, possession of marijuana with intent to deliver and possession of marijuana paraphernalia. Rufus is in Ward County Jail awaiting a court appearance.

Boy hospitalized after Tide pod bite FARGO (AP) — A 1-year-old Minnesota boy who bit into a Tide detergent pod is being treated for poisoning at a North Dakota hospital. Alexander Rohde from Hitterdal, Minn., turned 1 last week. He was flown to Sanford’s Pediatric Intensive Care Unit in Fargo over the weekend. Family members said Alexander thought the pod was a treat. He started throwing up and soon could not breathe. A hospital spokesman said Wednesday that Alexander was in critical condition but improving. Alex’s mother, Michelle Klienschmidt, said Tide should change the look of its pod. Tide said in a statement it’s working to educate people on keeping them out of the reach of children.

Wahpeton voters OK school project WAHPETON (AP) — Voters in the southeastern North Dakota town of Wahpeton have approved a $30 million school building project. Wahpeton Superintendent Rick Jacobson said unofficial results of the election showed 88 percent of those voting Tuesday approved the project. Voters also gave approval to funding the project by having the school district increase its debt service. The project would build a new grade school and remodel the middle and high schools. The district earlier dropped a plan to offer free hot dogs to voters during the bond issue vote. North Dakota Secretary of State Al Jaeger had said state law prohibits any enticement that could be viewed as a method to influence an election.

American Crystal defaults on loan FARGO (AP) — American Crystal Sugar will default on a government loan of $71.2 million under a program that provides relief when a glut of sugar on the market depresses prices. David Berg, the company’s president and CEO, said that forfeiting the sugar put up as collateral was the best option, given the very low prices that sugar is fetching. “Everything we have under loan we do intend to forfeit,” Berg said. “Today, it’s about the best place we have to sell sugar.” The loans end with the crop year, which concluded Tuesday.

Iowa state senator quits after report IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — An Iowa state senator has resigned after a special investigator found it likely he violated ethics rules by taking money from political entities connected to former presidential candidate Michele Bachmann and then denying he’d done so. Sen. Kent Sorenson told The Associated Press on Wednesday evening that he’s resigning. His decision came after attorney Mark Weinhardt said in a report released earlier in the day that it was “manifestly clear” Sorenson negotiated payments in 2011 that eventually reached $7,500 monthly in exchange for his work as Bachmann’s Iowa campaign chair. Weinhardt said Sorsenson received compensation that originated from Bachmann’s presidential campaign and her political action committee. He said the payments went to a Colorado company, which then paid Sorenson’s Iowa-based firm. Sorenson said resigning is best for his family.

Dakota

Bismarck Tribune ■ Bismarcktribune.com

Shutdown’s hit magnified for tribes CROW AGENCY, Mont. (AP) — American Indian tribes have more than access to national parks on the line with the government shutdown. Federal funding has been cut off for crucial services including foster care payments, nutrition programs and financial assistance for the needy. For the 13,000 members of southeast Montana’s Crow Tribe, the budget impasse had immediate and farreaching effects: Tribal leaders furloughed more than 300 workers Wednesday, citing the shutdown and earlier federal budget cuts. As a result, tribal programs including home health care for the elderly and disabled, bus service for rural areas, and a major irrigation project were suspend-

ed indefinitely. “It’s going to get hard,” said Shar Simpson, who leads the Crow’s home health care program. “We’re already taking calls from people saying, ‘Who’s going to take care of my mom? Who’s going to take care of my dad?’” Some tribes intend to fill the gap in federal funds themselves, risking deficits of their own to cushion communities with chronic high unemployment and poverty against the effects of the budget battle. “Do we just throw kids onto the street, or do we help them? Most likely we’re going to help those families and do whatever we can until this is unresolved,” said Tracy “Ching” King, president of northern Montana’s Fort

Belknap Reservation. But for other tribes, basic services stand to take a direct hit. That includes programs heavily subsidized by federal agencies and others paid for with tribal money that is suddenly unavailable because it’s being held by the Department of Interior, tribal leaders said. Essential activities such as law enforcement, firefighting and some social services will continue, said Bureau of Indian Affairs spokeswoman Nedra Darling. Programs that did not make the list include residential care for children and adults, cash assistance for the poor and payments to vendors who provide foster care. How long those programs will continue on reservations depends on the duration of

the shutdown and how much money individual tribes can spare. The BIA provides services to more than 1.7 million American Indians and Alaska Natives from more than 500 recognized tribes. Crow Chairman Darrin Old Coyote said his tribe decided to furlough workers now, hoping the move will be only temporary, rather than push into deficit a budget stretched thin by earlier federal cuts and recent declines in revenue from a coal mine on the reservation. In South Dakota, Yankton Sioux Tribe Vice Chairwoman Jean Archambeau said the shutdown means money for heating assistance won’t be coming this fall. “I don’t know what we’re going to do,” she said.

Medora worries about closure Williams MEDORA (AP) — Western North Dakota’s tourism industry will be hurt by the t e m p o ra r y c l o s u re o f Theodore Roosevelt National Park because of the federal government shutdown, officials said. Medora Mayor Doug Ellison said he hopes Congress reaches a budget agreement soon so the park can reopen. He said the park is a big attraction, and m o s t a re a b u s i n e s s e s depend on tourists. “If this drags on too much ... people may just

not bother stopping at all in Medora, and that has a detrimental effect on all our businesses,” Ellison said. Park officials put up signs Tuesday and told campers they had 48 hours to leave the park. Acting park superintendent Meg Schwartz said four rangers will work during the shutdown to ensure the safety and security of the park’s facilities. The other 36 employees are getting time off without pay, she said.

Theodore Roosevelt Medora Foundation spokesman Justin Fisk said the town is especially dependent on the park during the fall because the season has ended for the Medora Musical, another big tourist attraction. “There’s no doubt the park closure will be felt,” Fisk said. A number of federal wildlife refuges and wetland management districts across North Dakota also were closed because of the federal budget dispute.

Navigator Continued from 1B But many people are simply confused by the new law and are looking for answers, she said. “There’s just too much misinformation out there,” Feist said. North Dakota is one of 36 states where the federal government is running the marketplaces, which also are known as exchanges. Enrollment in the marketplaces began Tuesday, but a mixture of heavy demand and technical kinks overwhelmed the system. Feist said she — like many North Dakota residents and thousands of others around the U.S. — was unable to access the federal website HealthCare.gov on Tuesday; she also was greeted with error messages on Wednesday morning. “I’ve been unable to get in, and if I could have that would be great,” she said. “For those who got in, they said it was easy to follow.” Feist said there are other glitches affecting navigators, including brochures and other education material on the Affordable Care Act that have been prom-

ised by the federal government but have not arrived. If problems with the online sign-ups persist, Feist said she is prepared to print paper applications. Neil Scharpe, who is heading the navigator program in North Dakota, likened the enrollment debut to the opening of a much anticipated restaurant. “Everybody comes at one time in the beginning when it opens,” he said. A steady rollout actually is preferred over a crush of people signing up at once, Scharpe said. “We don’t want the flood gates to open,” he said. Dec. 15 is the deadline for coverage to start Jan. 1. Customers have until the end of March to sign up in order to avoid tax penalties. Scharpe and Feist said there is no way for navigators to track the number of North Dakota residents who will enroll in the online system. An estimated 74,700 North Dakota residents are uninsured, more than 10 percent of the state’s population.

Liquor license change Continued from 1B it permitted on an annual basis. This May, the city came up just shy of the 500 household units for the annual count, but the city met that quota a few weeks later. “We determined it was not the best way to take measurements,” Frank said. City Administrator Jim Neubauer showed commissioners a draft proposal on what minimum issuance fees would be for liquor licenses. Annual renewal fees for the licenses would still be required to still keep the liquor licenses current, he said. He proposed that an issuance fee for a Class A general on/off beer and liquor license have a one-time issuance fee of at least $60,000. A Class D liquor license of off sale beer and liquor would

require at least an $80,000 issuance fee. Commissioners asked he raise the minimum issuance fee for an off-sale beer and wine D-1 liquor license from $35,000 to $40,000 — what the last D-1 liquor license went for in a bid. After the one-time issuance fees, all liquor licenses would still have to pay annual renewal fees, according to Neubauer. The fee proposals will come back to commissioners Oct. 15. “There won’t be a liquor establishment on every corner,” Frank said. “Even with unlimited liquor licenses, the applications must still be approved by the city commission.” She said the one-time issuance fees would limit how many people apply for liquor licenses.

Neubauer said every liquor license applicant must still go through a background check from the police chief and must meet z o n i n g re q u i re m e n t s. “They can’t be placed in re s i d e n t i a l n e i g h b o r hoods,” he said. He said licenses also will be market-driven. If there are too many licenses, it can saturate the market and not everyone can make a living off a liquor license. The ordinance gives commissioners the discretion to determine that a significant number of licenses has been issued and it may refuse any future liquor licenses in certain classes. (Reach LeAnn Eckroth at 701-250-8264 or leann.eckroth@bismarcktribune.com.)

County inmate still on the loose By JENNY MICHAEL Bismarck Tribune

Williams County officials believe a convicted sex offender who escaped from custody while being treated at a hospital remains in Williston. Preston Sonstegaard, who was being held in the Williams County Correctional Center on a probation re v o c a t i o n , Sonstegaard escaped while being treated at Mercy Medical Center emergency room at 1:52 a.m. Tuesday. He left the hospital in black-and-white-striped jail pants, no shoes and no shirt. Williams County Sheriff’s Sgt. Caleb Fry said a man reported giving Sonstegaard, 25, a ride to the 700 block of 18th Street East in Williston Wednesday morning. The man knew who Sonstegaard was and called police after dropping Sonstegaard off, Fry said. Sonstegaard left on foot from the point where he was let out of the car. The Williams County Sheriff’s Office, Williston Police Department and the Northwest Narcotics Task Force searched the area but were unable to locate Sonstegaard. Sonstegaard pleaded guilty in 2009 to Class A felony continuous sexual abuse of a child, according to court records. He was sentenced to 10 years on probation, with a 10-year prison sentence suspended. A petition for revocation of probation was filed on Sept. 10. According to the North Dakota Sex Offender website, he is considered a lowrisk offender. S o n s t e g a a rd i s 5 ’ 6 ”, 125 pounds, with brownish red hair and blue eyes. Officials believe he now is wearing a baggy green sweatshirt and very baggy blue jeans. Anyone who sees Sonstegaard shouldn’t try to detain him, but call 911. The sheriff’s office asks people to make sure their garages, sheds, campers and homes are locked.

NUBS OF THE NEWS BIRTHS St. Alexius Medical Center Daughter, Paige and Stephen Guy, Mandan, 3:31 p.m., Sept. 27. Daughter, Travis and Tana Sukaskas, Mandan, 3:47 p.m., Sept. 27. Daughter, Justin and Deann Stanley, Bismarck, 6:55 p.m., Sept. 27. Son, Danielle Kraft, Bismarck, 9:11 p.m., Sept. 27. Daughter, Michael and Jill Place, Bismarck, 2:39 p.m., Sept. 30. Son, Desarae Bergquist, Wilton, 3:54 p.m., Sept. 30.

Daughter, Katie Schiwal, Bi s m a rc k , 4 : 0 5 p. m . , Sept. 30. Daughter, Maria Tuerino and Norlan Guerrero, Glen Ullin, 12:35 a.m., Oct. 1. Son, Kacie Harrison and Brett Bachmeier, Carson, 4:18 a.m., Oct. 1.

Sanford Health

Son, Katie and Michael McMahon, Bismarck, 12:36 p.m., Sept. 30. Son, Libby Stone, Mandan, 1:58 p.m., Sept. 30. Son, Amber and Travis Hellickson, South Heart, 10:10 p.m., Sept. 30.

MARRIAGE LICENSES

Burleigh County Christopher D. Kline and Katherine E. Selkowe, Mark D. Splonskowski and Alexandria A. Lengenfelder, Cole W. Geis and Tiffany D. Wanner, Mark G. Meier and Mary E. Aduddell, Mackenzie P. Ternes and Breanne K. Anderson, Zachary A. Nelson and Stacey N. Daniels, Jason M. Alexander and Stacey M. Wildeman, Scott L. Kaubisch II and Alison E. Huseth, Tyler E. Kientopf and Katie J. Weninger,

Jaden W. Nygaard and Jessica T. Gietzen, Cole E. Bernhardt and Courtney L. Schmidt, and Clancy W. Rangen and Joanne M. Heaton, all of Bismarck. Clayton J. Hamann and Ling Yan, and Derek J. Hoyt and Casey J. Thielen, all of Lincoln. Nevada D. Silha and Jessica L. Welk, both of Mandan. Jayme D. Ackerman, Dickinson, and Mindy S. Leonard, Bismarck. Patr ick W. Humann, Hazelton, and Brenda J. Lee, Bismarck.


Advice

Bismarcktribune.com ■ Bismarck Tribune

Thursday, October 3, 2013 ■ Page 3B

Father-in-law sending porn to husband’s email Dear Annie: I have a problem that I have never seen in your column. My 64-year-old father-inlaw sends my middle-age husband pornographic pictures. My husband and I share the same email address, and the last picture was extremely explicit. My husband does not check his email regularly. When he does, he ignores most of his father’s stuff, thank heavens. I haven’t deleted these emails, but I now think my father-in-law is a total creep. Is there anything I should do? I hope he sees himself in this letter. — Offended Wife Dear Offended: Is your husband aware that his father is sending him these photos? If not, tell him. Then

beyond us.

Adopted and lonely ANNIE’S MAILBOX

ask whether he wants to receive these pictures. He may not care, or he may prefer not to confront his father. S ince they’re meant for him, he should have the final word, although you can encourage him to tell Dad to stop. We also recommend that you open your own email account so you are not subjected to this assault on your senses. Although why you would voluntarily open any email from this man is

Dear Annie: I’m 14 years old and adopted. As I’ve gotten older, the feeling of wanting to know my real family has grown stronger. Because my adoption wasn’t open, I can’t meet my biological family. I know the government means well by these laws, but it makes me feel empty inside. My adoptive family drives me insane with the excuse, “I can’t tell you much until you’re 18.” Isn’t there something they can tell me? Can the government really bar me from seeing my birth family? — Left Lonely in My Heart. Dear Lonely: First of all, your “real family” is the one

that raised you. There are legitimate reasons why birth records are not intended to be seen by kids under age 18. Reunions with birth parents sometimes work out OK, but they also can be difficult, unpleasant, depressing and a huge disappointment, especially if you are expecting too much. Teenagers, in particular, often go through emot i o n a l l y r o u g h w a t e r s, becoming upset with their adoptive families and mistakenly believing the biological family would be easier. Your parents are simply trying to protect you. But we understand that this is hard and unsatisfying for you. There are counselors who specialize in this field. Ask your parents to make an appointment for all of you to

talk with someone who will assist in figuring out the best way to deal with your frustrations and how much information your parents can give you. They can get a referral from your pediatrician.

Things looking up Dear Annie: “In Turmoil in Kansas,” the 45-year-old gay man could have been me 16 years ago. I lived alone in Michigan, but I had no job, no social life, no partner and only one friend — and he lived far away. I was in the closet and didn’t know anything about PFLAG. I found that smoky, noisy and crowded bars were not for me. I was so scared to tell anyone I’m gay. I am now 46, have a great partner, live in Florida,

joined the local PFLAG chapter, have two great jobs and am out to everyone, including my very accepting parents — something I never expected. I never go to gay bars, although I have many gay pen pals. In two years, I’ll be moving to Boston to live with my partner, who is transferring jobs. Isn’t it great how life can be so wonderful after being depressed and lonely for so long? Please tell him not to give up hope. — Sarasota, Fla. (Annie’s Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Email questions to anniesmailbox@comcast.net or write to Annie’s Mailbox, P.O. Box 118190, Chicago, Ill. 60611.)

Talk to your teen about sex, or someone else will

BRIDGE

By PHILLIP ALDER Jane Goodall said, “Every individual matters. Every individual has a role to play. Every individual makes a difference.” A bridge player might add the word “card” after each “individual.” However, sometimes the role of a particular card may be difficult to discern. In this deal, South is in four spades. West leads the club king. How should declarer plan the play? What is the role of South’s heart king? South opens two clubs, strong, artificial and forcing. His hand is a minimum because, when unbalanced, opener will usually have at least nine winners. This hand has only eight and a half: five spades, two diamonds, one club and half a heart. But it is a sensible opening bid. However, when North raises spades, promising some points, South has to settle for four spades to announce his minimum. If North has a good hand, he can bid higher. When dummy tables with the spade ace, declarer has nine tricks. Probably his first thought is that he needs East to have the heart ace. Then, after getting to dummy with a trump, a heart lead through East would generate a trick for South’s king. Here, though, you will notice that West has the heart ace. What can South do? Declarer must realize that the heart king is a red herring. He should play to ruff a heart on the board, which generates a seventh trump trick. He takes the first trick (otherwise, West might shift to a trump) and plays a heart. When South wins the next trick, he leads another heart. And in a moment, declarer gains that key ruff.

DEAR DOCTOR K: I’m the parent of a teenage girl. I know it’s time to talk to her about sex, and I’d appreciate any advice. DEAR READER: Many parents feel anxious or uncomfortable talking with their children about sex. But remember that if you don’t, somebody else will. Teens get lots of information (and misinformation) about sex from their friends, the Internet, television, magazines, books and movies. It’s up to you to make your child understand what it really means to have sex, both physically and emotionally. Don’t worry that you will be “putting ideas” into your teen’s head. Many parents

DR. ANTHONY KOMAROFF

I’ve talked to are concerned that having the conversation will encourage their kids to try it. In fact, teens who talk openly with their parents usually wait longer to have sex — and they are more likely to use birth control when they do. Whether to have sex outside of marriage is a personal question, and I’m not going to weigh in on that. But it is

important that you state what your own views are regarding at what point in a relationship sex is appropriate. At the same time, don’t insist that your child share your views. My colleagues who specialize in adolescent medicine tell me that teens often are naturally rebellious and resist attempts to tell them what to do. It is very important to teach your child how to say no firmly. Coach your daughter to say “no” while looking her partner in the face. Again, it’s one thing to talk to your daughter about how to say “no,” and it’s another to tell her when. I wouldn’t describe all of the sexually transmitted dis-

HOROSCOPES BY HOLIDAY ARIES (March 21-April 19). It is safer for your heart to choose friendship over love. When both exist in the same relationship, today’s best bet is to put the precedence on friendship. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). It is human nature to assume that others have your capabilities, but this couldn’t be farther from the truth today. The helping hand you need is your own. GEMINI (May 21-June 21). Approximately 90 percent of your activities at work would have been impossible to accomplish a century ago. But the thing that remains the same is that people still need to feel important. CANCER (June 22-July 22). People won’t say what they mean — that’s life as usual. Most human discourse depends on the other person’s ability to extract meaning from the larger context. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). Kindness is not as prevalent as it needs to be in the world. Kindness is the value you would be wise to lean on now. It will do more good in the world than anything. VIRGO (Aug.23-Sept.22). You can be romantic at times, but right now it’s easy to see the benefit of autono-

HOLIDAY MATHIS

my. You don’t live for the sake of others, and you don’t want them to live for your sake. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). You’re not completely sold on the contributions or potential contributions of your teammates. But the bottom line is, you’ll win if you band together. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Where your mind goes in the time between activities is most enlightening. What do you think of en route to work, waiting in line or before you fall asleep? That’s where your heart is. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21). You sometimes wonder whether past hurt will really disappear if you revisit it and process it. The answer is a resounding yes, especially if you try. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19). The testimony of a person others see as important carries more influence than the testimony of a stranger. That’s why you

eases (STDs) in detail. That can come across as scaremongering and cause some kids to tune out. But I would list all of the STDs: Most kids don’t realize how many there are. By the same token, I wouldn’t stress that some of them, if unrecognized and untreated, can be fatal. I would emphasize that some of them can make it hard or impossible for a woman to bear children. I would describe the facts about birth control. The points I’d be sure to make are that no birth control is 100 percent effective, and that many types of birth control will not protect against STDs. The only way to be

entirely safe is not to have sex. Finally, I’d explain that sexually active females need to have a pelvic exam every year. Offer to take her to a gynecologist or pediatrician if and when she decides to have sex. Most important, be there for your teenager. Listen to her questions and try to answer every one. Let her know that whatever choices she makes, she will always have your love and support. (Dr. Anthony Komaroff is a physician and professor at Harvard Medical School. Go to his website to send questions and get additional information: www.AskDoctorK.com.)

Most twins OK without a C-section should build evidence of your social standing before making a recommendation. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). You’ll be courted by those who want your money, time or attention. If the price tag is low, you’ll give your money. It’s less valuable than your attention right now. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). If you play it too safe, it’s like you’re not playing at all — rather, you’re working to be like everyone else. Artistry is diminished where there are telltale signs of the labor. (If you would like to write to Holiday Mathis, go to www.creators.com.)

Expecting twins? You probably don’t need to schedule a cesarean section. Most moms can safely give birth without surgery, a big study finds. It’s the latest research to question the need for C-sections, which are done in one-third of all births in the United States and three-fourths of those involving twins. Studies increasingly are challenging long-held beliefs about cesareans, such as that women who had one need to deliver future babies the same way. Now doctors are looking hard at C-sections for twin births, which are on the rise because of infertility treatments. Twins have more risk for birth complications and some studies suggest C-sections lower that risk, but it had not been put to a rigorous test. Dr. Jon Barrett, of Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center in Toronto, led a study in 25 countries of 2,800 women pregnant with twins. All of the first twins to be delivered were in good position for birth (most doctors still recommend a Csection if the first twin is in feet-first or breech position). — Associated Press

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Page 6B ■ Thursday, October 3, 2013

Fire hydrant repairs continue

Bismarck Tribune ■ Bismarcktribune.com

CHATTING ABOUT N.D. FOOD

Bismarck city crews will continue fire hydrant repairs through today from Boulevard Avenue to Bismarck Expressway and between Ninth to 26th streets. Hydrants will be tested from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. During the testing, water customers may notice some rusty water in these areas. They are advised not to wash their clothes until their water clears. Running sprinklers helps clear the rust out of the water. For more information, call 701-355-1700 or visit www.bismarck.org.

Continued from 1B on the 600 block of Third Street Southwest in Mandan and stole $1,600 in electronics. According to the Mandan Police Department, the incident is believed to have occurred between 8 a.m. and noon Tuesday. Anyone with information should contact the Mandan Police Department at 701-667-3250. (Reach Jenny Michael at 701-250-8225 or jenny.michael@bismarcktribune.com.)

Planning commission seat filled The Mandan City Commission appointed Karl Liepitz to the city planning and zoning commission Tuesday to replace Loren Wetch who resigned. Liepitz is an attorney with MDU Resources Group Inc. and provides legal support for the Knife River Corp. In a letter he sent to the City Engineering and Planning Department, Liepitz stated he wants to “help support and plan for the current growth and development that is happening in Mandan.” —LeAnn Eckroth

Burleigh Continued from 1B

Halloween party volunteers needed The Bismarck Parks and Recreation District is seeking volunteers for the 29th annual All-City Halloween Party to be held from 6 to 8 p.m. on Oct. 25 at the World War Memorial Building. The event is for children between ages of preschool through fifth grade. Volunteers will help with carnival booths and handing out treats and prizes. To volunteer, call 701-222-6455 or visit the park district office at 400 E. Front Avenue. Office hours are 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday.

Students appointed to commission The Mandan City Commission has made appointments to the Mandan Youth Commission. Those appointed on Tuesday were: Mandan Middle School — Morgan Anderson, Brenna Hammer and Madison Just. Mandan High School — Casey Beck, Kaysee Fry, Cole Garman and McKenna Quintus. At large — Lauren Wingenbach, Ashley Doll and Connor Leingang.

Wishek hospital fundraiser planned The fall fundraiser for the Wishek Hospital and Clinics Foundation will be held Oct. 12. The fundraiser has a 1950s’ theme and will be held in the Wishek Civic Center. Tickets are $50 and can be purchased at the hospital’s four clinics in Wishek, Napoleon, Kulm and Gackle, or from foundation board members Polly Benson, Kay Rau, Valerie Rinehardt, Felicia Huber, Bryan Schumacher or Tom Lovik. Ticket sales end Tuesday. The annual event raises money to help departments fund necessary purchases their budgets don’t support. A social hour begins at 6:30 p.m., dinner is served at 7 p.m. and entertainment begins at 8:30 p.m.

Deadline looms to remove hay bales North Dakota farmers and ranchers have about a month to remove hay bales from roadside ditches. The state Transportation Department said the deadline to remove bales from highway rights of way is Nov. 1. Officials said the bales need to be removed for snow management and safety. — Associated Press

Intruder

TOM STROMME/Tribune

PRIDE OF DAKOTA SCHOOL LUNCH DAY: North Dakota Agriculture Commissioner Doug Goehring, left, visited Saint Anne School in Bismarck on Wednesday, where he had lunch with the students on the 12th annual Pride of Dakota School Lunch Day. Above, Goehring speaks with Ryan Brown, center, and Rebecca Burckhard, both sixth-graders, about North Dakota agriculture products. “I was impressed with what they knew,” said Goehring, “and they know that food grown in their state is better.” Goehring also said he and Brown had a discussion on navy beans, chick peas and pinto beans. Burckhard said the lunch of meat balls, mashed potatoes, corn and buns was “good.”

7 p.m. Activities will include demonstrations of vehicle extrication and fire extinguisher training, fire truck rides, hands-on experience spraying a fire hose, a smoke house and Patches The Fire Dog. Free hot dogs and pop will be served. (Reach LeAnn Eckroth at 701-250-8264 or leann.eckroth@bismarcktribune.com.)

Taxable sales revenue Continued from 1B the 30 or 40 percent that was seen in 2012. “North Dakota experienced a record-setting year for taxable sales and purchases in 2012, and that level of growth was not sustainable,” he said. The way taxable sales have been trending, growth has been leveling off as oil rig counts have plateaued. Rauschenberger also said the $157.3 million decrease is not that large of a portion of the whole sales tax base and is about the equivalent of one week of bad weather in the oil patch. He said the operating rigs pour “hundreds of millions of dollars” of tax revenue into the state within a week. For example, in McKenzie County, trucks were asked not to go out on wet gravel roads to avoid damaging them. That means the sand, drill bits, pipe and other taxable items related to the industry couldn’t be

moved so they weren’t being bought. Despite the decrease, the retail and wholesale trade sectors that often reflect consumer confidence remained strong. Retail spending was up 1.9 percent during the second quarter and wholesale trade was up 2.1 percent during the same timeframe. Other sectors reporting growth included utilities, which grew 54.4 percent; financial, insurance, real estate, rental and leasing, which grew 12.7 percent; and professional, scientific, technical, and management services, which grew 11.5 percent. S e c t o r s re p o r t i n g a decline included transportation and warehousing, which declined 49.3 percent; educational, health care, and social services, which declined 20.1 percent; mining and oil extraction, which declined 15.7 percent; and construc-

tion, which declined 13.7 percent. A slowed agricultural industry in certain parts of the state also may lead to some decreases or lighter growth going into the third quarter, Rauschenberger said. Some producers dealt with late spring winter storms and rains that kept them from getting into the fields. With fewer crops to harvest, farmers may have spent less on taxable goods. Rauschenberger said given other activity in the s t a t e, t h o u g h , t h e t a x department is confident in a positive report next quarter. Growth just isn’t expected to be huge because the last few years have been so strong that they’re hard to top. Sales tax is the largest part of the state’s general fund, Rauschenberger said. Appropriations made to fund state agencies and projects were based on anticipated sales tax levels

over the next biennium. He said the rig count leveling off was anticipated when sales tax predictions were made. Income taxes, which fund the other portion of the general fund, were dropped by 19 percent by the state Legislature. Income taxes are still very strong despite lower rates, Rauschenberger said, because there are more people working in the state and are receiving higher wages. Taxes on mineral rights income also is helping meet the forecasted tax collections. The forecast for sales tax for the biennium is $2.473 billion. The first two months of actual sales tax collections in the biennium were $212.6 million, which came in $8.7 million or 3.9 percent less than forecast. (Reach Jessica Holdman at 701-250-8261 or jessica.holdman@bismarcktribune.com)


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2013 Vikes, pheasants off to slow start PAGE 2C

O UTD O ORS

WWW. BISMARCKTRIBUNE . COM

S ECTION C

Oil and gas funds at stake A second state organization last week came out in opposition to an initiative for a second fund that would funnel oil and gas tax revenue for conservation. If enough signatures are collected, it would appear on the November ballot.

BRIAN GEHRING

The Greater North Dakota Chamber last week followed suit with the North Dakota Petroleum Council opposing the initiative for the Clean Water, Wildlife and Parks amendment. The initiative seeks to put on the ballot a measure that, if approved, would collect between $75 million and $100 million a year in oil and gas extraction taxes. The difference between the Outdoor Heritage Fund, passed during the last legislative session, and the proposed initiative is, at minimum, around $60 million a year. There are other striking differences between the two plans. The new measure would require about $50 million to be spent each year on conservation projects and would allow for the purchase of land. The existing fund, which will be capped at $30 million per biennium, would get swallowed up quickly in one or two projects. Honestly, $30 million doesn’t go far these days when it comes to conservation projects of any consequence. The new measure would allow the purchase of land and again, in all honesty, buying land may be the only sure-fire way to protect and conserve it for future generations. But the question then becomes who is to decide what lands are worthy of being preserved. Many would argue the lands that are most immediately at risk are in the western part of the state in the midst of the oil activity. Hard to argue. Some might point to other areas of the state where tiles are being put down to drain wetlands and farm more land. Also hard to argue with. Each will change the land forever and another truth is land is one thing they don’t make any more of these days. Hunters and anglers, along with farmers and ranchers, have been at the forefront of conservation from day one. In the case of hunters, for the most part they have been collectively silent when it comes to policy issues regarding conservation. Most don’t want to risk offending someone, somewhere by engaging in a debate that ultimately determines how land — public and private — is managed. This is a conversation that hunters, anglers, hikers, birders — anyone who spends time outdoors should be involved in. And not just the big groups like Ducks Unlimited, Pheasants Forever and others. Local wildlife groups best know the situation in their part of the state and what the issues are that concerns them. There is not much question of just how much is at stake when it comes to wildlife habitat, but it’s more than that. There are other issues like water quality and flooding that are part of this equation. (Reach Brian Gehring at 701250-8254 or brian.gehring@bismarcktribune.com.)

N.D. Game and Fish

More than 1,000 antlerless deer licenses for the southwestern part of the state will not be issued this fall because of the latest outbreak of EHD.

Diseases killing deer means fewer hunting licenses By BRIAN GEHRING Bismarck Tribune

within 72-96 hours. In general, deer infected with EHD lose their appetite, With more than 1,000 doe lose their fear of people, grow licenses left over in southwest- weak and disoriented and ern deer hunting units, it’s too develop a fever. early to know if the Game and Infected deer will seek Fish Department will offer water, often wading in it, to refunds. reduce their body temperaDan Grove, veterinarian for ture. Deer that have sucthe Game and Fish Depart- cumbed to EHD are often ment, said surveillance for the found near streams or stock latest outbreak of epizootic ponds. hemoragic disease is continuRandy Kreil, wildlife chief ing. for the Game and Fish DepartIn surrounding states like ment, said the 1,000 or so doe Wyoming and Montana, EHD licenses that were left over is killing white-tailed deer. after the first deer lottery will Grove said in terms of not be sold. severity in North Dakota, this The leftover antlerless year’s outbreak seems to be licenses are in units 3F1, 3F2 more limited in terms of geog- and 4F in the southwestern raphy. part of the state. “It’s not nearly as bad as Kreil said while reports of some years, but it’s still pretty dead deer have slowed down bad,” Grove said. in recent weeks, there hasn’t This year’s EHD outbreak been a great deal of hunting seems to be concentrated activity either. mostly south of Interstate 94 In 2011, deer deaths from and in hunting units in the EHD occurred well into Octosouthwestern part of the state. ber, and prompted Game and Grove said the most wide- Fish to offer refunds to license spread year for EHD came in holders in several southwest2011 when reports of dead ern units. deer came as far north as the Kreil said it’s too early to tell Canadian border and even whether this year’s EHD east of the Minot area. episode is significant enough Other states as far east as to warrant a similar action, Iowa and Michigan are report- and the agency will wait until ing EDH cases this year. after opening weekend of EHD is not pheasant season transmitted to determine from deer to whether refunds deer, but via a would be an biting midge option. which over“In the past,” winters in Kreil added, “it mud. Typicalhas been helpful ly, outbreaks to gauge the Dan Grove, Game scope and intenoccur in late s u m m e r t o and Fish department sity of an EHD early fall, when veterinarian situation ending with there are thoucooler weather sands of hunters because of the die-off of the in the field in EHD areas, who midges. might observe dead deer along Grove said in North Dakota waterways.” there are two EHD viruses — the one that strikes white-tails — and another that affects Grove said monitoring for domestic livestock, commonly chronic wasting disease will referred to as blue tongue. focus on the eastern one-third The virus does not affect of the state this fall. humans and rarely affects CWD was first confirmed in mule deer or pronghorned North Dakota in 2009 in unit antelope. 3F2. Grove said there were sinBut in white-tailed deer, gle cases of CWD confirmed in Grove said it moves quickly 2010 and 2011, but none last and is almost always deadly. year. He said deer can begin “That could be because showing clinical signs of the deer numbers are lower,” he virus within a week of expo- said. sure and death usually occurs Outward signs of CWD are

“It’s not nearly as bad as some years, but it’s still pretty bad.”

Chronic wasting

This year’s EHD outbreak is isolated in the southwestern part of the state, unlike 2011 when confirmed cases were indentified in the far northern part of the state. similar to those of EHD, including excessive salivation, disorientation, weight loss and behavioral changes. Grove said the Game and Fish Department cycles its monitoring of CWD every three years. “This year it will cover basically everything east of Highway 281,” he said. A handful of hunting units surrounding and including 3F2 also will continue to be monitored. During surveillance for CWD, collection sites for hunters to drop off deer heads are set up in the surveillance area. Grove said often the dropoff sites are at butcher shops, a n d t h e Ga m e a n d Fi s h Department will post a list of sites on its website and send out email notifications to hunters in the surveillance area. There also are specific regu-

lations for those hunting out of state in areas where CWD is present. Only the following portions of the carcass can be transported into the state: Meat that is cut and wrapped either commercially or privately; quarters or other portions of meat with no part of the spinal column or head attached; meat that has been boned out; hides with no heads attached; clean (no meat or tissue attached) skull plates with antlers attached; antlers with no meat or tissue attached; upper canine teeth, also known as buglers, whistlers or ivories or finished taxidermy heads. More information can be found on the Game and Fish Department website at http://gf.nd.gov. (Reach Brian Gehring at 701-250-8254 or brian.gehring@bismarcktribune.com.)


