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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 2011

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St. A’s CEO resigns

TOM STROMME/Tribune

Andrew Wilson has resigned as CEO of St. Alexius Medical Center in Bismarck.

Andy Wilson joined in ’06 By SARA KINCAID Bismarck Tribune The St. Alexius Medical Center Board of Directors will begin the process of selecting a replacement for former president and CEO Andy Wilson. Wilson resigned Monday, effective immediately. Gary Miller, the chief financial officer, was chosen as the interim CEO until a replacement is hired. “We wish Mr. Wilson the very best,” said Sister Nancy Miller, president of the board of directors. A release from the hospital said Wilson resigned to pursue other business opportunities. Six attempts to reach Wilson at his home telephone number were unsuccessful. Three messages were not returned. Wilson replaced Dick Tschider as president and CEO in January 2006. He Continued on 6A

Standoff suspect in court Bismarck man shot by police appears on charges

Glenn Lovgren signs court papers during his court appearance at the Burleigh County Courthouse in Bismarck on Tuesday. Lovgren is charged with threatening police and illegal possession of a firearm. (MIKE McCLEARY/ Tribune)

By JENNY MICHAEL Bismarck Tribune A Bismarck man shot by police in a standoff made his first appearance on charges that he threatened police and possessed a firearm illegally. Glenn Lovgren, 43, was booked into the Burleigh County Detention Center on Monday, according to detention center records. He had been at Medcenter One

Tuition talk: Freeze, free By DALE WETZEL Associated Press Student spokesmen for North Dakota State University and the University of North Dakota argued Tuesday about a proposed two-year tuition freeze that would require about $19 million in added state aid to carry out. Evan Andrist, a student lobbyist for UND, told the North Dakota House Education Committee during its hearing on the legislation Tuesday that the proposal would help keep tuition affordable for college students. “Invest in these students now, so that they can someday invest back into North Dakota,” Andrist said. However, Robert Vallie, an NDSU student Continued on 6A

Allowing North Dakota residents who are at least 55 years old to take college classes for free could complicate matters for paying students and would make enrollment reporting more confusing, the chancellor of North Dakota’s university system said Tuesday. William Goetz spoke at a House Education Continued on 6A

Your partner or your pet? Surprising number say they would prefer the pet By LEANNE ITALIE Associated Press

Photo Illustration/JENNIFER WEISGERBER

‘Move together or not at all’ By BEN FELLER AP White House Correspondent WASHINGTON — Pleading for unity in a newly divided government, President Barack Obama implored Democratic INSIDE and RepubAnalysis: lican lawGOP, Obama makers to frame debate rally behind for 2012, 9A his vision of economic revival for an anxious nation, declaring in his State of the Union address Tuesday night: “We will move forward together or not at all.” The president unveiled an agenda of carefully balanced political goals: a burst of spending on education, research, technology and transportation to make the nation more competitive, alongside pledges, in the strongest terms of his presidency, to cut the deficit and s m a c k d ow n s p e n d i n g deemed wasteful to America. Yet he never explained how he’d pull that off or what specifically would be cut.

since the standoff with police on Jan. 4 and 5. Lovgren was charged Jan. 5 with Class C felony terrorizing and illegal possession of a firearm. Because he has been in the hospital since that time, he did not make his first appearance in court on the charges until Tuesday. His left arm was in a brace at the court appearance. Continued on 6A

REPUBLICANS URGE OBAMA TO JOIN IN CUTTING SPENDING

Associated Press

President Barack Obama delivers his State of the Union address at the Capitol in Washington on Tuesday. Obama spoke to a television audience in the millions and a Congress sobered by the assassination attempt against one if its own mem-

bers, Rep. Gabrielle Giffords. Her seat sat empty, and many lawmakers of competing parties sat together in a show of support and civility.

Yet differences were still evident, as when Democrats stood to applaud his comments on health care and tax Continued on 9A

Protests in Egypt

Triple the impact

Thursday

Demonstrators clash with police, denounce leader — 2A

Study finds oil impact tripled to $12.7B from 2005-09 — 1B

Rough winters can be hard on wildlife, not just humans

WASHINGTON (AP) — The nation faces a crushing burden of debt and is on course for an economic disaster without dramatic action to wrestle the budget deficit under control, House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan said Tuesday in the Republican response to President Barack Obama’s State of the Union address. And such spending cuts must start immediately as the price of getting GOP conservatives to cast a painful vote to increase the government’s ability to borrow to pay its bills this spring, Ryan said. “Our nation is approaching a tipping point. We are at a moment, where if government’s growth is left unchecked and unchallenged, America’s best Continued on 9A

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NEW YORK — Your sweetheart or your pet. Which would you dump if one had to go? Most current pet owners said they would hold on to their spouse or significant other (84 percent), but a sizable 14 percent picked their pet, according to an AP-Petside.com poll. Put Sally Roland, 53, of Omaha, Neb., down in the dog-first column. “I’m divorced, so that might explain it,” she joked. The unmarried, like Roland, are more apt to choose their pet over their mate — 25 percent among unmarried pet owners versus 8 percent among the married. Count Fidel Martinez, 30, of Akron, Ohio, as forever loyal to Killer. That’s his mix-breed, 100-pound rescue dog. “I would absolutely give up my girlfriend for him,” Martinez said. “I know it sounds insane but I’ve had numerous relationships with women. My dog has never let me down.” For the record: Martinez and K iller have been together for seven years. Martinez and his girlfriend have been together for four. The two-legged pair have no immediate plans to cohabitate, he said, but she Continued on 9A


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 2011 OPINION Access to 911 recordings needed PAGE 8A

WWW. BISMARCKTRIBUNE . COM

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China’s premier welcomes critics BEIJING (AP) — China’s premier has urged citizens to voice their criticisms of the government and speak out about injustice during an unprecedented visit to the c o u n t r y ’s t o p p e t i t i o n bureau, where people are allowed to file complaints against officials, state media reported. The official Xinhua News Agency said late Tuesday that it was the first time since the founding of the People’s Republic of China in 1949 that a premier has met with ordinary petitioners. China Central Television quoted Wen Jiabao as telling visitors and staff at the bureau in Beijing on Monday afternoon that the government must “create conditions that allow citizens to criticize and supervise the government, and enable government to responsibly resolve the problems and difficulties of the masses.”

Underwear bomb suspect’s trial set DETROIT (AP) — A judge on Tuesday set an Oct. 4 trial date for a Nigerian man charged with trying to blow up a Detroit-bound airliner on Christmas Day 2009 using a bomb hidden in his underwear. Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab, who is acting as his own lawyer, asked for a 2012 date and said he might not have enough time to prepare. But U.S. District Judge Nancy Edmunds said a fall trial was best for now. “We need to move this case along,” she said. Abdulmutallab is charged with attempting to use a weapon of mass destruction and conspiring with others to kill 281 passengers and 11 crew members aboard Northwest Airlines Flight 253. U.S investigators believe he received training and instructions from alQaida operatives in Yemen, beginning in August 2009.

Hezbollah-backed PM urges unity BEIRUT (AP) — The billionaire businessman chosen by Hezbollah and its allies as Lebanon’s prime minister called for a unity government Tuesday, a sign that the Iranian-backed militant group does not want to push its growing power too far and risk isolation abroad and an escalation of sectarian tensions at home. In Washington, Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton warned that formation of a government dominated by Hezbollah would mean changes in U.S. relations with Lebanon. The militant group and its allies ousted the government backed by Washington two weeks ago when they walked out of the Cabinet. The United States deems Hezbollah a terrorist organization and has imposed sanctions against the group and its members.