Page 2C ■ Thursday, October 3, 2013

CALENDAR

W H AT ’ S G O I N G O N Thursday, Oct. 3 ARTS-ENTERTAINMENT-MUSIC: ■ “Ring of Fire: The Music of Johnny Cash,” 2 and 7:30 p.m., Belle Mehus Auditorium. ■ “To the Wonder” (USA 2012), Cinema 100, 3 p.m., 5:30 p.m., Grand Theatre. ■ Live solo acoustic music by Brian Gray, 5:30-7 p.m., Bruno’s Pizza, 910 E. Front Ave. ■ Music by Shaun Oban, 7 p.m., Bistro. ■ In The Air (local band debut), 8-11 p.m., Laughing Sun Brewing Co., 107 N. Fifth St. ■ Karaoke with DJ Paul Berge, 8:30 p.m.-close, Westside Bar and Grill, Mandan. FAITH: ■ The Banquet, a feeding ministry to serve people with needs in Bismarck and Mandan, 5:30-7 p.m., Trinity Lutheran Church, Third Street and Avenue B. Free meal served. ■ Prophetic Soaking, 7 p.m., River of Hope, 1996 43rd Ave. N.E., Bismarck. Info: Nick, 701-220-6121. ■ Worshipping Jesus led by Terry Jahner, 7 p.m., Solomon’s Rest. ORGANIZATIONS: ■ Alcoholics Anonymous: General Service Office, www.aa.org; and Area 52 North Dakota, www.aanorthdakota.org. ■ Alzheimer’s Association Minnesota-North Dakota Chapter. Info: 701-258-4933 or 800-232-0851. ■ Meadowlarks Toastmasters, 6:30 a.m., Church of Corpus Christi. Info: Bonnie Steiner, 701-224-0247. ■ MOPS, 9-11 a.m., Grace Lutheran Brethren Church. ■ TOPS No. 218, 9 a.m., First Lutheran Church basement, 408 Ninth St. N.W., Mandan. New members welcome. ■ TOPS No. ND 319, 10 a.m., McCabe United Methodist Church, 1030 N. Sixth St. ■ Capital City AA, noon and 8 p.m., 515 E. Main Ave., Suite 7. ■ Capital City Lions Club luncheon meeting, noon, Municipal Country Club. ■ Centurions Toastmasters, noon, Century Center, 1600 E. Century Ave. ■ Club Fed Toastmasters, noon-1 p.m., Federal Building, Third Street and Rosser Avenue, Room 164/166. ■ Keep It Simple AA, noon, Serenity Place. ■ Missouri Valley Optimist Club, noon, A&B Pizza South. Info: 701-258-9983. ■ Teamsters Retirees Association, 1:30 p.m., Teamster Hall. ■ Revitalize and Preserve Mandan meeting, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Morton Mandan Public Library. Info: Susan, 701-663-4728, or www.preservemandan.org. ■ TOPS No. ND 123, 5:30 p.m., McCabe United Methodist Church, 1030 N. Sixth St. ■ Co-dependents Anonymous, 6:30 p.m., Trinity Lutheran Church, use Fourth Street entrance, corner of Avenue A. ■ Central Labor Council, 7 p.m., Labor Temple. ■ Domestic violence support group, 7 p.m., Abused Adult Resource Center, free, and free child care is available. Info: 701-222-8370. ■ GamAnon support group, 7 p.m., Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, Washington Street and Divide Avenue. ■ Order of Rainbow Girls, 7 p.m., Masonic Temple. ■ Thursday Night Big Book AA, 7 p.m., Methodist Church, Mandan. ■ Spring Creek AA, 7:30 p.m., English Lutheran Church, Hazen. ■ City Center AA, 8 p.m., Serenity Place. ■ Eastenders NA (OP, WC), 8 p.m., Grace Lutheran Brethren Church, 503 N. 24th St. ■ Experience, Strength and Hope AA, 8 p.m., Faith Lutheran Church, southwest door. ■ North City Al-Anon, 8 p.m., Trinity Lutheran Church. ■ Thursday Night AA, 8 p.m., Church of the Cross. PUBLIC EVENTS: ■ Used book sale, 7 a.m.-8:45 p.m., Bismarck Public Library. ■ Baby and Me Story Time for infants up to 24 months, 9:30-10 a.m., Bismarck Public Library ■ Preschool Adventures Story Time for children 4, 5 and 6 years old, 10:15-10:45 a.m., Bismarck Public Library. ■ South Central High School 30th anniversary open house, 1-3 p.m., Riverside Education Center. ■ Capital farmers market, 8 a.m., Kmart. ■ Career Fair, 3-6 p.m., medical staff conference rooms, Sanford Seventh & Rosser Clinic. Info: bismarck.sanfordhealth.org/jobs. ■ Art and wine class-art uncorked, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Theo Art School. Cost: $15. For ages 21 and older; bring ID. ■ Diversity University: “Celebration of Cultures,” 7-8:30 p.m., Bismarck State College National Energy Center of Excellence, Bavendick Stateroom. ■ Texas Hold’em, 7:30 p.m., VFW Club, 14th Street and Broadway Avenue. Free. SCHOOLS: ■ Italian conversation group, 4:30-6 p.m., Welder Library, room 140, University of Mary. Info: Dr. Carol Andreini, 701-355-8322. SERVICES: ■ Blood drive, 8 a.m.-6 p.m., United Blood Services. Info: 701-258-4512. ■ Custer Health immunizations, 8:30 a.m.-noon; and WIC, Hazen City Hall. Appt.: 888-667-3370 or 701745-3599. ■ Free hearing screenings, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Sanford Clinic, Seventh and Broadway. Appt: 701-323-8921. ■ Burleigh County Bookmobile: Wing School, 10 a.m.-1:45 p.m.; and Wing downtown, 2-3 p.m. ■ Morton Mandan Library Bookmobile: Flasher School, 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m.; and downtown Flasher, 3:15-4:15 p.m.

Friday, Oct. 4 ARTS-ENTERTAINMENT-MUSIC: ■ Cleaton Saylor, 8 p.m., VFW Club. ■ Single File Dance, 8:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m., Bismarck Eagles. Entertainment by All Star (DJ). Cost: $7 members, $9 non-members. All singles over 21 welcome. FAITH: ■ Missions Conference 2013, sponsored by STEER Inc., held through Oct. 5, at Ramkota Hotel. To purchase tickets for the meals, receive a program or more info: 701-258-4911, email events@steerinc.com or visit www.steerinc.com. ORGANIZATIONS: ■ Knife River Al-Anon, 10 a.m., English Lutheran Church, Hazen. ■ Capital City AA, noon, 8 and 9:30 p.m., 515 E. Main Ave., Suite 7. ■ Keep It Simple AA, noon, Serenity Place. ■ Missouri Slope Shrine Club, noon-1 p.m. lunch and meeting, AMVETS. Masons, Shriners and prospective members welcome. Info: Edward, 701-255-1687. ■ Bismarck Duplicate Bridge Club, 1 p.m., Elks Club. ■ Happy Hour AA, 6 p.m., Serenity Place. ■ Bismarck-Mandan Bird Club, 6:30 p.m., Dakota Zoo. ■ Spring Creek AA, 7:30 p.m., English Lutheran Church, Hazen.

Outdoors

Bismarck Tribune ■ Bismarcktribune.com

Vikes, pheasants off to slow start I often draw parallels between sports and the outdoors because it sometimes helps to look at situations from different perspectives. Each season it seems, begins with promise, hope and optimism, along with predictions and prognostications. It’s a scenario that applies to your local high school or college football team, birds, deer or the Twins and Vikings. And so it is with North Dakota pheasants in 2013, leading up to the season opener on Oct. 12. Way last spring there was reason for optimism among hunters and wildlife managers, even though the annual spring pheasant crowing count was down 11 percent statewide. Following an extended winter and tardy spring, an 11 percent decline didn’t seem all that bad, and was a number that could realistically lead to a fall population increase given a good reproduction effort. Initially, biologists were cautiously optimistic that the pheasant nesting effort may not have started until after the prolonged cool, wet weather broke, as habi-

DOUG LEIER

tat conditions were good because of spring moisture. Now that the final summer production numbers are tabulated, it appears that early hope for a good hatch did not quite materialize. Certainly, North Dakota has young pheasants to entice hunters this fall, but the Game and Fish Department’s roadside survey conducted in late July and August indicates the fall population is down statewide from what it was in 2012. Stan Kohn, upland game management supervisor for the Game and Fish Department, said the survey showed total pheasants are down 30 percent from last year. In addition, Kohn said brood observations were down 29 percent, and the average brood size was down 10 percent. The final summary is

based on 253 survey runs made along 101 brood routes across North Dakota. “Poor production this spring resulted in fewer young birds added to the population and a lower fall population in all areas of the state,” Kohn said. Noteworthy factors cited for the lower brood numbers, according to Kohn, were continued land use changes in the prime pheasant range, including removal of Conservation Reserve Program acres, grasslands converted to croplands and small grain fields converted to row crops; and continuous wet spring weather. “Earlier this summer we thought it was possible that nesting season was delayed enough to avoid an influence from the cold, wet spring,” Kohn said, “but it now appears that wasn’t the case.” Kohn said even though statistics reveal bird numbers are down statewide, there will still be local areas with good pheasant populations. Statistics from southwestern North Dakota indicate the number of birds observed was down 25 per-

cent from 2012, and the number of broods was down 22 percent. Results from the southeast show birds are down 43 percent from last year, and the number of broods down 42 percent. Statistics from the northwest indicated pheasants are down 39 percent from last year, with broods down 32 percent. The northeast district, generally containing secondary pheasant habitat with much of it lacking good winter cover, showed one brood and seven birds per 100 miles. The 2013 regular pheasant season opens Oct. 12 and continues through Jan. 5, 2014. And while the numbers might be a bit disappointing, I’ll remind you that even if the local team isn’t faring as well as hoped, fans still turn out for the games. In similar fashion, North Dakota hunters still have a wealth of reasons to head afield this fall. (Doug Leier is a biologist with the Game and Fish Department. He can be reached by email: dleier@nd.gov. Read his blog at dakotatrails.com)

Goshawk king at Duluth’s Hawk Ridge By SAM COOK Duluth News Tribune DULUTH, Minn. — Broad-winged hawks are the most common raptor at Hawk Ridge. Bald eagles are the biggest. Sharpshins come through by the hundreds early each fall. But northern goshawks, the fierce hunters of the boreal forest, are the signature raptor of Hawk Ridge Bird Observatory in Duluth. “They’re Hawk Ridge’s claim to fame,” said count interpreter Erik Bruhnke. “People come from all over the world to Hawk Ridge to see the goshawk numbers.” None of the other hawk observation sites across North America get as many goshawks as Hawk Ridge does, said Frank Nicoletti, banding director at Hawk Ridge. Thousands of visitors will flock to Hawk Ridge this fall,

many of them converging for the annual Hawk Weekend, which was held last month. They’ll see plenty of sharpshins and broadwings and many other species of hawks. Some goshawks may be among them, but the Hawk Ridge faithful know the cool days of October will bring the greatest numbers of these big, powerful hunters. “They’re pretty much daily through the month of October when the migration is peaking,” Bruhnke said. About 200 to 300 come through each fall, Nicoletti said. Last fall, he and fellow banders caught and banded 159 goshawks. Northern goshawks are birds of the boreal forest. They’re the largest of the raptors known as accipiters, birds with short, rounded wings and long tails, designed to maneuver with agility through the aspen parklands they call home.

They prey on ruffed grouse and other large birds, as well as snowshoe hares. In her book, “For the Birds,” Duluth’s Laura Erickson calls the northern goshawk “the fiercest bird in the world.” Visitors to the canoe country will often hear the highp i t c h e d “ k y e - k y e - k y e” shrieking of a goshawk if they get too close to its nest. Goshawks are known to attack humans and animals that venture too close to their nests, according to the Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology. Goshawk numbers at Hawk Ridge can vary widely. In so-called “irruption” years, goshawks short of prey in the North will move through Duluth in large numbers as they seek food sources, Nicoletti said. It was the chance to see goshawks that drew Nicoletti to Duluth originally in 1991. He had planned to see

and band the birds during their irruption years at that time and then move on. But he decided to stay. Goshawk irruptions typically have occurred every nine to 11 years, he said. The last irruption years at Hawk Ridge were 2001 and 2002, Nicoletti said. “We’re actually due for one right now,” he said. “I saw signs of it last year toward the end of the season. But there’s still no real indication it’s coming.” Irruptions are not as pronounced or predictable as they once were, he said. “We don’t know why the cycle may not occur anymore,” Nicoletti said. “It’s not occurring in the numbers it did in the ’70s and ’80s and ’90s. It seems to be declining.” Perhaps this will be the irruption year Nicoletti and others at Hawk Ridge have been waiting for.

Ranchers to be compensated for livestock loss HELENA, Mont. (AP) — State wildlife officials say the Montana Livestock Board has begun compensating ranchers for livestock losses caused by grizzly bears. Program manager George Edwards said com-

pensation for damage done by wolves and grizzly bears will be covered under one program. The Montana Legislature last year added grizzly bears to the Montana Livestock Loss Program, but a companion bill to fund the pro-

gram was not approved. The Livestock Loss Board receives $200,000 per year from the state for wolf depredations. Edwards said they average about $108,000 in annual payments for wolf kills. The group Defenders of

Wildlife has committed to a $25,000 donation for grizzly bear depredations this year. Livestock producers who suspect that they’ve suffered a loss due to wolves or grizzly bears should contact the federal Wildlife Services agency.

OUTDOORS BRIEFS most hunting sea- or online at www.gf.nd.gov rized, and sent back to the Pheasants Forever sonsWithopen and producers . department with a fee. harvesting crops, moving banquet is Oct. 18 cattle and hauling bales, Verify your Reminder for nonThe Knife River Pheasants road traffic is busy at times, deer licenses Forever Chapter is hosting even on rural gravel roads. residents on PLOTs The North Dakota Game its fall banquet Oct. 18 at the With that in mind, Grandview Steakhouse in Beulah. A social begins at 5:30 p.m. Tickets for a membership and meal are $50 with an additional guest meal $20. Tickets purchased before Oct.11 qualify to win a 39-inch LED TV. Ringnecks meal and membership for youth are $5. For more information and for tickets call: Randy Huntimer at 701-891-8888, Ji m B o n d e r u d a t 7 0 1 870-4148 or Bill Wagner at 701-880-1380.

Use caution on state’s roadways North Dakota hunters are reminded to be cautious on roadways as farmers and ranchers are busy with fall farm duties.

STOREWIDE PRICE REDUCTION

hunters are asked to move to the side of the road to allow wide farm vehicles to pass, park their vehicles in a place that will not block a roadway, field approach or gate, pick up trash and empty shells, and not clean game in the road ditch or approach. In addition, hunters should avoid driving offtrail through tall vegetation due to dry ground conditions.

N.D. Outdoors calendars available The North Dakota Game and Fish Department is taking orders for its North Dakota Outdoors calendar. Contact the North Dakota Game and Fish Department, 100 N. Bismarck Expressway, Bismarck, N.D. 58501-5095

and Fish Department urges deer hunters to find their license and check it for accuracy. Every year the Game and Fish Department’s licensing section receives last-minute inquiries from hunters who can’t find their license. When that happens, it’s difficult to try to get a replacement license in time for the season opener. Another reason to check the license now is to make sure the unit and species is what was intended. Deer hunters in need of a replacement license can print out a duplicate (replacement) license application from the Game and Fish website, http://gf. nd.gov, or can call 701328-6300 to have an application mailed or faxed. The form must be completely filled out and nota-

Out-of-state hunters are reminded that state law does not allow nonresidents to hunt on North Dakota Game and Fish Department owned or managed lands during the first week of the pheasant season. Private land open to sportsmen acreage and state wildlife management areas are open to hunting by resident hunters only from Oct. 12-18. Nonresidents, however, can still hunt those days on other state-owned and federal lands, or private land. The law applies to all small game, waterfowl, furbearer and big game hunting on PLOTS and state wildlife management areas during the first seven days of the pheasant season. Starting Oct. 19 this year, nonresidents may hunt on PLOTS and WMAs as long as the appropriate season is open.

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Outdoors

Bismarcktribune.com ■ Bismarck Tribune Solunar tables

Peak times when fish and game are most active. 5:19 a.m. 5:43 p.m. 11:31 a.m. 11:55 p.m. 7:43 a.m. sunrise 7:15 p.m. sunset

Oct. 4

6:07 a.m. --------

Oct. 5

7:45 a.m. sunrise

6:32 p.m. 12:45 p.m.

7:14 p.m. sunset

7:00 a.m. 7:27 p.m. 12:47 a.m. 1:13 p.m. 7:12 p.m. sunset 7:46 a.m. sunrise

Oct. 6

7:58 a.m 8:26 p.m. 1:44 a.m. 2:12 p.m. 7:47 a.m. sunrise 7:10 p.m. sunset

Oct. 7 Oct. 8

7:49 a.m. sunrise

9:00 a.m. 9:29 p.m. 2:46 a.m. 3:15 p.m. 7:08 p.m. sunset

Oct. 9

10:04 a.m. 10:33 p.m. 3:50 a.m. 4:19 p.m. 7:50 a.m. sunrise 7:06 p.m. sunset 11:08 a.m. 10:37 p.m. Oct. 10 4:53 a.m. 5:22 p.m. 7:51 a.m. sunrise 7:04 p.m. sunset Major periods last one to two hours. Minor periods last one hour or less. Add one minute to times for each 12 miles west of Bismarck, subtract one minute for each 12 miles east.

FISHING REPORT Fishing report Walleyes are still deep on Lake Sakakawea — 50 feet of water in some cases — so that means covering a lot of water to find fish. Drifting and working slow with heavy jigs, Lindy or bottom bouncers to get deep seems to be producing. Lake Audubon is yielding some walleyes on the same presentation; drifting live bait rigs over islands and points. Salmon on the big lake is mostly slow, but a few are starting to show up on the face of the dam. Some are being caught trolling crankbaits. The Tailrace seems to be the most consistent game in town right now for walleyes. Pitching jigs in slack water is producing some nice eaters. — Brian Gehring

Thursday, October 3, 2013 ■ Page 3C

Yellowstone, Grand Teton close JACKSON, Wyo. (AP) — Thousands of visitors to Yellowstone and Grand Teton national park are grumbling and making alternate plans after being told to leave or denied entr y because of the budget impasse in Washington. The neighboring parks attract visitors from around the world, but both parks — like all other national parks in the United States — were forced to furlough hundreds of employees and close. People already inside t h e p a r k s w e re g i v e n 48 hours to leave. Yellowstone averages 54,000 visitors in the first week of October, according to park spokesman Al Nash. Grand Teton Superintendent Mary Gibson said some visitors resisted leaving while others tried to cross blocked entryways. No one was charged or arrested. Zach Gertsch of Las Vegas was among those who were denied entry to

Grand Teton. “ To h a v e m y t r i p wrecked by bureaucratic failure is incredibly disappointing,” Gertsch said Tuesday. “ We’re going home early. We would have g o n e h o m e S u n d a y. Instead, we’ll leave tomorrow.” Gertsch said he was drawn to northwes Wyoming by the prospect o f p h o t o g ra p h i n g t h e snow-capped Tetons and golden aspens during fall. “On the bright side, I’ll probably save $500,” he said. “Hotels, restaurants, gas — it all adds up.” Outside Yellowstone’s north entrance, where a roadside sign with the wording “Closed Yellowstone Park Government S h u t d ow n No V i s i t o r Access” greeted motorists, a tour bus of Chinese and Indian tourists sat idling while its passengers posed for photos in front of the park sign. Many from the tour did

not speak fluent English, but when they heard the word “shutdown” they frowned and two men gave the thumbs down sign. Jock Holland of Melbourne, Australia, was touring the American West, heading to Grand Teton from Yellowstone when he encountered a closed park entrance. “Now we’re headed to Jackson to grab a bite and decide what our plan will be,” he said. At the Irma Hotel in Cody, host Steve Franklin said some visitors from Asia and Europe complained to him in broken English about their interrupted trips. “They were pretty livid,” Franklin said. Stephen Price, general manager of the Spring Creek Ranch in Jackson Hole, said he has contacted the parks to help anyone displaced. “I think it’s terrible for everyone because you have

these people making a trip to Teton park and Yellowstone, and it might be a lifetime trip, and they can’t go,” Price said. Communities just outside the parks are seeing hotel rooms fill with displaced tourists on the one hand and cancellations on the other. They expect to lose money if the parks remain closed much longer. The Cody Country Chamber of Commerce expects to lose at least $4 million per day if the shutdown lasts for more than a few days, said Scott Balyo, executive director of the chamber. Jim Waldrop, general manger of the Wort Hotel in Jackson, said while the parks may be closed there are other opportunities for visitors in Jackson Hole. “We have tens of thousands of acres of national forest to enjoy,” he said. “There’s still plenty of things to do.”

10,000 walrus come ashore in Alaska By DAN JOLING Associated Press ANCHORAGE, Alaska — An estimated 10,000 walrus unable to find sea ice over shallow Arctic Ocean water have come ashore on Alaska’s northwest coast. Scientists with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on Friday photographed walrus packed onto a beach on a barrier island near Point Lay, an Inupiat Eskimo village

300 miles southwest of Barrow and 700 miles northwest of Anchorage. The walrus have been coming to shore since midSeptember. The large herd was spotted during NOAA’s annual arctic marine mammal aerial survey, an effort conducted with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, the agency that conducts offshore lease sales. An estimated 2,000 to 4,000 walrus were photographed at the site on

findnsave.bismarcktribune.com

Sept. 12. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the agency that manages walrus immediately took steps to prevent a stampede among the animals packed shoulder to shoulder on the rocky coastline. The agency works with villages to keep people and airplanes a safe distance from herds. Young animals are especially vulnerable to stampedes triggered by a polar bear, a human hunter or a low-flying airplane. The

carcasses of more than 130 mostly young walruses were counted after a stampede in September 2009 at Alaska’s Icy Cape. The gathering of walrus on shore is a phenomenon that has accompanied the loss of summer sea ice as the climate has warmed. Pacific walrus spend winters in the Bering Sea. Females give birth on sea ice and use ice as a diving platform to reach snails, clams and worms on the shallow continental shelf.

OUTDOORS CALENDAR Saturday

■ Youth pheasant season opens.

Saturday-Sunday

■ Public rifle sight-in days, Fried Family Marksmanship Range near Moffit. Sponsored by BismarckMandan Rifle and Pistol Association.

Oct. 10

■ Ducks Unlimited fall banquet, 5:30 p.m. Ramkota. Call 701-541-6964 for tickets.

Oct. 12

■ Knife River Chapter Pheasants Forever banquet, Grandview Steakhouse, Beulah. Social at 5:30 p.m. Call 701-891-8888, 701-870-4148 or 701-880-1380 for ticket information. ■ Wounded Warriors Family pheasant hunt/Freedom Concert event, Zeeland. Advanced ticket sales: The Quencher in Hague, The Last Resort in Zeeland or at www.stopsmellnow. For details contact Darrel Wolf at 701-851-0023 or 701-4235506.

Oct. 18

■ Pheasant, turkey seasons open.

Oct. 26

■ Mink, muskrat, weasel trapping seasons open. (To submit a calendar item contact Brian Gehring at 250-8254 or brian.gehring @bismarcktribune.com.)

Bismarcktribune.com


Page 4C ■ Thursday, October 3, 2013

Nation-World

Bismarck Tribune ■ Bismarcktribune.com

Head of far-right party in court By ELENA BECATOROS and DEREK GATOPOULOS Associated Press ATHENS, Greece — The head of Greece’s extremist right-wing Golden Dawn party was testifying Wednesday on charges of running a criminal organization as part of an investigation into his party triggered by the killing of a left-wing rapper. Nikos Michaloliakos was led into a central Athens courthouse wearing handcuffs. More than 100 supporters waved Greek flags and chanted “Blood, Honor, Golden Dawn.” Michaloliakos’ testimony was expected to last several hours. Earlier, the investigat-

Yiannis Lagos, was jailed pending trial. All have denied the charges against them. The government, which has vowed to eradicate Golden Dawn, insisted the case against the Nazi-inspired party was still on track despite the releases. Golden Dawn, which the government has described as a “Nazi creation,” rose from the margins of Greece’s political scene to become the third most popular party in Greece amid the country’s Associated Press severe financial crisis. It has long been blamed for a series Supporters of the extreme far-right Golden Dawn with violent attacks, mostly Greek and party flags gather in Athens on Wednesday. of against immigrants. ing magistrates ordered the makers in a marathon court The party denies it is release of three party law- session. A fourth lawmaker, behind any violent attacks.

Man’s trial set for slapping toddler ATLANTA (AP) — A man accused of slapping a crying toddler on a jet is set to go on trial this week. Joe Rickey Hundley faces a misdemeanor simple assault charge in the February incident. His trial is scheduled to start Thursday in federal court in Atlanta. Authorities say Hundley used a racial slur to refer to the 19-month-old boy and then hit him under the right eye as the flight began its descent to the Atlanta airport. Hundley, who has pleaded not guilty, faces up to a year in prison if convicted. His lawyers say Hundley’s son was in a coma in Atlanta, and he was flying there to decide whether to take him off life support. Hundley lived in Idaho at the time but has since moved to North Carolina.

Man: Not guilty in Iran uranium plot FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — A West African man has pleaded not guilty in a Florida courtroom to U.S. charges of trying to broker an illegal deal to ship tons of uranium ore from Sierra Leone to Iran. Patrick Campbell entered the plea at a brief hearing Wednesday in Fort Lauderdale. The 33-year-old Campbell was indicted on a charge of attempting illegal exports to Iran. The charge carries a maximum 20-year prison sentence and up to $1 million fine.

Trial Oct. 10 for Saudi air force sergeant in Vegas sex case By KEN RITTER Associated Press LAS VEGAS — A Nevada judge on Wednesday scheduled trial to begin Oct. 10 for a Saudi Arabian air force sergeant accused of raping a 13-year-old boy last New Year’s Eve at a Las Vegas Strip hotel. Trial had been scheduled Monday, but prosecutors and a defense attorney for 24-year-old Mazen

Alotaibi told Clark County District Court Judge Stefany Miley they needed a little more time for each side to review DNA test results. Jury selection and trial are expected to take several days. Alotaibi has pleaded not guilty to nine felony charges, including kidnapping, sexual assault of a minor under 14 and lewdness with a child under 14 that each could get him life in prison. He faces additional lesser

charges of sexually motivated coercion, and a burglary count accusing him of entering a room with intent to commit a crime. Alotaibi spoke with his lawyer, Don Chairez, but said nothing as he listened to court proceedings Wednesday with an Arabic interpreter. Alotaibi is being held at the Clark County jail on $1.7 million bail. Alotaibi told police in a video

interview that he met the boy in a hallway at Circus Circus early Dec. 31. He said the boy wanted marijuana and offered to exchange sex for money. Nevada state law says children under 16 cannot consent to sex. Chairez argues that Alotaibi was too tired and intoxicated after traveling to Las Vegas from Los Angeles and staying up all night drinking cognac at a strip club, and too limit-

ed in English proficiency to waive his right to have a lawyer with him while he answered police questions. Police reported collecting DNA evidence from a used condom and a soiled towel found in the hotel room bathroom where the boy said the attack took place. Alotaibi was in the U.S. for military training at Keesler Air Force Base in Biloxi, Miss., and Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland in Texas.

It takes two to find the right one. The only two sources you’ll ever need when searching for the right job are the ads printed in the newspaper everyday and the bismarcktribune.com/jobs website.

GO LOOK. IN PRINT AND ONLINE.


Bismarcktribune.com ■ Bismarck Tribune

Thursday, October 3, 2013 ■ Page 5C

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Phone hours Mon.-Fri. 7:30 AM - 5:30 PM. . . .701.258.6900 Toll Free.................................1.866.I.SOLD.IT Fax...........................................701.250.0195 24-hr voice mail.......................701.258.6900

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701-258-6900 1-866-476-5348 Employment Bismarck North Fairfield Inn & Suites

Discovery Childcare Center

Assistant General Manager

FULL & PART TIME STAFF

Is seeking an energetic, professional

To Apply, email: www.tmihospitality.com

302-334

is currently hiring for

For an application or for additional information, call

Century Baptist Church is seeking a full-time

CUSTODIAN

Must have experience in maintenance and groundskeeping.

Email resume to: grow@centurybaptist.org Or mail to: Attn: Mike Wobbema 205 Colt Avenue, Bismarck ND 58503 Job description is available at www.centurybaptist.org

701-222-2273 Or Email to: discoverychildcarebis @yahoo.com

FT Gramma Ginnas

• FT/PT ROOM ATTENDANTS • PT WEEKEND BREAKFAST ATTENDANTS

Apply in person at: 3808 E. Divide Ave. Bismarck-Ask for Amber

• Maintenance Person • Housekeeper

Mon-Sat 8am-2pm Please apply in person at the Bis/Man Elks. 255-1199

Comfort Inn & Comfort Suites • FT Housekeeping (Starting wage $10.50/hr) • FT Desk Clerk (Weekends are required) • PT Pool Attendant •FT/PT Breakfast Attendant • FT Night Auditor (Weekends are required) Apply in person at:

Comfort Inn

1030 E. Interstate Ave. between 9am-3pm. EOE

ARE YOUR HOURS THIS GOOD?

No nights or weekends. - Full or Part-time Competitive, WEEKLY pay. Clean houses on a schedule you can live with! Family, team atmosphere, 18 yrs of age, drivers license, vehicle and insurance required, Call Merry Maids TODAY! 701-255-5031 to apply.

Customer Service Rep

Appliance & Furniture RentAll has a unique opportunity for a candidate who likes to work with people. Responsibilities will include collections, sales and delivery. No Experience necessary, will train. Opportunity for advancement available. This position is mostly daytime with no Sunday work and is available immediately. Apply in person or mail resume:

Craig Valnes Appliance & Furniture Rent All 1018 South 12th St Bismarck, ND 58504 Be a creative part of Bismarck’s most unique interior design and decor company. Seeking experienced applicants for:

Secretary / Retail Sales Associate PT Retail Sales Associate Send your resume to: 3250 Rock Island Place Suite 2, or call 250-9600

Applicant must have an outgoing personality and possess good people skills. List of jobs would include but not limited to, coffee barista, fudge server, serving of hot and cold sandwiches and soup. Scheels offers competitive pay and benefits including Health and Dental plans, associate retirement plan, vacation/ sick leave, and the best employee purchase plan in the industry. We start out at $13.00 an hour. Scheels also offers an extensive training program to all applicants. Strong oral and written communication skills required PT in Gramma Ginnas also available nights and weekends. We start at $11.00 an hour. Pick up an application at the customer service counter at our store or apply online at: careerinfoki@ scheelssports.com

Hiring FT Laborers

Carpentry Work, Siding Installation, Building and more. Travel and Valid drivers license required. Wage DOE.

Holiday Season Temp Workers Needed

The Bismarck Tribune packaging department has immediate need for dependable people to work in our production department during our busy holiday season. Packaging employees are responsible for inserting and bundling of the papers for distribution, and stacking our newspaper products prior to delivery. We can create a shift to fit almost any need. Are you interested in: •Weekends only •PT or FT nights •PT or FT days •Afternoons only •Two, three or four days a week? Apply today. Indicate on the application your desired shift. Permanent positions are also available. No benefits for temp employees, full benefit package for permanent, FT employees. Applicants must be able to stand, bend, twist, and lift 15 lb bundles numerous times per day. Pre-employment drug screen is mandatory. EOE Applications are accepted at www.bismarck tribune.com/workhere

Warehouse Lead at the Bismarck, ND Distribution Center

Merchandiser / Driver FT. Salary dependant on obtaining a CDL. Must be 21 & able to lift 180 lbs.

Apply in person at: Jerome Distributing 3420 Miriam Ave Bismarck, ND

Infant/Toddler Center

FT Sat. - Wed. $18.50/hr Apply at:

http://careers. supervalu.com

Kirkwood Ace Hardware Full or Part Time We can train, but experience preferred.

Apply in person, ask for Jeff or Gary

Diesel Mechanic

Must have certified diesel, min. 5 years oilfield equipment maintenance experience, certified brakes, winch trucks, gin/pole trucks, heavy haul truck maintenance experience, heavy haul trailer, jeep and booster maintenance experience, self-motivated, and able to use MS Office, Fleet Maintenance software, etc. This position is located in Watford City, ND.

Crane Operator

Must have current NCCCO Certificate, valid CDL A license, 3-5 years experience and/or training, and must possess organizational, leadership and people skills, and have the ability to work under pressure. Previous mechanical and maintenance skills a plus. This position is located in Minot, ND.

Rigger

Must have current NCCCO rigger certification and minimum 2 years oilfield industry experience and/or training. CDL license preferred. This position is located in Minot, ND. All applicants should send resume with references to:

Join a growing company. Competitive wages, health insurance, 401K and vacation.

Call 701-527-2709

Paint Sales Position

is now hiring for:

rlong @rosscocrane.com

Hiring FT. 9:30-5:30. Benefits. 214 E Thayer Ave, (701)258-7490

HIRING A

MULTIPLE POSITIONS Rossco Crane and Rigging

NOW HIRING

• Front Desk • Kids Club

Apply online at:

www.goldsgym.com click on the career tab

Northwest Tire is looking for a

FT Customer Service Representative

to be part of out exciting team. Ideal candidates should be career minded, and have good math and customer service skills. Applicants will be responsible for customer sales and service. Good people and computer skills are essential. Candidate will be reliable, self-motivated and able to follow instructions. We offer an excellent wage and benefit package. Wage: DOE

Apply in person to: Darren Hulm Northwest Tire 1615 E Bismarck Expressway Bismarck, ND 58504 www.nwtire.com

Now looking for

Cashiers

starting at $11.86 per/hr

+ $300 SIGN ON BONUS Look for other positions online and to apply, visit: www.lowes.com/ careers or stop in at 1401 West Century Ave. EOE

Super 8, Bismarck, ND Now hiring for

HOUSEKEEPING & FRONT DESK

•Great Pay •Benefits •Bonus Program!! Apply in person at: 1124 E. Capitol Ave.

SERVERS

Benefits include: Flexible hours • Meal Plan • Energized Atmosphere • Great Money Stop in for an immediate interview.

Blarney Stone Pub 408 E. Main Ave. Bismarck, ND 58501

Production

Packaging Workers

The Bismarck Tribune is looking for FT and PT Production workers to work primarily in our Packaging Department for days or night shifts. These individuals would be responsible for inserting and bundling of the papers for distribution, stacking papers, and preparing rolls in the press room. We offer a 75 cents per hour night differential and progressive pay increases. Requirements include: - Weekend and holiday work required for some positions - Ability to lift at least 20lbs on a regular basis - Stand and walk the majority of the shift, pushing/pulling, stooping, bending, and twisting. - Medical Benefits available for FT positions: - Paid vacation and sick leave for all 20+ hour positions EOE

Now hiring for full and part time

Taking applications for the following:

• Waitstaff • Cashier • Housekeepers (10.25/hr)

• Laundry • Maintenance

Good benefits available!

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Apply in person at: Radisson Hotel 605 E. Broadway Bismarck, ND

*Some categories excluded

Applications are accepted at: www.bismarcktribune. com/workhere. Drug Free Workplace * EOE

Warehouse / Delivery Personnel

Immediate full and part-time openings. Individuals must be honest, personable, have a valid drivers license and clean driving record. Major duties include assisting with deliveries, loading / unloading freight & general warehouse detail. Excellent compensation and full-time benefits package including 401K, major medical, paid vacations and much more. APPLY IN PERSON AT:

Slumberland Furniture, 2400 E. Bismarck Expy

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Call Ron at 250-8215 or Becky at 355-8826


Bismarck Tribune ■ Bismarcktribune.com

CRACKER BARREL IS NOW HIRING DEPENDABLE & RELIABLE INDIVIDUALS FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS:

• Retail

(SeaSonal & PeRmanent PoSitionS)

• CaShieRS

Come work for people who value your efforts! We offer weekly paychecks, discounted meals, regularly scheduled raises, opportunities for advancement and excellent benefit package for full and part-time employees. All with flexible scheduling to meet your needs.

Apply in person at: Cracker Barrel 1685 N. Grandview Lane • Bismarck, ND • EOE

needed to help reduce my work load. Computer skills needed and should be well organized and will be well paid.

Seven Seas Hotel & Waterpark

Interested person(s) should please email to: jack.adams17@ hotmail.com for more info & wages.

FT SALES DIRECTOR Applicant must be sales

Eckroth Music is looking for a part-time (flexible hours)

Executive Assistant

to join our Bismarck corporate team serving six stores in three states. Working with the Leadership Team and Store Managers, this position requires multi-tasking, being detail oriented, and customer service driven. Must have excellent computer skills; knowledge of Microsoft Office and Photoshop, Illustrator and/or InDesign. Verbal/written communication and excellent phone skills is a must. Eckroth Music provides a competitive salary and benefits package. Send resume and salary requirements to: Tamara Kautzman Eckroth Music 1655 N Grandview Ln Suite 201 Bismarck, ND 58503 tamara@eckroth.com

DAKOTA FARMS Now hiring for

ing Loofkor

CRACKER BARREL IS NOW HIRING DEPENDABLE & RELIABLE INDIVIDUALS FOR THE FOLLOWING POSITIONS:

FT & PT SHIFTS SERVERS & GRILL COOKS (GRILL COOKS START AT $11/hr.) Come work for people who value your efforts! We offer weekly paychecks, discounted meals, regularly scheduled raises, opportunities for advancement and excellent benefit package for full and part-time employees. All with flexible scheduling to meet your needs.

• Cooks • Waitress

Apply in person at: 1120 E. Main Avenue Mandan, ND

is adding to their sales team. Now hiring for a

driven, work to build new clients & corporate client base. A combination of inside calling and outside selling. Position requires excellent communication and customer service skills. Flexible schedule working days, evenings and weekends. Send resume to: Karen.sevenseas@ midconetwork.com

• PM Servers • Cooks • Cocktail Servers

(Exp. preferred but not necessary)

All shifts available Apply in person at: MINERVAS 1800 N 12th St Bismarck 222-1402

1685 N. Grandview Lane • Bismarck, ND • EOE Now Hiring

ALL POSITIONS

It’s just $5.00 and you can win gift certificates from Party America! It’s easy to submit your photos - just log onto

www.bismarcktribune.com/celebrate click on ‘Submit Yours’ then Halloween

Quality Car Care Products

Now hiring a Sales Professional in a growing market to call on automotive / agricultural outlets in SW North Dakota. • Establish accounts • Salary + commission • Bonus + 401K program • Vehicle including expenses • Training program 75 years of continuous growth

Call 1-800-533-7492

Watershed Coordinator.

Mon - Fri 7am-3pm Arbor House

Mental Health Technicians (4 positions)

• Every other weekend 3pm-11pm Sannish • Every other weekend 3-11pm Arbor • 1 week day 3-11pm • Tues/Thurs 3-9pm and every other weekend 3-10pm ACS

Medication Aid

Bismarck Public Schools Is now accepting applications for the following position:

BUS DRIVER

(9 month position) Requires High School Diploma or equivalent. It is recommended that you have a minimum of a Class B or higher commercial driver’s license with passenger and school bus endorsements. Air brake endorsement recommended. We will work with driver to achieve endorsements. Must meet current DOT standards, must provide current driving record from the North Dakota Motor Vehicle Department and must be able to lift up to 50 pounds.

www.bismarck schools.org Application Deadline: October 11, 2013 EEOE

Every other weekend and on call

If interested call 701-223-4517 or send resume to 600 S. 2nd Street #8 Bismarck, ND 58501

South Location: Bismarck has openings for full or part time

High school or equivalent. 18 yrs old. Apply online at:

cvscaremark.com EOE

Busy ophthalmology practice is looking for someone who likes working one-onone with people of all ages in a clinic setting. Although skilled, certified ophthalmic personnel preferred. Will train the right person to be an opthalmic assistant. Medical background helpful. Benefits pkg retirement, health, dental, vision & uniform allowance. Send resume to: Dakota Eye Institute Attn: Colette 200 S. 5th Street Bismarck, ND 58504 Or email resume to: csabot@dakotaeye.com No phone calls please.

The Face & Jaw Surgery Center

Well established, local business is seeking candidates to fill this position. OR Technician or Dental Assistant with a GREAT attitude to join our team. Position is full- time, Mon- Fri. We offer competitive salary and excellent benefits package which includes Medical and Dental Insurance and company sponsored 401(K) Plan. Please send resume to: Face & Jaw Surgery Center Attn: Linda Kleinjan 1140 W. Capitol Ave. Bismarck, ND 58501

Medical Aesthetician

Our busy medical / surgical facility is looking for a full-time Medical Aesthetician to work 8am-5pm Mon-Fri and some receptionist duties. Experience with lasers is preferred. Excellent benefit package.

SALES

Liechty Homes Inc. is looking for a professional, confident individual to join our sales dept. at our Bismarck location. Sales experience and a 4 year degree is helpful but not required. Full-time position with base pay plus commission the first year. We offer a benefit package including health, paid vacation & 401K. Successful candidate must also have excellent verbal, written and communication skills along with great customer service & be detailed oriented to be considered for this position. If interested please send a resume to: Liechty Homes Inc., PO Box 2259, Bismarck, ND 58502

a surface coal mine in Colstrip, MT has an opening for a Mobile Maintenance Superintendent.

Director of Nursing Location: Mandan HIT, a local non-profit, is looking for a Director of Nursing for our Dakota Alpha brain injury program. Primary responsibilities include: - Manages and leads the nursing support team - Ensures proper administration of all medications, treatments, and procedures as indicated by the individual’s medical professional - Promotes the maximum level of resident independence and functioning through a committed team effort Qualified candidates will be a licensed Registered Nurse with at least 3 years of supervisory experience. HIT offers a competitive compensation package including medical, dental and vision insurance, 401K, tuition reimbursement, and Paid Time Off Closing Date: Oct. 8, 2013

Please visit www.hitinc.org to complete an online application or contact Human Resources at 701-663.0379 for more information.

It’s easy to submit your photos - just log onto bismarcktribune.com/celebrate click on ‘Submit Yours’ then Halloween

Send resume to: Advanced Surgical Arts Center, 3913 Lockport Street, Bismarck, ND 58503

Next to Ace Hardware - Bismarck

Next to Ace Hardware - Bismarck

Monday Easy Puzzle

Tuesday Intermediate Puzzle

Wednesday Intermediate Puzzle

Thursday Challenging Puzzle

Location: New Town ND, Responsibilities: Ensure timeliness of financial statements, Preparation of budgets & financial reports, Maintain data accuracy & integrity, Conduct acct reconciliations & analysis, assist in the company’s monthly & yearly closing Skills: Good communication skills, Organizational & time management, Judgement, planning and leadership skills Qualifications: Experience in construction and / or heavy equip. Compensation: Competitive Oilfield Package. Fax resume: or email: 701-627-3590, gtayner@mchsi.com

OFFICE MANAGER Local company looking for an energetic person to manage our office located in Bismarck. Come work for a fun, team oriented company committed to the future of our company and employees. Potential employee will be very computer savvy, superior customer skills, self starter, total team player, attention to detail, & bring a great can do attitude to the job. Full-time salaried position with a full benefit package.

List of the jobs responsibilities is located on website www.ndascd.org Send resume to: ndascd@ lincolnoakes.com

Detailed job description and application process can be accessed at: www.westmoreland. com (careers) An Equal Opportunity Employer

NOW HIRING

ASC Construction Equipment has available the following positions:

• Diesel Mechanics (Minot) • Equipment Sales Associates (Fargo and Minot)

ASC Construction Equipment USA, Inc. is the largest Volvo construction equipment dealership in the US. We have branches in the Southeastern US and 3 locations in North Dakota - Minot, Fargo, and Bismarck. Applicants should be familiar with construction heavy equipment. Experience in this field is preferred. We offer competitive wages and competive benefits package. ALL INQUIREIES WILL BE TREATED AS CONFIDENTIAL.

Please contact Suzanne McKinney HR Director, ASC Construction Equipment, suzanne.mckinney@ ascvolvo.com Phone: 877-272-2117 Fax: 704-494-8195 www.ascvolvo.com

FIND A JOB. FILL A JOB. JOBS.BISMARCKTRIBUNE.COM

The Credit Union Association of the Dakotas (CUAD), a trade association for credit unions, is looking for an addition to their team. will be responsible for all creative marketing services for our organization and for providing and expanding similar services for our member credit unions and potentially beyond. The Manager of Creative Services will have a Bachelor degree along with five years of progressive experience in the marketing, advertising, or creative services field. This position will be located at our office in Bismarck, ND. Primary responsibilities include developing marketing materials and graphics for promotional use, websites, and publications. Individual will publish newsletters for members, grow our youth savings program, focus on developing marketing and creative service lines of business, and oversee our awareness campaign and daily electronic newsletter production. The Manager of Creative Services will have experience with InDesign, Photoshop, Microsoft programs, and other related software. Other beneficial attributes include creative thinking, ability to manage multiple projects and meet deadlines, and excellent written and oral presentation skills. We offer a competitive salary and excellent benefits. Please submit resume, cover letter, and salary history to: kclark@cuad.coop or CUAD Attn: Karla Clark 2005 N. Kavaney Drive Bismarck, ND 58501

MANAGER Well established company in the Bismarck market has an immediate full-time opening for a Store Manager. We are searching for the right person to lead a well trained staff that delivers efficient and accurate service to our customers. Previous Management & Sales experience a must. You will be responsible for inventory, deliveries, sales, customer service and managing staff. The candidate must have excellent verbal and written communications skills, ability to provide leadership, direction and motivation to our staff and the ability to manage time effectively and meet daily deadlines. Strong analytical and problem solving skills are a must in this position as well as PC proficient. We offer competitive salary and benefits package.

Send resume to: BB#1150 in c/o The Bismarck Tribune, PO Box 5516, Bismarck, ND 58506

Class A Driver/Furniture Installer Monday-Friday 7:30am-4pm

*FULL STATE BENEFITS INCLUDE: Fully paid family coverage health insurance, retirement benefits, annual, sick leave and family sick leave benefits, a basic life insurance benefit, employee assistance program, a FlexComp Plan and 10 paid holidays per year. Additional information regarding this position can be found at:

has expanded our Service Department. We are seeking highly skilled

Diesel Technicians

for both day and evening shifts. We are also seeking highly skilled

Night Shift Supervisor

We are offering $20-$30 per hour starting depending on experience. Benefits include 401k Retirement Plan, Paid Vacation and Health Insurance for employees.

TrueNorth Steel is seeking a full-time experienced

Tekla or SDS2 detailer.

Individual must possess knowledge of Structural Steel and or Misc. Architectural Metals. Minimum 2 years working experience in related field. Starting wage DOE and qualifications plus an excellent benefits package. If you are interested in a career with an established growing company, please apply online at www.TrueNorthSteel.com EEO/AAP Employer

Welding/Factory Maintenance

Part- time, Full-time, or Contract

$14-22/hr

Wedgcor Steel Building Manufacturing 701-252-7380 cwirth@ sunwardsteel.com

CONSTRUCTION LABORERS

for erecting pole buildings & applying tin. A valid drivers license and construction experience is required. $18/hr. Call 701-391-5086

Voice and piano lessons available. Call Kate at 202-1812 for more info

$19.24 per hour *PLUS FULL STATE BENEFITS Will assist in moving finished furniture, upholstered items and metal products, prepare them for shipment, load semi-trailers and delivery. Products delivered into offices may require set up and installation. Frequent customer contact is required. Other duties include: operating forklift and bobcat, calling to schedule deliveries, making adjustments and repairs to products and supervising minimum security inmates. A current CDL is required.

Nelson International of Bismarck, ND

Contact Ross or Barry at 701-223-7676 Or apply in person at: 1716 Revere Drive Bismarck, ND 58501

The Manager of Creative Services

Western Energy Company,

OPHTHALMIC TECHNICIAN

OR Technician / Dental Assistant

CVS

The Watershed Coordinator is directly responsible for the overall management of water quality monitoring, planning and reporting duties for the Turtle Creek Watershed. Promote conservation practices through cooperator contact and follow-up, evaluate practice effectiveness; conduct planning activities for conservation programs and contracts using the Technical Guide, soil survey and other available tools as a basis for the activity. Provide assistance to cooperators applying practices; publicize water quality and conservation activities in cooperation with other districts, NRCS and the ND Health Dept. staff through news media. Competitive salary based on experience. Send resume to: South McLean SCD PO Box 537 Turtle Lake ND 58575 or email: Southmcleanscd @westriv.com DEADLINE: Oct. 15, 2013

Mobile Maintenance Superintendent

Has an immediate opening for a full time

Apply in person at: 526 S 3rd, Bismarck

JUSTICE BROTHERS

Mental Health Technician / Supervisor Assistant

is hiring and will train for the following positions:

Every other weekend 7am-9 am & 5pm-8pm and PRN during the week.

Pharmacy Technician

Apply in person at: Cracker Barrel

Are you interested in working with Agriculture and working outdoors? The South McLean County SCD is looking for a full-time

Medication Monitor

For job information and application procedures, go to the Human Resources page at:

Now Hiring

DACOTAH FOUNDATION

FIND A JOB. FILL A JOB.

CLERICAL PERSONNEL

Starting $11 & up

Burger King now hiring energetic, fun loving individuals for Full-time, Nights & Weekends Only

JOBS.BISMARCKTRIBUNE.COM

Page 6C ■ Thursday, October 3, 2013

If you have a great attitude and want to work in a fun environment stop by Mandan Burger King and pick up an application between 9am-11am & 2pm-4pm.

http://www.nd.gov/hrms/jobs/announcements.asp

Friday

Start your Career in Oil & Gas Today!

Tough Puzzle

Solution to last Sudoku puzzle

Saturday

Your Road To The Future

Super Tough Puzzle

Now Hiring for

Sunday Super Tough Puzzle Solution, tips and computer program at www.krazydad.com/sudoku/ © Puzzles by Krazydad.com

Maintenance / Engineering AmeriPride Services is growing and we need to add several people to our Bismarck Team. We are hiring for skilled Maintenance / Engineering Personal. This position requires mechanical ability and knowledge of electrical, plumbing and boiler. Full-time Monday - Friday position and includes benefits package. Wages DOE. All applicants must be at least 18 years old, have a minimum of high school education, and be dependable / reliable.

Leadership Development Management Training ervices Company, Casedhole Solutions, a C&J Energy Services

DIESEL MECHANIC Excellent Pay & Benefits Requirements: Experience Required Must pass ATF Background Check Clean Driving Record CDL Required

Apply on-line at: www.careerbuilders.com Or in person at: AmeriPride Service Inc. 1238 Frontier Drive Bismarck, ND 58504 Ph: 701-258-6505 • Fax: 701-255-7713 AmeriPride Services Inc. is an AA/EEO Employer M/F/D/V

Apply In Person or Call:

4946 Hwy 85 Williston, ND 58802 (701) 572-4191 www.casedhole-solutions.com


Bismarcktribune.com ■ Bismarck Tribune

Thursday, October 3, 2013 ■ Page 7C

FREE DEALMAKER ADS DEALS, STEALS & BARGAINS OF THE BISMARCK TRIBUNE CLASSIFIEDS

Place unlimited online Dealmaker ads at dakotaclassifieds.com. Call or stop by to place 5 free Dealmakers per week.

Merchandise/Ag

4 DRAWER chest - good shape. $15 OBO. 701-223-3068 or 701-226-7974 4 TIRES, 17”. Asking $100 for all four. 701-734-6677.

Brand New 13 1/4 x 19 Rapture, 13 spline for OMC , Suzuki and some Yamaha outboards and older OMC outdrives. $220. 701-400-8934 48” ROUND OAK Dinette Table w/ 12” leaf, 2 captains chairs, excellent condition. $165 Cash. 701-663-9391 (4) TIRES: BF Goodrich Premier Touring 215X65X16, 3/4 Tread. $130. Call 934-3752 or 701-663-4445.

4X7 FACTORY built trailer, mesh floor, with ramp. $480. 701-751-1860. 55” LED TV: Brand new. $375. Call 701-391-4100.

(4) TIRES: Kumho, 225X65X17, 9/32” Tread. $140. 701-934-3752 or 701-663-4445.

Cash Registers: 2 nearly new cash registers. $199 ea. Call 701-663-8715 Casserole dish w/cover by Hall. Autumn leave design. $40. 701-223-4033.

(4)TOMATO CAGES + (2) 2 ft tall wire surround, 6ft around. $10 OBO. Call 701-663-8132/701-440-013 6. (6) BIKES, really great shape. $100 for all. Call 701-597-3854.

ANDERSON PERMA shield C5 double pane. Part #1346816 S white sash 23 1/4”Wx581/2”H. $120. Call 222-4389 or 333-8959. ANDERSON PERMA shield casement - CW35 double pane part #1346822 S white sash 27 1/4”Wx40”L. $60. Call 222-4389 or 333-8959

ANTIQUE OAK office chair with arms, very good condition. $75. Call 701-255-3169

Cheese Plates: (6) plates w/ different cartoons printed on ea., from the New Yorker Mag. About 8” in diameter. Never used, original container. $15 for set. 255-1103.

China Dinnerware vintage 70 piece, white, handpainted 22kt gold, includes 2 platters. Very good cond. Cash $20. 701-223-5502 CLOTHING BRAND NAME Mens 30-36” waist jeans, $5/pair. Hooded sweatshirts, various sizes, $5. Men’s Big & Tall jeans 42-48 waist, $5. 701-663-9391

ANTIQUE SAUSAGE Stuffer No-O about 10”x10” with 25” handle $40. Can deliver in Bismarck / Mandan. Call 701-258-4585.

APPLES, JUST picked, some hail marks, for baking or juicing, while they last $3 for 10lb bag. 701-223-6808 or 202-2728. ARCHERY: Selling my supply of misc archery items, mostly vintage BEAR brand, $5 and up. 4 blocks West of Eagles 701-663-3212

2 End Tables paid $99 asking $50 like new. End table like new $20 13” Sharp colored TV with remote, $15. 701-400-3893

BEAUTIFUL LARGE solid oak entertainment center, retail $1500 asking $150; contemporary entertainment center $25 701-663-8715 BED: TWIN size mattress, box spring & frame. All new cond., bought at Conlins $300 OBO. 701-258-5968

Collectible Dolls from Thailand and Romania , $45 for all. 701-222-1990

Ezra Brooks Whiskey Clown w/ Accordian Decanter Empty 1971 Ex Cond No chips or wear 14” tall cash $15 701-223-5502

COMBINATION ELECTRIC grill & water smoker. New in the box. $100. 701-751-2864 CONTEMPORARY COFFEE & end table, black with gold trim $100 for set. 701-663-8715

Craftsmen Electric Start Snow Blower - Works Great in Great Shape. 24” wide path. $400. 701-751-1950

Boots: New SIZE 9 Rubber Water Boots, $5. Call 701-223-3697 BOWLING SETS - bowling ball, bag & shoes. One ladies and one men’s set. $25 per set. 701-255-7438. BURN BARRELS: 55 gallon steel. Tops cut off and ready to use. $22. 701-595-3779 BUSHNELL, NEW in the box, 3x9x40 Elite 3200 Firefly Rifle Scope, light sensitive,$300. (701)+400-6740 Buttercup Squash: $2.00 ea. 701-663-3092

Louie L’amour and Black Stallion BOOK Collections, 103 LL’amour $117- (28 Black Stallions $27) OBO both. $1 each 751-1950 LOVESEAT: Broyhill, olive Green very good condition, Does not recline. $250. Call 701-258-5968

Pick Up Box Sprayer with hoses and motor that works. $225. 701-751-1950 PICKUP TOPPER fits 4x6 cab high. Asking $200. 701-734-6677.

MENS COATS Columbia, size XL, red & black, good condition, $10. Columbia XLT, like new, yellow & charcoal, $50.701-220-3365 Men’s grey v-neck long sleeve sweater XL, $2. New neckties, $1. New white socks size 10-13, $1. Men’s new briefs, size 34-44, $1 ea. 701-223-6752. MIDEA ENERGY Star freezer. Control display on door. 28 1/4”Wx61”H. Exc. cond., used very little. $300. Call 222-4389 or 333-8959. MINI TRAMPOLINE - Very heavy duty. Exc. cond. $40. 701-223-4033. MISC. PVC RAILING + 11 Posts & Hardware. New Condition! $200. Call 751-1436.

PICTURE, North Dakota oil drilling camp with wooden Derrick and coal fed steam boiler, this is a very clear detailed enlargement of my Grampa’s original 1926 photo. Matted, framed -19” x23” overall, with history. A real office classic, $75 (701)258-9508 PICTURES: 2 wall hanging Gratitude by jack Garren Women (The Lords Prayer). Grace by Eric Enstrom, Man (The Lords Prayer)23x19” matted & framed, $100 /pair Call 701-223-4813

MOWER: Honda Harmony 215 mower rear bagger or mulcher, self propelled, $250.00. Call 701-223-7579 or 226-2238 NECK TIES, 100 for $25. 701-255-3683

Jacket: Men’s navy blue, XL, $2. Raincoat: Men’s black, new w/hood & lined, 2XL, $20. Dress Coat: Men’s black like new, XL, $20. 223-6752

POKEMON TRADNG CARDS 6 collector tins and 2 binders each one filled with 100 cards, $10 each. 701-319-1917

Fur Coat: Saga black fox fur w/lambs wool, full length coat from Scandinavia, paid $1000, size 8-10 European size, asking $250. Call 701-222-1990

PROP - 13 1/8 x 14 Mercury Vengeance. Very solid like new used prop, uses the flo torq hub fits all outboards 60-130 hp. $210 OBO hub 400-8934 New Oak Garbage Can Holder, 13 gal. container. $139. Call 701-225-3422, will deliver to Bismarck.

Kimball Swinger Piano, little older. $400 w/ bench and song books $150. (701)223-1906. KITCHEN SINK Cast Iron, Beige $25, antique glass cabinet, $280, Bavarian china dishes, $100, 12 & 8 piece silverware set, $98. 527-6150 or 258-4365 after 2pm. KITCHEN TABLE set white, 4 chairs, 1 leaf. $200. BLACK TV swivel stand $75. Call 701-226-5589.

Newer Nike Golf Bag $40. 701-391-7434 NORTH FACE JACKET: Mens XL, black, like new. $120 Cash. Call 701-400-9825.

Lamp with light up fish lamp shade. $15. (701)223-1906.

Last Supper Figurine: about 50 years old, $40. Bible w/ Praying Hands: $20. Call (701)223-1906 LAWN BOY MOWER rear self propelled side bagger or mulcher $175. Call 701223-7579 or 226-2238

Garden Way Cart: This cart is great for hauling dirt, yard waste, compost, ect. $225 (701)391-8616.

DECOYS, GOOSE new never used, rare vintage Honker decoys, Victor #D-16. 2 piece large shell type, $125/ dozen. 701-663-3212

GIVEAWAY: 5 wk old kittens, litter box trained. For more info. call 701-255-6210 or 701-527-5482. GIVEAWAY: KITTENS, 1/2 grown, multiple colors available, need to go to farm. Call (701)258-8524.

Pumpkins: $3 ea. Buttercup Squash: $2.00 ea. Gourds: $.20 ea. Jack Be Littles: $.30 ea. 701-663-3092 QUEEN SIZED pillow top mattress, boxspring and frame. Good shape. $200 OBO. 701-202-1232. Quilted flannel shirts, new, size 16-16.5 tall, size XL, $15 ea. Men’s hankies, good condition, .25 cents - $3. 701-223-6752.

Oak Kitchen Hutch $150. Call (701)222-1606.

FURNITURE: MATCHING Couch 93” long, light green, microfiber, like new, very comfortable, $250 (701)258-8592 after 5pm.

DECOYS - Honker Goose decoys. Silhouette, pivot type. New, still in sealed carton. $84 per dozen. 4 blocks W. of Eagles Club. 701-663-3212

Depression Glass Plate: Large Size 11” yellow color, patrician spoke pattern. Very good cond. Cash $10 701-223-5502 DESK - older oak desk from the 60s. $100. Call 701-255-2322

GREEN GLIDER Rocker in excellent condition, $60 701-226-4189

DOCTOR BROWNS infant bottle systems, various sizes, $8. 701-222-1990

HALLOWEEN COSTUME: Dream Girl, Med. $10. Kendra, Teen. $10. Skellbone, Toddler size. $4. Many More! Call 701-751-0297.

Downriggers for sale $50 each. Call 701-255-0697 DRILL PRESS stand, 1/2in Rockwell drill, 32 drill bits. $80. 42 in round oak table, with 2 leaves $150. 701-255-0656 DRYER: Maytag Neptune Electric dryer needs some repair, $50 obo. Call 701-223-3286 ELECTRIC TREADMILL, $125. Call 701-258-5140 Entertainment Center, larger, oak. $25.00 701-400-9357.

H A L L O W E E N COSTUMES: Disney Dress. $5. Red Dress, size 4-6. $5. Black Jump Suit. $5. All in great shape, Many More. Call 701-7510297.

UNDER CABINET newer Whirlpool microwave. $100. 701-873-7666.

SEARS AUTOMATIC door opener w/Sears solid state remote. $125 OBO. 701-663-8132/440-0136. WAGON WHEELS - cast iron wagon wheels approx 3 ft tall. $100 a piece. Call 701-258-4585 WATER SOFTNER- Eco water electronic demand system. Newly reconditioned. $200. 701-258-7872. SEARS CRAFTSMAN Drill press. 8” - 1/6 hp, 3 speed. $100. 701-255-1532.

OAK Shelf, 6ft solid oak, decorator shelf. $20. Call 701-751-0297 oak table - 42” pedestal. 24” leaf. 4 chairs with wood carvings-like new condition. $400.00 701-255-9022

SEARS KENMORE DRYER: $80. Call 701-258-1931. SHOCK BUMPER: chrome, fits Chevy Pickup. $200. Call 701-361-3319.

SKIL BAND saw. 10”, $100. 701-255-1532. Small portable propane stove. Would work good in a fish house or small building.. $40 (701) 220 - 6771 SNOW BLOWER: 8 HP, 2 Stage, electric start. $350. Call 701-258-1931.

SONY rear projection TV. 48”, works great, $125 OBO. 702-743-7116.

RACING BIKE: 12 speed 25” Azuki road bike, hand made frame from bridgestone bike co., has shimano 600 brakes, and edco headseat, $500. Call 701-223-7428

STEEL DOOR new 32” 6 panel dont need it, $40. Call 701-220-3365. STURDY WOOD workbench - 2.5’x4.5’. Includes 3 drawers, outlet, and lower shelf. $65. 2 pair saw horses, $10 ea. 701-255-1532

TACKLE BOX: (fishing) new still with tags on, 4 drawers, 53 compartments, Guide Series, Plano, nice $50. Call 701-400-6740

RAMPS 2 heavy duty car ramps like new no rust, $40 OBO. Call 701-663-8132 or 701-440-0136. Oak Wood Computer Desk. 78.5” long, width varies between 31.5” and 20.5 “, 30” tall. Nicely varnished $400 701-258-5984

RED WAGON radio flyer. 34x15. Original condition, $55 Old metal tacklebox, $45. 600x16”-5 ply tire w/rim, 5 hole, $15. 701-663-9391.

One dbl. Recliner Love Seat w/ cup holders between seats. Also one leather couch. Asking $250 a piece. 701-391-7434

RUBBER OVERSHOES: rubber work overshoes, size 8.5-9. new in box, $1.50 ea. Corona Typewriter, used very little, with case, $25. 223-5268

Tall 6’ tall Storage Dresser: all doors slide out, was a store display out of a clothing store. $150. Phone after 1 pm Call (701)233-3465. TIRES setup of 4 P215/60R16 off of 2004 Ford Taurus, $60 obo. 701-223-3286 TIRES: (2) Falken, 23565R18. $50 for Pair. Call 701-873-2527 or 701-880-0221

OSTER TOASTER oven. $30. 701-578-4869

TOOL Box - locking w/7 drawers. $15. 701-223-3068 or 701-226-7974. Lego Bionicle Castle. All parts included along with original box and instruction booklet 45 701-258-5984

Oven - Wall Mounted - Whirlpool 30” electric built-in single oven. Good condition. $75. Call 701-224-0248 $75

Saddle with 15” padded seat, like new $500 or reasonable offer. 701-258-4585.

Overshoes: Womens, winter, flat bottom, velcro on side to close. New. Size 6. $3. 701-223-6752.

Like new Rocker/Glider chair, soft green and wood, excellent shape. $117. (701)751-1950.

Love Seat, multi color, blue mauve green, 37”Hx37”W $40. Call 701-663-2401

PATIO CHAIRS: (2), high swivel bar stool w/ backs and arm rests, like new. $50 ea. Call 701-222-4092. PERMA SHIELD patio Dr. Panel. Panel white temp 84. Part #1997426 6. 30 1/8”Wx78”H. $200. Call 222-4389 or 333-8959.

SAFETY 1ST pink baby walker w/sounds and toys. Collapses down for easy transport or storage. $35. 701-391-8525 SAKAKAWEA SALMON: 1st Come, 1st Serve. $4 per Salmon. Call Amanda, 701-442-5054, 8am-8pm.

PET CARRIER Petmate med-lrg dogs, white with metal door, like new, 34 1/2” long x 22” wide x 30” high, great for hunters transporting pets, $85. 701-391-8525

SAND BOX: Kessler, Primary Colors, 1 large or can be divided into 2 sand boxes, home/preschool/playground $95. Call 701-319-1917.

PET PORTER - large, like new, $50. Call 701-255-2322

Scroll Saw 13” delta. $40 701-255-3683

WEDDING DRESS with train. Gorgeous sequin & pearl gown, size 6-8, beautiful, never worn, Asking $175 New $1000. Call 701-258-5494 or 391-8525. WELDER Wire feed 110 volt fire power FP120 hardly used, make wire welder, new $500, asking $250. Call 701-400-8675

WESTMINSTER LINDEN Tempus Fugit chime clock. Jeweled bushings. $175 OBO. 701-223-3068 or 701-226-7974. WILLOW BASKETS: 3 piece set, hand crafted, olive willow baskets, small medium & large, $30 for set. 701-223-4813 WOMENS BIKE: 5 speed, good condition. $25. Call 701-595-4440. Women’s S-XL scrub tops, 2 for $1. Men’s new t-shirts: L, $2; XL & XXL, $3; Men’s everyday long and short sleeve shirts, $.25. 701-223-6752.

STANDARD ATLAS of Morton County, ND. Pub. 1917, Plat bk. villages, cities, townships w/ pics of farmsteads. $100 obo. Call 701-663-2344.

TABLE: 6 ft wooden banquet table, $35. 701-425-5458

ROUND CLOTHING rack. 36”. $20 firm. 701-873-7666. LCD TV Stand: comes w/ two tops wood and black glass tops, good shape. $60. ph after 1 pm (701)223-3465.

SEARS CRAFTSMAN Table saw - 9”. $250. 701-255-1532.

Table and Chair Set - Solid wood table with formica top & 3 leaves & 4 wood chairs. $200. Call 701-224-0248.

Remington 870: 3”, 12 Gauge Pump Shotgun. Beautiful wood, Like new, only shot 2 boxes of shells. $500. Call (701) 220-6771.

HARLEY DAVIDSON premium stereo helmet headset. New in the box. $100 OBO. 701-527-0303. HOME SCHOOL CURRICULUM - complete science for grade 8 and grade 9. Like new cond. $25. 701-258-7872

Two TRI POWER INTAKES for 1961 and 1966 PONTIAC. No Carburetors.. Both for 300 (701) 220 - 6771

SCREEN DOOR 36”wide x 80” tall frame is good but needs mesh and bottom adjustment wheels, $10. Call 701-255-1181

QUILTS: light weight homemade log cabin quilts, queen size, 3 at $20 each. 701-223-4813

GIVEAWAY: Patio Furniture, recliner, glider and chair. Call (701)258-8732. GOLF BALLS Logo, Reg, & practice balls, all cleaned, you pick, not bagged. 1000’s to choose from. Any brand. Will match or beat any price. .30-1.25 per ball. 258-1979.

SCOOTER: Go Go Elite Traveler Plus Electric Scooter, three wheel; new batteries;. Call 701-224-5100 $300.00 701-224-5100

SNOW BLOWER: Castman 7 hp, 24” cut, electric start, $250. Call 701-223-7579 or 226-2238

PROP- 14 1/2 X 19 Yamaha Black Stainless. LIke new used two hrs, fits 135 up outboards & out drives $235 OBO. 400-8934

KRESS KILN. $200. OBO. 701-873-7666.

FURNITURE: MATCHING Loveseat, 64”, Chair & Ottoman, light green, microfiber, like new, very comfortable, $400. (701)258-8592 after 5pm.

TSC 15 gal. pull behind Mower, electric pump sprayer. LIKE NEW. $175 OBO (701)751-1950.

New Oak Belt Buckle Display Case: holds 16 Heston size buckles. $59. Call 701-225-3422 will deliver Bismarck.

JUKE BOX, Seeburg, plays 45 records, $500. Call 701-400-9357. Kerosene Lamps: variety $15-$18 each. Call 701-255-0697.

PIONEER CAR stereo for sale. AM/FM, CD player w/detachable face. $50 OBO. 701-391-1835

NEW ROLL carpet, padding, beige tones. 12x17 1/2 + extra. $275 OBO. 701-873-7666

CURIO SOLID oak 6 ft high 30” wide x 16” deep, 2 doors on each side, 4 adjustable shelves, lights up, exc cond. $500. Call 701-425-5458

Queen Bed orthopedic mattress and frame, $100 hardly used. 701-400-3893

BOOKS of John Deere tractors. 1837 - 1960; 100 & 200 pages, appr. 2 pictures per page. $30 per book or $50 for both. 701-258-4585

J. MASON highchair w/tray. Folds up (not big and bulky). Very good cond. $30. 701-391-8525.

Ezra Brooks Whiskey Clown w/ Accordian Decanter Empty 1971 Ex Cond No chips or wear 14” tall cash $15 701-223-5502 FIGURE SKATES Riedell white silverstar 355 boot, 10 1/4” blade, jackson protege ultima size 6 1/2 , $295 obo snow sealed wax waterproofed boot 701-319-1917

SCOOTER 3 wheeled handicapped scooter, 2 new battery $240 first $300 takes it. Wood Dining table laminate top, 3 leaves, & 4 wooden chairs. $100. 701-258-5421

MOVIES: VHS large selection $1 ea. Call 701-223-7428

JEWELRY - beautiful beaded ladies heart-shaped sterling silver earrings. Must see. $35. 701-223-4813

COLORED TV’S 15” Sony with remote. $30. RCA, works great for day care center, $20. Call 701-223-4813

BEETS FOR SALE: $.50/lb. 701-426-9058

30” square antique table. Very nice condition. $75.00 701-255-9022

Extendable construction lamp. $15. 701-223-3068 701-226-7974

FISHERPRICE FLUTTERBY musical light up baby swing. Exc. cond. Originally pd $150, asking $55. 701-391-8525

Ball Hitch Dolly: Used to pull boat or trailer. New over $200 asking $90. 391-8616.