IN

1873

THE INSIDE STORY

Protests flare in Egypt Demonstrators denounce leader, clash with police By HAMZA HENDAWI Associated Press CAIRO — Egyptian police fired tear gas and rubber bullets and beat protesters to clear thousands of people from a central Cairo square today after the biggest demonstrations in years against President Hosni Mubarak’s authoritarian rule. Two protesters and a police officer were killed in the nationwide demonstrations inspired by Tunisia’s uprising, which also demanded a solution to Egypt’s grinding poverty and were likely to fuel growing dissent in a presidential election year. Mobilized largely on the Internet, the waves of protesters filled Cairo’s central Tahrir — or Liberation — Square on Tuesday, some hurling rocks and climbing atop armored police trucks. “Down with Hosni Mubarak, down with the tyrant,” chanted the crowds. “We don’t want you!” they screamed as thousands of riot police deployed in a massive security operation that failed to quell the protests. As night fell, thousands of demonstrators stood their ground for what they vowed would be an all-night sit-in in Tahrir Square just steps away from parliament and other government buildings — blocking the streets and setting the stage for even more dramatic confrontations. A large security force moved in around 1 a.m. today, arresting people, chasing others into side

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Demonstrators deface a poster of Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak in Alexandria, Egypt, on Tuesday. streets and filling the square with clouds of tear gas. Protesters collapsed on the ground with breathing problems amid the heavy volleys of tear gas. The sound of what appeared to be automatic weapons fire could be heard as riot police and plainclothes officers chased several hundred protesters who scrambled onto the main road along the Nile in downtown Cairo. Some 20 officers were seen brutally beating one protester with truncheons. “It got broken up ugly with everything, shooting,

water cannon and (police) running with the sticks,” said Gigi Ibrahim, who was among the last protesters to leave the square. “It was a field of tear gas. The square emptied out so fast.” Ibrahim said she was hit in her back with something that felt like a rock. “Some people were hit in their faces,” she said. Some protesters turned violent amid the crackdown. They knocked down an empty white police booth and dragged it for several yards before setting it on fire, chanting that they want to oust the regime. A police

By DEANNA BELLANDI Associated Press

pickup truck was overtur ned and set ablaze behind the famed Egyptian Museum. Protesters also set fire to a metal barricade and blocked traffic on a major bridge over the Nile. Police at the bridge fired tear gas and protesters mounted a charge, forcing officers to retreat, though they quickly regrouped. Two protesters with bleeding head wounds were carried off in ambulances. Well after midnight, the smell of tear gas drifted throughout central Cairo and riot police remained deployed in large numbers.

Associated Press

Former White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel accepts the endorsement of the Teamsters Joint Council 25 in his bid for mayor of Chicago on Tuesday. city, pressed ahead with confidence and said he was doubling his campaign by adding more stops to his already busy schedule. “I am clear that I think that we will succeed because of the thoroughness of our argument,” he said Tuesday at an event w h e re h e re c e i v e d a n endorsement from the

Teamsters. He said he was “more determined to see this through so the people have a right to make the choice for themselves.” Emanuel asked the Supreme Court to overturn the appeals court ruling, which pulled his name off the ballot because he did not live in Chicago for a year before the Feb. 22 election.

Until October, the former Chicago congressman had been living in Washington w o r k i n g f o r Pre s i d e n t Barack Obama. The high court was to review legal briefs and would not hold oral arguments, a sign the justices want to decide the case quickly. That plan is “absolutely a reflection that they understand the tightness of the time schedule,” said Dawn Clark Netsch, a professor emeritus at Northwestern University’s law school. Chicago election officials said they had printed nearly 300,000 ballots without Emanuel’s name before they abruptly stopped. The Board of Elections had hurriedly authorized the printing after Monday’s appellate ruling. Board chairman Langdon Neal said a suburban Chicago printer was called Tu e s d a y a n d l i t e r a l l y ordered to “stop the presses.” Neal said the agency planned to resume printing ballots later Tuesday, this time with Emanuel listed.

Ohio to use surgical sedative in executions By ANDREW WELSH-HUGGINS AP Legal Affairs Writer COLUMBUS, Ohio — Ohio is set to become the first state to execute condemned inmates with a surgical sedative sometimes used in assisted suicides, a switch made as the shortage of the drug normally used for executions has worsened. Beginning in March, the state execution team will use a single, powerful dose of pentobarbital, the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction announced Tuesday. The drug also is used to induce surgical comas and is chemically

ABOUT US Established in 1873, the Bismarck Tribune is the official newspaper of the state of North Dakota, county of Burleigh and city of Bismarck. Published daily at 707 E. Front Ave., Bismarck, ND 58504. Periodicals postage paid at the Bismarck Post Office. Member of the Associated Press. SUBSCRIBER SERVICES Delivery deadlines for the Bismarck Tribune are 6 a.m. Monday-Saturday and 7 a.m. Sunday. If you have not received your Tribune by this deadline, redeliveries are available in Bismarck-Mandan until 10 a.m. Monday through Friday and until 11 a.m. Saturday and Sunday by calling 250-8210. When going on vacation, please call 250-8210 or 877-590-6397 to have your paper saved in a vacation pack or donated to the Newspaper in Education program.

Emanuel appeals to Ill. court CHICAGO — Illinois’ highest court agreed Tuesday to decide whether Rahm Emanuel can run for Chicago mayor, and justices ordered election officials not to print any ballots without his name until they rule on the case. The action bought valuable time for the former White House chief of staff, who a day earlier was kicked off the ballot by an appeals court. The state Supreme Court said it would expedite the matter but gave no specific time frame. With less than a week to go before the first early ballots are cast, a number of potential scenarios loomed, including the possibility that Emanuel would have to resort to a write-in campaign or wage a desperate bid to take the matter to federal court. Emanuel, who had been the heavy favorite to lead the nation’s third-largest

VOLUME 137, NUMBER 26 ISSN 0745-1091. Published daily.

related to a version of pentobarbital used to euthanize pets. It replaces the anesthetic sodium thiopental, which was already scarce when its only U.S. manufacturer announced last week it would no longer produce it. Ohio is following the lead of Oklahoma, which switched to pentobarbital last year and has since used it three times. However, Ohio, which used only a single dose of sodium thiopental to execute inmates, would become the first state to use pentobarbital alone, without two additional drugs that paralyze inmates and stop their hearts. The drug has been used in 200 of

the 525 assisted suicides in Oregon since 1998, according to data compiled by the Oregon Public Health Division. It also was prescribed for 5 of 47 assisted-suicide patients in Washington state in 2009, state health statistics show. Chemically speaking, the pentobarbital used by veterinarians and the product used for human surgeries is the same, said Rich Bednarski, professor of veterinary anesthesia at Ohio State University. But vets use a far more concentrated version marketed only for euthanasia and often combined with other drugs, Bednarski said.

Ohio is buying its supply from a manufacturer that only produces the drug for use in hospitals, said DRC spokesman Carlo LoParo. The prisons department said it will use its remaining supply of sodium thiopental for the scheduled execution Feb. 17 of Frank Spisak, who killed three people at Cleveland State University in 1982. The first use of pentobarbital is planned for March’s scheduled execution of Johnnie Baston of Lucas County, condemned to die for shooting the owner of a Toledo store in the back of the head during a 1994 robbery.

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FAMILY: A photograph on Page 7A of Tuesday’s Tribune of three people outside the Bismarck Motor Hotel wasn’t of people being evacuated from the burning hotel but was of the owner, Dan Frank, his wife, Cherie Frank, and their son, Jordan Frank, 13. NORTH DAKOTA LOTTERY WWW.LOTTERY.ND.GOV POWERBALL Saturday: 30-31-34-45-51 Powerball: 23 Power Play: 2 Jackpot: $20 million MEGA MILLIONS Tuesday: 5-8-31-46-50 Mega Ball: 4 Jackpot: $63 million HOT LOTTO Saturday: 1-3-14-27-33 Hot Lotto: 18 Jackpot: $1.71 million WILD CARD Saturday: 8-10-15-18-26 Wild Card: King of Spades Jackpot: $170,000 2BY2 Tuesday Red Balls: 11-25 White Balls: 15-20


Bismarcktribune.com ■ Bismarck Tribune

Wednesday, January 26, 2011 ■ Page 3A

Fewer than half of American students proficient in science By CHRISTINE ARMARIO Associated Press The nation’s students are still struggling in science, with less than half considered proficient and just a tiny fraction showing the advanced skills that could lead to careers in science and technology, according to results from an exam released Tuesday. Only 1 percent of fourthgrade and 12th-grade students and 2 percent of eighth-graders scored in the highest group on the 2009 National Assessment of Educational Progress, a federal test known as the Nation’s Report Card. “Our ability to create the next generation of U.S. leaders in science and technology is seriously in danger,” said Alan Friedman, former director of the New York Hall of Science, and a member of the board that oversees the test. The results also show a stark achievement gap, with

NORTH DAKOTA STUDENTS DO WELL IN NATIONAL SCIENCE TESTING

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North Dakotans were among the best in the nation in science testing of students in grades four and eight. In the 2009 National Assessment of Educational Progress, fourth-grade and eighth-grade students in North Dakota had an average score of 162 compared with a national average of 149 for both grades. The state Department of Public Instruction said the state’s eighth-graders tied with Montana and the Department of Defense schools for the nation’s top score. The federal test is known as The Nation’s Report Card. Data show that the percentage of North Dakota students who performed at or above basic and proficient levels also was much higher than the national average. — Associated Press only 10 percent of black students proficient in science in the fourth grade, compared to 46 percent of whites. At the high school level, results were even more bleak, with 71 percent of black students scoring below the basic knowledge level, and just 4 percent proficient. Fifty-eight percent of Hispanic 12th-grade students scored below basic, as did

21 percent of whites. “These are really stunning and concerning numbers,” said Amy Wilkins, vice president for government affairs and communications at The Education Trust. She noted that minority and low-income students are the fastest growing parts of the youth population, making the need to increase their achievement levels all the more urgent.