Battery Charger and starter, Schumacher brand, 2, 10, 50 amp, charges conventional maintenance free, deep & deep cycle batteries, $30. Call 701-255-3683

2 SECOND Row floor seat tickets for the show Under the Street Lamp at the Civic Center 10/1. Pd $114, asking $60 cash for both. 701-254-4892.

EXHAUST MANIFOLDS, fits 350 General Motors engine, INCLUDES exhaust cross over pipe. All items less than 5000 miles $50 ea. Call 400-6740

CRAFTSMAN AUTOMATIC Scroller Saw, new in box. $22. 701-223-4033.

2 Chevy 1/2 Ton Pickup Wheels with Tires 225X75X15 and G78X15/ $15. 701-934-3752 or 701-663-4445

2 RUNG rolling clothes rack. $35 OBO. 701-873-7666.

Hunting Knives & Pocket Knives: huge selection. Selling out my private collection. Most made in America, many brands. $2-$35. 663-3212

CLOTHING/BRAND NAME girls sm tshirts/sweatshirts $1-$5. Wilson Leather Jacket size medium, like new, $30. 701-663-9391

COIL SHOES - by Z coil. Women’s size 9, white, asking $70 OBO Men’s size 11, black, $95. 701-258-4585

BASEBALL SHOES - adult size 10.5. Nike Keystone style. Red - black - white. Exc. shape. $20. 701-258-7872

2 P255/70 R17 Bridgestone tires. $100 for both. Like new. Call 701-223-3929

Exercise Martial Arts Stretching machine. Like new, Brand: The Rack treco Productions $100 (701) 220-6771

FOLEY FOOD MILL - ready for canning. $30. 701-471-3094

1977 Ford F150 race track molding, door sides, cab corners & box sides, $100. 701-220-6913

2 Front Row Tickets: Bill Cosby @ Norsk Hostfest, 10-3-13 @ 7:30pm. Unable to attend, Selling at Face Value. $175.00 701-206-0769

EXERCISE MACHINE: Ultra glide XL, $75. 2 buckle overshoes, size 13, never worn, $10. Call 701-471-7376 after 12 noon.

HUNTING BOOTS/WORK: 11” high, size 8 1/2 w 2 pair Gore-tex liners, never worn . $40 CASH. CROCKPOT: $5. 701-663-9391.

IRON CADDY, new $3.50. Potlock slow cooker 5 quart, $10. box fan $5. 223-5268

Antique chair, nice looking, $45 OBO. 701-202-1232

ANTIQUE WHITE metal bed, twin size, like new, (mattress always enclosed). $225. Call (701)663-2401

2 Front Row Tickets: Bellamy Brothers & Marty Stuart @ Norsk Hostfest, 10-3-13 @ 1pm. Selling at Face Value. $175.00 701-206-0769

HUNTERS: EZ haul Cart. Heavy Duty and ideal to haul out your deer or other gear. $35 701-220-6771

6 Door Dresser: w/ sliding door, has doors behind door, solid woods, use for tv or bdrm. $100. ph af 1 pm (701)223-3465.

13 1/4 x 15 Apollo XHS Fits all makes 60-130 hp with a proper hub kit, comes w/o hub $225.00 400-8934

1994 CHEVY Corsica. 3.1 Auto, Air, Runs Good. Needs to go. $500. Call 701202-7456 after 3:30 $500

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER solid oak, 2 glass doors and adjustable shelves and 2 drawers $50 obo. Call 701-223-3286

CHAIN LINK fence roll of heavy gauge, 6 ft high, $50. Call 701-223-2602 leave message

Antique white Broyhill table, 66”Lx36”w, Like New, $150. (701)258-8592 after 5pm.

13 1/4 x 17 Power Tech fits all makes 60-130 hp with proper hub kit. Comes with mercury hub $220 Call 701-400-8934.

HP LAZER Jet, 2840 All-in-one, printer/scanner/copier/fax. $150 New. Call 701-319-1917.

Hutch Dresser: 66” wide, 33” High, 16” Deep - 6 Drawers. $200. 701-391-7434.

CHARCOAL GRILL on wheels, light weight, no rust, excellent shape, $20 OBO. 701-663-8132 or 701-440-0136.

1 Ford 15” Pickup Wheel. $10. 701-934-3752 or 701-663-4445 10LB BOWLING ball & bowling bag. $10. 701-223-8312.

Entertainment Center mission style, 35 wide x 62 high, fits 32” flat screen, $100 obo. CALL 701-202-1232.

CASSETTE PLAYER & FM Radio. $35. 701-223-7284.

ACCORDION - Bernilli, 120 base pearl, great shape w/ case. $365. Call 751-0297.

(4) TIRES: Toyo 215X60X17, 9/32 Tread. $160. Call 701-934-3752 or 701-663-4445

HOTWHEELS RIDE in, brand new fisher price, battery battery-powered car. Red, ages 3-10. $95. Call 701-319-1917.

TOW BAR: Blue Ox Alpha, Model#BX7365, rated at 6500#, for a #2 receiver, inlcudes, tow, safety chains and cover.$500. 891-9789. TRACTOR PART: live hydraulic distributor pump with lines for M International $150. Call 701-258-5352 TREADMILL: SEARS, fold-up. $200. Ask for Lu 701-223-7965.

WORKBENCH - 36x50”. Portable w/wheels. 7” woodworker’s vice. $25. 701-223-3068 or 701-226-7974 Wrenches: open end, combination, and box end, rust free, good condition. Over 100 for sale, private collection, 2 for $1. 701-663-3212.

JOBS.BISMARCKTRIBUNE.COM

402-504

BRAKING SYSTEM: Blue Ox Apollo Luxor, Model # BX88193, in box, never used. Cost $1208, Selling for $500. Call 701-891-9789.

EMachines Desktop Tower: 4GB/140GB/DVDRW 18.5 flat panel monitor printer MS Office $135. Call (701)202-4702

FIND A JOB. FILL A JOB.

4 antique chairs with wood carvings. very good condition. $160.00 701 2559022

TREK MOUNTAIN Bike, 13 speed $75 obo. Call 701-223-7578 TRUCK TOPPER: Fiberglass, white, 8’ box, excellent condition. $100. Call 701-361-3319

FREE ADS FOR ITEMS PRICED $500 OR LESS! Call 258-6900 or go to dakotaclassifieds.com and click on POWER PACKAGE

Items priced $500 or less.

*Some restrictions apply


Page 8C ■ Thursday, October 3, 2013

Bismarck Tribune ■ Bismarcktribune.com

Merchandise/Ag GIGANTIC MOVING & Estate Sale

ANTIQUE SHOW

4605 Highland Rd

402-504

7.5’ CURTIS Snow blade for tractor or pickup. Left right hydraulics. Quick attach. New, never used. New $2900, selling for $1900. 701-751-0282 WANTED TO BUY International 1456 Standard tractor, running or NOT. Call in the evenings. 701-316-0048 WANTING TO BUY! Older tractors, running or not, IH 100’s,1026, 1206 1256, 1456. Alis Chalmers D21,210, 220. JD 5020, 6030, 820,830. Or various front wheel drive & older tractors. (701) 316-0048, Evenings.

100 BALES of hay, 1400lbs. Asking $40/bale. Call 701-734-6677. PRAIRIE HAY FOR SALE: Big Round Bales, Net Wrapped, 2012 Hay. $30 per Bale. 2013 $35 per Bale. Call (701)391-8185.

Mandan, 1 1/2 mi N of the Seven Seas Hotel Wed-Fri 9am-6pm Sat 10:30am-3pm Antiques, Red Wing water crocks, other crocks & jugs, many porcelain pieces, antique scales, old tools, farm well pumps, crank wall telephones, anvil, bitter churns, antique clocks, cast iron pots, large iron cauldron, copper boilers, wash tubs square & round, adult 3 wheel bike, 3 speeds entertainment center, black TV stand w/glass door, picture & frames, glassware, old dolls, coolers, chairs, knick knacks, wall decor, bedding, plant stand, old 33 1/3 record albums, lots of very old hardcover books, pocket books, roller blades, lots of shoes & boots, clothes large womens 2x & 3x, young womens sizes 3 to 5, mens clothes & coats, hunting coat & lots of misc items.

518 GRIFFIN St

10am-6pm Glasses, vases, cups, lamps, all kinds of dishes, comforter, sheets, pillows, sweaters, jackets, gloves, alot of Hull Hall & McCoy. CASH ONLY.

It’s just $5.00 and you can win a gift certificate from Party America!

October 12th & 13th Saturday, 9am - 5pm $2 ADMISSION Sunday, 9am - 4pm FREE ADMISSION!

8821 Welly Loop N. Bismarck Area Friday 8am-6pm

Accent Beginner, good condition. $300. Call 223-6155.

4-H BUILDING

COLLECTION OF natural gemstones and jewelry for sale. Tanazite diamonds, red diamond band & other loose stones. $2400. 701-527-2338

IOrio Accordion: (2), comes w/ everything, both are electric. Centerra $1,000 and Centerra Deluxe $950. 701-850-5403 or 425-2220.

Sparkling Clean!! Rent This Commercial Carpet Shampooer for

24 hrs ONLY $8!

Also refurbished machines for sale. Call 701-224-1421

WASHER: MAYTAG

Dependable Care Plus Heavy Duty 2 speed washer. 10 cycles, super capacity. Almond colored. Great condition. $300 CASH ONLY! Call 701-221-3121

Saturday & Sunday, Oct 5 & 6 Everything in house to be sold. China, crystal stemware, antiques, collectibles, women’s large size fashions, hundreds of LP’s, home décor, wall art, men’s large size dress clothes. To many other items to mention.

AN AD A DAY MAKES BUSINESS STAY!!

1 4 9 14 15 16 17 18 20 22 23 26 27 28 30 33 35 36 38 39 40 41 43 44

1st Place - $75 2nd Place - $50 3rd Place - $25

KIDS (14 & UNDER) 1st Place - $75 2nd Place - $50 3rd Place - $25 It’s easy to submit your photos - just log onto

Thursday Noon-8pm Friday 8am-8pm BIG SALE!! childrens toys, books, costumes, bikes, clothes, tvs, PS2 and video games, furniture and sports equipment.

bismarcktribune.com/celebrate click on ‘Submit Yours’ then Halloween

Next to Ace Hardware - Bismarck

A Daily Crossword By Wayne Robert Williams ACROSS ness Tahlequah, 45 Get one’s OK school own back for Foot control 48 Moral transWild guesses gression Post-dusk, 49 Character poetically assassination Piece of 50 Government poetry overthrow In the neigh- 55 Container borhood weight Compass dir. allowance A friend 56 A friend indeed indeed Relative of 59 Eng. channel etc. 60 Warehouse Without a will 61 Divvy out Jimmied 62 Permit to Sounds of 63 Tough quesapproval tion Increase 64 State gamFlock of bling game birds on the 65 Hosp. secground tions Ike’s initials A friend DOWN indeed 1 Handrail North Caroliposts na cape 2 Sonnet comSaintponent Nazaire’s 3 A friend river indeed PC pic 4 AUS enlistee First star 5 Auction or designation racket endSea eagles ing A friend 6 Welsh sorindeed cerer Faberge col- 7 Part of AARP lectible 8 Riga resident Spotted by 9 Like agitated an eye witwater

Antique Oak Furniture: intricate designed, including armoire, chine hutches, wash tables, dining room tables w/ 7 leafs & chairs, storage tables w/ glass ball legs, end tables & chests all w/ unique carvings. Call 701-226-7583.

A simple reminder: Just as it is important to use caution when replying to suspicious offers in email or on the phone, you should also use caution when replying to classified advertisements that require advance payment. The North Dakota Attorney Generals’ Consumer Protection Division is available to offer assistance and answer questions if you think an offer or company is questionable. If you have any questions, you can reach them at 701-328-3404 or 1-800-472-2600.

Landlords: Don’t Own A Smoke-Free Building Yet? All of our services & materials are FREE. 355-1597 Bismarck 667-3370 Mandan

3+ BDRMS main floor w/garage, updated, A/C unit, close to schools, hospital, Capitol, no pets, parties, smoking $1200 + util. + dep. 701-220-2066

NEW TWIN home, 1400 sq. ft, 2 bdrm +den, 2 bath, C/A, W/D, granite, dbl attch’d gar., $1595. 701-223-8910. NO STEP Condos! 2 Bdrm., 2 ba., dbl. gar. $1495 per mo. 701-320-5182, 751-2197

New Taekwondo Weapon and Belt Display Shelf: Holds 10 belts, solid oak $65. Will deliver to Bismarck. Call 701-225-3422

Small 3 bdrm, 2 ba, gar. W/D. No pets/smoking. $1135 + util. 701-258-6205

Bankrupt? AKC Adult Shelties. Breeder retiring. Perfect for families, 4h or other breeders. All colors. 605-285-6302. $100-$200

Bobcat Hunting Guide needed this fall in the western 1/2 of the state. Call 701-223-3697. WANTED - Older baseball cards (pre 1980). 701-258-7872.

TV: 70” Sharp Flatscreen TV. Aquos Smart TV $1400. Call (701)391-7434.

WANTED: AMANA RADAR Range Microwave. Call 701-258-7872.

Announcements 1828 N. 14th St.

KEITH RICHARDSON: Please contact me, Don Parsons. 360-383-7861. Nickelback.

YAMAHA PIANO / one owner, brand new condition, rich, full, beautiful sound, free prof movers delivery. Asking $5,398 cash (Blue Book Price) Call 701-224-0864

ADULTS 810 N 28th Street

FOR SALE: 104 year old Cast Norwegian Script Bell, $4900 and 16 stain glassed windows $650 each. Also little white country church to be moved, $8,500 or $15,000 for all. Velva, ND area. Call 701-624-2060 HYGIENICALLY CLEAN

3715 East Bismarck Expressway Questions: 701-667-8894

Saturday 8am-5pm BIG BIG MOVING SALE!!!

(Washington North to Hwy 1804, 1 1/2 miles West to 15th St. North, take right and 2 miles North until end of pavement, make left on Welly Loop, will be signs) Horse Tack: Breast Collars, Bridles, Blankets, Reins, Halters and much much more! Traditional Archery Supplies: New Strings, New Shooting Gloves, New Dick Baer Green Razor Heads, New Arrow Rest, Inserts and much more! Tools: Black N’ Decker Drill Press, Truck and Pull Behind TSC Spayers, Lawn Mowers, Bike Rack, Snow Blower, Grinder, Ramps, Lots of Hand Tools and Wrenches, Tool Drawers, (4) Brand New Windows. Antiques: Metal Trunks and Butter Churn ect. Tires: New Pickup Tires and Studded Car Tires, 14” adn 15”. Lots of Decorations: Louie L’Amore and Black Stallion Book Collections, Music CDS, DVDS, and HUGE 100’s of Western Collection of VHS, Small Tables, Pillows, Full Size King Coil Mattress, Chairs, Pheonix Juicer, Card Table and Chairs, Treadmill, Masters, Stationary Bike, Body by Jakes Bun & Thing Rocker, A Total Gym 1000, Variety of Flower Pots, Wine Rack, Poker Table, Desk Cabinet, 3 Office File Cabinet, Rocker Chair (like new), Shop Cabinets and A Lot of Jewelry!

FRENCH HORN

BED: QUEEN size mattress & box brand new, still in plastic, never used $175. Also brand new King PT set $395. Call 221-3011 or 400-9157.

FOR SALE: Royal Currier and Ives “The Old Grist Mill” design china. 11 plates, 10 bowls, 11 saucers, 8 dessert plates, 4 sauce dishes, 6 cups, cream and sugar set. $25. Selection of souvenir china cups and saucers, Arizona, English Bone China Minnesota, Mexico, Japanese China anniversary, Royal Albert June birthday. $10 each. Call 701-462-3353 or 701-226-2876. Leave message.

AKC Dark Red Lab puppies. 3 select bloodlines in USA. Mitchell, SD. 605-999-7149 www.southdakotayellowlabs .com. $1000

We can help. Call for a precise quote. Payments on your terms accepted.

LaRoy Baird Attorney at Law

Debt Relief Agency 30 years experience.

223-6400 120 N 3rd St. Suite 210 Bismarck, ND

Puppy Classes, Obedience Classes and Individual Instruction. 663-4441

Answer to Previous Puzzle Chihuahua-Cross Rescue dog for adoption. Adorable 6-7 month old neutered male current on shots. $100. Call 873-2620. GIVEAWAY (9) 6 week old kittens ready to give away, gray & white & calico with gray, Call 701-870-1265 evenings.

506-556

NEW ENERGY Efficient, 3 bdrm 2 bath manufactured homes for rent.701-663-9219

WINTER VACATION Townhome in Mesa AZ. 3 bdrm w/ hot tub & pool. Rent weekly or monthly. 701-220-2075

Bolinske Law Firm

10 Willful injuries 11 Proceedings 12 Thai currency 13 Roy Rogers’ real last name 19 Zigzag 21 Pariahs 24 Hold sway over 25 Cure or gram starter 28 Unrestricted weapon 29 Author Wiesel 30 A friend indeed 31 Lah-di-__ 32 Big time 34 Subdivision division 35 Silvertongued 36 Civil War

general 37 Assn. 39 Edison’s middle name 41 Religious principle 42 Dance in France 44 Crablike mover 46 Baby food brand 47 Builds 48 Donut in the trunk 49 Wading bird 50 Pointed end 51 In the know 52 Sci-fi ships 53 Blue shade 54 Folksinger Guthrie 57 Negative word 58 Classic Pontiac letters

Learn more at: bolinskelawfirm.com

701-255-3410

Thousands of cases successfully resolved.

FSBO CONDO: 2bed, 2bath, dbl. garage, built in 1995, 1300 sq ft, new appl., 55+. $162,900. Call 701-220-3704. NEW NO steps Condos. 3 bdrm. 2 ba, attach dbl. gar. Nebraska Dr $285,000 751-0584, 701-320-9079.

ALL NEW 2013 MODELS Samples: 28x56 starting at $69,900; 28x60 starting at $79,900; All homes total drywall, primed & painted. Delux trim packages & appl. pkg. Call for details Liebelt Homes 605-225-3222 ask for Don. Limited time offer! We List, We Sell, We Buy, We Trade, We Finance! Call Liechty Listing Service, LLS. 223-0555 or 202-1640

In accordance with the federal Fair Housing Act, we do not accept for publication any real estate listing that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, family status, or national origin. If you believe a published listing states such a preference, limitation, or discrimination, please notify this publication at fairhousing@lee.net.

Real Estate Rentals

702-732

SW NORTH DAKOTA LAND FOR SALE BY BID

602-646

The Gretta Werre Trust is offering eleven quarters of agricultural and prime pheasant hunting land for sale in Grant County, ND. 2 BDRM 1 bath, single stall gar., W/D, no pets/smoking Near hospital. 701-471-6874.

Robert. V. Bolinske, Jr. KITTENS: Handraised, 8 weeks old, short hair, gray & white, First shots. $20. Call (701)214-1400.

BRENDEL HOMES New Condos & Homes Available. www.brendelhomes.com or call Pete anytime for showing at 701-471-9571

SHOP SPACE with office for lease in S. Bismarck. Floor drain & 12 ft. o/head door. 1500 sq. ft. $1300/ mo. Call 701-202-7780

Criminal Defense Injuries/Accidents *Free Initial Consultation In All Cases

BRAND NEW 3 bdrm 2 bath condo w/double garage. Master suite. No Specials. Starting at only $168,900! 701-202-7780

Professional Building 5th & Rosser ph. (701) 258-4000

CHAP. 7/13 BANKRUPTCY COLES LAW FIRM Over 30 yrs exp. We are a Debt Relief Agency. We help people file for Bankruptcy Relief under the Bankruptcy Code. Flat fee in most cases. Call 701-222-8131 coleslaw@btinet.net

SUPERB 2-STORY 3900 sf. Laundry & office on main fl. Rock fireplace. Luxurious master. Finished basement w/media room & full bar. 629900 7015951365

UPDATED 2 bdrm 1 bath, single garage, no smoking/parties/pets, $800 +lights. Call 701-220-3935, please leave message.

3816 DOMINION STREET FOR SALE: Beautiful 5 bdrm, 3 ba, 3 stall gar. 2710 sq’. Ready to move in. North of Menards. Price reduced: $307,500. Call 701-471-1429.

For tract information and terms of sale; Crane Roseland Hardy, PC at 219 Brown Ave., Mott, ND 58646; call 701-824-2591 or email; amymcrhlaw@ ndsupernet.com.

Recreation

Wait list open for subsidized elderly/disabled one bedroom units. Call Patterson Place 701.255.6067

Orange Tabby Cat: For adoption, Lilly is talkative and sweet, 2 year old, spayed and shots. Call 873-2620.

RETIREMENT SALE Storewide Price Reduction

*Excluding Certain Items.

• Knives • Reloading • Holsters • Gun Case Caps • Books • Clothing

GUN CITY 212 W. Main Bismarck • 223-2304 Mon - Fri 9 - 7pm Saturday 9 - 5pm

MISSING HUSKIES: (2) red & white huskies, missing since 4:30pm of 9/23/13, wearing collars, Id tags, rabies, and City of Lincoln license tags. Call 426-8645 or 226-0503. Larry and Neeko. They are missed deeply. You may also call the City of Lincoln 258-7969 or the Lincoln Police Department 258-2403. It has been a week and I really am worried!! Reward Offered! Stolen/Lost in or around the Bismarck area. Black tote w/ Yellow lid full of hunting clothing. 701-214-0079.

In accordance with the federal Fair Housing Act, we do not accept for publication any real estate listing that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, disability, family status, or national origin. If you believe a published listing states such a preference, limitation, or discrimination, please notify this publication at fairhousing@lee.net.

For Sale By Owner: 3126 MANCHESTER Place 4 Bedrooms, 3 Bath, Steel Siding, 2126 Sq. Ft., Stone Fireplace. Move in Ready! $279,000. Call 701-220-2113

Great Home in NW Bismarck. Realtors Welcome! 5 bdrm 3.5 bath 2900 sq ft, quiet cul-de-sac, 1 block from Centennial School! $338,900. 701-223-0746.

802-818

14 1/2 x 17 Mercury Vengeance.

Nice used prop, fits 135 and up outboards & outdrives with the proper flo torq hub, Comes w/out a hub. $210. 701-400-8934.

1 BDRM Downtown, $425+ lights, 650 credit score req’d. 701-220-2779 or 663-5165. Steel Building Bargains Big Allocated Discounts We do deals, 30x40, 50x60, 100x100 and more. Total Construction and Blueprints Available Source# 18X 701-205-4047

HOMEMADE PICKLES:

Sliced & Unsliced in Spicy Dill for $4 or Garlic Dill for $6.50. Call 701-426-9124.

2 BDRM, A/C. No smoking/ pets $700/mo. 104 6th St NE, Mandan Call 220-9069 FOUND: Black and white male (?) cat on the 1600 block of Mapleton Avenue in North Bismarck. The cat is very affectionate, front legs have been declawed, is litterbox trained and appears to be someone’s pet. Please call 701-390-4843 or 701-751-2668 if this lost cat belongs to you or if you have any information on the rightful owner.

Open House 10/6 1- 2:30pm $279,00. Nice move in ready 4 bdrm/ 3 bath home with many updates, mother-in-law suite with kitchen/bath. MUST SEE! 701-527-6223

2009 LUXURY 5th Wheel, 40 ft. 2 bdrms, 3 slide outs, sleeps 8, many extras. Priced to See. Must See! $22,000. Call 701-516-7386

LOW INTEREST RATES

2 bedroom split entry w/2 stall garage. Large kitchen and dining area, large master bedroom, makes these designs spacious & comfortable. Is Nowhe T To Timeuy B

OWN THIS HOME FOR

174,700

$

Sattler Homes

Construction Qualifies for FHA & VA loans

255-7621

“Your Affordable Building Specialists” www.bismarckbuilder.com


Bismarcktribune.com ■ Bismarck Tribune

Thursday, October 3, 2013 ■ Page 9C

Transportation ROCKWOOD by Forestriver, 2005, 32’, 2 slides, stereo, A/C, microwave, heated holding tank, front and rear bdrm, w/ heated mattress, sleeps 8, rollout awning, fiberglass, ultralight. Located in Minot, ND. $14,000. Call (302)357-8003. 1997 29’ Class C motorhome, Ford chassis & V10 eng. 57K mi. Sleeps 8, rear queen, gen. Lots of ext/int storage. New tires, lrg ref. micro, 3 burner range, TV/DVD player, No smoking/pets. Exc. cond. Call $18,900. 701-258-8962.

2007 29ft Forrest River Cherokee Camper. Full kitchen & bath, 2 bdrms, Heater & A/C. Dickinson. $9,250 call or text 906-632-3132

2008 LUXURY TRAVEL TRAILER 42 ft with 3 slideouts, sleeps 8, 2 bedrooms, AC, W/D, many extras, $19,000 OBO. Call 701-204-5037

902-926

‘09 MONTANA 3400 RL 5th Wheel RV. Nice unit to take south for the winter. Exc. cond., many extras. 4 slides, A/C, new tires, lots of storage, $37,000. 701-220-8845

1989 28’ Class C Motorhome: Ford chassis, 460 V8, slps 6, rear full size bed, separate bath/shower, 3 way fridge, lots of storage, microwave, 4 burner stove w/ oven, excellent tires, Onan generator, inside like new, A/C, awning, new water htr., 35K mi. $6000. Call 701-400-5787.

FOR SALE: Fiberglass Tonneau cover. Fits Chevy Ext. cab, 6-1/2 ft. box. Like new. Pd $900. Asking $325. Call 226-1482 or 255-2366.

38’Toyhauler: 5th Wheel - 3 slides - loaded, in Riverdale, ND. Contact us for additional details/pictures. $30,000. 701-391-5363.

PRICED REDUCED! MUST SELL! 2005 JAYCO EAGLE 32’ ft bumper pull, fully self contained, front kitchen, slps. 6, full size private rm. w/ king size bed, couch makes into bed, roll out awning, roomy bathroom C/A $11,500 or best offer 302-250-6075.

2013 TRAVEL trailer. 42’. 2 bdrm, 2 A/C, W/D. Like new. Bismarck. $28,000 OBO. Call 817-602-8854 FALL SALE on all inventory Countryside RV www.countrysidervnd.com 701-252-3444

1999 Chevy Malibu LS. SALE $2999, Leather, PWR Roof, Alloy Wheels, 30 MPG, 140000 miles, trades welcome 701-663-5381

1950 FORD Truck, 1 1/2 ton 12ft. box and hoist, new tires, V8 engine & radiator. Stored inside original owner. Exc. cond. $4500. 701-361-3319.

2008 DODGE ADVENGER SXT: Sharp Blue,Exc. Cond., Very Clean, 77,000, Great Gas Mileage. $8800/OBO Call 701-880-0527.

1998 BUICK Lasabre 3.8 V6 automatic, 30 MPG, 156,000 miles with new rubber, runs good, $2900. Call Ed at 701336- 7822 or 701- 400-0264.

1995 OLDS AURORA: great shape, everything works, new tires. $2,695. For more info. call 701-400-1123.

2002 Dodge Grand Caravan ES: $4499, Leather Seats, Power Sliding Doors, 3.8L V-6, Remote Start, trades welcome 701-663-5381

2004 Chevy Avalanche 4X4 $11999, Free Warranty, Z-71, Leather, Pwr Roof, 140000 miles, 5.3 Vortec, trades welcome. 701-663-5381. 2007 CHEVY Suburban Great Shape. 105K miles. 5.3L V8 Vortec. Black Leather Seats. Thunder Struck Black Grill Guard. Almost New 10 Ply Tires. $17,500 OBO. Call 701-567-1039 In Bismarck for viewing!

90 Chevy Corvette Convertible, Must Go. $8999, 98k mi, new top, tan leather, new tires, chrome alloy whls, trade welcome 701-663-5381.

2013 40 ft long camper two bedroom 2 power slideouts, sleeps 10 DVD with surround sound, loaded, very clean, will deliver and setup. $23,500 OBO. 701-214-1922 2001 30 ft. Ford Minnie Winnie RV for sale. Model WF430V. V10 Ford Triton E450 Super Duty engine. Low miles (40,650)! No smoking, no pets, super clean. Onan generator. Slideout, fridge, microwave, flat screen tv, queen bed in rear. Sleeps six. Two newer batteries. Mandan $29,000 OBO. 701-527-1349.

1951 CHEVROLET 3 speed 216 engine, runs, needs complete interior and some brake work, $1951.00 Bismarck 701-258-4585.

Need a car? Need Financing? Visit Auto Finance Super Center today. Expressway - Bismarck Or apply online at: www.yougetautocredit.com

2001 Cadillac STS: 95K miles, very clean, AZ car, pearl white. $5,500 OBO. Call 701-448-9159 or 701-400-0703 2009 FORD MUSTANG GT California Edition, 4.6 V8 5 speed manual, heated leather seats, Shaker stereo system, fully loaded, 45K mi., like new $17,900. Call Ed at 701336-7822 or 701- 400-0264.

2005 Nissan Sentra 1.8S, SALE $4999, Free Warranty, 35MPG, LOW MILES, 4 cyl. 5 spd, trades welcome 701-663-5381

1994 PONITAC Bonneville, runs good. $500. Call (701)527-8727

STUDEBAKER MARK 4 lark 2 door. 1963. Asking $7800. 701-734-6677.

2000 Oldsmobile Alero GL V-6, $3499, Only 128000 miles, Remote Start, Pwr seat, 30 MPG, trades welcome 701-663-5381

2002 Chevy Avalanche Z-71 4X4, $10999, ONLY 116000 miles, Leather, New Tires, 5.3 Vortec, trades welcome 701-663-5381

2003 Dodge Grand Caravan SE, $4999, Free Warranty, ONLY 109000 miles, 25MPG, trades welcome. Call 701-663-5381

1996 Chevy Suburban 4x4 NEW TIRES! Drive a Little, Save A Lot Price $4500, Bismarck Retail $4999. 701-258-8881 07 Pontiac G6 GTP, SALE!! $9500, Free Wrnty, ONLY 75000 MILES. 30mpg, leather, remote start, panoramic sunroof, trade welcome 701-663-5381

2007 WORKHORSE W42 Stepvan with International VT 275 Diesel 36k. Auto New tires ,rear backup camera, foldable aluminum shelves, power door locks, Like new yet! $26,500. 202-6304 2003 Chevy Tahoe LS 4X4, $10999, 108000 miles, Vortec V-8, Lift Kit w/33’s, READY FOR FUN, trades welcome 701-663-5381.

2003 CHEVY 1500 half ton extended cab w/3 door pickup. Full size, 4WD, 327 engine, 5.3L. 605-845-3395 605-848-0739.

05 Chevy Silverado Crew LS 4X4, $13999, Free Warranty, Only 109000 miles, One Owner, New Tires, Remote Start, Book Value $15750, trades welcome 701-663-5381.

2003 Ford F-150 4X4 Heritage Edition, SALE $7999, Free Warranty, 5.4L, Remote Start, Tonneau Cover, nerf bars, trades 701-663-5381

2004 Ford F150 XLT Super Cab 4X4, SALE $9999, Free Warranty, Very Nice, loaded, 5.4L, Only 125k mi, trade welcome 701-663-5381

2009 LTZ crew cab, exc. shape, white, black leather, 6.2 engine, 56k miles, $25,000. Call 701-220-8462.

2004 TOYOTA Camry LE Super clean interior. No issues, Clear title with 137,252 original miles. $2900. Call 980-272-8249 2010 BUICK Enclave CXL $28,000 OBO loaded 7 pass. quad leather bucket seats, AWD, 55K mostly road miles, exc. cond., 701-400-9832

2007 Chevy Tahoe LT, $16999, FREE WARRANTY, 3 rows Leather, 5.3 Vortec, 20” wheels, 21mpg Flex Fuel, trade welcome 701-663-5381

1999 Ford F-250: X-cab Dually 4X4, $9999, 7.3 Power Stroke, Only 119000 miles, New Injectors, Remote Start, trades welcome. Call 701-663-5381. ‘03 FORD F350 XLT Crew Cab, 2 WD , V-10, dually, running boards, $8900. Call 605-889-2895

2006 VOLVA S80 2.5T front wheel drive, auto transmission, 96K miles, fully loaded, leather seats and sun roof. $6500. Call Ed at 701- 3367822 or 701- 400-0264. ANOTHER MAN’S treasures. Don’t let those unused items collect more dust! You could be collecting $$$. Call 2586900 to place your ad.

2004 FORD F250, Super Duty Lariat 4x4 crew cab, 6.0 diesel. Warranty through May 2015, 77K miles, very nice condition, $18,500. Call 701663-0457 M-F 8:30-5:30.

2004 Chevy Blazer LS 4X4, $6999, Free Warranty, Only 98000 miles, New Tires, New front Brakes, 20 MPG, Ready 4 Winter, trades welcome, 701-663-5381

05 Chevy Tahoe LT 4x4, $12499 Free Warranty, New Tires, Leather, Nav, DVD, Rear Buckets, PWR Roof, Remote Start, trade welcome 701-663-5381

2001 FORD RANGER Ext. Cab, V6, low miles, New Tires. Excellent Condition. MUST SELL! $5850 or best offer. 701-516-4513 Bismarck

2004 GMC Yukon SLT 4X4, $11999, Free Warranty, 3 rows of lthr., New Tires, Rear DVD, Only 125000 mi., 5.3 Vortec, Flex Fuel, trades welcome 701-663-5381

2001 GMC Yukon XL 2500 4X4, $8499, 8.1L V-8, leather, Very Nice, Hard To Find, Ready to Pull, trades welcome 701-663-5381.

Place unlimited online Dealmaker ads at dakotaclassifieds.com. Call or stop by to place 5 free Dealmakers per week.

FREE ADS FOR ITEMS PRICED $500 OR LESS!* Call 258-6900 or go to dakotaclassifieds.com and click on POWER PACKAGE

ACROSS 1 Pass out 6 Pretended 11 Teased 12 Entertain 13 Provides funds 14 Uncannily 15 Bridal path 16 Nave neighbor 17 Engineering toy 19 Flows back 23 Mecca pilgrimage 26 “Kiss Me —” 28 Suffix for depart 29 Portable 31 Inch along 33 Alpha opposite 34 14-line poem 35 Waterlogged 36 Appreciative sighs 39 Turf 40 Wall St. landmark 42 Siskel or Kelly 44 Swallow 46 Brand of spandex 51 Raspysounding 54 Ethically neu-

55 56 57 58

SoilMover Earth Scraper 9 yard capacity. $7000. Call 605-886-7717.

Peterson Truck Sales

2008 CHEVY 4x4, 5.3 engine P/W, P/D, clean truck, $12,000 and matching topper $1000. Call 605-889-2895.

Need a car? Need Financing? Visit Auto Finance Super Center today. Expressway - Bismarck Or apply online at: www.yougetautocredit.com

SWATHER TRANSPORT TRAILER: factory made, new tires, stored inside, excellent cond. $1200. Call 361-3319.

2003 FORD F250 FX4 4x4, 7.3 Liter Diesel, auto, 92K miles, 6” lift, brand new rims & tires. Very clean. Call Ed 701336-7822 or 701- 400- 0264

tral Verily Diminish Deep ditches Fad

DOWN 1 Foreign film ender 2 Does sums 3 Elvis, to some 4 Stair post 5 Gridiron stats 6 Legal costs 7 Concur 8 Chiang — shek 9 Building extension 10 Susan of “L.A. Law” 11 Big parrot 12 Move a fern 16 Famous Khan 18 Barely scrape by 20 Good, to Pedro 21 Multiply 22 Equinox mo. 23 Cozy 24 Aids in a crime 25 Lively dance 27 Kind of system

•2003 Columbia Daycab, 12L Detroit, 455 HP, 10 spd, good runner, $22,500 •2005 FL Columbia Daycab, 460 HP Mercedes, 10 spd, good runner, $22,000 •2000 IHC Eagle w/small sleeper, C12 Cat, 10 spd, runs good $9,5000 •2004 KW T-600 Red Top, N14 Cummins, 460 HP, 10 speed, new clutch, recent engine work, $17,000 •2004 Sterling w/12L Detroit 455 HP, 10 spd, new paint, rebuilt differentials •1988 Freuhoff 45 x 96 spring ride, New Mexico trailer, new paint & deck boards, $10,500 •Several Trailers: Pintlehitch tiltbed trailers, dual tandems •Chassis: Several container chassis Call Peterson Truck Sales @ 701-238-5898

Answer to Previous Puzzle

29 Cut, as grass 30 Philosopher — -tzu 32 ER staffers 34 Nine-digit no. 37 Eyed amorously 38 Like cool cats 41 Marsh stalker 43 Fudd of cartoons 45 Purposes 47 Jedi knight trainer 48 Santa —, Calif. 49 Marathon or 10K

50 Pub pint 51 That guy 52 Lennon’s wife 53 Toothpasteapproving grp. 54 Rocket trajectory

FREE DEALMAKER ADS DEALS, STEALS & BARGAINS OF THE BISMARCK TRIBUNE CLASSIFIEDS *Some restrictions apply 10-3

© 2013 by NEA, Inc.


Page 10C ■ Thursday, October 3, 2013

CAMPGROUND

ALL AROUND SERVICE

REBUILDING DREAMS • Decks • Home/Bath Remodeling • Painting & Staining • Flooring • Base & Trim • Tree Trimming & Resourceful, Innovative, Pays Attention To Detail Licensedd re u s In “Satisfaction Guaranteed” 701-400-4917

Free Estim s & Senior Citate ize Discount n

skapfer@flowwireless.net

ALL AROUND SERVICE U-Name It Property Maintenance LLC • Cabinet Refacing • Decks Door/window Installation • Finish Work • Painting • Yard Care • Remodeling/siding

Bismarck Tribune ■ Bismarcktribune.com

Call Nick Today & Get A Free Estimate!!! 400-5082 LICENSED & INSURED

• Stain & Varnishing • Build Sheds & Entries • Storm Clean Up, & Transport Hauling

Roughrider Campground Full hookups Electric Sites, 50/30 AMP Large pull thru sites Extended-stay sites Clean 24-hour upgraded bathrooms Showers and Laundry room

NEW S R OWNE

Complete Auto Detailing Mention this Ad, Receive $10.00 Off Saturday & Evening Appointment’s Available 1236 Park Ave., Bismarck Phone: 701-202-7779 AUTO DETAILING

LLAWN AWN SERVICE

Scott 701-220-8917

Lic/Ins. 2002

OPEN ALL YEAR ROUND

500 54th Street Minot, ND 58703

CARPENTRY

GARIC ORNDORFF BUILT

Quality Construction Built To Last Custom Decks, Screened Porches, Sunrooms, Gazebos, Additions, Pole Barns, Basement Finishing, Garages, Remodeling, Repairs...More Mandan - 20+ Yrs. Exp. Ref. - Lic. & Ins.

AUTO DETAIL

AB AUTO DETAIL

LIFESTYLE DESIGNS Stamped Concrete - patios, sidewalks Resurfacing - patios, steps & indoor applications

roughriderrvpark@gmail.com

701-934-3520

LAWN CARE

Decorative Concrete & Outdoor Living Spaces

701.852.8442

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CONCRETE

Joel Wentz

Call

391-8156

• Window & Door Replacement • Interior Trim Work

Featuring

Silver Line Concrete • Driveways • Patios • Slabs • Sidewalks • Stamped Concrete

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 3, 2013 Rays take AL Wild Card

Lynx ready for WNBA finals

PAGE 3D

PAGE 5D

WWW. BISMARCKTRIBUNE . COM

S ECTION D

Rising to the occasion Skyhawk

CLASS B NOTEBOOK

Schaner coming off impressive region tourney By LOU BABIARZ Tribune Sports Editor

The West Region boys tennis tournament was Brandon Schaner’s time to shine. The Mandan senior spent four years biding his time, a contributor, but not quite able to crack the postseason lineup for the best Braves’ teams in a generation. Schaner qualified for state in singles in 2012, but he took his game up a couple of levels at last week’s West Region tournament. Schaner scored two of the biggest wins of his career against a couple of long-time nemeses, helped the Braves finish second in the team competition and advanced to the finals of the singles draw before finally falling to Minot’s Dustin Foster in the championship match. “Going into my senior year, my last West Region tournament, I wanted to go out there and do my best,” Schaner said. Now Schaner will get to see what he can do at the state tournament, which begins today in Fargo. Though Mandan dropped a 3-2 decision to Century for the West Region title, Schaner kept the Braves in it with a big victory over Brian Swanberg. Schaner hadn’t beaten Swanberg in three years, but he rallied for a 6-7, 7-5, 7-5 win. Bigger still was Schaner’s 7-5, 76 victory over second-seeded Isaac Massey of Minot in the semifinals of the individual singles draw. “It was a really good moment for me,” Schaner said. “It made me really happy, and it showed me I could beat some of the people I had never beaten.” Schaner had been competitive in all his previous matches against Massey, but never won one. “I think beating Swanberg was like clearing a mental hurdle for Brandon,” Mandan coach Paul Christen said. “That helped him against Massey. “He had always played close matches, but it seemed like BranTOM STROMME/Tribune don would always lose those big Mandan’s Brandon Schaner placed second in last week’s West Region boys tennis tournament. Continued on 4D

Mystics sweep Lake Region By CINDY PETERSON Bismarck Tribune

MIKE McCLEARY/Tribune

Bismarck State’s Kelsey Glatt goes for a kill during Wednesday’s match against Lake Region State.

It’s not a secret that the Bismarck State volleyball team has turned in a successful season so far. The No. 20-ranked Mystics tend to see each opponent’s best performance. It’s simple. The Mystics just elevate their level of play or weather the storm. And weather they did against Lake Region State in a 15-14, 25-23, 25-19 sweep on Wednesday night at the BSC Armory. The Mystics remain unbeaten in the Mon-Dak at 7-0 and improved to 25-4 overall. “We definitely have to come into each game playing hard and not underestimating each team,” said BSC outside hitter Madison Deibert, a 5-foot-8 sophomore from Dickinson. “We have to play our game and not get into any lulls. It’s not

very hard now. We just have to keep our confidence up and keep playing how we have been.” Bismarck State coach Jeni Walsh wouldn’t have it any other way. “This is exactly the spot we want to be in,” Walsh said. “Right now teams are bringing their A game against us, and we’re responding well.” The Mystics have won their last 14 of 15 matches, including a 3-2 victory against the Valley City State varsity on Tuesday night. Bismarck State doesn’t play again until Tuesday. BSC has played seven matches in a span of nine days. “The girls have gotten themselves through it,” Walsh said. “They are veteran volleyball players. They pull each other up. That’s what a true team does.” The fatigue did show a little against Lake Region State. Bis-

marck State came from behind in the first two sets and withstood a 10-3 Lake Region State rally in the clincher. “I think they proved it to themselves that not on their most spectacular night, they can still get it done,” Walsh said. “I think that is something to be said about the athletes themselves. It’s hard to be on every single night, and you still have to find a way to win when it’s not your night.” Deibert led Bismarck State with eight kills and three aces. Kelsey Glatt had seven kills and Leslie Beaudoin six. Katie Ramlo ran the offense with 21 a s s i s t s. C a s e y Re a m a n n recorded 18 digs and Beaudoin had two blocks. Lake Region State stats were not available. Royals coach Brigitte Freschette said her team came up short on its attack. Continued on 4D

United Tribes is first-day leader in Region 13 golf By Tribune Sports Staff The United Tribes men’s golf team was pleased with its placing after the first day of the Region 13 tournament. However, the Thunder-

birds still left some unfinished business on Mandan’s Prairie West Golf Course. United Tribes carded a 329 to take a four-stroke lead over Bismarck State in the two-team tournament

on Wednesday. The tournament wraps up today with the top team and medalist earning a trip to the national tournament, scheduled for May 20-23 at the Indiana National Golf Club at Swan

Lake Resort in Plymouth, Ind. “I was expecting a little better score,” United Tribes coach Ray Helphrey said. “We had a chance to make some things happen, but we didn’t capitalize. Look-

ing back, today would have been a good day to get a jump on BSC.” Helphrey said the Thunderbirds were about eight or nine strokes over their season average. Continued on 4D

girls enjoy first No. 1 ranking By MICHAEL WEBER Bismarck Tribune The Shiloh Christian girls cross country program experienced a first last week. When the Class B poll was released last Wednesday, the Skyhawks found themselves at the top of the list for the very first time. They replaced Hillsboro-Central Valley, which had occupied the top spot the first four weeks of the season. In that time, Shiloh was ranked fifth, third, third and second, respectively. The Skyhawks stayed at No. 1 in this week’s poll. Last week was the first time that a Shiloh team had ever been ranked No. 1 in any sport. The school has yet to produce a team state champion, and new girls cross country coach Katie Smith said her squad is eager to become the first. “Being ranked No. 1 is very exciting for the girls. They realize the possibility of being the school’s first team state champion,” Smith said. “It’s right there in front of them and it’s making them work that much harder. There is a little more pressure that goes with being a No. 1 team, but that’s something we’re talking about and working through every day. We’re taking it one day at a time.” The Skyhawks have one runner who is ranked in the top 10 of the individual poll — No. 7 Amber Stevahn. Allison Bearstail, Regan Watson, Billie Jo Bearstail and Miriah Forness round out Shiloh’s top five. “Amber is our lead runner. Allison, Regan and Billie Jo have been running in a pack, and Miriah is very close behind,” Smith said. “Keeping our runners close together is the key. We have a very solid group of girls here.” Last season, Billie Jo Bearstail, Watson, Stevahn and Forness placed fourth, eighth, 12th and 17th, respectively, as Shiloh claimed its first Class B West Region championship. The Skyhawks went on to place third in the state meet, with Forness coming in 24th, Billie Jo Bearstail 27th and Watson 40th. Shiloh also has two runners ranked in the boys individual poll. Elliott Stone is No. 1 and Jace Ritzke is No. 9. Shiloh will host its annual invitational meet on Saturday at McDowell Dam. The first race is scheduled to begin at 11 a.m.

Wildcats rolling along Quarterback Logan Staigle, wide receiver Lane Erhardt and running back Noah Johnson have been putting up some impressive numbers lately for the resurgent Center-Stanton Wildcats. Over the past three games, Staigle has completed 30 of 54 passes for 613 yards and six touchdowns, Erhardt has 11 receptions for 368 yards and five six-pointers, and Johnson has rushed for 447 yards on 30 carries. The senior trio has helped the Wildcats to three straight 9-man Region 4 victories after an 0-2 start. Continued on 4D

COMING FRIDAY

SPEAKING

TRIVIA

Prep volleyball: St. Mary’s at Bismarck. Boys soccer: Ben Weisbeck. Boys tennis: State tournament. College golf: Region 13 tournament.

“To know that so many people look up to me, so many kids, that’s what means more than anything, that I continue to inspire the youth and they look at me as a role model.”

Who holds the World Series record for most strikeouts in a game?

Miami’s LeBron James, who has the best-selling jersey in the world.

ANSWER IN MORNING KICKOFF ON PAGE 2D


Sports

Page 2D ■ Thursday, October 3, 2013

Bismarck Tribune ■ Bismarcktribune.com

AREA SPORTS Williston at Jamestown

HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL HAZEN TOPS CLASS A POLL

EAST REGION

Defending state champion Hazen continued its hold on the No. 1 ranking in Class A in this week’s high school football polls. The Bison (5-0) received 13 of 15 first-place votes. Killdeer, which moved into sole possession of second place this week, picked up one first-place vote, as did Larimore, which slipped to third. Carrington remained in fourth. Cavalier picked up 12 of 15 first-place votes as it held down its first-place spot in 9man. Second-ranked TGU picked up two first-place nods, as did Grant CountyFlasher, which remained third. Shiloh Christian moved up a spot to fourth. The polls are conducted by the North Dakota Associated Press Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association.

Region Overall W L W L West Fargo 3 0 3 2 Fargo Davies 2 0 3 2 Fargo South 2 0 3 2 G.F. Red River 1 1 2 3 G.F. Central 1 2 1 4 Devils Lake 0 3 1 4 Fargo North 0 3 0 5 Friday, Sept. 27 G.F. Central 23, Fargo North 12 West Fargo 34, Devils Lake 20 Fargo Davies 41, Williston 8 Bismarck 55, Fargo South 49 Minot 41, G.F. Red River 21 Friday, Oct. 4 West Fargo at Century, 4:30 p.m. Devils Lake at Fargo Davies G.F. Red River at Fargo North Fargo South at G.F. Central

CLASS A Team (first-place votes) W-L Pts LW 1. Hazen (13) 5-0 73 1 2. Killdeer (1) 5-0 58 2T 3. Larimore (1) 5-0 46 2T 4. Carrington 5-0 29 4 5. (tie) DL-Burlington 5-0 7 NR 5. (tie) Milnor-N. Sargent 4-1 7 NR Also receiving votes: Park River-FordvillLankin (4-1) 5. 9-MAN Team (first-place votes) W-L Pts LW 1. Cavalier (12) 4-0 67 1 2. TGU (2) 6-0 52 2 3. Grant Co.-Flasher (1) 5-0 49 3 4. Shiloh Christian 5-0 21 5 5. St. John 5-1 13 NR Also receiving votes: Finley-Sharon-HopePage (5-1) 6, Richardton-Taylor-Hebron (5-1) 2.

CLASS AAA WEST REGION Region Overall W L W L Century 3 0 5 0 Bismarck 2 0 5 0 Minot 2 0 5 0 Dickinson 1 2 3 2 Jamestown 1 2 3 2 Mandan 0 3 0 5 Williston 0 2 0 5 Friday, Sept. 27 Century 31, Jamestown 6 Dickinson 42, Mandan 7 Bismarck 55, Fargo South 49 Minot 41, G.F. Red River 21 Fargo Davies 41, Williston 8 Friday, Oct. 4 Bismarck at Mandan, 7 p.m. West Fargo at Century, 4:30 p.m. Dickinson at Minot

COLLEGE FOOTBALL U-MARY, MSU GAME TO BE AIRED

The University of Mary and Minot State game will be aired on NBC. Kickoff is Saturday at 2:30 p.m. Midco SportsNet will broadcast the game on Wednesday. NAHL STANDINGS CENTRAL DIVISION Austin Aberdeen BOBCATS Minot Brookings MIDWEST DIVISION Fairbanks Coulee Region Kenai River Minn. Wilderness Minn. Magicians Wenatchee NORTH DIVISION Port Huron Johnstown Springfield Soo Michigan Janesville SOUTH DIVISION

W 5 5 4 2 0

L OTL PTS 1 0 10 1 0 10 2 0 8 3 1 5 5 1 1

W 7 5 5 3 3 3

L OTL PTS 1 0 14 1 0 10 3 0 10 1 2 8 2 1 7 3 0 6

W 6 4 4 2 3 1

L OTL PTS 1 1 13 4 1 9 2 0 8 2 3 7 3 0 6 4 1 3

W L OTL PTS Wichita Falls 6 1 1 13 Topeka 5 2 2 12 Rio Grande Valley 2 3 3 7 Amarillo 3 2 1 7 Corpus Christi 3 4 1 7 Odessa 2 7 0 4 Lone Star 1 6 1 3 Thursday, Oct. 3 Lone Star at Topeka Friday, Oct. 4 BOBCATS at Aberdeen, 7:15 p.m. Michigan at Janesville Magicians at Wilderness Amarillo at Wichita Falls Minot at Wenatchee Lone Star at Topeka Austin at Brookings Rio Grande Valley at Odessa Corpus Christi at Fairbanks Port Huron at Soo Coulee Region at Kenai River Saturday, Oct. 5 Aberdeen at BOBCATS, 7:15 p.m. Michigan at Janesville Port Huron at Soo

Springfield at Johnstown Amarillo at Wichita Falls Wilderness at Magicians Brookings at Austin Minot at Wenatchee Rio Grande Valley at Odessa Coulee Region at Kenai River. Corpus Christi at Fairbanks Sunday, Oct. 6 Springfield at Johnstown

BOYS SOCCER WEST REGION Region Overall Team W L T Pts W L T Bismarck 7 1 2 16 11 1 4 Century 6 1 3 15 10 2 4 St. Mary’s 5 2 3 13 9 4 3 Minot 4 2 4 12 7 3 5 Mandan 1 9 0 2 2 13 0 Jamestown 1 9 0 2 1 13 1 Tuesday, Oct. 1 Century 5, Jamestown 0 Bismarck 4, Mandan 1 St. Mary’s 2, Minot 2 End of regular season WEST REGION TOURNAMENT At Mandan Dacotah Centennial Park Friday, Oct. 4 State qualifiers Match 1: #4 Minot vs. #5 Mandan, 5 p.m. Match 2: #3 St. Mary’s vs. #6 Jamestown, 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5 Third place Game 3: Winners Matches 1 and 2, 1 p.m. Championship Match 4: #1 Bismarck vs. #2 Century, 3 p.m.

EAST REGION Region Overall Team W L T Pts W L T Shanley 10 1 1 21 13 3 2 West Fargo 8 3 1 17 12 4 2 Fargo Davies 4 5 3 11 6 6 5 Fargo South 4 6 2 10 5 9 3 Fargo North 4 6 2 10 6 8 5 G.F. Central 3 6 3 9 6 10 3 Red River 2 8 2 6 4 11 4 Monday, Sept. 30 G.F. Central 6, Crookston 1 Tuesday Oct. 1 Fargo Davies 3, G.F. Central 0 Fargo North 2, G.F. Red River 0 Fargo Shanley 4, Fargo South 1 West Fargo 2, Moorhead 2 End of regular season

STATE TOURNAMENT At Jamestown Thursday, Oct. 10 Quarterfinals Match 1: #1W vs. #4E Fargo South, 1 p.m. Match 2: #2E West Fargo vs. #3W, 3 p.m. Match 3: #1E Fargo Shanley vs. #4W, 5 p.m. Match 4: #2W vs. #3E Fargo Davies, 7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 11 Consolation semifinals Match 5: Losers Matches 1 and 2, 1 p.m. Match 6: Losers Matches 3 and 4, 3 p.m. Semifinals Match 7: Winners Matches 1 and 2, 5 p.m. Match 8: Winners Matches 3 and 4, 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 12 Fifth place Match 9: Winners Matches 5 and 6, 11 a.m. Third place Match 10: Losers Matches 7 and 8, 1 p.m. Championship Match 11: Winners Matches 7 and 8, 3 p.m.

HIGH SCHOOL CROSS COUNTRY STATE POLLS Class A boys Teams

1. Bismarck. 2. Fargo Davies. 3. Grand Forks Central. 4. Century. 5. Minot. Individuals 1. Jackson Binstock, Dickinson. 2. Matt Gotta, Bismarck. 2. Brandon Scheel, Davies. 4. Camron Roehl, Grand Forks Central. 5. Sam Clausnitzer, Bismarck. 6. Sebastain, Startz, Fargo Shanley. 7. Preston Lerew, Bismarck. 8. Leif Larsen, GFC. 9. Andrew Beach, Minot. 10. Tanner Bjorlie, Fargo North. Class A girls Teams 1. Century. 2. Bismarck. 3. Davies. 4. Dickinson. 5. Grand Forks Central. Other teams receiving votes: Fargo North. Individuals 1. Jordan Jacob, Century. 2. Brittany Brownotter, Bismarck. 3. Lexis Zeis, Bismarck. 4. Kelby Anderson, Century. 5. Karly Ackley, GFC. 6. Ali Matter, Davies. 7. Grace Gannon, Bismarck. 8. Emily Tyrell, Dickinson. 9. Jen Dufner, West Fargo. 10. Elizabeth Yoder, Dickinson. Class B boys Teams 1. New Town. 2. Beulah-Hazen. 3. Medina. 4. Griggs County Central. 5. Hillsboro-Central Valley. Other teams receiving votes: Bowman County. Individuals 1. Elliott Stone, Shiloh Christian. 2. Thomas Horgeshimer, Lisbon. 3. Ryan Wheeling, New Town. 4. Scott Hale, New Town. 5. Daniel Kuntz, Velva. 6. Jalen Chase, New Town. 7. Joe Baker, New Town. 8. Calvin Aichele, Beulah-Hazen. 9. Jace Ritzke, Shiloh. 10. Lucas Nadeau, Dunseith. Class B girls Teams 1. Shiloh Christian. 2. Hillsboro-Central Valley. 3. Killdeer. 4. Rugby. 5. Beulah-Hazen. Other teams receiving votes: Velva. Individuals 1. Asha Smith, Watford City. 2. Symbria Bell, New Town. 3. Ashley Neumiller, Carrington. 4. Annika Rotvold, Hillsboro-CV. 5. Sydney Anderson, Killdeer. 6. Cailee Peterson, Mayville-Portland-Clifford-Galesburg. 7. Amber Stevahn, Shiloh. 8. Kaylene Klein, Beulah-Hazen. 9. Ashley Perez, Dakota Prairie. 10. Mackenzie Holkesvig, HattonNorthwood.

NHL ROUNDUP

Century at Minot, 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5 Minot at Jamestown Turtle Mountain at Williston

Toronto 3, Philadelphia 1

EAST REGION Region W L 9 0 7 1 6 2 4 3 3 3 3 4 3 4 2 5 1 9 0 7

Overall W L 14 0 12 3 8 6 7 7 11 8 8 8 7 10 2 10 3 12 2 13

Fargo Shanley Fargo Davies G.F. Red River Fargo North Valley City Fargo South West Fargo Wahpeton Devils Lake G.F. Central Tuesday, Oct. 1 West Fargo 3, Devils Lake 0, 2-point Thurday, Oct. 3 G.F. Central at Fargo Davies, 2-point Devils Lake at Fargo Shanley Wahpteton at Fargo North, 2-point Fargo South at West Fargo, 2-point Valley City at G.F. Red River, 2-point

COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL GLATT NAMED PLAYER OF THE WEEK

Kelsey Glatt of Bismarck State has been named the player of the week in the Mon-Dak. The 5-foot-9 sophomore from Century had 64 kills, eight blocks, 36 digs and six aces in guiding the Mystics to a 5-1 record last week. BSC BREAKS INTO NATIONAL POLL

After receiving votes for the last three weeks, BisCOLLEGE CROSS COUNTRY marck State broke into the U-MARY CRACKS INTO POLL national poll. The Mystics For the first time this sea- are ranked 20th with six son, the University of Mary points. has made an appearance in COLLEGE BASEBALL the nation’s top 25. After tak- U-MARY SCRIMMAGES ing a jump in the Central The University of Mary Region poll earlier this week, the Marauders debuted at 21 will be hosting its own Fall Classic. The Marauders will in the coaches poll. be holding their best of HIGH SCHOOL VOLLEYBALL seven intrasquad scrimWEST REGION mages at the U-Mary baseRegion Overall W L W L ball field. Jamestown 8 0 16 3 All 33 players were put Century 9 1 18 3 St. Mary’s 6 2 10 5 into a pool and the assistant Bismarck 5 3 12 8 coaches drafted teams. Mandan 3 6 8 13 Minot 2 4 10 9 The first game took place Dickinson 1 4 9 10 Williston 1 6 3 11 Wednesday. Turtle Mountain 0 9 1 14 The series will continue Tuesday, Oct. 1 Century 3, Bismarck 1 Monday, Tuesday, WednesJamestown 3, Mandan 0 Thursday, Oct. 3 day and Friday (if necessary) St. Mary’s at Bismarck, 7 p.m. of next week. Williston at Dickinson

CLASS AA, A AND 9-MAN FOOTBALL STANDINGS REGION 3

HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL CLASS A

CLASS AA WEST REGION Minot Ryan St. Mary’s Watford City Beulah Griggs-BC Turtle Mountain Dickinson Trinity Stanley-PL EAST REGION Wahpeton Fargo Shanley Lisbon Central Cass Grafton Kindred Valley City MV-Enderlin

Region W L 3 0 3 0 2 1 2 1 2 1 0 3 0 3 0 3 Region W L 3 0 3 0 2 1 1 2 1 2 1 2 1 2 0 3

Overall W L 5 0 5 0 4 1 3 2 2 3 1 4 0 5 0 5 Overall W L 5 0 4 1 3 2 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 3 2 3

REGION 1 Carrington Milnor-NS Oakes Linton-HMB Hillsboro-CV Kidder County Northern Cass Ellendale-EK REGION 2 Larimore North Prairie Park River May-Port-CG Lakota-AEDP Langdon-Munich North Border Midway-Minto

Region W L 4 0 4 0 3 1 2 2 1 3 1 3 1 3 0 4 Region W L 4 0 4 0 3 1 3 1 1 3 1 3 0 4 0 4

Overall W L 5 0 4 1 4 1 3 2 2 3 1 4 1 4 0 5 Overall W L 5 0 5 1 4 1 3 2 2 3 1 4 1 4 0 5

DL-Burlington Lewis & Clark-OR Rugby Harvey-Wells Co. Velva Williams County Bottineau Surrey REGION 4 Hazen Killdeer Garrison-Max New Salem-GU Heart River Central McLean Southern McLean

Region W L 4 0 3 1 3 1 2 2 2 2 1 3 1 3 0 4

Overall W L 5 0 4 1 3 2 2 3 2 3 3 3 1 4 1 4

Region W L 4 0 4 0 2 2 1 2 1 2 0 3 0 3

Overall W L 5 0 5 0 2 3 3 2 2 3 1 4 1 4

9-MAN

Napoleon-GS South Border LaMoure-LM Sargent Central Strasburg-Zeeland Hankinson Richland Wyndmere-Lidge. Fargo Oak Grove REGION 2 Cavalier Finley-Sharon-HP Hatton-Northwood Thompson NR-Sheyenne North Star Benson County Four Winds-War. REGION 3

REGION 1

Region W L 5 1 4 1 4 2 3 2 3 2 2 3 2 3 1 4 0 6

Overall W L 5 1 4 1 4 2 3 2 3 2 2 3 2 4 1 4 0 6

Region W L 4 0 5 1 3 1 2 2 2 3 1 3 1 4 0 4

Overall W L 4 0 5 1 4 1 3 2 2 4 2 3 2 4 0 5

Region

Overall

TGU Divide County St. John Drake-Anamoose Westhope-NG Parshall Kenmare-Bowbells Mohall-LS New Town Dunseith REGION 4 Grant Co.-Flasher Shiloh Christian Richardton-TH Center-Stanton Beach Mott-Regent Hettinger-Scranton Bowman County Trenton-TC

W 6 5 5 4 4 3 1 1 1 0

L 0 1 1 2 2 3 5 5 5 6

Region W L 5 0 5 0 5 1 3 2 3 3 2 4 1 4 0 5 0 5

W 6 5 5 4 4 3 1 1 1 0

L 0 1 1 2 2 3 5 5 5 6

Overall W L 5 0 5 0 5 1 3 2 3 3 2 4 1 5 0 5 0 5

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Dave Bolland scored twice and Phil Kessel added a goal to lead the Toronto Maple Leafs to 3-1 win over the Philadelphia Flyers on Wednesday night. The Maple Leafs are off to a 2-0 start and spoiled Philadelphia’s season opener one night after ruining Montreal’s. Jonathan Bernier stopped 31 shots for the Maple Leafs. Toronto acquired Bolland and Bernier in the offseason to bolster their bid to get out of the first round and make a run in the Eastern Conference playoffs. Kessel scored his goal a day after he signed a $64 million, eight-year extension. Brayden Schenn scored for the Flyers. Bolland scored the goahead goal from the slot early in the third period. It was his first goal since the Game 6 clincher for the Chicago Blackhawks in the Stanley Cup finals. He sealed this win with a power-play goal with 22.5 seconds left.

Red Wings 2, Sabres 1 DETROIT (AP) — Pavel Datsyuk and Mikael Samuelsson scored 36 seconds apart midway through the first period and the Detroit Red Wings held on to beat the Buffalo Sabres 2-1 Wednesday night in the season-opener for both teams. Detroit goalie Jimmy Howard turned the puck over, allowing Zemgus Girgensons to score in his NHL debut with 7:24 left in the game. Howard tried to clear the puck from behind his net, but it hit Buffalo’s Brian Flynn and popped over the net to set up Girgensons’ backhander that pulled the Sabres within a goal. Howard made 19 saves in Detroit’s debut in the Eastern Conference, playing an Atlantic Division game against the young Sabres. Buffalo had a two-man power play for 1:31 early in the first period and for 51 seconds late in the second, but couldn’t take advantage. In between those 5-on-3 opportunities, the Sabres were held scoreless on three power plays.

SCOREBOARD FOOTBALL NFL AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA New England 4 0 0 1.000 89 57 Miami 3 1 0 .750 91 91 N.Y. Jets 2 2 0 .500 68 88 Buffalo 2 2 0 .500 88 93 South W L T Pct PF PA Indianapolis 3 1 0 .750 105 51 Tennessee 3 1 0 .750 98 69 Houston 2 2 0 .500 90 105 Jacksonville 0 4 0 .000 31 129 North W L T Pct PF PA Baltimore 2 2 0 .500 91 87 Cleveland 2 2 0 .500 64 70 Cincinnati 2 2 0 .500 81 81 Pittsburgh 0 4 0 .000 69 110 West W L T Pct PF PA Denver 4 0 0 1.000 179 91 Kansas City 4 0 0 1.000 102 41 San Diego 2 2 0 .500 108 102 Oakland 1 3 0 .250 71 91 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA Dallas 2 2 0 .500 104 85 Philadelphia 1 3 0 .250 99 138 Washington 1 3 0 .250 91 112 N.Y. Giants 0 4 0 .000 61 146 South W L T Pct PF PA New Orleans 4 0 0 1.000 108 55 Carolina 1 2 0 .333 68 36 Atlanta 1 3 0 .250 94 104 Tampa Bay 0 4 0 .000 44 70 North W L T Pct PF PA Detroit 3 1 0 .750 122 101 Chicago 3 1 0 .750 127 114 Green Bay 1 2 0 .333 96 88 Minnesota 1 3 0 .250 115 123 West W L T Pct PF PA Seattle 4 0 0 1.000 109 47 San Francisco2 2 0 .500 79 95 Arizona 2 2 0 .500 69 89 St. Louis 1 3 0 .250 69 121 Thursday, Oct. 3 Buffalo at Cleveland, 7:25 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 6 Detroit at Green Bay, Noon New Orleans at Chicago, Noon

Kansas City at Tennessee, Noon Jacksonville at St. Louis, Noon New England at Cincinnati, Noon Seattle at Indianapolis, Noon Baltimore at Miami, Noon Philadelphia at N.Y. Giants, Noon Carolina at Arizona, 3:05 p.m. Denver at Dallas, 3:25 p.m. Houston at San Francisco, 7:30 p.m. San Diego at Oakland, 10:35 p.m. Open: Minnesota, Pittsburgh, Tampa Bay, Washington Monday, Oct. 7 N.Y. Jets at Atlanta, 7:40 p.m.

CFL EAST DIVISION W L T Pts PF PA x-Toronto 9 4 0 18 388 337 Hamilton 6 7 0 12 327 364 Montreal 5 8 0 10 302 361 Winnipeg 2 11 0 4 268 421 WEST DIVISION W L T Pts PF PA x-Calgary 10 3 0 20 408 312 x-B.C. 9 4 0 18 378 319 Saskatchewan 8 5 0 16 388 299 Edmonton 3 10 0 6 316 362 x-Clinched playoff berth Friday, Oct. 4 Hamilton at Toronto, 6 p.m. Saskatchewan at B.C., 9 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5 Montreal at Edmonton, 2:30 p.m. Winnipeg at Calgary, 5:30 p.m.

BASKETBALL WNBA PLAYOFFS FINALS (Best-of-5) Sunday, Oct. 6: Atlanta at Minnesota, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 8: Atlanta at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 10: Minnesota at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. x-Sunday, Oct. 13: Minnesota at Atlanta, 7 p.m. x-Wenesday, Oct. 16: Atlanta at Minnesota, 7 p.m.

HOCKEY NHL EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division

GP W LOT Pts GF GA Toronto 2 2 0 0 4 7 4 Detroit 1 1 0 0 2 2 1 Boston 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Florida 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Ottawa 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Tampa Bay 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Buffalo 1 0 1 0 0 1 2 Montreal 1 0 1 0 0 3 4 Metropolitan Division GP W LOT Pts GF GA Carolina 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Columbus 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 New Jersey 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NYIslanders 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NYRangers 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Pittsburgh 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Phildlpha 1 0 1 0 0 1 3 Washngtn 1 0 1 0 0 4 6 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W LOT Pts GF GA Chicago 1 1 0 0 2 6 4 Winnipeg 1 1 0 0 2 5 4 Colorado 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Dallas 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Minnesota 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Nashville 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 St. Louis 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Pacific Division GP W LOT Pts GF GA Anaheim 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Calgary 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 LosAngeles 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Phoenix 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 San Jose 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vancouvr 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Edmonton 1 0 1 0 0 4 5 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Tuesday’s Games Toronto 4, Montreal 3 Chicago 6, Washington 4 Winnipeg 5, Edmonton 4 Wednesday’s Games Toronto 3, Philadelphia 1 Detroit 2, Buffalo 1 Anaheim at Colorado, 8:30 p.m. Thursday’s Games Tampa Bay at Boston, 6 p.m. New Jersey at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Calgary at Washington, 6 p.m. Los Angeles at Minnesota, 7 p.m. Nashville at St. Louis, 7:30 p.m. Florida at Dallas, 7:30 p.m. N.Y. Rangers at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Vancouver at San Jose, 9 p.m. Friday’s Games

Ottawa at Buffalo, 6 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Detroit at Carolina, 6 p.m. Calgary at Columbus, 6 p.m. Los Angeles at Winnipeg, 7 p.m. Nashville at Colorado, 8 p.m.