Philippines steps up security MANILA, Philippines (AP) — Philippine police stepped up security at bus terminals, ports and airports today as officials suspected Muslim militants could be behind a bus bombing that killed five people in the bloodiest attack in the capital in six years. Metropolitan Manila police director Nicanor Bartolome said investigators had recovered parts of a remotely detonated impro-

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vised bomb that resembles similar devices used by militants in the volatile southern Philippines, where minority Muslims have been fighting for self-rule for decades. President Benigno Aquino III tried to calm residents in a televised news conference shortly after Tuesday’s blast along a major thoroughfare in the Makati financial district, promising his government will not allow fear to settle in.

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He and other officials have not named any specific group, but suggested the possible involvement of al-Qaida-linked Abu Sayyaf militants. They were also blamed for a bus bombing in 2005 that killed four near the site of Tuesday’s blast. A year earlier, the Abu Sayyaf was blamed for the country’s worst terrorist bombing that killed 116 people in a burning ferry in Manila Bay.

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Page 4A ■ Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Bismarck Tribune ■ Bismarcktribune.com

WEIRDLES

Outside today

Morning

Briefing (Weirdles is drawn by Tim Leer and appears weekdays on Morning Briefing and at www.bismarcktribune.com/ weirdles. See previous Weirdles online at www.weirdles.com.)

Odds and ends

MYSTERY CIRCLE: A mysterious circle is inspected in a rice field in Sleman, Yogyarkarta, Indonesia on Tuesday. ■ Jakarta, Indonesia

UFO in a rice field? Thousands of curious onlookers are flocking to central Indonesia to look at a “crop circle” in a rice field following rumors it was formed by a UFO. Though clearly sculptured by humans — it looks like an intricately designed flower — the 70-yard-wide circle has drawn so much attention that police have blocked off the area with yellow tape. Villagers have started charging entrance fees. Guntur Purwanto, chief of Jogotirto village in Sleman district, said the circle appeared in the middle of the green rice paddies over the weekend. Among those turning out Tuesday and offering opinions were officials from Indonesia’s space agency, respected astronomers and nuclear agency officials. All agree it was not left by a UFO. ■ Rome

TV host’s coffin missing

Police are looking for the body of a late beloved Italian TV host after visitors at the cemetery found his tomb broken into and his coffin missing. Generations of Italians grew up watching Mike Bongiorno as he hosted quiz shows and other entertainment programs during the fledging days of television in Italy. Bongiorno died in 2009 at the age of 85. Italian news reports said a man who came to the cemetery to visit a family grave noticed Bongiorno’s tomb was open Tuesday and the coffin gone. From wire reports

Quote in the news “At stake right now is not who wins the next election ... At stake is whether new jobs and industries take root in this country or somewhere else.” — President Barack Obama, in his State of the Union speech See story on Page 1A

Classifieds deal of the day

Partly cloudy Noon: 31 Evening: 31 Tomorrow: 36/22

People and personalities Chopin might have had epilepsy LONDON (AP) — Frederic Chopin’s habit of drifting off and hallucinating at the piano may have been caused by epilepsy, according to a new study of the 19th-century romantic composer. Chopin’s tendency to lapse out of consciousness was interpreted by his partner George Sand, pseudonym of the French novelist Aurore Dudevant, as “the manifestation of a genius full of sentiment and Chopin: expression.” But Epileptic? in the analysis published this week, Spanish doctors say Chopin’s hallucinations may have been due to a temporal lobe epilepsy rather than the result of any sweeping artistic tendencies. Manuel Vazquez Caruncho and Francisco Branas Fernandez of the Complexo Hospitalario Xeral-Calde in Spain analyzed descriptions of Chopin’s hallucinations from those close to him. They propose the French-Polish composer suffered from a type of epilepsy that produces conscious hallucinations that last from seconds to minutes. The research was published in the journal Medical Humanities, a specialist publication of the BMJ. Some historians have suggested the composer’s frequently noted melancholic moods may have been due to depression. Experts are split on what ultimately killed him; his death certificate lists tuberculosis as the cause, but others suspect it may have been cystic fibrosis. A request to the Polish government to perform genetic tests on Chopin’s heart was denied.

Jackson’s doctor pleads not guilty LOS ANGELES (AP) — Michael Jackson’s doctor pleaded not guilty Tuesday to a charge of involuntary manslaughter in the pop superstar’s death as the case moved rapidly toward a trial that will likely be televised. “Your honor, I am an innocent man,” Dr. Conrad Murray told Superior Court Judge Michael Pastor in a soft voice. “I definitely plead not guilty.” Lawyers for Murray, who is accused of giving Jackson a lethal dose of the powerful anesthetic propofol and other sedatives, said they would be ready

Photo of the day

Submitted photo

CAPITOL IN WINTER: Vivian Deichert of Bismarck submitted this photo of the state Capitol, taken on Dec. 26. (Want to submit a photo to be considered for publication as photo of the day? It’s easy. Just go to www.bismarcktribune.com/submitphotos, fill out the form, attach the photo and click the “submit” button. Readers can submit any photo, but we are specifically looking for photos of recent events and activities in the Bismarck-Mandan area.) to go to trial within the 60-day statutory time limit, which would make for an unusually speedy trial. Deputy District Attorney David Walgren said the prosecution would be ready to go as well for the trial he estimated would last six weeks. The judge scheduled the trial to begin March 28 and set Murray: a pretrial hearing Facing trial for Feb. 7. “Dr. Murray is looking forward to finally telling his side of the story,” defense attorney Ed Chernoff said outside court. A coroner testified that Jackson, 50, died of a propofol overdose in combination with other drugs on June 25, 2009. His death was classified as a homicide.

dynamic amongst the cast that keeps them coming back each season,” MTV programming vice president Chris Linn said. “Europe is a fresh spin on a show that continues to reach new heights for us.” The fourth season is set to premiere later this year.

O’Reilly marks no-name’s exit

NEW YORK (AP) — Bill O’Reilly marked the departure of rival Keith Olbermann from MSNBC, but wouldn’t say his name. The host of “The O’Reilly Factor” on Fox News Channel, a frequent target of Olbermann’s barbs, noted on Monday’s broadcast that a “hateful commentator” has been replaced by MSNBC. Olbermann and MSNBC abruptly announced on Friday that he would be leaving “Countdown,” the network’s most-watched show and the template for which MSNBC remade itself as a network with LOS ANGELES (AP) — “Jerliberal hosts in prime time. No sey Shore” is headed to the reason was given for the exit. Motherland. O’Reilly said that Fox News The popular MTV reality TV was ranked well above MSNBC series starring a group of hardin the rating, and that 12 of its partying Italian-Americans will shows had a bigger audience on film its fourth season in Italy, the average than anything on network said Tuesday. MSNBC. Fox News was the “While the stateside ‘Jersey fourth most popular cable netShore’ locales have become work last year, he said. iconic for our audience, it’s realFox did not immediately ly the constantly evolving respond to a request for an

‘Jersey Shore’ headed to Italy

interview with O’Reilly. Olbermann had frequently targeted O’Reilly in his “Worst Persons in the World” segment. O’Reilly had fought back, so much so that there were published reports that corporate leaders of the networks were involved at one point in trying to cool tensions. Meanwhile, Olbermann tweeted followers Monday night to thank them for their support. “The reports of the death of my career are greatly exaggerated,” he wrote.

Fred Thompson turns to lobbying NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Former Republican presidential candidate Fred Thompson is registering as a lobbyist for a Tennessee trial lawyers group. The Tennessee Association for Justice announced Tuesday that the former U.S. senator would be joining its legislative team. Thompson was elected to the U.S. Senate in 1993, Thompson: and ran unsucLobbyist cessfully for president in 2008. He was best known for his role as the gruff district attorney on NBC’s “Law & Order” before leaving the show in 2007.

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Bush admin. broke law in 2006 races WASHINGTON (AP) — In the run-up to the 2006 midterm election in which Republicans lost control of the House, the Bush administration repeatedly broke the law by using federal funds to send Cabinet secretaries and other high-level political appointees to congressional districts of GOP candidates in tight races, according to a government report. “Because those trips were classified as official, funds from the U.S. Treasury were used to finance the trips and reimbursement from the relevant campaigns was never sought,” stated the report by the Office of Special Counsel, an independent federal agency that enforces Hatch Act restrictions on partisan political activity inside the federal government. “In other cases, even when trips were correctly designated as political, agencies used U.S. Treasury funds to cover the costs associated with the trips and did not recoup those funds as required by the Hatch Act and its regulations,” the office concluded.