SOCCER MLS EASTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF GA New York 15 9 7 52 48 37 Sporting KC 14 10 6 48 43 29 Montreal 13 9 7 46 48 44 Houston 12 10 8 44 38 37 Philadelphia 11 10 9 42 38 39 Columbus 12 14 5 41 40 41 New England 11 11 8 41 42 34 Chicago 11 12 7 40 38 45 Toronto FC 5 15 11 26 29 45 D.C. 3 21 6 15 20 52 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF GA Real Salt Lake15 10 6 51 54 39 Seattle 15 8 6 51 39 29 Portland 12 5 13 49 46 31 Los Angeles 13 11 6 45 46 37 Colorado 12 9 9 45 37 31 San Jose 12 11 8 44 32 41 Vancouver 11 11 8 41 42 39 FC Dallas 10 10 10 40 42 46 Chivas USA 6 17 8 26 29 55 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. Friday, Oct. 4 Chicago at D.C. United, 7 p.m. Montreal at Houston, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5 New England at New York, 6 p.m. Sporting Kansas City at Columbus, 6:30 p.m. Toronto FC at Philadelphia, 6:30 p.m. FC Dallas at Real Salt Lake, 8 p.m. Seattle FC at Colorado, 9 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 6 Chivas USA at Los Angeles, 4 p.m. Portland at Vancouver, 7 p.m.

AUTO RACING NASCAR SPRINT CUP Standings Through Sept. 29 1. Matt Kenseth, 2,149. 2. Jimmie Johnson, 2,141. 3. Kyle Busch, 2,137.

4. Kevin Harvick, 2,110. 5. Jeff Gordon, 2,110. 6. Greg Biffle, 2,108. 7. Ryan Newman, 2,101. 8. Clint Bowyer, 2,098. 9. Kurt Busch, 2,094. 10. Dale Earnhardt Jr., 2,092. 11. Carl Edwards, 2,084. 12. Joey Logano, 2,083. 13. Kasey Kahne, 2,071. 14. Jamie McMurray, 819. 15. Brad Keselowski, 799. 16. Martin Truex Jr., 781. 17. Paul Menard, 768. 18. Aric Almirola, 741. 19. Ricky Stenhouse Jr., 727. 20. Jeff Burton, 724.

TRANSACTIONS WEDNESDAY BASEBALL COMMISSIONER’S OFFICE—Suspended Milwaukee RHP Dylan Brock 50 games for a violation of the Minor League Drug Prevention and Treatment Program. American League HOUSTON ASTROS—Selected 1B Jon Singleton to the major league 40man roster. Claimed LHP Raul Valdes from the Philadelphia Phillies. Sent RHP Philip Humber, C Cody Clark, INF Brandon Laird and C Matt Pagnozzi outright to their minor league camp. MINNESOTA TWINS—Assigned RHPs Cole De Vries, Shairon Martis and Josh Roenicke and OF Clete Thomas outright to Rochester (IL). TEXAS RANGERS—Announced the contracts of first base coach Dave Anderson and bench coach Jackie Moore will not be renewed. American Association EL PASO DIABLOS—Released INF Shelby Ford. LINCOLN SALTDOGS—Sent RHP Stayton Thomas to Rockford (Frontier) to complete an earlier trade. WINNIPEG GOLDEYES—Signed RHP Jason Jarvis. Frontier League WASHINGTON WILD THIGNS— Sent LHP Dayne Quist to San Angelo (United) to complete an earlier trade. WINDY CITY THUNDERBOLTS— Sold the contract of RHP Jake

Roberts to the Arizona Diamondbacks. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association CHICAGO BULLS—Released Gs Kalin Lucas and Patrick Christopher. NEW YORK KNICKS—Signed G Chris Douglas-Roberts. Released F Justin Brownlee. SAN ANTONIO SPURS—Named Dave Telep draft scouting coordinator. FOOTBALL National Football League ARIZONA CARDINALS—Placed LB Vic So’oto on injured reserve. Signed LB Marcus Benard. Traded OT Levi Brown to Pittsburgh for a conditional draft pick. CINCINNATI BENGALS—Released DB Curtis Marsh. Signed LB Michael Boley. INDIANAPOLIS COLTS—Released G Thomas Austin from the practice squad. JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS—Traded OT Eugene Monroe to Baltimore for two undisclosed draft picks. KANSAS CITY CHIEFS—Released LB Darin Drakeford from the practice squad. Signed G Chandler Burden to the practice squad. MIAMI DOLPHINS—Released S Kelcie McCray and FB Tyler Clutts. Signed LB Austin Spitler. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS—Resigned S Kanorris Davis to the practice squad. NEW YORK GIANTS—Released OT Steven Baker from the practice squad. Signed WR Marcus Harris to the practice squad. NEW YORK JETS—Signed WR David Nelson. ST. LOUIS RAMS—Signed WR Emory Blake to the practice squad. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS—Signed QB John Skelton to a one-year contract and LB Jermaine Cunningham. Released QB B.J. Daniels and RB Owen Marecic. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS—Released LB John Lotulelei. Released FB Jameson Konz from the practice squad. Claimed QB B.J. Daniels off waivers from San Francisco. Signed WR Arceto Clark to the practice squad. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS—

Signed WR Chris Owusu. Claimed S Kelcie McCray off waivers from Miami. Canadian Football League EDMONTON ESKIMOS—Signed RB Robbie Rouse to the practice roster. WINNIPEG BLUE BOMBERS— Added WR Jheranie Boyd, OL Shea Allard, LB Taylor Reed, DB Semaj Moody and DE Jake Killeen to the practice roster. HOCKEY National Hockey League SAN JOSE SHARKS—Assigned F Freddie Hamilton to Worcester (AHL). Recalled F Matt Pelech from San Francisco (ECHL). American Hockey League PEORIA RIVERMEN—Signed Fs Brett Lipscomb and Branden Parkhouse; D Jarrett Rush and Tyler Amburgey; and G Russell Stein. SYRACUSE CRUNCH—Reassigned D Carl Nielsen to Florida (ECHL). TEXAS STARS—Assigned D Etienne Boutet to Idaho (ECHL). WORCESTER SHARKS—Named Charlie Townsend video coaching assistant. ECHL FLORIDA EVERBLADES—Agreed to terms with D Jordan Henry. READING ROYALS—Signed Gs Ryan Klingensmith and Shawn Sirman and D Brock Sawyer to tryout agreements. COLLEGE ALABAMA—Suspended S Ha Ha Clinton-Dix indefinitely for violating team rules. DELAWARE—Named Noah Fossner assistant lacrosse coach. FIU—Named Maegan Azpiazu assistant athletic director for marketing and new media. IONA—Named Matt Glovaski senior associate athletic director for advancement and external affairs. MASSACHUSETTS—Named Chris Wielgus director of operations for women’s basketball. PURDUE—Suspended WRs B.J. Knauf two games and Jordan Woods indefinitely.

MORNING KICKOFF a.m. Boys soccer: West Region tournament at Mandan. scored 17 points to lead third- 8 TGC — European PGA Tour, Seve Trophy, first round, SCHEDULE Girls swimming: Mandan Invitational; diving 9 a.m.; ranked and unbeaten New Salem at Paris swimming 10:30 a.m. THURSDAY 11 a.m. tennis: State tournament at Fargo. to a 66-54 victory over previously- TGC — PGA Tour, Presidents Cup, first round, at High school cross country: Mandan at Williston Boys College volleyball: Sioux Falls at U-Mary, 6 Invitational, 4:15 p.m. Dublin, Ohio p.m.High school volleyball: Washburn Invitational. unbeaten Center-Stanton in the 3 a.m. Men’s soccer: U-Mary at Northwest Nazarene, 5:30 SUNDAY title game of the New Salem Invita- TGC — LPGA, Reignwood Classic, second round, at p.m. Boys tennis: State tournament at Fargo. College hockey: Manitoba at UND, exhibition, 7:07 tional girls basketball tournament. Beijing (delayed tape) High school volleyball: St. Mary’s at Bismarck, 7 FOOTBALL p.m.; Century at Minot, 7 p.m.; Washburn at Shiloh, 7 p.m. 50 YEARS AGO (1963): Ron NFL Men’s soccer: BSC at Century College, 3 p.m. p.m. 7 p.m. Women’s soccer: U-Mary at MSU-Mankato, 1 p.m.; Klimpfel finished first as Bismarck NFL — Buffalo at Cleveland FRIDAY BSC at Century College, 1 p.m. High swept a cross country meet in NHL HOCKEY NAHL: Bobcats at Aberdeen, 7:15 p.m. High school football: Bismarck at Mandan, 7 p.m.; Playback Jamestown, finishing with the min- 7 p.m. West Fargo at Century, 4:30 p.m.; Watford City at St. CONTACT US NBCSN — Los Angeles at Minnesota 10 YEARS AGO (2003): Centu- imum 15 points. Jamestown was Lou Babiarz, Tribune sports editor, 250-8243 or 888Mary’s, 7 p.m.; Trenton-Trinity Christian at Shiloh, 7 SOCCER p.m. 684-2293 after 3 p.m. (e-mail: lou.babiarz@bismarckry’s Chelsey Wongjirad is three second with 75. Women’s soccer: U-Mary at Concordia-St. Paul, 7 tribune.com) 11 a.m. p.m. Steve Thomas, Tribune sportswriter, 250-8244 or strokes off the lead after the first FS1 — UEFA Europa League, Tottenham at Anji Boys soccer: West Region tournament at Mandan. 888-684-2293 after 3 p.m. (e-mail: steve.thomas@bis2 p.m. TV TODAY day of the Class A girls golf tournaGirls swimming: Williston, Gillette at Mandan, 5 p.m. marcktribune.com) FS1 — UEFA Europa League, St. Gallen at Swansea AUTO RACING Boys tennis: State tournament at Fargo. City Cindy Peterson, Tribune sportswriter, 250-8245 or ment. College volleyball: Southwest Minnesota State at 8 8 8 - 6 8 4 - 2 2 9 3 a f t e r 3 p . m . ( e - m a i l : Noon COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL U-Mary, 7 p.m. Wongjirad, the medalist at the NBCSN — Formula One, practice for Korean Grand cindy.peterson@bismarcktribune.com) 6 p.m. SATURDAY Michael Weber, Tribune sportswriter, 355-8839 or West Region meet, carded an 82 in Prix, at Yeongam, South Korea ESPN2 — Penn St. at Indiana 888-684-2293 after 3 p.m. (e-mail: mike.weber@bisCOLLEGE FOOTBALL NAHL: Aberdeen at Bobcats, 7:15 p.m. windy conditions. That left her 6:30 p.m. College football: Northern Iowa at NDSU, 2:30 p.m.; marcktribune.com) Scott Throlson, Tribune sports copy editor, 250-8246 RADIO TODAY UND at Idaho State, 3 p.m.; Minot State at U-Mary, three shots back of Jenny Hender- ESPN — Texas at Iowa St. or 888-684-2293. (e-mail: scott.throlson@bismarcktri2:30 p.m. 9 p.m. NFL Men’s soccer: U-Mary at MSU-Billings, 2:30 p.m.; bune.com) son of Fargo South. FS1 — UCLA at Utah Send faxed results to 223-2063. 7 p.m. BSC at Riverland, 1 p.m. 20 YEARS AGO (1993): Jill Doll GOLF KXMR (710 AM) — Buffalo at Cleveland. Send e-mail results to: sports@bismarcktribune.com Women’s soccer: BSC at Rochester, 7 p.m.

Trivia answer

FROM 1D: Who holds the World Series record for most strikeouts in a game? Bob Gibson of the St. Louis Cardinals recorded a record 17 strikeouts in his team’s Game 1 victory over the Detroit Tigers on Oct. 2, 1968.


Bismarcktribune.com ■ Bismarck Tribune

Sports

Thursday, October 3, 2013 ■ Page 3D

Rays top Indians in wild card CLEVELAND (AP) — The Tampa Bay Rays’ road show rolls on. Next stop: Boston. Alex Cobb dodged trouble for nearly seven innings and the Rays pitched their way to another must-have win on the road, beating the Cleveland Indians 4-0 Wednesday night in the AL wild-card game. Cobb, who missed a chunk of the regular season after he was hit in the head by a line drive, quieted a thundering Cleveland crowd and ended the Indians’ unexpected season. Delmon Young homered in the third inning off rookie Danny Salazar as the Rays, playing in their third city over four days, advanced to face the AL East champion Red Sox in the division series starting Friday. Co b b’s c o m e b a c k i n August from his frightening injury helped stabilize the Rays, who have spent the past two weeks winning crucial games to make the postseason for the fourth time in six years. Cobb pitched out of massive jams in the fourth and fifth, and allowed two runners to reach in the seventh before turning it over to Tampa Bay’s dependable bullpen. Joel Peralta struck out Nick Swisher on three pitches, ending Cleveland’s last real chance. Fernando Rodney worked a perfect ninth, striking out Lonnie Chisenhall to end it. Rodney dropped to one knee and pointed skyward and soon was mobbed by all the Rays, who may be a little homesick but are Bostonbound. Unfazed by a raucous, red-clad, towel-waving crowd of 43,579 that roared like a jet engine inside Progressive Field, the Rays handled the Indians and will now face their division

Associated Press

Tampa Bay’s Yunel Escobar (11) welcomes home Delmon Young after Young's solo home run in the third inning against Cleveland on Wednesday. nemesis, the Red Sox, who went 12-7 against Tampa Bay this season. David Price set the tone for the Rays’ postseason run by throwing a complete game to beat Texas in the wild-card tiebreaker, and Cobb picked up where his teammate left off. After he was pulled in the seventh, Cobb walked to the dugout where he was first greeted with a high-five from Price. There was a time when Cobb wasn’t even sure he would pitch again this season. On June 15, he suffered a concussion when he was struck in the right ear by a line drive hit by Kansas City’s Eric Hosmer. Cobb was sidelined for 50 games and Tuesday he recalled lying on his sofa and wondering if he would be able to help the Rays contend for a playoff spot. He didn’t want a repeat of 2011, when he couldn’t pitch in the playoffs after undergoing surgery to remove a blood clot in his ribs. But not only did Cobb go 5-1 after his scary moment, the 25-year-old finished 11-3 in 22 starts and manager Joe

Maddon didn’t hesitate giving him the ball for the winner-take-all wild-card game. The Indians went from 94 losses a year ago to 92 wins under first-year manager Terry Francona and won their last 10 games to make the postseason for the first time since 2007. But it was one and done for Cleveland, which didn’t capitalize on scoring opportunities. The first three hitters, Michael Bourn, Swisher and Jason Kipnis, went a combined 0 for 12. The road-tested Rays, who have traveled 3,627 miles since leaving home on Sept. 23, took a 3-0 lead in the fourth on Desmond Jennings’ two-run double. James Loney and Evan Longoria hit one-out singles before Salazar retired Ben Zobrist on a fly to right, sending Loney to third. Jennings, who recently missed time with a hamstring injury, pulled Salazar’s pitch past diving a diving Chisenhall at third, and by the time left fielder Michael Brantley, who had been shading Jennings toward center, ran it down, Loney and Longoria scored to give Cobb a three-

run cushion. Cobb was in trouble in the bottom of the inning as the Indians loaded the bases on a double, single and walk. But Cobb got Asdrubal Cabrera to hit a grounder to first baseman Loney, who threw to second for a force and shortstop Yunel Escobar fired to Cobb covering first for the double play. Cobb pumped both fists in celebration, knowing he had escaped danger. It was nothing new for Cabrera, an All-Star the past two seasons who struggled in 2013 and went 2 for 15 with the bases loaded. The Indians threatened again in the fifth, putting two on with none out. But Cobb struck out Bourn, got Swisher to ground to first and retired All-Star Kipnis on a soft-as-cotton comebacker to keep it 3-0. Francona was confident Salazar, who sailed through Cleveland’s farm system with a rocket right arm, could prolong the season. “We gave him the ball for a reason,” Francona said. “This stage isn’t too big for him.” And for the most part, Salazar held his own. But a few mistakes cost him and will undoubtedly give him some restless nights until spring training. Young’s ninth homer in the past three Octobers gave the Rays a 1-0 lead in the third, and their first hit off Salazar. Drafted first overall by Tampa Bay in 2003, Young returned to the Rays in August with plenty of postseason experience — and success. He was the ALCS MVP with Detroit last season as the Tigers swept the New York Yankees in four games. Now he’s on the road with the Rays, who want to travel as deep as they can this month.

Cabrera’s health a big concern DETROIT — That sweet swing is still there. No matter how banged up Miguel Cabrera has been, he’s always a threat to hit the ball where nobody can catch it. It’s the rest of his duties that have looked more and more painful. Those jogs out of the batter’s box became progressively slower — and although Cabrera helped the Detroit Tigers win the AL Central for a third straight year, even they can’t be sure what to expect from their best hitter in the postseason. “He’s not 100 percent,” manager Jim Leyland said. “He’s been playing in a lot of pain. He’s a real tough guy.” After winning the Triple Crown in 2012, Cabrera was even better for much of this season. By the end of August, he looked well on his way to one of the American League’s best offensive seasons of the last 50 years. His final numbers were still terrific — a .348 average with 44 homers and 137 RBIs — but toward the end, a number of nagging problems began to add up. “It doesn’t matter right now,” Cabrera said. “You’ve got to be ready to play. Go out there and play hard.” Cabrera missed a game in early July with a bad back,

Associated Press

Detroit’s Miguel Cabrera has been bothered by injuries the second half of the season. and on July 22 against the said was a sore left hip flexor. Chicago White Sox, he exited After missing four games, the early with what the team star third baseman homered

in his first at-bat July 27 against Philadelphia. That began a remarkable pattern in which Cabrera would miss time because of one injury or another — but still put up staggering numbers when he did play. He was bothered by a strained lower abdomen, but after missing a few days in early August, he came back to help Detroit sweep a key fourgame series at Cleveland. Then he homered in all three games of a road series against the New York Yankees, twice off Mariano Rivera. The first homer off Rivera was the most memorable — a tying two-run shot in the ninth inning that came while Cabrera was still hobbling after fouling two balls off his left shin in the atbat. The Tigers ended up losing, but it was still one of the highlights of the season. Then on Aug. 20, Cabrera aggravated a strain in his groin, abdominal and hip area. He kept playing, never going on the disabled list, but his numbers finally dipped a bit. At the end of an Aug. 26 game against Oakland, Cabrera was hitting .359 with 43 homers and 130 RBIs. Since then, he’s hit .284 with only two extra-base hits in 25 games.

MLB POSTSEASON RAYS 4, INDIANS 0 Tampa Bay

Cleveland

ab rhbi ab rhbi DeJess lf 4 0 0 0 Bourn cf 4000 WMyrs rf 4 0 1 0 Swisher 1b 4 0 0 0 Kiermr cf 0 0 0 0 Kipnis 2b 4000 Loney 1b 4 1 1 0 CSantn dh 4 0 2 0 Longori 3b 4 1 1 0 Brantly lf 4010 Zobrist 2b 4 1 1 0 Raburn rf 3010 DJnngs cf 3 0 2 2 AsCarr ss 4000 Fuld pr-cf-rf 1 0 0 0 YGoms c 4020 DYong dh 3 1 1 1 Chsnhll 3b 4 0 3 0 YEscor ss 4011 JMolin c 3000 Totals 34 4 8 4 Totals 3509 0 Tampa Bay 001 200 001 — 4 Cleveland 000 000 000 — 0 E—Chisenhall (1). DP—Tampa Bay 1, Cleveland 1. LOB—Tampa Bay 6, Cleveland 9. 2B—De.Jennings (1), C.Santana (1), Raburn (1), Y.Gomes (1). HR—D.Young (1). CS— J.Molina (1). IP H R ER BB SO Tampa Bay Cobb W,1-0 6.2 8 0 0 1 5 Jo.Peralta H,1 1 1 0 0 0 1 McGee H,1 .1 0 0 0 0 1 Rodney 1 0 0 0 0 2 Cleveland Salazar L,0-1 4 4 3 3 2 4 Rzepczynski .1 0 0 0 0 1 Shaw 1.2 1 0 0 0 2 Masterson 2 1 0 0 0 2 Allen .1 1 1 0 0 1 J.Smith .2 1 0 0 0 1 Salazar pitched to 1 batter in the 5th. Shaw pitched to 1 batter in the 7th. HBP—by Masterson (DeJesus). Umpires—Home, Gerry Davis; First, Ted Bar-

rett; Second, Mike Everitt; Third, Greg Gibson; Right, Brian Knight; Left, Phil Cuzzi. T—3:40. A—43,579 (42,241).

WILD CARD Tuesday, Oct. 1: NL: Pittsburgh 6, Cincinnati 2 Wednesday, Oct. 2: AL: Tampa Bay 4, Cleveland 0

DIVISION SERIES (Best-of-5 x-if necessary) American League Boston vs. Tampa Bay Friday, Oct. 4: Tampa Bay (Price 10-8) at Boston (Lester 15-8), 2:07 p.m.(TBS) Saturday, Oct. 5: Tampa Bay (Moore 17-4) at Boston (Lackey 10-13), 4:37 p.m.(TBS) Monday, Oct. 7: Boston (Buchholz 12-1) at Tampa Bay x-Tuesday, Oct. 8: Boston (Peavy 12-5) at Tampa Bay x-Thursday, Oct. 10: Tampa Bay at Boston Oakland vs. Detroit Friday, Oct. 4: Detroit (Scherzer 21-3) at Oakland (Colon 18-6), 8:37 p.m.(TBS) Saturday, Oct. 5: Detroit (Verlander 13-12) at Oakland (Gray 5-3), 8:07 p.m.(TBS) Monday, Oct. 7: Oakland (Parker 12-8) at Detroit (Sanchez 14-8) x-Tuesday, Oct. 8: Oakland (Straily 10-8) at Detroit (Fister 14-9) x-Thursday, Oct. 10: Detroit at Oakland National League St. Louis vs. Pittsburgh Thursday, Oct. 3: Pittsburgh (Burnett 1011) at St. Louis (Wainwright 19-9), 4:07 p.m.(TBS)

Friday, Oct. 4: Pittsburgh at St. Louis (Lynn 15-10), 12:07 p.m.(MLB) Sunday, Oct. 6: St. Louis at Pittsburgh x-Monday, Oct. 7: St. Louis at Pittsburgh x-Wednesday Oct. 9: Pittsburgh at St. Louis Atlanta vs. Los Angeles Thursday, Oct. 3: Los Angeles (Kershaw 16-9) at Atlanta (Medlen 15-12), 7:37 p.m.(TBS) Friday, Oct. 4: Los Angeles (Greinke 15-4) at Atlanta (Minor 13-9 or Teheran 14-8), 5:07 p.m.(TBS) Sunday, Oct. 6: Atlanta (Minor 13-9 or Teheran 14-8) at Los Angeles (Ryu 14-8) x-Monday, Oct. 7: Atlanta at Los Angeles x-Wednesday Oct. 9: Los Angeles at Atlanta

LEAGUE CHAMPIONSHIP SERIES (Best-of-7 x-if necessary) American League All games televised by Fox Saturday, Oct. 12: Oakland-Detroit winner at Boston or Tampa Bay at Oakland-Detroit winner Sunday, Oct. 13: Oakland-Detroit winner at Boston or Tampa Bay at Oakland-Detroit winner Tuesday, Oct. 15: Boston at OaklandDetroit winner or Oakland-Detroit winner at Tampa Bay Wednesday, Oct. 16: Boston at OaklandDetroit winner or Oakland-Detroit winner at Tampa Bay x-Thursday, Oct. 17: Boston at OaklandDetroit winner or Oakland-Detroit winner at Tampa Bay x-Saturday, Oct. 19: Oakland-Detroit win-

ner at Boston or Tampa Bay at OaklandDetroit winner x-Sunday, Oct. 20: Oakland-Detroit winner at Boston or Tampa Bay at Oakland-Detroit winner National League All games televised by TBS Friday, Oct. 11: Atlanta-Los Angeles winner at St. Louis or Pittsburgh at Atlanta-Los Angeles winner Saturday, Oct. 12: Atlanta-Los Angeles winner at St. Louis or Pittsburgh at AtlantaLos Angeles winner Monday, Oct. 14: St. Louis at Atlanta-Los Angeles winner or Atlanta-Los Angeles winner at Pittsburgh Tuesday, Oct. 15: St. Louis at Atlanta-Los Angeles winner or Atlanta-Los Angeles winner at Pittsburgh x-Wednesday, Oct. 16: St. Louis at AtlantaLos Angeles winner or Atlanta-Los Angeles winner at Pittsburgh x-Friday, Oct. 18: Atlanta-Los Angeles winner at St. Louis or Pittsburgh at Atlanta-Los Angeles winner x-Saturday, Oct. 19: Atlanta-Los Angeles winner at St. Louis or Pittsburgh at AtlantaLos Angeles winner

WORLD SERIES (Best-of-7) All games televised by Fox Wednesday, Oct. 23: at AL Thursday, Oct. 24: at AL Saturday, Oct. 26: at NL Sunday, Oct. 27: at NL x-Monday, Oct. 28: at NL x-Wednesday, Oct. 30: at AL x-Thursday, Oct. 31: at AL

Associated Press

Carl Crawford of the Los Angeles Dodgers takes batting practice in preparation for tonight’s NLDS opening game against the Atlanta Braves.

Dodgers, Braves look to regain edge in NLDS By PAUL NEWBERRY AP Sports Writer ATLANTA — It’s been a while since either team played a truly meaningful game. The Los Angeles Dodgers took control of the NL West with an amazing 2 1-2month stretch and could let off the gas over the final weeks. The Atlanta Braves won the East going away, their commanding lead not at all threatened by a losing record over the final month. Now, it’s time to get serious again. They meet tonight in Game 1 of the NL division series. “I don’t think we necessarily let up,” Dodgers infielder Michael Young said after a workout at Turner Field. “In our situation, we had to get some guys healthy. A couple of guys needed a couple of days off, so we gave it to them. Now we’re ready to roll.” Despite having some room for error, the Dodgers are far from healthy going into the playoffs. Slugger Matt Kemp is out for the postseason with an ankle injury, while outfielder Andre Ethier will likely be limited to pinch-hitting duties because of his own ankle issues. He hasn’t played in the field since Sept. 13. While Ethier took part in the workout, he ruled out any chance of playing in the field. “The ankle is getting better every day,” he said. “It’s not as fast as we want, but it’s definitely on the timetable that we knew going in. Every day that it doesn’t get more sore and set me back is a good day.” The Dodgers certainly won’t get any sympathy from the Braves, who lost seven players to season-ending injuries. Atlanta was bolstered by unlikely contributors such as Evan Gattis, who made the team as a non-roster player in the spring, hit 21 homers and paced all NL rookies with 65 RBIs. He’s expected to bat cleanup against Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw (16-9, 1.83 ERA) in the series opener. Gattis is not alone. The Braves playoff roster is filled with guys who no one would’ve expected just a few months ago. Journeyman Elliot Johnson, acquired off waivers in August, will start at second base. Veteran pitcher Freddy Garcia, purchased from Baltimore late in the season, is set to start Game 4 if the best-of-five series goes that far. Rookie David Hale, who made two September starts after the rosters expanded, made the bullpen as a long reliever. “We got a lot of contributions from a lot of guys who,

coming into the season, a lot of people didn’t expect,” catcher Brian McCann said. There also were some huge disappointments. Three-time All-Star second baseman Dan Uggla hit just .179 and didn’t even make the 25-man squad, despite 22 homers. B.J. Upton was demoted to a backup role in the outfield after batting .184 with nine homers and 26 RBIs. With Kemp out and Ethier hurting, the Dodgers are counting on veterans such as Young, Skip Schumaker and Jerry Hairston to step up. Plus, they have one of the most exciting — and sometimes exasperating — rookies in the game, 22-year-old Yasiel Puig, who batted .319 with 19 homers and 42 RBIs. “Matt is a great player,” first baseman Adrian Gonzalez said. “But we have a bunch of great players behind him.” Kris Medlen (15-12, 3.11) will start Game 1 for the Braves. He was the loser in last year’s wild-card playoff against the St. Louis Cardinals and struggled a bit early this season, but the Braves are confident he can go pitch-for-pitch with Kershaw. “Some guys thrive in these situations. Some guys don’t,” McCann said. “He’s definitely one of those guys that the bigger the moment, the more he thrives.” The Braves also discount their shaky performance down the stretch, which cost them home-field advantage throughout the NL playoffs. Atlanta won just 13 of 27 games in September and lost the top seed to St. Louis by a game, which certainly raised the question of whether the team is destined for its eight straight playoff series loss. The Braves haven’t won a postseason series since 2001. “We clinched the division with a week and a half to go, but we still had home-field advantage we were fighting for,” first baseman Freddie Freeman insisted. “ We fought all the way to the end of the season. There was no edge taken away. We were competing every day, every game. That’s going to help us going in.” Atlanta shrugged off its history of playoff failures, which dates to an unprecedented run of 14 straight division titles from 19912005 that resulted in only one World Series championship. McCann is the only active holdover from the Braves’ last division crown. He said this team isn’t dwelling on the ones that got away. “No one here was even part of it for those 14 years. I just caught the tail end of it that last year,” McCann said. “I don’t think anybody thinks about that. Once the game starts, it’s just us vs. them.”


Sports

Page 4D ■ Thursday, October 3, 2013

Bismarck Tribune ■ Bismarcktribune.com

UND hockey looks for new identity By DAVE KOLPACK Associated Press GRAND FORKS — It’s a season of new identities for the University of North Dakota men’s hockey team, and this time it’s not about a nickname. The perennial challengers in the Western College Hockey Association have moved to a new league this year after the Big Ten teams decided to band together. The fledgling National Collegiate Hockey Conference features five former WCHA teams and three teams that UND has not played on a regular basis. “You’re going to see some new names on the Hakstol backs of jerseys,” UND head coach Dave Hakstol said Wednesday at the team’s annual media day festivities. “It’s going to be hockey played at a highly competitive level, and that’s nothing really different from the WCHA.” In addition to the change of scenery, the team that has been without a nickname since the contentious Fighting Sioux moniker was retired before last season might have a new formula to produce goals. It lost its two top scorers

from last year, Danny Kristo and Corban Knight, both of whom were candidates for the Hobey Baker Award as the college hockey’s top player. Hakstol said he’s looking for balanced scoring from all of his lines. “It’s going to be interesting to see how our team finds our identity and what that is going to be,” senior defenseman Dillon Simpson said. “It’s going to be exciting.” UND does return perhaps its most electrifying player in forward Rocco Grimaldi, a 5-foot-6 jitterbug who was third in scoring last year with 36 points. Grimaldi said he has set individual benchmarks for himself for point production, but has learned not to live by the numbers. “That’s my job on the team, to be an offensive threat every time I’m out there. Sometimes I put too much pressure on myself, as I learned last year,” he said. “That doesn’t help at all. I just need to focus on the game at hand and just be confident in my abilities and what I usually do.” The team is confident about its strength in goal with senior Clarke Saunders and sophomore Zane Gothberg, both of whom played their best at the end of last year. Those two “will compete at a high level against each other and make each other better,”

Hakstol said. Hakstol and the players said it won’t take long to find new league rivals, beginning with the conference opener at Miami of Ohio later hits month. Miami could be the No. 1 team in the country when that series is played. “We both play similar styles of hardnosed hockey,” junior for ward Stephane Pattyn said. “I’m really excited to play them. I think it will be a very intense and very emotional series. It will kick off the new conference with a bang, I think.” North Dakota is among the tops in the country with seven national championships, its last coming in 2000. Hakstol, who took over in 2004, has won 235 games in 10 seasons and has been in the regional finals or Frozen Four seven times. “We’re not starting for any other reason,” Hakstol said, asked about the program’s desire for national championships. “Nothing more needs to be said.” Simpson, who last week was named team captain, nodded when asked if anything less than an NCAA title is a disappointment. “Seems to be always the case here,” he said. “For us, it’s always a bitter taste in our mouth if we don’t win the national championship.”

SPORTS DIGEST Official: Service academy games will go on U.S. military academy football teams will play this weekend, despite the government shutdown. A senior defense official said Wednesday the decision affects this weekend’s games only, and future games will be evaluated as events unfold. The official was not authorized to discuss the matter publicly so spoke on condition of anonymity. Army’s game at Boston College, and Air Force’s game at Navy in Annapolis, Md., on Saturday were in jeopardy after the Defense Department temporarily suspended sports competition at the service academies as a result of the budget impasse in Congress. The teams will be allowed to play because the games are paid for with non-appropriated funds, and have been long planned. Nonappropriated funds generally come from outside sources and are not approved through Congress. A phone message left with Navy athletic director Chet Gladchuk was not immediately returned, along with email messages left with spokesmen for Army and Air

Force. Earlier in the day, Gladchuk said he was optimistic the Pentagon would allow the games to be played. He said the athletic department has provided information to Pentagon officials to assure them that no government funds will be spent on any aspect of the game. Gladchuk said a Navy home game brings in about $4 million from tickets, sponsorship, television and radio rights fees and other revenues such as parking and concessions. The game essentially pays for itself, he said. Football revenue also funds Navy’s 32 other sports teams.

NCAA now facing another concussion lawsuit INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Two more former college football players have filed a lawsuit against the NCAA stemming from concussions and brain injuries. John DuRocher, a quarterback at Washington and Oregon, and Darin Harris, a safety at Washington, are seeking more than $5 million in damages. Both say they sustained repeated head injuries, despite promises that they would be compet-

ing in a protected college environment. The class-action suit was filed Tuesday in the U.S. District Court of Southern Indiana. Helmet-manufacturer Riddell and its parent company, Easton-Bell Sports, are also named in the complaint. I t ’s a n o t h e r l e g a l headache for the NCAA, which is facing another concussion lawsuit in Illinois federal court and a California suit to recover money from using players’ likenesses and images in a video game.

Shannon, Harrelson Frick Award finalists COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. (AP) — Ken Harrelson and Mike Shannon are among the 10 finalists for the Baseball Hall of Fame’s broadcasting award. Harrelson has broadcast for the Boston Red Sox, New York Yankees and Chicago White Sox, spending 27 years in Chicago. Shannon has called St. Louis Cardinals games for 42 years following a nine-year playing career with the Redbirds. Other finalists for the Ford C. Frick Award are: Joe Castiglione, Jacques Doucet, Bill King, Duane Kuiper, Eric

Nadel, Eduardo Ortega, Dewayne Staats and Pete van Wieren. Doucet, King and Kuiper were the top three picks in online voting by fans. Final voting for the award, presented annually for excellence in baseball broadcasting, will be conducted by a 20-member panel. The winner will be announced on Dec. 11 at the baseball winter meetings.

Boeheim not for paying student-athletes SYRACUSE, N.Y. (AP) — Syracuse basketball coach Jim Boeheim isn’t on board with paying college athletes. Speaking Wednesday in Syracuse at an annual Associated Press meeting of New York newspaper editors, Boeheim said he’s heard the most recent talk about paying college athletes and calls it “the most idiotic suggestion of all time.” Boeheim took exception with retired NBA star Chris Webber’s complaint he received nothing after his team shirt was sold. In a documentary released earlier this year, Webber lamented that while a student-athlete at Michigan, his team jersey sold in a campus store for $75 without any money going to him.