Wednesday, January 26, 2011 ■ Page 5A

Putin vows revenge for airport bombing By LYNN BERRY Associated Press MOSCOW — Prime Minister Vladimir Putin vowed revenge Tuesday for the suicide bombing that killed 35 people at a Moscow airport — a familiar tough-onterrorism stance that has underpinned his power but also led to a rising number of deadly attacks in Russia. Lax security was blamed for Monday’s explosion in the international arrivals area of Domodedovo Airport that also injured 180 people, with President Dmitry Medvedev criticizing police and managers at the airport, the largest of three that serve the capital. NTV television showed a photograph of what it said was the detached head of the suspected bomber.

Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin, second from right, speaks to hospital director Valery Kubyshkin, left, Moscow Mayor Sergei Sobyanin, second from left, and Health Minister Tatyana Golikova as he visits the Vishnevsky hospital where some of the victims of Monday’s bombing at Domodedovo Airport are being treated on Tuesday. (Associated Press) Investigators have said that DNA testing will be necessary before the man can be identified. A two-second video of the blast itself, broadcast on state television and said to be from a closed-circuit TV camera, showed a burst of

flames and passengers falling and fleeing as smoke filled the hall. No one has claimed responsibility for the attack, but suspicion has fallen on Islamist separatists from Chechnya or elsewhere in the Caucasus region who

have been battling Russian authority for over 15 years. Chechen insurgents have claimed responsibility for an array of attacks, including a double suicide bombing on Moscow’s subway system last year that killed 40 people. They also have used

Domodedovo Airpor t before, with two suicide bombers slipping through its security in 2004 to kill 90 people aboard flights that took off from there. Putin rose to power in 2000 on a vow that Chechen rebels would be hunted down and killed “in the outhouse.” But despite a second devastating war that brought Chechnya back under Moscow’s control and sanctioning the violent rule of his chosen Chechen leader, Putin has been unable to wipe out the Islamic insurgency that has spread across much of the Caucasus. A brutal crackdown on the insurgency has produced a backlash that has led to almost daily attacks on police and security forces in the Caucasus and brought the terror to Moscow.

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Tunisia govt. mulls Cabinet changes TUNIS, Tunisia (AP) — Tunisia’s new interim government worked Tuesday to replace ministers who quit and weighed possible deeper changes to the Cabinet as protesters continued to complain that the old guard still holds too much power. Demonstrators are angry that members of former President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali’s regime have clung to leading posts in the interim government in place since last week. Ben Ali fled the country Jan. 14 after 23 years in power, pushed out by weeks of deadly protests driven by anger over joblessness, corruption and repression in the North African nation. Anti-government protesters have demonstrated every day since Ben Ali’s ouster. For the first time Tuesday, hundreds marched in the capital in support of the c a re t a k e r g ov e r n m e n t , which is trying to stabilize the country after five weeks of unrest.

Detainee gets life sentence for plot

STATE DEATHS CAVALIER — Helen Vistad, 85; Leonard Winkler, 67. GRAND FORKS — Constance Kachena, 54; Lois Larson, 78. MINOT — Marilyn Carlson, 64; Doris Hanson, 88; Sharon McGowan, 70. PALERMO — Raymond Woessner, 76. PARK RIVER — Charles Wilkes, 81. R O L E T T E — Ro n a l d Anderson, 65. ST. JOHN — Alice Hiatt, 76. STANLEY — Clayton Arneson, 77. VELVA — Lois Bley, 86. (More deaths and funeral today on 7A.)

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NEW YORK (AP) — The first, and possibly the last, Guantanamo detainee to have a U.S. civilian trial was sentenced to life in prison Tuesday for his role in the 1998 U.S. embassy bombings in Africa, a case that nearly unraveled when the defendant was convicted on just one of more than 280 counts. Ahmed Ghailani, who served as Osama bin Laden’s cook and bodyguard after the bombings in Tanzania and Kenya, sought leniency, claiming he was tortured at a secret CIA detention site after his arrest in Pakistan seven years ago. But U.S. District Judge Lewis A. Kaplan imposed the maximum sentence, saying that whatever Ghailani suffered “pales in comparison to the suffering and the horror” caused by the nearly simultaneous attacks, which killed 224 people and injured thousands more.

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Page 6A ■ Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Bismarck Tribune ■ Bismarcktribune.com

Tuition talk Continued from 1A lobbyist, said the measure was not specific about how the Board of Higher Education would split up the tuition aid among North Dakota’s 11 public colleges. “It leaves a lot of uncertainty in the whole process,” Vallie said. Using the $19 million for academic building improvements and maintenance, or for hiring new faculty, “would help to ensure greater gains for the institution and for students overall, both in the short term and the long term,” he said. The committee did not act on the legislation Tuesday. It is sponsored by two Grand Forks Democrats whose district includes UND — Sen. Mac Schneider, who is the Senate’s assistant Democratic leader, and Rep. Corey Mock, who ran unsuccessfully for secretary of state last year. The Project on Student Debt, based in Oakland, Calif., ranked North Dakota 27th in student debt in 2009. The organization estimated that North Dakota’s 2009 college graduates carried an average debt of $22,030, and said 71 percent of graduates had some debt. Mock said the two-year tuition freeze would help relieve the debt load and provide some hope. “North Dakota is below average on starting salaries in most industries,” Mock said. “We truly are pricing many college (students) out of an education, and really putting them at a disadvantage when they enter the work force.” Gov. Jack Dalrymple, in his budget recommendations to the Legislature, said he included enough aid to North Dakota’s university system to keep tuition charges at the state’s five twoyear schools level for the next two

FROM 1A

Associated Press

North Dakota state Reps. Mark Sanford, R-Grand Forks, left, John Wall, R-Wahpeton, center, and Corey Mock, D-Grand Forks, listen to testimony during a North Dakota House Education Committee hearing on Tuesday. years. His proposed college aid budget was large enough to limit tuition increases at the state’s six four-year schools to 2.5 percent annually, Dalrymple said. The legislation introduced by Mock and Schneider would extend the tuition freeze to four-year schools. Tuition charges have remained even at North Dakota’s two-year schools for the last two years, while they have risen 3.5 percent annually at the state’s four-year public universities.

Tuition expenses in North Dakota’s university system have risen steeply in the last decade. At North Dakota State University, for example, the current bill for tuition and mandatory fees is $5,639 annually, compared to $2,604 during the 200001 school year. At Bismarck State College, the largest of North Dakota’s two-year schools, tuition has risen from $1,649 during the 2000-01 school year to $3,364 now.

Committee hearing against legislation, sponsored by Rep. Vicky Steiner, R-Dickinson, that would let older North Dakotans enroll in undergraduate college courses without paying tuition or fees if their chosen class had available slots. Steiner said the proposal would not include online classes, and would not require the hiring of additional instructors. Older students would not have to meet any class admission requirements. Other states offer college classes for older students gratis or at reduced rates, Steiner said. “If we can encourage them in lifelong learning, and if we have the availability within our university system, some of these people have paid into that university system all their lives,” Steiner said. “I would love to see them be able to participate with that incredible experience that the universities offer.” The committee did not take action on the bill Tuesday. The panel will make a recommendation later on whether it should be approved or defeated. North Dakota’s Board of Higher Education already has a policy that allows administrators at its 11 colleges to permit state residents who are at least 65 years old to sit in on classes and waive audit fees, Goetz said. A student who audits a course does not earn academic credit. North Dakota’s university system already enrolls about 400 students aged 55 to 64, who take about 2,200 credit hours each semester and pay about $1.8 million in tuition and fees, Goetz said. Two House Education Committee members, Rep. Joe Heilman, R-Fargo, a recent graduate of North Dakota State University, and Rep. Corey Mock, D-Grand Forks, a University of North Dakota alumnus, wondered whether an older student would block someone else from getting into a needed class if the younger student was late in enrolling, or needed to reshuffle his or her schedule. Some university programs, such as engineering, charge significant fees to students that older students would not have to pay under Steiner’s bill, Mock said. An older North Dakotan could conceivably use the law to earn a private pilot’s license at little cost by attending UND’s Center for Aerospace Sciences, Mock said. “That person ... could get a $60,000 to $100,000 degree without having to pay,” Mock said. Steiner said if a program had an open spot, an older student should be allowed to occupy it. “If there were empty chairs, and that professor was paid, the lights were paid, and the university basically is paying for that chair, I really don’t know any reason to deny somebody that access,” she said.

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Standoff suspect South Central District Judge Gail Hagerty set bond for Lovgren on Tuesday at $100,000. If he is released on bond, he will be prohibited from using or possessing alcohol and must participate in the 24/7 Sobriety Program. The terrorizing charge carries a mandatory minimum sentence upon conviction of two years in prison due to allegations he used a gun. Authorities have said Lovgren, who was believed to be intoxicated, called 911 at 7:55 p.m. Jan. 4 and said he was holding people at gunpoint and wanted police to come. At 7:59 p.m., the first of three patrol officers from the Bismarck Police Department arrived at the home in the mobile home park at 1119 University Drive No. 312.

Lovgren came outside carrying what appeared to be a rifle and confronted officers before retreating to the house. The officers began negotiating with him. The West Dakota SWAT team was activated at 8:43 p.m., and negotiations continued for approximately four hours. One person inside the home was allowed to leave during the negotiations. Police have not released whether there were other people in the home nor whether they were held against their will. Lovgren would not come to the door, but had told those he was in contact with during negotiations that he wanted to shoot officers, police said. He later indicated he did not want to harm anyone inside the mobile home. At approximately

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enforcement work at the department. The Bureau of Criminal Investigation is investigating the shooting, and the agency’s report will go to the Burleigh County State’s Attorney’s office to determine whether the officers acted appropriately in shooting Lovgren. Buschena said the police department believes the officers were justified. Court documents say Lovgren has multiple convictions for felony offenses, including theft of a motor vehicle, theft of property and escape. He made a court appearance on a bench warrant in the escape case on Jan. 3, court docu-

Continued from 1A ments say. Burleigh County Detention Center records show Lovgren was arrested on Jan. 1 for failing to comply with sentencing on the escape charge and was released by court order on Jan. 3. Burleigh County Assistant State’s Attorney Pam Nesvig said in court on Tuesday that Lovgren has a criminal history in multiple states that includes offenses with firearms. She said he has made suicidal comments since the early January incident. (Reach reporter Jenny Michael at 250-8225 or jenny.michael@bismarcktribune.com.)

Continued from 1A came to Bismarck from Atlanta, where he was president and executive director of Synergy at Saint Joseph’s Inc., an organization that managed care and resource issues for a hospital and a physician’s group. He made about $485,000, according to a 2008 IRS Form 990, which must be filed by nonprofit organizations. It is the most recent information available, said Julie Jeske, St. Alexius marketing director. The board of directors met Monday. The board meets the fourth Monday of the month. (Reach reporter Sara Kincaid at 250-8251 or sara.kincaid@bismarcktribune.com.)

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Bismarcktribune.com ■ Bismarck Tribune

Wednesday, January 26, 2011 ■ Page 7A

DEATHS Otillia Schumacher LINTON — Otillia “Tillie” Schumacher, 86, formerly of Linton, died Jan. 24, 2011, in the Strasburg Care Center. Services will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, Jan. 28, at St. Anthony’s Catholic Church, Linton. Burial will be in the spring in the church cemetery. She is survived by two daughters, Peggy Bosch, Linton, and Carla Johanson, Fargo; five grandchildren; five great-grandchildren; three stepsons, Herman, Harry and Russ Schumacher; four stepdaughters, Rosie Schumacher, Brenda Olsen, Geri Weiss and Ardy Biel; two brothers, Bill Deichert and Ray Deichert, both of Billings, Mont.; and two sisters, Eva Wall, Tappen, and Fran Weixel, Bismarck. (Myers Funeral Home, Linton)

Steven Kessel BELFIELD — Steven M. Kessel, 71, Belfield, died Jan. 22, 2011, at St. Alexius Medical Center, Bismarck. Services will be held at 10 a.m. MST Friday, Jan. 28, at St. Bernard’s Catholic Church, Belfield. He is survived by his wife, Elaine; three children, Craig, Federal Way, Wash., Stacie Fremont, Maple Valley, Wash., and Kristina, Seattle; six grandchildren; and seven siblings, Paul, Pat, Dave, Albert, Ann Staley, Betty Foy and Leo. (Ladbury Funeral Service, Dickinson)

Robert Schuld RICHARDTON — Robert “Bob” Schuld, 64, Richardton, died Jan. 25, 2011, at his home south of Richardton. Services will be held at 10 a.m. MST Saturday, Jan. 29, at St. Stephen’s Catholic Church, south of Richardton. Further arrangements are pending with Ladbury Funeral Service, Dickinson.

Edna Donner

Paul Bergquist

Florence Vinquist

Leo Fleck

Ella Schroeder

Lorraine Meadows

TURTLE LAKE — Paul Bergquist, 67, Turtle Lake, formerly of rural Washburn, died Jan. 24, 2011, at his residence. A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 27, at First Lutheran Church, Washburn, with the Rev. Betty Stedman (of Trinity Lutheran Church in Turtle Lake) officiating. Inurnment will be held at a later date at Riverview Cemetery, Washburn.

Florence Elnore Vinquist, 84, Bismarck, formerly of Beach, passed away on Jan. 24, 2011, at the Baptist Home, Bismarck. Services will be held at 11 a.m. MST Friday, Jan. 28, at First Lutheran Church, Beach, with the Rev. J.T. Burk officiating. Interment will be at Beach Lutheran Cemetery.

Leo Fleck, 82, died Jan. 24, 2011, at home. Mass of Christian burial will be held at 11:30 a.m. Thursday, Jan. 27, at Church of Saint Anne, Bismarck, with the Rev. Edwin Wehner officiating. Burial will be at St. Mary’s Cemetery following the Mass.

HEBRON — Ella Schroeder, 90, Hebron, passed away on Jan. 20, 2011, at Missouri Slope Lutheran Care Center, Bismarck. Services will be held at 11 a.m. CST Saturday, Jan. 29, at St. John’s Church, Hebron. Burial will be held at St. John’s Cemetery later this spring.

Lorraine Meadows, 86, Bismarck, formerly of Medina, passed away on Jan. 23, 2011, at the Baptist Home, Bismarck. Services will be held at 2 p.m. Friday, Jan. 28, at English Lutheran Church, Medina, with the Rev. Zach Bey officiating. Spring burial will be held at Medina Cemetery.

Florence Vinquist

Paul Gene Bergquist was born Sept. 4, 1943, in Turtle Lake, to Ernest and Florence (Backman) Bergquist. He was raised on the family farm northeast of Washburn and attended rural school. Paul graduated from Washburn High School in 1961 and attended one fall quarter at North Dakota State University in Fargo. Due to the untimely death of his father, Paul returned to the family homestead to help farm and ranch. He married Claudette Carr on Jan. 30, 1965; from this union two children were born, Karen and Warren. Paul continued to live and work on the family farm until his health declined. He enjoyed playing cards and attending auction sales. He is survived by one daughter, Karen (Richard) Hanson, Turtle Lake; one s o n , Wa r r e n ( D a w n ) Bergquist, Washburn; five grandchildren, Rachel, Joshua, Jacob, Brenden and Ashley; his mother, Florence Hanson, McClusky; two brothers, Richard (Patricia) Bergquist, El Paso, Ill., and William (Lois) Bergquist, Golden Valley, Minn.; and one sister, Claudia (Lloyd) Thompson, Grafton. Paul was preceded in death by his father, Ernest. Provide condolences and sign the guest book at www.goetzfuneralhomes. com. (Goetz Funeral Home, Washburn)

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FUNERALS TODAY

DICKINSON — Jerr y Page, 77, Dickinson, died Madelyn Brown, 101, FesJan. 25, 2011, at St. Benedict’s Health Center, Dickinson. senden, 2 p.m., Nelson Arrangements are pending Funeral Home, Fessenden. Rita Feist, 83, Strasburg, with Stevenson Funeral 10:30 a.m., Sts. Peter and Home, Dickinson. Paul Catholic Church, Strasburg. (Myers Funeral Home, Linton) LeRoy M. Teske, 75, BisHelen Fried, 95, Bismarck, died Jan. 24, 2011, at marck, 3 p.m., Parkway St. Alexius Medical Center, Funeral Service, Bismarck. Bismarck. Arrangements are Thomas Kopp, 87, Manpending with Perry Funeral dan, 10:30 a.m., Bismarck Home, Mandan. Funeral Home. Clifford Morlock, 80, Pettibone, 11 a.m., Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, Pettibone. (Eddy Funeral Home, Jamestown) Kenneth Mosbrucker, 76, Mandan, 10:30 a.m., St. Joseph Catholic Church, Mandan. (Buehler-Larson Funeral Home, Mandan) Gary Russell, 63, Williston, 2 p.m., Faith United Methodist Church, Williston. (Fulkerson Funeral Home, Williston)

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John Duma John Duma, 101, Bismarck, died Jan. 25, 2011, at Missouri Slope Lutheran Care Center, Bismarck. Mass of Christian burial will be held at 10 a.m. Friday, Jan. 28, at Church of Corpus Christi, Bismarck. Visitation will begin at 5 p.m. Thursday at Eastgate Funeral Service, Bismarck, where a rosary will begin at 7 p.m. Visitation will continue one hour prior to the service at the church. Further arrangements are pending.