Mystics volleyball Continued from 1D “We had numerous hitting errors,” she said. “I thought we passed a wonderful ball. I thought we blocked decent. Our hitting errors, we lost the game by

ourselves. It was frustrating to watch. “Our outsides did a great job. We didn’t have anything coming from the middles, and that happens some-

times. Bismarck State did a good job on our middles because they did not get a lot of options.” LRSC BSC

14 25

23 25

19 25

LRSC — Statistics not reported. BSC — Kills: Madison Deibert 8, Kelsey Glatt 7, Leslie Beaudoin 6. Blocks: Beaudoin 2, Katie Ramlo 1, Ashley Bohrer 1, Micaela Meyer 1. Assists: Ramlo 21. Digs: Casey Reamann 18, Deibert 9, Ramlo 7. Aces: Deibert 3, Reamann 2, Glatt 1. Records: LRSC 1-3 Mon-Dak, 19-6 overall; BSC 7-0, 25-4

Class B notes Continued from 1D Center-Stanton has scored 148 points during the winning streak while matching the win total it had in 2011 (1-8) and 2012 (2-7) combined. “We have a nice winning streak going and Logan, Lane and Noah are big reasons for it,” Center-Stanton’s first-year head coach Cale Ferderer said. “They’re good athletes and they’re big-play guys. At the start of the year, we counted on them to carry a lot of the load for us, and that’s what they’ve been doing.” For the season, Staigle is 55-for-113 passing for 1,178 yards, Erhardt has 21 catches for 681 yards, and Johnson has 457 markers rushing. Staigle has also rushed for 300 yards. Erhardt has receiving games of 102, 155, 159 and 175 yards. “Lane has great speed and athleticism,” Ferderer said. “The thing about him is he’s turned a lot of short passes into big plays. He has that ability.” The Wildcats are also getting good production from seniors Matt Gonzales (300plus all-purpose yards), Gavin Sampson (200-plus all-purpose) and Danny Henke (100-plus receiving),

and sophomore Weston Meckle (300-plus all-purpose). Defensively, Henke has a team-high eight quarterback sacks. “We have a very good senior class,” Ferderer said. “They’ve played a lot of football and you can see the experience.” Ferderer said the team’s primary goal is to get to the playoffs for the first time since 2003. Last season, the Wildcats started 0-7, but won their last two games. “We ended last season pretty well, and I think that got the kids thinking positively about this year,” said Ferderer, who was a member of Center-Stanton’s last playoff team. “The kids want to go to the playoffs and they believe they have a really good chance.” Next up for the Wildcats is unbeaten and No. 3-ranked Grant County-Flasher. The 5-0 Storm have outscored their opponents 303-36. “Grant County is very quick, very athletic. They have a lot of weapons,” Ferderer said. “We’re anxious to see how we stack up against them.” Another team on the rise is Strasburg-Zeeland, which picked up its third straight

win last Friday with a 21-20 v i c t o r y ove r L a Mo u re Litchville-Marion. The Clippers are now 3-2 in 9-man Region 1 play. Strasburg-Zeeland went 1-8 last year and 2-7 in 2011.

Clarin at full strength Last year, Beach volleyball standout Channa Clarin was a dominant force at the net, but wasn’t able to play at full strength in the postseason because of the knee injuries she suffered in late October. The 6-foot-2 middle hitter-blocker tore the ACL in her right knee and the meniscus in both knees during a regular-season match. Clar in was advised to have surgery soon after, but the then sophomore decided to continue playing and have the knees repaired after Beach’s season had ended. Beach went on to win the District 13 championship and place third in the Region 7 tournament. The good news for Beach is Clarin is back to her dominant self in 2013. She is the leader in kills and blocks for a Beach team that is expected to make another serious

run at the region championship. “I’m still kind of recovering and getting used to things again, but I’m feeling really good,” Clarin said. “It’s great to be back on the court again, and being with my teammates.” Clarin made life difficult for the Beulah hitters on Sept. 24, when the Buccaneers claimed a key 3-2 region victory. She was credited with a career-high 12 blocks. “Channa was outstanding that night,” Beach coach Shae Peplinski said. “Beulah is a good team and they have some dangerous hitters. But they had a very hard time getting anything past Channa. She can make that kind of a difference.” Expectations are high for the 2013 Buccaneers, who returned seven seniors from l a s t y e a r’s t e a m . T h e y i n c l u d e h i t t e r s Ha i l e e Farstveet and Bailey Waldal, who put down 13 kills apeice in the victory over Beulah. “We had a good team last year and I think we’re even better now,” Clarin said. “We’ve improved a ton. We’re playing so well as a team and we’re hoping to keep it going through the tournaments.”

TOM STROMME/Tribune

First-day leader Laramie Keplin of United Tribes shot a 74 on Wednesday in the first round of the Region 13 tournament.

Region 13 tourney Continued from 1D “The guys weren’t mad or anything, but they felt unsatisfied,” he said. “They felt they all should have been lower.” Laramie Keplin of United Tribes took a first-day lead for medalist honors with a 2 over 74. Teammate Chugger Davis carded an 81 for third place. Starling Bolkan and Julius Baker had 87s for seventh. “Laramie just goes into the day knowing what he wants to do, and he sticks with the game plan,”Helphrey said. “He doesn’t let things get to him on the course. If something goes wrong, he can recover from it.” Noah Iverson was BSC’s top golfer with a 78 and is four strokes away from Keplin. Matt Schirado is fourth with an 84, Jaeden Jenson fifth with an 85 and Zackery Monson is part of the three-way tie for seventh.

“Our top two guys shot their worst rounds today,” BSC coach Michael Herzog said. “The good thing is I know they will shoot better tomorrow. The guys have some work to do tomorrow. They have to be smart and know where all the pins are at. “They want this really bad. They want a region championship for BSC. They know what they need to do, and I am confident they will do it. Team totals 1. United Tribes 329. 2. Bismarck State 333. Individual results (Top 10) 1. Laramie Keplin, UTTC, 74, 2. Noah Iverson, BSC, 78. 3. Chugger Davis, UTTC, 81. 4. Matt Schirado, BSC, 84. 5. Jaeden Jenson, BSC, 85. 6. Jordan Beyer, BSC, 86. 7. (tie) Starling Bolkan, UTTC, Julius Baker, UTTC, and Zackery Monson, BSC, 87. By team UTTC (329): Laramie Keplin 74. Chugger Davis 81. Starling Bolkan 87. Julius Baker 87. Bismarck State (333): Noah Iverson 78. Matt Schirado 84. Jaeden Jenson 85. Jordan Beyer 86. Zackery Monson 87. Lake Region State: Chris Fixen 95. Jase Green 99.

State tennis points,” Christen said. “He wasn’t aggressive in their previous matches. … This time you could tell he wanted it. He was being aggressive in those big moments.” Christen says Schaner has continued to improve his game since joining the team as a seventh-grader. “The most notable difference is probably his ground strokes,” Christen said. “He used to slice everything. He was a little bit one-dimensional, but he’s worked on adding topspin to his Christen game, which didn’t come naturally to him. He’s become a better allaround player.” Schaner has seen the benefits of the change. “I’ve gone from hitting really flat shots to including more topspin and more variation — hitting down the middle, hitting more to the sides,” Schaner said. “It really helps. It allows me to set up the point, to shorten a lot of points and win a lot more matches.” Last season Schaner played in singles in the West Region tournament for the first time, placing seventh. He went on to lose both his matches at state. He’s hoping to improve upon that in his final high school tournament. “Last year I didn’t win a single match at state. This year I’d like to win at least one or two, to play on the second day (of the individual tournament),” Schaner said. In addition to Schaner, Mandan will have the doubles team of Erik Porter and Ben Wanner competing in the individual tournament, and Alex Wanek in the singles draw. Last season Porter was half of a team that placed fifth at state, while Wanner qualified in singles, going 12. They enter this year’s state tournament as the second seed from the West. “They are a good doubles team, both really solid players,” Christen said. “If they put it all together for a few matches, they can go far. There are a lot of good doubles teams, but if they don’t place this weekend, it will be

Continued from 1D a disappointment.” Century is the top seed from the West, but Grand Forks Red River is a heavy favorite to win another state championship, and West Fargo has also been tough. The Patriots will have two entries each in the singles and doubles draws. Sam Mastel and Joe Janes won the regional double title for a third straight time, while the team of Grant Ehli and Brian Swanberg is seeded fifth from the West. In singles, Michael Janes is the West’s fourth seed and Tanner Anderson the fifth. Last year Joe Janes and Mastel placed second at state. Bismarck did not qualify for the team tournament, but the Demons will have a doubles team competing. David Keys and Scott Pomeroy are the third seed from the West. STATE TOURNAMENT At Fargo TEAM TOURNAMENT Thursday, Oct. 3 Quarterfinals Match 1: #1W Century vs. #4E G.F. Central, 1 p.m. Match 2: #2E West Fargo vs. #3W Williston, 1 p.m. Match 3: #1E G.F. Red River vs. #4W Minot, 1 p.m. Match 4: #2W Mandan vs. #3E Fargo South, 1 p.m. Consolation semifinals Match 5: Losers Matches 1 and 2, 45 minutes after completion of first round Match 6: Losers Matches 3 and 4, 45 minutes after completion of first round Semifinals Match 7: Winners Matches 1 and 2, 45 minutes after completion of first round Match 8: Winners Matches 3 and 4, 45 minutes after completion of first round Friday, Oct. 4 Fifth place Match 9: Winners Matches 5 and 6, 9 a.m. Third place Match 10: Losers Matches 7 and 8, 9 a.m. Championship Match 11: Winners Matches 7 and 8, 9 a.m. INDIVIDUAL TOURNAMENT Friday, Oct. 4 Singles First Round #1W Dustin Foster, Min, vs. #8E Ben Mostad, FN. #4E Ander Sawchuk, Shan, vs. #5W Tanner Anderson, Cen. #3W Isaac Massey, Min, vs. #6E Andrew Gordon, GFRR. #2E Joey Anderson, GFRR, vs. #7W Alex Wanek, Man. #2W Brandon Schaner, Man, vs. #7E Dallas Chambers, GFC. #3E North Knewtson, WF, vs. #6W Grayson Bahl, Min. #4W Michael Janes, Cen, vs. #5E Marcus Osman, FD. #1E Greg Wischer, GFRR, vs. #8W Tate Barbot, Wil. Doubles First Round #1W Sam Mastel-Joe Janes, Cen, vs. #8E Evan Kottsick-Siddharth Gupta, FD. #4E Andrew Thompson-Folson, GFC, vs. #5W Grant Ehli-Brian Swanberg, Cen. #3W David Keys-Scott Pomeroy, Bis, vs. #6E Patrick Strom-Brandon Schott, Shan. #2E Andre Caoili-Jake Kuhlman, GFRR, vs. #7W Nick Watne-Ashton Johnson, Jam. #2W Erik Porter-Ben Wanner, Man, vs. #7E Dustin Miller-Derek Reimers, VC. #3E David Youngs-Davis Lawley, FS, vs. #6W Travis Kuhn-Chase Olson, Wil. #4W Tracer Overland-Adam Kemp, Wil, vs. #5E Mitch Kuhlman-Ryan Kenyon, GFRR. #1E Brady Ballweber-Keyan Farahmand, WF, vs. #8W Ty Nygaard-Drew Thomas. ■ NOTE: First-round matches are scheduled to begin at 1 p.m. Friday, with quarterfinals to follow at 3.


Sports

Bismarcktribune.com ■ Bismarck Tribune

Thursday, October 3, 2013 ■ Page 5D

Lynx face Dream in WNBA finals By DOUG FEINBERG AP Basketball Writer Ever since the Minnesota Lynx lost in the WNBA finals last year, they’ve been focused on getting back there. Now they are three wins away from a second championship in three seasons, facing a team they swept two years ago to earn the franchise’s first title. “We’re a very hungry, determined group of women,” said Minnesota’s Seimone Augustus. “All year we’ve talked about holding our goal and destiny in our hands. We have another chance at a title after not ending last season the way we wanted to.” Minnesota has looked nearly unbeatable in the playoffs. The Lynx have swept all four of their playoff games after posting the best record in the regular season (26-8). They won both of their home games easily. One key to Minnesota’s success has been the play of Maya Moore. She’s coming off a career year and has raised her game in the playoffs, averaging 21.5 points, including a career playoff best 27-point effort in the ser ies clincher against Phoenix in the Western Conference finals. Moore was the runner-up to Candace Parker for the league’s MVP, losing by just 16 points. Almost expecting that her star wouldn’t win the MVP award, coach Cheryl Reeve said in early September that she’d rather see Moore raising the MVP trophy in the finals because that meant the Lynx were the champions again.

“She’s matured and developed into a young leader,” Reeve said. “She’s become much more efficient on the offensive side. The overall growth of Maya makes life easier for Seimone, Lindsay ( Whalen) and Rebekkah (Brunson).” The Dream want to avoid losing in the finals for the third time in the past four seasons. The Dream were swept by Seattle in 2010 and

Minnesota in 2011. If Atlanta can’t beat Minnesota, the Dream would become the second team in league history to lose in the finals three times, joining the New York Liberty — who lost in three of the league’s first four championships. “We learned from our failures,” said Angel McCoughtry, who leads the Dream with 19.5 points a game. “We know what it feels

like to not win it, and we want to get over that hump this year and bring a championship to Atlanta.” Atlanta got off to a hot start, winning 10 of its first 11 games before cooling off with eight losses in the next nine. The Dream lost the final four games of the regular season and got blown out in Game 1 of their firstround series against Washington. But then it all clicked with two straight wins over Washington and a sweep of defending champion Indiana. “We had a long road streak there in July that tested us a lot going to the West Coast,” Atlanta coach Fred Williams said. “All in all we were able to maintain our second place in our division and try to gain home court advantage in the East. Down the stretch we wanted to get into postseason play when it’s a different season. We stepped up after that first Washington loss.” The two teams split their regular-season matchups, each defending its home court. Atlanta has struggled on the road, winning just twice away from home since June 23. Both of those came in the playoffs at Washington and Indiana. The first two games of the finals will be in Minnesota before the series shifts to Atlanta. If having to face the best team in the league wasn’t enough of a problem, the Dream won’t even be able to play on their home court; Disney on Ice is booked at the Phillips Arena. The Dream will be forced to play 25 miles away at Gwinnett Arena in Duluth.

Thompson 574, Claudia Benjamin 552, Shelly Richter 548, Debbie Crouse 536.

Women’s series — Adeline Fleck 477. Moose Bantam: Boys game — Jaxon Wetzel 96. Boys series — Jaxon Wetzel 184. Girls game — Allie Salter 116. Girls series — Allie Salter 217. Sid’s Kids: Boys game — Tyler Richter 194. Boys series — Tyler Richter 518. Girls game — Vedrana Hodzic 124. Girls series — Vedrana Hodzic 331. Twilite: Game — John Davenport 204. Series — John Davenport 554. Unknowns: Game — David Buchanan 268. Series — David Buchanan 716, Troy Bender 698, Brandon Getz 692, Claude Wilmes 686, Craig Boehm 674, Terry Hoerer 672, Lynn Geffre 672. Wednesday Soda: Game — Vanessa Fox 207. Series — Vanessa Fox 528.

Women’s Western: Game — Debbie Crouse 198. Series — Joyce Hellman 512. ■ NOTE: Bowling leaders are compiled from league websites on Tuesday evenings. Season leaders are limited to top five scores, plus ties, from each bowling center. Leaders for top series will be listed under three-game or four-game series depending on league rules, not both. For weekly leaders, each league’s top game and series will be listed, plus any bowler who meets the following minimums: 275 game, 650 three-game series or 850 four-game series for men; 225 game, 600 three-game series or 750 four-game series for women. There will be a limit of three weekly leaders, plus ties, per league.

Associated Press

Guard Seimone Augustus (33) is a big reason why the Minnesota Lynx are playing for the WNBA championship.

BOWLING SEASON LEADERS TEN SPOT LANES Men Game — Craig Boehm 289, Mike Lund 280, Claude Wilmes 278, Bruce Rauser 269, David Buchanan 268, Anthony Teske 268. Three-game series — Stuart Sipma 719, David Buchanan 716, Troy Bender 698, Anthony Teske 677, Todd Wahl 673. Fourgame series — Eric Lund 933, Craig Boehm 926, Ryan Ressler 898. Women Game — Chelsey Richter 268, Sarah Schauer 233, Debbie Crouse 227, Shelly Richter 222, Kaitlyn Thompson 217. Threegame series — Chelsey Richter 690, Kaitlyn

WEEKLY LEADERS TEN SPOT LANES Custer: Game — Shane Maxwell 230. Series — Mike Unterseher 585. Friday Niners: Men’s game — Jason Schauer 226. Men’s series — Jim Bender 603. Women’s game — Shelly Richter 191. Women’s series — Shelly Richter 544. Men’s Mandan: Game — Claude Wilmes 278. Series (4) — Eric Lund 933, Jesse Hill 856. Monday Seniors: Men’s game — Ray Jund 211. Men’s series — Mike Haggen 520. Women’s game — Adeline Fleck 178.

RECREATION DIGEST BASKETBALL

VOLLEYBALL

Mandan League Week 3: Division A — Shear Tech 6-0, Westside Bar 5-4, Tarheels 5-4, Heat Check 5-4, L&B Homes 4-5, Chuppe Chiropractic 4-5, Starion Financial 4-5, Chips 0-6. Division B — Vicky’s Sports Bar 9-0, Air-Baller 9-0, Leingang Home Center 5-4, Recreation Supply Co. 3-3, MDUR/Carpet World 4-5, Broderick Repair 4-5. Dakota Community Bank 2-7, Pippen Ain’t Easy 0-9, MCS Appraisal 0-9.

Mandan League Week 2: Women’s Classic: Bis-Man Security 6-0, Skeels Electric 51, Butcher Block 4-2, Barret Excavating 3-3, Last Call Bar 33, ND Life Spa 2-4, Chad Berger Bucking Bulls 1-5, B&B Roofing 0-6. Women’s Pacific: Castaways 5-1, Mosbrucker Wallpaper & Painting 4-2, Schindler & Stewart Dentistry 4-2, Kiss My Ace 4-2, Stage Stop 3-3, Keller Heatth N’ Home 2-4, Last Call Bar 1-5, Bowers Excavating 1-5. Women’s Badlands: RJR Maintenance & MGMT 5-1, JSJ

Construction 5-1, Platinum Photography 5-4, Corral Sales 45, Heart River Stables 2-4, Peterson Lawn Care 2-4, Curves/James Vault & Precast 1-5. Coed Rec. Division: Any Leaks Inc. 6-0, Vicky’s Sports Bar 6-0, Scared Hitless 6-0, Sloppy Sets 3-3, Last Call Bar 2-4, Ball Busters 1-5, MPOA 0-6, Dawson Body Shop 0-6. Men’s C & D: Westside/Mulligans 6-0, Lonesome Dove 30, Vicky’s Sports Bar 4-2, MTL/Teracon 3-3, Mandan Repair & Radiator 3-3, Bowers Excavating 2-4, Net Monkey Accounting 2-4, B&B Roofing 1-5, Kaysi Jochim Therapeutics 0-3.

UPCOMING EVENTS DEADLINES SUBMIT BY TUESDAY: All Upcoming Events or Recreation Digest items should be submitted to the Tribune sports department by 5 p.m. Tuesday of the week they are first intended to run. Information may be provided by e-mail, fax (223-2063), phone call (888-684-2293) or by visiting the Tribune office. Please send all e-mail items for Recreation Digest or Upcoming Events to sports@bismarcktribune.com.

BASEBALL MANDAN HIGH CAMP: Jan. 5 for six weeks, Directed by coach Len Stanley in conjunction with U.S. Baseball Academy. Classes open for players grades 1-12, limited to 6 players per coach. Focus of clinic: advanced hitting, pitching, catching, field, and baserunning. Space is limited. For more information, visit www.USBaseballAcademy.com, or call toll-free 866-622-4487.

BASKETBALL MINOT STATE CLINIC: A series of skill development clinics, will run for six consecutive Sundays. Dates remaining: Oct. 6, 13, 20, 27. at the MSU Dome. Registration is walk-up only. Sessions are for players in grades 5-12. Registration, 6:30 at the Minot State Dome. Session times are 7 and 8 p.m. Camp fee: $10 per session. For more information, contact the MSU men’s basketball department at 858-4812. 3-on-3 TOURNAMENT: Hosted by Valley City State University, Oct. 27, Deadline Oct. 18, open to boys and girls grades 3-12, Fee: $75, 3 game guarantee. For more information contact Nathan Stover 845-7240. CHS PATRIOT FALL CLASSIC: Hosted by the CHS Boys Basketball Boosters, Nov. 23, open to Boys grades 3-8, and Girls grades 3-6, games played at CHS and Horizon Middle School. Registration form may be obtained by visiting the CHS website (Athletics/Boys BB) or by calling George McDonald at 400-3058. MANDAN GIRLS BOOSTER TOURNAMENTS: Nov. 16-17, girls grades 3-6, boys grades 3-8. Jan. 25-26, girls grades 3-8, boys grades 3-6. Feb. 15-16, girls grades 38, boys grades 3-6. Register online at www.mandanbackboard.com. WEST FARGO BOYS TOURNAMENT: Nov. 9-10 in West Fargo. Registration deadline Nov. 4. Open to boys grades 3-9. Team fees: $135. For more information, email janelle564@hotmail.com, or phone Jaysen Schock 540-5134. CROCKETT FALL CLASSIC: Nov. 16-17 at Minot. Divisions: Boys grades 5-6-7-8. Fees: $130 per team. Tournament website: www.bishopryan.com. Contact Bob Daws at 701-720-3244 or at andycrockettbb@gmail.com. VALLEY CITY YOUTH TOURNAMENTS: All camps fee: $130 per team. Camp Dates: Nov. 23, deadline, Nov. 13, 5 p.m. for boys and girls grades 4-6 and boys grades 7-8. Dec. 14, deadline: Dec. 4 at 5 p.m. for boys and girls grades 4-6 and boys grades 7-8. Jan. 25, 2014, deadline, Jan. 15 at 5 p.m. for boys and girls grades 4-6, and girls grades 7-8. Feb. 22, deadline, Feb. 12 at 5 p.m. For boys and girls grades 4-8. Mar. 29, deadline: Mar. 19 at 5 p.m. For boys and girls grades 4-8. CENTURY HOOPS FEST: March 23-24, 2014. Register by Mar. 6. Fee: $135. Open to girls and boys grades 4-8. Contact: Corey Wilhelm at cwilhelm@spscompanies.com, or call 400-0172.

FOOTBALL PASS, PUNT & KICK: The 52nd annual NFL-PPK program is under way. The program tests the skills of young boys and girls, ages 6-15 in their ability to punt, pass and kick a football. Any community group or even a school may sponsor the program. There is no cost. To register to host a local competition, go to the PPK website and click on to “host a local competition” and follow the p ro m p t s . T h e w e b s i t e a d d re s s i s www.nflppk.com. State coordinator Duane Zwinger at 652-1752 or dzwinger@daktel.com has additional information.

ROAD RACE BEEFIN’ IT UP; FUEL FOR THE FINISH: Oct. 5, 9:30 a.m. at The Post, which is located south of Mandan. Events: 5K run/walk, 10K run, half-mile kids fun run. Run/walk course will follow the paved trails and roads from The Post into Fort Lincoln Park, Highway 1806, 2 miles south of Mandan. For more information contact Kathy Tokach at 400-7390, or ktokach@aol.com. RUN/WALK FOR BREAST CANCER AWARENESS: Oct. 11, Tom O’ Leary Golf Course. Fee: $25 per person before Oct. 9, $30 per person after Oct. 9. Event includes an 8K competitive run-walk, a 4K non-competitive walk, an education forum featuring wellness screenings and information about breast cancer prevention and treatment. Registration and the education forum begin

at 5:30 p.m. Each participant receives a long-sleeved performance shirt and refreshments. To register, visit bismarck.sanfordhealth.org/whc or call the Sanford Women’s Health Center at 323-6376.

rental, 2 slices of pizza, beverage, a U-Mary softball shirt, and a chance to win prizes. For more information contact U-Mary softball head coach K.J. Kelley at 360-261-5066.

RODEO

VOLLEYBALL

COWBOYS AND CAMP: Hosted by Minot’s Y’s Men’s Rodeo, Oct. 10-13 at the State Fair Center. The 100-plus best cowboys and cowgirls from across North and South Dakota converge in Minot to vie for Badlands Circuit championships. Special events: Western shopping experience, cowboy Christmas, Kiwanis pancake feed on Oct. 12. A special rodeo for kids with challenges on Oct. 10. The 2014 Miss Rodeo North Dakota pageant will be held, and a ranch rodeo will also take place. Tickets: $10 for children, $25 for adults. Season passes, good for all four rodeo performances, are also available. More information at www.MinotYsMensRodeo.com, or by calling 852-5577.

FELAND MEMORIAL TOURNAMENT: Hosted by Dickinson Parks and Recreation, Oct. 19-20 in Dickinson. Entry deadline: Oct. 7. Open to adult men’s, women’s and coed A-B-C-D divisions. Entry forms and information are available at www.dickinsonparks.org, or by calling Leah Hoenke at Dickinson Parks and Recreation, 456-2074. All proceeds will benefit the Anne Carlsen Center for Autism.

BOWLING MARAUDERS BOWL-A-THON: Oct. 5, 7 p.m., at Midway Lanes in Mandan. Registration forms and fees due Sept. 27, Open to all Marauder supporters and bowling enthusiasts. Fees: $30 per person or $120 for a team of four. Checks payable to UM Softball. Single registrants will be assigned a team. Personal or Company lane sponsorship: $200. Entry fee includes 3 games, shoe

WRESTLING NDSU CLINIC: Oct. 18, Bison Sports Arena. Coaches are invited to an NDSU afternoon practice and a coaches’ social. Clinic staff are NDSU head coach Roger Kish, assistant coaches Bret Maughan and Manny Rivera, strength coach Ryan Napoli and All-American wrestler Trent Sprenkle. Fees: $100 for first registered coach, $50 for each additional coach on a staff. Contact For clinic questions contact Nancy Erickson 231-7447, nancy.erickson@ndsu.edu. or Manny Rivera 630-4067, manny.rivera@ndsu.edu.

Associated Press

Dany Heatley was sorely missed by the Minnesota Wild late in the 2012-13 season. He was sidelined with a shoulder injury.

Healthy Heatley looks to bounce back for Wild By DAVE CAMPBELL AP Sports Writer ST. PAUL, Minn. — Dany Heatley’s days as a 50-goal scorer are probably gone. The lanky right wing still has a significant presence with the Minnesota Wild. The 32-year-old Heatley hasn’t produced with the Wild nearly the way he once did for Atlanta, Ottawa and San Jose, but his value was never more obvious than last April after he got hurt. The Wild went 5-6-1 in their last 12 regular season games without him, barely making the playoffs, before losing four of five to Chicago in the first round. Over those 17 games, the Wild scored only five powerplay goals in 42 opportunities. “We really missed him,” left wing Zach Parise said. “He’s one of the better ones in the league who can score from five or six feet out. So he looks good. He’s moving well out there, and I think that he’s going to play a big role on our team.” Heatley needed surgery on a torn labrum in his left shoulder after a collision with a Sharks defenseman on April 3. But the bright side to the injury that kept him out of those crucial games and the Wild’s first playoff appearance in five years was that Heatley got a head start on his offseason conditioning. He came back a little leaner and more determined than ever to become a 30goal scorer again. “I was in the gym a lot more. I feel pretty fresh coming into this camp,” he said. Parise, Mikko Koivu and Jason Pominville are the skill players on the first line, but Heatley’s absence and the relentlessness of the Blackhawks reminded the Wild how important forward depth is for a playoff run. “I’d like to be able to put myself in better position to score goals. I look at our forwards, and we have a lot of talent and a lot of skill,” Heatley said. “I think we have more depth than last

Get

year, depending on which of our young guys stick around. But I’m excited. We’re solid on the back end, and we’ve got a lot of great players up front.” Heatley will likely find himself on the second line with center Charlie Coyle, who’s coming off a decent rookie season. Heatley is in the final year of his contract, making $7.5 million. “I’m very confident that he’s going to have a really good season for us,” coach Mike Yeo said. “First off, he’s better supported with the depth that we have in the lineup, with the skill that we have in the lineup. Skilled players need to play with skilled players to be at their best, and he’s one of those guys.” Heatley once had consecutive 50-goal marks for the Senators, and he has scored 39 goals or more six times in his career. The last of those came in 2009-10 with the Sharks. He still has that 6foot-4 frame, though, to run interference around the net and get those tip-ins and rebounds to supplement the snipers on the perimeter. “With a big body like Dany’s, especially the closer you get to the net, and his touch along there, he can score a lot of goals like he showed in the past,” Koivu said. “We sure missed him last year at the end so of course he’s a big help for us when he’s healthy.” Heatley isn’t the only player the Wild are counting on for a bounce back. Third line center Kyle Brodziak is another one, after scoring only eight goals in 48 games and registering a team-worst minus-18 rating last season. He was sick with pneumonia early on and never fully recovered his energy and stamina. “I feel like there is a level to my game not everybody has seen yet,” Brodziak said. “I know I’m going to get there and hopefully, when I get the opportunity to do whatever role is open, I’m going to make the best of it.”

Stronger. Faster. Better.

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Money

Page 6D ■ Thursday, October 3, 2013

Bismarck Tribune ■ Bismarcktribune.com

NYSE Close Change Year A AFLAC 63.21 -.21 +19.0 AGCO 61.15 +.39 +24.5 AK Steel 3.90 +.02 -15.2 ASA Gold 13.28 +.07 -38.3 AT&T Inc 33.94 -.12 +.7 AbtLab s 33.90 +.12 +8.2 AbbVie n 45.95 +.15 +34.5 Actavis 146.38+1.28 +70.2 ActiveNet 14.40 +.03 +193.3 AMD 3.90 +.04 +62.5 Aeropostl 9.65 +.10 -25.8 Aetna 64.76 -.14 +39.8 AlcatelLuc 3.99 +.32 +187.1 Alcoa 8.02 -.15 -7.6 AlliantEgy 50.04 -.15 +14.0 AlliantTch 96.55 -2.11 +55.8 AlphaNRs 5.91 +.09 -39.3 Altria 34.75 +.04 +10.5 AlumChina 9.25 -.03 -22.3 Amdocs 36.89 +.19 +8.5 AMovilL 20.37 ... -12.0 AEagleOut 13.96 -.11 -31.9 AEP 43.88 +.16 +2.8 AmExp 74.58 -1.12 +30.2 AmIntlGrp 49.22 +.12 +39.4 Anadarko 94.68 +1.24 +27.4 AnglogldA 12.81 -.07 -59.2 Annaly 11.75 +.02 -16.3 Aon plc 73.63 -.02 +32.4 Apache 86.07 -.40 +9.6 ArcelorMit 14.27 +.39 -18.3 ArchCoal 4.08 +.06 -44.3 ArchDan 37.18 +.33 +35.7 ArmourRsd 4.23 -.01 -34.6 ATMOS 42.12 -.52 +19.9

Cemex 11.42 -.02 +20.3 CenterPnt 24.41 +.22 +26.8 CntryLink 31.61 -.15 -19.2 ChesEng 26.17 -.07 +57.5 Chevron 120.83 -.49 +11.7 Chicos 17.09 +.10 -7.4 Chimera 3.03 +.06 +16.1 ChinaFd 21.93 +.09 +2.4 ChiMYWnd 2.69 +.24 +124.2 Cigna 78.42 -.13 +46.7 Citigroup 48.71 +.11 +23.1 CliffsNRs 21.45 +.64 -44.4 Clorox 82.68 +.54 +12.9 CocaCola 37.43 -.52 +3.3 CocaCE 40.72 -.08 +28.3 ColeREI n 12.38 +.04 +13.6 ColgPalm s 59.43 -.66 +13.7 ConAgra 30.62 +.11 +3.8 ConocoPhil 70.36 +.32 +21.3 ConEd 55.20 +.03 -.6 ContlRes 111.03 -.39 +51.1 Corning 14.53 -.21 +15.1 CSVelIVST 26.81 -.86 +61.6 CSVxSht rs 15.07 +.78 -83.9 Cummins 134.64+1.91 +24.3 D DCT Indl 7.17 -.05 +10.5 DDR Corp 16.23 +.13 +3.6 DNP Selct 9.60 -.01 +1.4 DR Horton 19.54 +.16 -1.2 DTE 66.32 +.19 +10.4 Deere 82.30 +.08 -4.8 DeltaAir 24.25 +.04 +104.3 DenburyR 18.92 +.11 +16.8 DxGldBll rs 46.78 +.39 -91.5 DxFinBr rs 29.12 +.08 -51.8 DxSCBr rs 22.19 +.27 -58.9

AuRico g 3.72 -.07 -54.5 Avon 20.91 +.19 +45.6 B BP PLC 42.11 +.26 +1.1 BcoBrad pf 14.16 +.19 -10.3 BcoSantSA 8.47 +.16 +3.7 BcoSBrasil 7.07 +.16 -2.9 BkofAm 14.06 +.16 +21.1 BkNYMel 30.46 -.29 +18.5 Barclay 17.71 +.29 +2.3 BariPVix rs 14.63 +.45 -54.0 BarrickG 18.41 +.38 -47.4 Baxter 63.89 -1.69 -4.2 Beam Inc 66.81 +1.09 +9.4 BerkHa A 171500.00+472.00+27.9 BerkH B 114.41 +.27 +27.5 BestBuy 37.66 -.29 +217.8 BlkHillsCp 49.57 -.49 +36.4 BlockHR 27.94 +.08 +50.5 Boeing 117.84 +.09 +56.4 BostonSci 11.75 -.01 +105.1 BrMySq 46.93 +.04 +45.6 BrkfldOfPr 19.06 -.05 +12.1 BurlStrs n 25.01 ... ... C CBRE Grp 23.24 -.37 +16.8 CBS B 55.47 -.29 +45.8 CSX 26.07 -.08 +32.1 CVS Care 57.10 -.44 +18.1 CabotOG s 36.18 -.92 +45.5 CampSp 40.96 -.25 +17.4 CapOne 69.55 -.24 +20.1 CapitlSrce 11.93 -.15 +57.4 CardnlHlth 53.21 +.13 +29.2 Carnival 32.33 -.25 -12.1 Caterpillar 84.07 +.31 -6.2 CedarF 43.72 -.26 +30.7

DxFnBull s 70.15 DirDGdBr s 36.19 DxSCBull s 64.06 Disney 64.88 DomRescs 62.34 Dover 90.21 DowChm 38.70 DuPont 58.99 DukeEngy 67.25 E E-CDang 11.70 EMC Cp 25.72 EQT Corp 86.99 Eaton 69.26 EdgenGrp 11.91 EdisonInt 46.11 Elan 15.72 EldorGld g 6.55 EmersonEl 64.43 EmpStR n 13.10 EnCana g 17.25 Equifax 59.37 EuroEqFd 8.27 ExcoRes 6.72 Exelis 16.02 Exelon 29.71 ExxonMbl 86.08 F FamilyDlr 72.95 FstHorizon 11.01 FordM 17.21 ForestOil 6.41 FMCG 33.51 G GabelliET 6.72 Gap 40.86 GenElec 24.33

-.30 +75.5 -.31 +129.7 -.83 +100.3 +.05 +30.3 -.17 +20.3 -.45 +37.3 +.39 +19.7 +.30 +31.2 -.02 +5.4

GenGrPrp GenMills GenMotors Genworth GeoGrp Gerdau GlobPay GoldFLtd Goldcrp g GtPlainEn

+.92 +181.9 +.01 +1.7 -1.88 +47.5 +.27 +27.8 +.01 +68.7 +.05 +2.0 -.02 +54.0 -.04 -49.1 -.64 +21.7 ... ... -.11 -12.7 -.50 +9.7 +.07 +17.6 -.16 -.7 +.02 +42.1 +.07 -.1 +.08 -.5