Charles Volesky DICKINSON — Charles J. Volesky, 86, Dickinson, died Jan. 25, 2011, at St. Joseph’s Hospital and Health Center, Dickinson. Services will be held at 10 a.m. MST Saturday, Jan. 29, at St. Patrick’s Catholic Church, Dickinson. Further arrangements are pending with Stevenson Funeral Home, Dickinson.

Visitation will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. today at Bismarck Funeral Home, where a vigil/rosary will be held at 7 p.m. Leo was born Dec. 8, 1928, in Timmer, the son of Joseph and Rose (Ressler) Fleck. He married Cecilia Wilhelm on Oct. 26, 1955, at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Bismarck. Leo worked at Midwest Motor Express as a mechanic and welder. He farmed and also helped build Garrison Dam. He also worked as a welder for Kirschmann Manufacturing. Leo was a lifetime member of the Fraternal Order of Eagles No. 2237 and the Knights of Columbus. He was also a member of St. Anthony Verein and UCT. He was an avid fisherman and was especially proud when he received his whopper patch. He loved spending and sharing time with his wife in the garden and yard. He also enjoyed spending time with his daughters and grandchildren and was proud of all their accomplishments. Some of his other pastimes were playing cards, bowling and listening to old-time polka music. He is survived by his wife of 55 years, Cecilia; his daughters, Susan (Rick) Evans, Bucklin, Kan., Della (Rod) Mastel, Bismarck, and Ruth Hart, Bismarck; his grandchildren, Kesley and Katlyn Mastel and Mindy, Jesse and Alicia Hart; his brothers, Adam (Darlene) Fleck, Mandan, and Joe (Janice) Fleck, Mesa, Ariz.; and his sister, Dorothy (Frank) Glasser. He was preceded in death by his parents; his stepmother, Eva; three infant sisters, Ann, Veronica and Amelia Fleck; three brothers, John, Frank and Emmanuel Fleck; one sister, Tillie Schmidt; one infant half-brother, William; and one stepbrother, John Vogel. In lieu of flowers, memorials can be given to the American Cancer Society. Those wishing to sign the online register book or leave a message of condolence please go to www.bismarckfuneralhome.com.

Visitation will be held from 3 to 7 p.m. CST Friday at Spangelo-Stevenson Funeral Home, Hebron, with a prayer service beginning at 7 p.m. CST. Ella was born Dec. 24, 1920, to Henry and Bertha (Trautman) Staiger on their family farm south of Hebron. She grew up on the farm and attended country school. In her young adulthood, she graduated from Christie’s Beauty College in Bismarck as a hairdresser. After graduation, she moved to Williston to work as a beautician. From Williston, she moved to Hebron, where she owned and operated Charm Beauty Shop. On Jan. 18, 1948, she married Walter Schroeder at St. John Church in Hebron. Following their marriage, Ella and Walter farmed south of Hebron for the next 51 years. Ella was a member of St. John Church, where she was involved in St. John’s Sunday school for 30 years and was a m e m b e r o f S t . J o h n’s Women’s Guild. She was also involved with the Hebron Family 4-H Club for many years. Ella and Walter retired from farming in 1999. When Walter died in 2002, Ella continued living on the farm until December 2009, when she entered Missouri Slop Lutheran Care Center in Bismarck. Ella enjoyed her family, gardening, canning, baking and visiting with friends. Ella is survived by one daughter and son-in-law, Joanne and Dean Anderson, Chandler, Ariz.; two sons, Allen Schroeder, Fargo, and Larry Schroeder, Fargo; four grandchildren, Paul Anderson, Chandler, Ariz., Tom Anderson, Oklahoma City, Okla., Ashley (Craig) Huot, Fargo, and Abbey Schroeder, Honolulu; one great-granddaughter, Quinn Huot; one sister, Alma (Ervin) Specht, Bismarck; and one sister-inlaw, Violet Staiger, Hebron. She was preceded in death by her husband, Walter; her parents; a sister, Irene Maas; a brother, Arnold Staiger; and two infant brothers and one infant sister. Remembrances and condolences may be shared with the family at www.stevenEmma (Sittner) Nelson, sonfuneralhome.com. 97, Mobridge, S.D., formerly of Lemmon, S.D., died Jan. 24, 2011, at Mobridge STRASBURG — Bertha Regional Hospital, following Scherr, 84, Strasburg, died a heart attack on Sunday. Jan. 24, 2011, in the StrasServices will be held at 2 p.m. burg Care Center. Services MST Saturday, Jan. 29, at will be held at 2:30 p.m. New Hope Worship Center, Thursday, Jan. 27, at St. Peter Lemmon. Burial will be in and Paul Catholic Church, Greenhill Cemetery. Strasburg. Burial will be in Survivors include two the church cemetery. sons, Jim, Timber Lake, S.D., She is survived by one and Wilfred, Big Lake, Minn. son, Ronnie, Milwaukee; (Evanson-Jensen Funeral three daughters, Linda Home, Lemmon) Scherr-Clawson, Billings, Mont., and Bonnie Mandarich and Mary Jane Scherr, Mildred Espeland, 94, both of Denver; three granddied Jan. 22, 2011, at Sheri- children; two great-granddan Memor ial Nursing children; one brother, Henry Home. Services will be held Volk, Portland, Ore.; and at 9 a.m. MST Thursday, three sisters, Ann Burgad, Jan. 27, at St. Joseph Church, B i s m a rc k , He l e n Jo h s , Plentywood, Mont. Further Springfield, Ore., and Esther arrangements are pending Loeb, Redding, Calif. (Myers with Fulkerson Funeral Funeral Home, Linton)

Emma Nelson

Bertha Scherr

Mildred Espeland

Home, Plentywood.

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Florence Elnore Stedman was born March 22, 1926, in Beach, to Norman and Georgia (Adams) Stedman. Florence was raised in Beach and received her education in the Beach Public Schools, graduating with the class of 1944. On Feb. 5, 1946, she was united in marriage to Howard Vinquist in Billings, Mont. After their marriage, they lived on a farm 25 miles north of Beach until 1965, when they moved into Beach. She resided there until May 2000, when she moved to Mandan to be near her daughter. In November 2004, she moved into Edgewood Vista Assisted Living Place in Bismarck. She eventually moved into the Baptist Home in Bismarck, where she lived until the time of her death. Florence was a member of First Lutheran Church of Beach and the Church Circle, as well as the Homemake r s C l u b. Sh e e n j oy e d embroidering, sewing, gardening and her house plants. Florence loved being around her family and dogs. She was a very happy person. Florence was preceded in death by her husband, Howard Vinquist; as well as f i v e b r o t h e r s , Ve r n o n , Edmond, Dale, Charles and Gerald Stedman. She is survived by her daughter, LaVonne (Donald) Haider, Mandan; her son, Darrel Vinquist, Independence, Mo.; two grandchildren, Curtis Haider and Mindy (Trent) Guthmiller; two great-granddaughters, Jordan and Taylor Guthmiller; three brothers, Larry Stedman and David Stedman, both of Wibaux, Mont., and Sidney Stedman, Glendive, Mont.; two sisters, Dora Luella Wilson, Dickinson, and Rosalie Twardoski, Beach; as well as numerous nieces and nephews. Remembrances and condolences may be shared with the family at www.silvernalesilhafuneralhome.com. (Silvernale-Silha Funeral Home, Beach)

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Lorraine Meadows

Paul Bergquist

WISHEK — Edna Donner, 89, Wishek, died Jan. 24, 2011, at St. Alexius Medical Center, Bismarck. Services will be held at 11 a.m. Friday, Jan. 28, at St. Luke Lutheran Church, Wishek. Further arrangements are pending Edwin E. Telin, 79, Biswith Dahlstrom Funeral marck, passed away on Home, Wishek. Jan. 23, 2011, in a Bismarck care center. Services will be held at 1:30 p.m. Monday, SHEYENNE — Berniece Jan. 31, at Bismarck Funeral E. Jordre, 97, Sheyenne, died Home. Burial will be held at Jan. 24, 2011, in Carrington Sunset Memorial Gardens. Visitation will be held Health Center. Services will be held at 2 p.m. Friday, from 5 to 7 p.m. Sunday at Jan. 28, at Grandfield Luther- Bismarck Funeral Home and an Church, rural Sheyenne. will continue one hour prior Further arrangements are to the ser vice. Further pending with Evans Funeral arrangements are pending. Home, New Rockford.

Jerry Page

Leo Fleck

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Visitation will be held from 2 to 6 p.m. Thursday at Eddy Funeral Home, Jamestown. Lorraine Falk was born July 20, 1924, in Tappen, to Carl and Mary (Briese) Falk. She attended Valley Township country grade school and graduated from Tappen High School. She attended Capital Commercial College in Bismarck. While attending school in Bismarck, she worked at a variety of jobs, including the Vital Statistics Department at the Capitol building. Lorraine married Clifton “Tip” Meadows of Medina on July 10, 1942. Lorraine traveled with Tip after he was inducted into the Army. They lived in many states, until Tip went overseas to the European theater of war in 1944. They moved to Seattle in 1951, but returned to Medina in July 1952. Lorraine and Tip had three children, Dayle, Laren and Rod. Lorraine held a number of jobs through the years, including secretary for the county extension office in Steele, making airplane bearings for the war effort in Minneapolis at the Scott Atwater Co., working at the Bon Ton department store in Seattle as a clerk and serving as Medina school treasurer for many years. She worked for Medina Implement as a bookkeeper. In 1971, she went to work at the Bank of Steele, Medina Exchange and worked there until she retired in December 1986. Lorraine was also active in her church and community. At English Lutheran Church, Lorraine served on the council, was active in the education department and served on the building committee when the fellowship hall was built in 1995. She was also a member of the organizing board of the Medina Community Medical in 1959 and served as secretary. Lorraine designed the logo for the Medina Diamond Jubilee in 1974. Lorraine was also a lifelong member of the America Legion Auxiliary. Lorraine was a talented artist who painted many oil, as well as acrylic, paintings. She painted many canvases on commission, but her family was also the recipient of many wonderful paintings. Lorraine loved to travel. She and Tip went on many, many trips together, enjoying the numerous states they visited. One of her favorite trips was to Greece with her son and his wife. Lorraine and Tip spent many happy hours renovating and restoring the house they lived in for 40 years. Lorraine is survived by those grateful to have shared her life, including her children, Dayle (Roger) Ketterling, Mercer, Laren (Linda) Meadows, Dickinson, and Ro d (Ka th y) Mea dows, Ocean Isle Beach, N.C.; seven grandchildren; 19 great-grandchildren; one brother, Alfred Falk, Tappen; two sisters, Marcella Strander, Billings, Mont., and Vallis (Art) Garceau, Glynden, Minn.; and many nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her parents; her husband; one sister, Delores; and one brother, Richard. The family suggests memorials to English Lutheran Church, Medina. Online guest book: www.eddyfuneralhome.com. (State deaths on 5A.)


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 2011

8A

“Seeking to find and publish the truth, that the people of a great state might have a light by which to guide their destiny.” — Stella Mann, Tribune publisher, 1939

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TRIBUNE EDITORIAL

EDITORIAL BOARD Brian Kroshus . . . . . . . Publisher Ken Rogers . . . . . Opinion editor Libby Simes . . . . . . . . Controller John Irby. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Editor Steve Wallick . . . . . . . City editor

ONLINE DISCUSSION Wit, comments and rants from our online readers.

“It just slays me that the school board is so worried about a cap. We as citizens of Bismarck need to start looking at the district spending. They had an unlimited check book and the state needs to put a cap on this increase of property taxes ... Freeze property valuations and limit the property tax increase ... I only make so much money and must budget now to pay the taxes and my house payment. My salary does not go up based on my wants and needs ( I wish it did). Another thing the district needs to assess is the outragous salaries that our numerous administrators are making. Sure, they work 12 months, but do they work with students like teachers do?” — property tax broke, on “Bismarck School Board discusses legislation,” posted Jan. 25

“Good work PD. I am glad to see they were caught, and some way there has to be restitution to the victims ... Maybe the damage wasn’t all that great, but it is an added expense, plus major inconvenience, when your tires are cut. Flogging — I guess, but even better would be to have these kids watch something of theirs be hit or broken or slashed right before their eyes. Then they would feel what others feel when they destroy others property.” — mdngal, on “Mandan boys cited for criminal mischief,” posted Jan. 24

LETTERS & CONTACT INFO The Tribune welcomes letters to the editor. Writers must include their address and both day and night telephone numbers. This information will be used only for verification and will not be printed. We cannot verify letters via tollfree numbers. Letters of 300 words or fewer are preferred. All letters are subject to editing. No more than two letters per month, please. Letters of thanks are discouraged.

E-mail may be sent to letters@ bismarck tribune.com. Mail letters to the Bismarck Tribune, Letters to the Editor, P.O. Box 5516, Bismarck, N.D. 58506. Ken Rogers, opinion editor, can be reached by phone at 250-8250 or by e-mail at ken.rogers@ bismarck tribune.com.

Access to 911 recordings needed The reason for public access to recordings of 911 calls isn’t to exploit the terror of callers who are witnesses to accidents, crimes or other emergency situations. It isn’t so someone can invade the personal lives of others and get their jollies off that person’s crisis. It isn’t for some perverse or sensational entertainment. Rather, the public has a right, a powerful need, to know what happens in a democratic society. There are always responsibilities and consequences associated with the rights codified in the U.S. Constitution. It’s not always convenient to be democratic. We all know there are abuses and people who expoit those freedoms. But do we give up those freedoms? The 911 calls to emergency

agencies are an important part of community. They are not just about callers or the victims. They are also about 911 operators and the following responses by police, firefighters and other emergency personnel. They are a part of the narrative of a story within the community, and given the nature of 911 calls, often an important story. They are about accountability. The trend has become to put more and more of what government does behind a wall of secrecy. For who knows better what’s good for you than government? We’re talking economic develop-

ment conversations, public health issues, law enforcement efforts and, now, 911 calls. The wall of secrecy separating people from government and its actions grows higher and wider with each legislative session. Lawmakers tuck more and more of what they and government officials do behind closed doors and into locked files. Already, public access information shielded by other laws is edited before 911 calls are released. And now the Legislature wants to restrict access unless the caller gives permission for release. Government has no business

Citizens left in the dark by proposed recording restrictions

deciding what the public should or should not hear about its own community. The Legislature should back off this effort to further erode what was at one time a model “open meetings, open records” law — one that has been, session by session, tarnished by those who believe they know better than the state’s citizens. People have a right to their privacy. We are, after all, a nation predicated on individual freedom. And one part of that freedom is from the overreaching of government. That’s the rub here, between individual freedom and the hand of government — we side with individual freedom and, thereby, the public right to know. We side with public responsibility.

VOICES OF THE PEOPLE Citizens are the Legislature By SEN. RAY HOLMBERG Grand Forks Recently, several editorials criticized the state Legislature for introducing what they consider needless or inappropriate bills. One such bill deals with a proposed ban of alcohol at college sporting events. Others concern themselves with the perpetual University of North Dakota Fighting Sioux nickname debate. Tribune readers need to remember that North Dakota has a long and proud tradition of citizen input into the legislative process. As a citizen Legislature, we have always believed that any idea, whether profound or ridiculous, gets its day in court, and what is profound to one legislator or citizen may be absolute nonsense to another, and vice versa. One way to address this situation would be to allow someone to be a gatekeeper and not allow the mundane and trivial bills to be introduced. In North Dakota, however, the Legislature decided a long time ago that kind of decision is best left to the body and not a specific individual. Though some may criti-

cize over how absurd some types of legislation can be, a number of them might be viewed as very important to some North Dakotans. Take, for instance, the so-called “Ladybug Bill” (HB1219), which was proposed by an active group of second-grade students from Kenmare who would like to see the ladybug become the state insect. Some critics view this as a monumental waste of legislators’ time and energy. I view this as an opportunity for a group of young people to experience their government firsthand.

Lloyd Omdahl references a bill introduced in the last session that would have mandated a UND/NDSU football game. At the end of the day, that bill died in the House, where it got three votes. The point is, the opportunity for these seemingly “pointless” bills to be heard exists. I, for one, believe in a system of government that allows for the most participation from its citizens. (Ray Holmberg, R-Grand Forks, is chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee.)