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19.91 48.01 35.94 12.85 33.36 7.68 56.49 4.41 25.47 22.23 H 45.34 4.64 49.09 65.36 3.28 31.06 5.69 12.91 3.05 92.02 22.11 79.96 21.40 36.66 76.32 82.84 42.21 18.11 21.13 I 4.63 11.95 5.01 12.77 48.89 38.28

+.35 +.03 +.03 -.07 -.47 +.22 +5.79 -.04 +.23 -.11

+.3 +18.8 +24.7 +71.1 +18.3 -14.6 +24.7 -59.0 -30.6 +9.5

+.74 -.02 +.49 -.09 -.02 -.23 +.15 +.04 -.02 -.56 +.03 +1.27 +.09 +.27 +.06 -.38 -.20 +.21 +.10

+50.3 -32.9 +41.5 +33.9 -63.4 +38.4 -37.3 +38.5 -47.7 +27.4 +35.9 +51.0 +50.2 +28.6 +23.4 +30.5 +35.2 +15.6 +32.9

... +.18 -.32 +.25 +.52 +.09

-59.6 +25.9 -23.0 -21.6 -12.6 +14.4

iShJapan 11.81 -.06 iSTaiwn 14.15 -.01 iShSilver 20.92 +.51 iShChinaLC 37.57 -.03 iSCorSP500170.01 -.26 iShEMkts 41.73 +.16 iSh20 yrT 105.96 +.16 iS Eafe 64.12 -.02 iShR2K 107.41 -.44 iShREst 64.80 +.04 iShHmCnst 22.62 +.14 Imation 4.37 +.07 IBM 184.96-1.42 IntlGame 19.15 -.15 IntPap 44.60 -.68 Interpublic 17.11 -.04 Invesco 32.36 +.14 InvRlEst 8.20 -.04 ItauUnibH 14.38 +.06 J JPMorgCh 52.09 +.51 Jabil 21.88 -.02 JohnJn 87.29 -.18 JohnsnCtl 41.47 +.01 JnprNtwk 20.18 +.03 K KB Home 18.67 +.25 Kellogg 58.89 +.14 Keycorp 11.42 -.11 KimbClk 94.26 -.12 Kimco 20.18 +.01 KindME 80.39 -.08 KindMorg 35.85 -.25 Kinross g 4.87 -.06 KodiakO g 12.54 -.03 Kohls 52.54 +.22 Kroger 40.58 -.07

+21.1 +3.9 -28.8 -7.1 +18.8 -5.9 -12.6 +12.8 +27.4 +.2 +6.9 -6.4 -3.4 +35.1 +11.9 +55.3 +24.0 -6.1 -3.8 +19.3 +13.4 +24.5 +35.2 +2.6

LDK Solar LVSands LennarA LillyEli LockhdM LaPac Lowes MBIA MFA Fncl MGIC MGM Rsts Macys MagHRes MarathnO MarathPet MktVGold MktVRus Masco McDnlds McGrwH McEwenM Medtrnic Merck MetLife MexEqt MexicoFd Molycorp Monsanto MonstrWw MorgStan Mosaic MurphO

+18.2 +5.4 +35.6 +11.6 +4.5 +.8 +1.5 -49.9 +41.7 +22.2 NL Inds +56.0 NQ Mobile

L 1.75 -.14 +21.5 66.61 -.36 +44.3 36.10 +.38 -6.6 50.54 -.13 +2.5 125.08-2.42 +35.5 18.07 -.09 -6.5 48.41 +.22 +36.3 M 10.68 +.42 +36.1 7.53 +.01 -7.2 7.28 -.02 +173.7 20.70 -.04 +77.8 43.97 +.53 +12.7 6.54 +.10 +63.9 34.60 -.44 +12.9 65.34 +1.05 +3.7 24.49 +.08 -47.2 28.69 -.13 -4.0 21.22 -.08 +28.0 95.28 -.85 +8.0 66.65 -.38 +21.9 2.40 -.11 -37.3 53.52 +.28 +30.5 48.37 -.37 +18.1 47.10 -.33 +43.0 15.62 +.04 +9.6 29.75 +.25 +2.5 7.36 +.70 -22.0 104.04-1.01 +10.4 4.41 +.02 -21.5 27.12 -.02 +41.8 45.60 +1.61 -19.5 62.01 +1.16 +20.7 N 11.30 -.37 -1.3 21.70 +.70 +259.3

NRG Egy Nabors NatGrid NewellRub NewmtM NikeB s NobleCorp NokiaCp Nordstrm NoestUt Nucor OGE Egy s OasisPet OcciPet OfficeDpt OfficeMax Oi SA OldRepub Olin Omnicom OpkoHlth Oracle PNC PPL Corp PallCorp Pandora PeabdyE Penney PepsiCo PetChina PetrbrsA Petrobras Pfizer PhilipMor Phillips66

27.55 +.10 +19.8 16.83 +.32 +16.5 60.38 +1.28 +5.1 27.66 ... +24.2 27.53 +.32 -40.7 71.89 -.53 +39.3 38.19 -.11 +9.7 6.63 +.01 +67.8 56.80 +.85 +6.2 41.47 +.10 +6.1 48.83 -.13 +13.1 O 36.07 -.32 +28.1 50.51 -.49 +58.8 94.81 +.42 +23.8 4.89 -.06 +49.1 12.86 -.11 +49.2 1.99 +.10 -50.4 15.17 -.26 +42.4 23.02 -.20 +6.6 63.17 -.39 +26.4 9.49 +.35 +97.3 33.68 +.18 +1.1 PQ 72.68 +.01 +24.6 30.69 +.04 +7.2 77.23 -.47 +28.2 26.89 +1.36+192.9 17.58 +.20 -33.9 8.72 -.03 -55.8 79.56 -.26 +16.3 111.04 -.43 -22.8 17.16 +.27 -11.1 15.81 +.18 -18.8 29.01 +.12 +15.7 87.72 +.35 +4.9 59.18 +1.28 +11.5

PitnyBw 19.24 +.31 +80.8 PlumCrk 47.45 -.29 +6.9 Polaris 128.50-2.16 +52.7 PortglTel 4.85 +.30 -2.6 Potash 32.84 +1.02 -19.3 Praxair 121.43 +.60 +10.9 PrinFncl 43.02 +.01 +50.8 ProLogis 38.75 +.48 +6.2 ProShtS&P 27.80 +.02 -18.3 ProUltSP 85.62 -.28 +41.9 PrUVxST rs 33.95 +1.94 -83.8 PrUltCrude 35.71 +1.36 +21.8 ProctGam 75.93 -.23 +11.8 ProgsvCp 27.28 -.07 +29.3 PrUShSP rs 36.11 +.12 -33.3 PUSSP500 20.32 +.05 -46.2 PSEG 33.37 +.16 +9.1 PulteGrp 16.91 +.24 -6.9 QksilvRes 2.32 +.15 -18.9 R Rayonier 55.78 -.86 +7.6 RegionsFn 9.33 -.07 +30.9 RemaxH n 27.00 ... ... ReneSola 5.13 ... +233.1 Renren 3.92 +.28 +13.6 RiteAid 5.01 +.07 +268.4 RockwlAut 106.96-1.00 +27.3 Royce 15.99 -.07 +19.2 S SpdrDJIA 150.98 -.64 +15.6 SpdrGold 127.06+2.47 -21.6 SP Mid 228.97 -.46 +23.3 S&P500ETF169.18 -.16 +18.8 SpdrHome 30.86 +.05 +16.0 SpdrLehHY 39.77 +.04 -2.3 SpdrS&P RB35.80 -.36 +28.0 SpdrRetl 82.93 ... +33.0

MARKET SUMMARY

58.56 points, or 0.4 percent, at 15,133.14 points. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell 1.13 points, or 0.1 percent, to 1,693.87. The Nasdaq composite declined 2.96 points, or 0.1 percent, to 3,815.02. Six of 10 industry sectors in the S&P 500 fell. Declines were led by the makers of consumer staples and industrial companies. Defense companies,

NONFERROUS METALS

which rely on government contracts for a large part of their revenue, led declines for industrial companies. Raytheon fell $1.73, or 2.2 percent, to $76.08. Lockheed Martin dropped $2.42, or 1.9 percent, to $125. Earlier, European Central Bank head Mario Draghi said that the partial U.S. government shutdown was a risk to economic recoveries in the U.S. and globally.

Selected world gold prices, Wednesday. London morning fixing: $1293.75 up $3.00. London afternoon fixing: $1306.25 up $15.50. NY Handy & Harman: $1306.25 up $15.50. NY Handy & Harman fabricated: $1410.75 up $16.74. NY Engelhard: $1304.36 up $5.01. NY Engelhard fabricated: $1402.19 up $5.39. NY Merc. gold October Wed. $1320.60 up $34.60. NY HSBC Bank USA 4 p.m. Wed. $1317.50 up $27.50.

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****

Australia .9385 .9387 1.0655 1.0653 Britain 1.6223 1.6199 .6164 .6173 Canada .9680 .9684 1.0331 1.0327 China .1634 .1633 6.1210 6.1219 Denmark .1821 .1814 5.4920 5.5127 Euro 1.3583 1.3530 .7362 .7391 Hong Kong .1290 .1290 7.7546 7.7542 Japan .010269 .010220 97.38 97.85 Mexico .076310 .075958 13.1045 13.1653 Russia .0310 .0310 32.2203 32.2250 Sweden .1567 .1570 6.3798 6.3679 Switzerlnd 1.1076 1.1039 .9028 .9059

CANADIAN EXCHANGE OIL PATCH Wednesday, Oct. 2, 2013 Posted price for N.D. Sweet Crude (40 gravity) FLINT HILLS, BULLETIN 20130172 (Oct. 1), price per barrel .......... $88.50 NEW YORK MERCANTILE EXCHANGE Crude oil, light sweet (NYM) 1,000 barrels, price per barrel November Last Change Open High Low 103.87 -.23 101.62 104.23 101.43 NUMBER OF RIGS OPERATING Friday (Sept. 27, 2013) Year ago 184 189

SILVER NEW YORK (AP) — Handy & Harman silver Wednesday $21.810 up $1.020. H&H fabricated $26.172 up $1.224. The morning bullion price for silver in London $21.140 off $0.560. Engelhard $21.350 up $0.490. Engelhard fabricated $25.620 up $0.588. NY Merc silver spot month Wednesday $21.846 up $0.722.

$1 Canadian = 96 cents U.S. for sale to customer and 93 cents U.S. purchase from customer At the Bank of North Dakota Wednesday INTEREST RATES 3-month T-Bill 1-year bill 10-year T-Note 30-year T-Bond

0.02 0.10 2.62 3.70

0.03 0.11 2.63 3.65

Bond Buyer Muni Idx Fed Fds Target 30-year T-Bond

... ... -0.02

5.12 .13 3.70

AG PRICES Dakota Cash Grain Prices Sp Wht Sp Wht Winter Durum Corn 14% 15% Wht 12%

7.10 7.06 7.13 …. .... …. 7.37 7.37 7.41 7.32 7.06 7.07 7.44 7.14 7.07 7.41 …. 6.54

6.75 …. 6.75 ,,,, .... 6.37 6.95 6.95 6.94 6.76 6.74 7.00 6.94 6.69 7.00 6.94 …. 6.46

6.80 …. 7.00 … .... .... …. .... …. .... 7.00 .... …. 7.00 .... 6.85 .... 6.88

3.89 4.24 …. 3.74 .... 3.79 3.89 .... 3.84 3.77 3.64 3.69 4.25 3.49 3.69 .... 3.60 ….

Barley feed

Oats

.... 2.95 3.00 … 3.80 3.60 …. .... …. .... 3.00 2.60 3.00 2.80 …. 2.80 3.00 2.73

.... 2.94 …. … 3.20 .... …. .... .... 2.75 2.25 …. 2.90 …. .... 2.20 2.70 2.00

FUTURES WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dec 13 681Ÿ 689ß 678 686 +4ß Mar 14 689 697¿ 686 693ß +4Ÿ May 14 693 698ß 689Ÿ 696 +3¿ Jul 14 675 683¿ 673 681ß +6 Sep 14 681 688Ÿ 681 687 +6 Prev. sales 100319 Prev. Open Int. 356627 chg.-2706 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dec 13 438ß 441 435 439 Mar 14 451ß 453ß 448 451ß May 14 459¿ 461¿ 456 459ß Jul 14 466 468ß 463Ÿ 467 +¿ Sep 14 470 473Ÿ 468ß 472¿ +Ÿ Prev. sales 247092 Prev. Open Int. 1182752 chg.+12311 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dec 13 315¿ 316 311ß 313ß -1Ÿ Mar 14 305 307 300 305Ÿ +2ß May 14 303¿ 306 303¿ 304ß +3 Jul 14 296¿ 299¿ 296¿ 299¿ +3 Sep 14 301¿ 304¿ 301¿ 304¿ +3 Prev. sales 573 Prev. Open Int. 11056 chg. +8 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Nov 13 1267¿ 1282 1263ß 1273ß+5ß Jan 14 1270 1283¿ 1266 1275ß+5ß Mar 14 1253 1262ß 1247ß 1257¿+4¿ May 14 1234Ÿ 1243 1228ß 1239 +5Ÿ Jul 14 1229 1239 1224 1234 +5 Prev. sales 207323 Prev. Open Int. 616871 chg.-5639 SOYBEAN OIL 60,000 lbs- cents per lb

Achillion ActivsBliz AdobeSy Amarin ACapAgy ANtIns h Amgen Apple Inc ApldMatl ArenaPhm AriadP ArrayBio AstexPhm Atmel Autodesk Baidu BlackBerry BonTon Broadcom BrcdeCm

2.88 +.23 -64.0 16.79 -.12 +58.1 51.52 -.91 +36.7 6.65 +.14 -17.8 23.02 +.16 -20.3 98.85 +.36 +44.8 113.06 -1.52 +31.2 489.56 +1.60 -8.0 17.51 +.04 +53.1 5.00 -.11 -44.6 18.67 -.22 -2.7 6.59 +.15 +77.2 8.63 +.13+196.6 7.43 +.01 +13.4 42.55 +2.06 +20.4 159.94 +1.30 +59.5 7.96 +.04 -32.9 10.59 +.10 -12.9 26.40 -.05 -20.5 8.00 -.02 +50.1

CdnSolar CelldexTh Cisco Comcast Costco Cree Inc DARABio h Delcath h Dell Inc DishNetw h DryShips eBay ElectArts Ericsson ExpScripts Facebook FifthThird FstSolar FrSea rsh FrontierCm

18.56 +.38+445.9 36.71 -1.12+447.1 23.32 +.08 +18.7 45.45 -.16 +21.7 114.82 -.18 +16.3 68.59 -1.17+101.9 .70 +.20 -9.7 .59 +.28 -52.0 13.83 -.01 +36.4 47.98 +2.30 +31.8 3.74 +.01+133.8 55.63 -.34 +9.1 25.62 -.80 +76.4 13.56 -.04 +34.3 62.41 -.22 +15.6 50.28 -.14 +88.9 18.05 -.21 +18.8 42.98 +.84 +39.3 .74 -.03 -15.9 4.29 +.04 +.2

Oct 13 40.01 40.08 39.09 39.12 -.89 Dec 13 40.33 40.33 39.20 39.38 -.89 Jan 14 40.62 40.63 39.53 39.71 -.86 Mar 14 40.92 40.96 39.88 40.06 -.83 May 14 41.22 41.22 40.18 40.36 -.81 Prev. sales 72445 Prev. Open Int. 305528 chg. +248 SOYBEAN MEAL 100 tons- dollars per ton Oct 13 408.50 418.20 407.00 417.60+9.10 Dec 13 403.20 412.60 401.70 411.70+8.40 Jan 14 400.90 409.10 398.90 408.30+7.40 Mar 14 392.70 399.20 390.60 398.40+5.70 May 14 383.40 389.80 381.60 389.10+5.30 Prev. sales 79057 Prev. Open Int. 259320 chg. +456 CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Oct 13 127.15 127.62 127.07 127.30 +.05 Dec 13 131.75 132.20 124.80 131.82 -.08 Feb 14 133.35 133.85 133.32 133.65 +.15 Apr 14 134.30 134.95 127.82 134.92 +.35 Jun 14 128.77 129.60 128.75 129.45 +.48 Prev. sales 48172 Prev. Open Int. 303689 chg. +327 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Oct 13 164.55 164.90 164.07 164.57 +.17 Nov 13 166.10 166.65 165.57 166.20 +.15 Jan 14 165.17 166.00 164.80 165.77 +.57 Mar 14 165.72 165.72 164.30 164.72 +.30 Apr 14 164.62 165.15 164.62 165.15 +.55 Prev. sales 8166 Prev. Open Int. 32784 chg. +566

Flax Sunflower Soybeans seeds

.... 13.40 …. … .... 13.20 …. .... .... …. 13.30 12.90 13.10 …. 12.90 13.05 13.00 ….

.... 18.00 .... …. .... 18.50 …. .... 16.50 17.40 …. 17.70 16.90 16.90 17.60 16.65 …. ....

AbdAsPac AlldNevG AmApparel AmpioPhm AvalnRare B2gold g Bacterin Banro g BarcUBS36 BarcGSOil BrigusG g Cardium rs CastleBr CFCda g CentSe

6.13 4.05 1.19 7.78 .98 2.42 .75 .66 37.24 24.65 .56 1.07 .76 14.53 23.67

... -20.8 +.07 -86.6 -.06 +17.8 +.28 +116.7 +.02 -28.3 +.01 -32.2 +.00 -40.3 +.02 -76.3 +.28 -9.9 +.50 +13.1 +.00 -40.1 +.04 -71.9 -.02 +171.4 +.27 -30.9 -.07 +18.5

CheniereEn ChiMarFd ClghGlbOp CrSuiHiY DejourE g DenisnM g DocuSec EV LtdDur EVMuniBd EmrldO rs FAB Univ FrkStPrp GamGldNR Gastar grs GoldResrc

34.49 .44 12.94 3.08 .19 1.16 1.11 15.45 11.40 7.25 6.05 12.71 10.58 4.42 5.66

Vale SA Vale SA pf ValeroE VangEmg VangEur VangFTSE VeriFone

VerizonCm 46.79 -.20 +8.1 W WaddellR 52.44 +.08 +50.6 WalMart 73.72 +.13 +8.0 Walgrn 56.53 +.29 +52.7 WalterEn 14.46 +.45 -59.7 WeathfIntl 15.98 -.01 +42.8 WellsFargo 41.26 -.23 +20.7 WestarEn 30.63 -.21 +7.0 WstAsWw 12.45 -.08 -17.7 WstnUnion 18.69 -.01 +37.3 Weyerhsr 29.07 -.06 +4.5 WhitingPet 61.55 -.22 +41.9 WmsCos 36.58 -.17 +11.7 Winnbgo 26.89 +.08 +57.0 WiscEngy 40.61 +.12 +10.2 WTJpHedg 46.91 -.52 +27.2 XYZ XcelEngy 27.76 -.03 +3.9 Xerox 10.51 +.02 +54.1 YPF Soc 20.05 -.16 +37.8 Yamana g 10.05 -.03 -41.6 Yelp 70.69 -.43 +275.0 YingliGrn 7.17 +.06 +205.1 YoukuTud 29.84 +1.18 +63.6 YumBrnds 70.70 -.88 +6.5 Zoetis n 32.00 +.22 +3.2

GT AdvTc GileadSci s Goodyear GreenMtC Groupon HimaxTch Hologic HuntBncsh HutchT Intel KnCtyL KeryxBio LSI Corp MAKO Srg MarvellT MaximIntg McGrathR MicronT Microsoft Mondelez

8.80 62.40 23.27 75.46 11.77 11.02 21.00 8.35 3.47 22.89 43.90 10.42 7.98 29.55 11.28 29.74 35.70 17.67 33.92 30.65

+.06+190.4 -.40 +69.9 +.02 +68.5 -1.52 +82.5 +.07+142.2 +.49+359.2 +.16 +4.9 -.01 +30.6 -.06 +73.5 +.06 +11.0 -.30 +15.0 +.03+297.7 +.06 +12.9 ... +130.0 +.01 +55.4 -.48 +1.2 -.77 +22.7 +.06+178.6 +.34 +27.0 -.20 +20.4

NII Hldg NetApp Netflix NewLead h NewsCpA n Nvidia Omeros OnSmcnd Patterson PeregrinP PetSmart PwShs QQQ Qualcom RevolutnL RiverbedT RockwllM SanDisk SeagateT SiriusXM Staples

6.47 +.31 -9.3 42.84 -.21 +27.7 330.73 +6.11+257.2 .12 -.02 -69.5 16.14 +.23 +2.2 15.54 -.01 +26.8 11.19 +1.51+115.6 7.32 -.04 +3.8 40.00 -.36 +16.9 1.48 +.08 +12.1 76.80 -.52 +12.4 79.65 -.03 +22.3 67.68 +.19 +9.4 3.47 -.38 +449.9 14.73 +.10 -25.3 11.99 +.55 +48.9 61.48 +1.41 +41.3 45.95 +1.25 +51.1 3.98 +.01 +37.7 15.14 +.34 +32.8

Starbucks StemCells SunPower Symantec TakeTwo TeslaMot TexInst TibcoSft TowerGp lf 21stCFoxA UniPixel Vivus Vodafone Wendys Co Windstrm XOMA Yahoo Zalicus Zogenix Zynga

77.19 +.03 +43.9 1.47 -.21 -9.8 28.01 +.73+398.4 24.52 -.13 +30.3 18.20 -.18 +65.3 180.95 -12.05+434.2 40.26 -.14 +30.3 26.89 +.33 +22.3 7.92 +.52 -49.6 33.71 -.27 +49.6 19.70 +.88 +43.9 10.19 +.81 -24.1 35.83 +.47 +42.2 8.62 -.20 +83.4 8.17 -.02 -1.3 5.41 +.25+125.4 34.14 -.17 +71.6 1.20 +.02 +84.6 2.24 +.29 +68.4 3.82 -.02 +61.9

.... .... …. 12.13 .... 12.19 …. …. .... 11.69 11.98 11.94 12.07 …. 11.94 .... 11.71 ....

MINNEAPOLIS FUTURES SPRING WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Dec 13 735ß 748ß 735¿ 746ß +11 Mar 14 743 753ß 741ß 751¿ +6 May 14 747 754 747 751¿ +4¿ Jul 14 750 756Ÿ 750 750Ÿ -ß Sep 14 755 755 748ß 748ß -2ß Prev. sales 7080 Prev. Open Int. 46827 chg. +277

FOREIGN EXCHANGE LEGEND * Today’s foreign currency in dollars ** Previous day’s foreign currency in dollars *** Dollar value in the foreign currency **** Previous day’s dollar value in foreign currency

UTC: 5K workers may be furloughed HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — United Technologies Corp. says it may furlough more than 5,000 workers if the U.S. government shutdown continues into next month.

+.18 +83.7 +.06 -45.1 -.01 +10.2 +.01 -3.8 -.00 -14.7 +.06 -7.2 -.04 -48.8 -.04 -7.3 -.07 -18.5 -.05 +38.4 +.06 +87.9 -.04 +3.2 +.07 -17.3 +.10 +265.3 -.26 -63.3

GoldenMin GoldStr g GranTrra g GtPanSilv g iBio ImmunoCll InovioPhm IntTower g Lannett MastThera MeetMe NanoViric NavideaBio Neuralstem Nevsun g

.93 .40 7.20 .86 .43 2.67 2.08 .30 22.14 .45 1.74 5.36 2.56 2.62 3.17

-.01 -79.8 -.01 -78.5 -.01 +30.7 +.01 -44.1 -.02 -31.1 +.02 +39.1 -.05 +316.0 -.00 -86.2 -.21 +346.4 +.01 -20.7 -.02 -50.1 +.21 +225.8 -.08 -9.5 -.07 +140.4 -.05 -25.9

NwGold g NA Pall g NDynMn g NthnO&G NovaBayP NovaGld g NuvAmtFr Organovo ParaG&S RareEle g RexahnPh Rubicon g SamsO&G SandstG g SynergyRs

5.97 .96 1.77 15.37 1.70 2.33 12.34 5.68 1.30 2.55 .48 1.22 .49 5.23 9.85

+.08 -45.9 -.02 -26.2 +.13 -44.0 -.26 -8.6 -.01 +50.4 +.06 -48.3 -.02 -16.8 -.15 +118.5 +.02 -44.0 -.13 -25.0 +.03 +54.8 -.03 -52.2 -.00 -36.8 +.01 -55.7 -.15 +82.7

TanzRy g TasmanM g TherapMD Timmins g TrnsatlPet TriangPet UQM Tech US Geoth Uranerz UraniumEn VangTotW VantageDrl VistaGold WFAdvInco WirelessT

2.38 .83 3.09 1.56 .84 10.30 1.73 .44 .98 2.14 55.91 1.73 .43 9.02 2.00

39.09 54.83 64.56 15.14 8.20 17.97 63.65 43.32 37.61 25.95 91.28 36.39

-.01 +22.8 +.37 +51.7 +.80 +56.1 +.34 +32.8 -.03 +232.0 +.02 +18.1 -.26 +7.6 +.22 -1.7 -.08 +.7 +50.0 -.52 +23.8 -.32 +13.9

Vodafone

35.83 +.47 +42.2

-.09 -46.0 -.02 -29.7 +.02 -.3 -.07 -48.0 -.01 +1.2 +.30 +72.0 -.07 +127.6 +.00 +22.7 +.03 -29.3 -.07 -16.4 -.08 +13.1 -.05 -5.5 -.03 -84.1 ... -10.4 -.01 +66.7

LOCAL COMPANIES AT&T Inc Aetna Allete AmExp BP PLC BarnesNob Baxter Citigroup CocaCola ConAgra Cott Cp CrackerB

33.94 -.12 64.76 -.14 48.85 +.01 74.58 -1.12 42.11 +.26 13.04 +.21 63.89 -1.69 48.71 +.11 37.43 -.52 30.62 +.11 7.72 +.01 103.98 -.26

+.7 +39.8 +19.2 +30.2 +1.1 -13.6 -4.2 +23.1 +3.3 +3.8 -3.9 +61.8

DeanFds rs Deluxe DineEquity DblEgl Exar Fastenal GenElec HarvNRes LSI Corp Lee Ent MDU Res McDnlds

18.74 42.83 69.22 2.98 13.32 51.51 24.33 5.69 7.98 2.79 27.92 95.28

-.46 +20.3 -.32 +32.8 -.10 +3.3 -.02 -23.6 -.22 +49.7 +.15 +10.4 +.16 +15.9 +.15 -37.3 +.06 +12.9 +.15+144.7 -.45 +31.5 -.85 +8.0

NACCO NashF Nordstrm NorthropG OfficeDpt OneokPtrs OtterTail Penney PepsiCo Pfizer ProgsvCp RadioShk

56.14 26.13 56.80 95.18 4.89 53.22 27.49 8.72 79.56 29.01 27.28 3.39

-.47 -.55 +.85 -.96 -.06 +.21 -.17 -.03 -.26 +.12 -.07 +.01

-7.5 +22.8 +6.2 +40.8 +49.1 -1.4 +10.0 -55.8 +16.3 +15.7 +29.3 +59.9

RobtHalf StJude SearsHldgs Staples Supvalu SykesEnt Target Tesoro TevaPhrm Unisys UPS B US Bancrp

WaddellR

52.44 +.08 +50.6

WalMart

73.72 +.13 +8.0

WellsFargo

41.26 -.23 +20.7

Wendys Co 8.62 Westmrld

-.20 +83.4

13.02 -.05 +39.4

WirelessT

2.00

XcelEngy

27.76 -.03

-.01 +66.7 +3.9

Twitter IPO in preparation By MICHAEL LIEDTKE AP Technology Writer

FOREIGN EXCHANGE

GOLD

NEW YORK (AP) — Spot nonferrous metal prices Wed. Aluminum -$0.8100 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$3.2743 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper -$3.3115 N.Y. Merc spot Wed. Lead - $2052.50 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $0.8402 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1306.25 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1320.60 troy oz., NY Merc spot Wed. Silver - $21.810 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $21.846 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Wed. Platinum -$1387.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum -$1389.80 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Wed. n.q.-not quoted n.a.-not available r-revised

6.75 6.91 6.93 6.91 .... 6.97 6.97 6.97 7.06 7.02 6.76 6.97 7.09 6.84 6.97 7.06 6.61 6.46

URS US Airwy UnionPac UtdContl US Bancrp US NGas US OilFd USSteel UtdTech UtdhlthGp

16.71 -.02 -.3 24.77 +.44 +25.0 17.47 +.05 +1.8 12.42 +.41 +9.6 63.65 -.26 +7.6 16.03 +.25 +18.8 43.90 +2.53 +35.2 34.41 +.46 +22.4 43.32 +.22 -1.7 37.61 -.08 +.7 2.19 ... +37.7 59.08 +.10 +57.8 119.20 -.42 +28.4 66.36 -.32 +38.7 18.38 -.02 +14.5 16.06 -.01 +270.0 9.79 -.02 +2.5 28.36 -.14 +46.2 U 54.28 +.20 +38.3 19.84 +.15 +47.0 156.13 -.55 +24.2 30.93 -.45 +32.3 36.39 -.32 +13.9 18.22 -.32 -3.6 37.42 +.74 +12.1 21.63 +.62 -9.3 104.98-2.40 +28.0 72.57 -.01 +33.8 V 15.73 +.17 -25.0 14.45 +.16 -28.8 34.38 +.54 +.8 41.06 +.13 -7.8 54.87 +.01 +12.3 39.77 -.04 +12.9 23.82 +.82 -19.7

AMEX

QUOTES

Beach Bismarck Bowman Cleveland Dickinson-Woody’s Harvey Hebron Hensler Lemmon, S.D. McLaughlin, S.D. Max Napoleon New Salem Scranton Sterling-SCG Taylor Tuttle Watford City

TECO TIM Part TaiwSemi TalismE g Target TelefEsp TenetHlt rs Terex Tesoro TevaPhrm Theragen Thor Inds 3M Co TimeWarn TriContl TrinaSolar TwoHrbInv Tyson

NASDAQ

Stocks fall as shutdown lingers NEW YORK (AP) — Fear of a protracted U.S. government shutdown is making global investors increasingly nervous. U.S. and European stock markets fell Wednesday as investors and world leaders worried about the threat to the global economy. Europe’s top central banker called the partial shutdown “a risk if protracted.” Boston’s Federal Reserve Bank president cited the budget battle as a reason the Fed refused to pull back its economic stimulus last month, and President Barack Obama appeared on financial network CNBC to urge Congress to pass a budget and avoid derailing the nation’s economic recovery. “The markets are sending a loud message to Washington lawmakers to get their act together and resolve the budget crisis,” said Peter Cardillo, chief market economist at Rockwell Global Capital. The Dow Jones industrial average ended the day down

SpdrOGEx 67.30 +.14 +24.4 Safeway 32.11 +.14 +77.5 Saks 15.95 +.02 +51.8 Salesforc s 53.15 +.52 +26.5 SJuanB 16.42 +.41 +22.4 SandRdge 6.19 +.02 -2.5 Schlmbrg 89.85 +.80 +29.7 Schwab 21.29 -.09 +48.3 Sherwin 184.69 +.17 +20.1 SiderurNac 4.34 +.09 -26.4 SilvWhtn g 24.29 +.19 -32.7 SnapOn 100.40 -.35 +27.1 Sothebys 50.04 +.33 +48.8 SouthnCo 41.33 +.05 -3.5 SwstAirl 14.67 -.06 +43.3 SpectraEn 34.81 +.14 +27.1 Sprint n 6.35 +.06 +14.4 SP Matls 42.30 +.11 +12.7 SP HlthC 51.11 -.12 +28.2 SP CnSt 39.96 -.09 +14.5 SP Consum 61.10 -.02 +28.8 SP Engy 83.63 +.19 +17.1 SPDR Fncl 20.04 -.01 +22.3 SP Inds 46.48 -.22 +22.6 SP Tech 32.33 +.01 +12.1 SP Util 37.52 +.04 +7.4 Standex 58.81 -1.29 +14.7 StateStr 65.94 -.76 +40.3 Stryker 67.74 -.22 +23.6 SturmRug 64.10 +.81 +41.2 Suncor gs 35.64 -.34 +8.1 SunEdison 8.35 -.16 +160.1 Suntech 1.56 -.02 +2.0 Synovus 3.30 -.06 +34.7 Sysco 31.67 +.06 +.9 Systemax 9.56 +.08 -.9 T

SAN FRANCISCO — Internet stocks are heating up again, just as Twitter is preparing to turn up the temperature with its highly anticipated IPO. Consider what’s happened in the past month: The once-scorned stocks of Netflix and Facebook have soared to new highs; Yahoo’s long-languishing stock has regained its vigor and surpassed $34 for the first time in nearly six years; enamored investors just poured more than $1.7 billion into seconda r y s t o c k o f f e r i n g s by LinkedIn and Pandora Media Inc.; and Priceline.com’s stock recently broke $1,000, catapulting past its peak reached in 1999 during the dot-com boom. “There is great demand right now to invest in companies that could be powering the future, but it’s a window of opportunity that won’t last forever,” said BGC Financial analyst Colin Gillis. As hot as some Internet stocks are, the fervor is noth-

ing like it was in the late 1990s when investors minted dozens of unprofitable companies with rich market values. “The difference is that investors today are investing on value rather than on emotion and hype, as was the case in 1998 to 2000,” said Jeff Corbin, CEO of investor relations consultant KCSA Strategic Communications. Many of today’s investors are judging Internet companies on their individual merits and prospects for growth. “Back then,” said Corbin, “just by including the word ‘Internet’ in a company description or name gave rise to a multi-million if not billion dollar valuation.” Dan Appelman is a longtime investor in technology who views the current run-up in Internet stocks as a reflection of the ever-expanding role online services play in people’s lives. “The Internet is everywhere now, and that wasn’t the case in 2000,” Appelman said. “It’s become like electricity or plumbing.” Twitter couldn’t have chosen a better moment to join the party. The timing proved

to be ideal for recent IPOs by Rocket Fuel Inc., a company that uses artificial intelligence software to distribute digital ads, and FireEye Inc., a maker of computer security software. The stocks of both Silicon Valley companies nearly doubled in their Sept. 20 trading debuts. Tw i t t e r h a s n’t s e t a timetable for its IPO since announcing its plans to go public in a Sept. 12 tweet. Most analysts expect the San Francisco company to complete the process in November or December. Wall Street’s current infatuation with Facebook Inc.’s social network and LinkedIn Corp.’s online professional network bodes well for Twitter. Like Facebook and LinkedIn, Twitter runs a bustling service that relies on free content posted by its users. With about 200 million users, Twitter is the smallest of the bunch, based on the company’s most recent disclosures about its size. LinkedIn has nearly 240 million users while Facebook boasts nearly 1.2 billion active users.

The Jeans Day recipient for May was

Designer Genes of ND The Jeans Day money from the Bismarck Tribune means a great deal to a small, but growing organization like ours. One of our priorities is to make sure that every new family with a baby with Down Syndrome in Bismarck/Mandan and our state are wellsupported. We would also like to see our programs grow to assure our youth and adults with Down Syndrome have greater opportunities in our community.

Roxane Romanick Designer Genes of ND



The Bismarck Tribune - Oct. 3, 2013