Repeal health care reform By CHRISTOPHER ALBERTSON St. John An open letter to Sen. Kent Conrad: First of all, I would like to thank you for your years of service to the United States and to the state of North Dakota. With that being said, it is time for you to remedy the egregious error you made with your vote on the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. Sen. Conrad, if you are the “num-

bers guy” and the “deficit hawk” you claim to be, you must know that this law is an economic train wreck. You must know that you cannot spend tax dollars you won’t receive (the plan includes the spending of tax revenue generated by taxing unions’ Cadillac health plans; the problem is this tax does not exist) and Medicare savings that will not materialize to make your bill deficit neutral. This law spends that money twice. The other economic problems in this law are too numerous to list in this letter, and they far outweigh the good that will be done. — not to mention this law will only increase the cost of health insurance for those of us already paying for it. I agree wholeheartedly that our health care system has some problems that need to be fixed. But the Patient Protection and Affordability Act is adding tremendously to the problems health care is already facing. Sen. Conrad, I am asking you to press for a vote and vote to repeal this law in the Senate. The best option we have is to repeal this law and replace it with a new common sense law that is truly deficit-neutral, will truly bring down the cost of health care, and does not tread on individual liberties.

Environmentalists: Hands off my dishes I began noticing the white coating, dull film and simply unclean dishes a few weeks ago. Naturally, I suspected that other members of my clan were failing to place dishes on the racks of the dishwasher properly. “If the water can’t reach it, it won’t get clean,” I lectured (not, ahem, for the first time), ostentatiously removing a small bowl that had been slipped under a larger one, no doubt by a person who clings to the discredited idea that dishwashers should be loaded to the gills. And those little separators in the utensil caddy — they are there for a reason, gentlemen. But the crisis persisted. And as the days passed, it became clear that the matter was beyond poor placement. Bits of spaghetti, stiff and stubborn, stuck like stalactites to bowls. The walls and doors of the machine emerged waxy and coated from each wash, in contrast to the gleaming surfaces of the past. Between the tines

MONA CHAREN

of forks, ugly bits of hardened remains resembled something you’d see on “NCIS” — if not quite repellent, then certainly unwelcome from what should have been a disinfected, pristine dishwasher. I switched brands of dishwashing liquid. No change. Topped off the rinse aid reservoir. No change. I’d be lying if I didn’t admit that the thought of buying a new machine flitted through my consciousness. Sparkling, squeaky-clean dishes are a necessary part of our quality of life. But our dishwasher is only 3 years old. And then I learned that I don’t have a personal problem. I have a political problem. Jonathan V. Last of The Weekly Standard explains

The ‘stealth attack’ on our dishes came with little public debate

that, all across the nation, innocent Americans are grappling with the identical scourge. Our dishwashers are fine. The reason our dishes are dirty is that the environmentalists have succeeded in banning phosphates from dishwashing soap. Until recently, dishwashing soap contained about 8 percent elemental phosphorus. That’s the magic element that “strips food and grease off dirty dishes and breaks down calciumbased stains.” It also prevents food from reattaching to the dishes. Or used to. As of July 2010, the nation’s detergent manufacturers, bowing to laws regulating phosphorus in 17 states, reconfigured the formula for all dishwashing soap to contain less than 0.5 percent phosphorus. It’s taken until now for most of us to notice as we used up the old soap and unwittingly made the switch. Environmentalists argue that phosphorus winds up in our lakes and streams, causing algae blooms, which in turn reduce the oxygen available for other life. They admit that the amount of phosphorus coming from dishwasher soap is small, but, according to Jani Gilbert, a

spokeswoman for the Department of Ecology in Washington State, “Anything we can do is good.” Well, hang on. According to a 2003 Minnesota study, only 1.9 percent of the phosphorus in that state came from dishwashing detergent. And even The New York Times acknowledges that fertilizer and manure are the big culprits, with dishwashing soap contributing only “a fraction” of phosphates in the water. Besides, removing phosphorus has other environmental consequences. People may run their dishwashers twice (guilty), causing more greenhouse gases to be created, or they may hand-wash their dishes using more hot water than machines do (there are studies that show that handwashers tend to run the hot water too long — really). This stealth attack on our dishes happened with little public debate. If there really is a serious problem with phosphates in our rivers and streams (and from my quick inquiries, it seems to vary considerably around the nation), then voters should be offered alternatives. We can reduce our use of lawn fertilizers, for example. I’d prefer a yel-

low lawn to grimy dishes if it came to that. But I need to be convinced. Remember those compact fluorescent light bulbs that were supposed to save billions of kilowatts of energy? California was an early adopter and is spending $548 million over seven years to subsidize the sale of the bulbs (the rest of us will see incandescent bulbs disappear from shelves by 2014). But now it seems the CFL bulbs don’t last 9.4 years — more like 6.3. They don’t work well when they’re cold. They’re very expensive. They cast a garish light. And if they break, you have to don a Hazmat suit to dispose of them. Meanwhile, LED lights are coming on fast, making the whole CFL thing seem as fresh as pet rocks. In other words, environmentalists may not know what they’re talking about. In any case, something as intimate and critical as the cleanliness of our dishes ought not to be decided through stealth or backroom deals. Arise! A cascade of complaints — to the companies and to governments — is our best hope. (Mona Charen’s syndicated column appears in the Tribune on Wednesdays.)


Bismarcktribune.com ■ Bismarck Tribune

Wednesday, January 26, 2011 ■ Page 9A

Analysis: GOP, Obama frame debate for 2012 By TOM RAUM Associated Press Writer WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama took a significant step toward retooling his presidency with a challenge to INSIGHT lawmakers to rise above partisan differences to tackle economic and budget problems “decades in the making.“ And while there remained stark differences in approach between the president and the Republicans with whom he now shares power, Obama made some striking concessions in the name of national unity — and asked others to do the same.

In a State of the Union address made somber by the recent Arizona shootings, Obama on Tuesday night coupled a call for budget restraint with a plea for more American innovation to allow the United States to better compete in the global economy. “The rules have changed” and the U.S. must not let itself be left behind by other fast-growing economies like China and India, Obama said. Obama and newly empowered Republicans each framed their rival political themes, ones that will carry them to the 2012 elections. With signs that the recovery is beginning to pick up steam, the occasion gave both parties a chance to look forward — not back to the

economic mess in the nation’s rearview mirror. “Now that the worst of the recession is over, we have to confront the fact that our government spends more than it takes in,” Obama told a House chamber filled with many new House and Senate faces, mostly Republican ones. Obama’s wish list included new government “investments” in education and infrastructure such as roads and bridges and more market-opening deals with other nations. And in a key concession, one sure to rile environmentalists, Obama called for spending on clean-energy technology — but for the first time included nuclear power, “clean” coal

and natural gas. “At stake is whether new jobs and industries take root in this country, or somewhere else,” Obama said. “To win the future, we’ll need to take on challenges that have been decades in the making.“ At the same time, Obama proposed deficit-cutting steps, including a five-year freeze in spending for some domestic programs. And he called for a reduction in the taxes corporations pay but “without raising the deficit.“ Republicans scoffed at Obama’s concept of “investments” and suggested the president was merely seeking to continue a longtime spending spree.

‘Move together’ cuts while Republicans next to them sat mute. In his best chance of the year to connect with the country, Obama devoted most of his hour-long primetime address to the economy, the issue that dominates concern in a nation still reeling from a monster recession — and the one that will shape his own political fortunes in the 2012 election. Eager to show some budget toughness, Obama pledged to veto any bill with earmarks, the term used for lawmakers’ pet projects. House Speaker John Boehner and other Republicans applauded. But Obama’s promise drew a rebuke from his own party even before he spoke, as Senate Majority

Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., said the president had enough power and that plans to ban earmarks were “a lot of pretty talk.” Obama’s proposals Tuesday night ranged across the scope of government: cutting the corporate tax, providing wireless services for almost the whole nation, consolidating government agencies and freezing most discretionary federal spending for the next five years. In the overarching theme of his speech, the president told the lawmakers: “The future is ours to win.” In essence, Obama reset his agenda as he heads toward a re-election bid with less clout and limited time before the campaign con-

sumes more attention. Obama entered the House c h a m b e r t o p ro l o n g e d applause, and to the unusual sight of Republicans and Democrats seated next to one another rather than on different sides of the center aisle. And he began with a political grace note, taking a moment to congratulate Boehner, the new Republican speaker of the House. Calling for a new day of cooperation, Obama said: “What comes of this moment will be determined not by whether we can sit together tonight but whether we can work together tomorrow.” On a night typically known for its political theater, the lawmakers some-

times seemed subdued, as if still in the shadow of the Arizona shootings. Many in both parties wore black-and-white lapel ribbons, signifying the deaths in Tucson and the hopes of the survivors. Giffords’ husband was watching the speech from her bedside, as he held her hand. At times, Obama delivered lighter comments, seeming to surprise his audience with the way he lampooned what he suggested was the government’s illogical regulation of salmon. Halfway through his term, Obama stepped into this moment on the upswing, with a series of recent legislative wins in his pocket and praise from all corners for the way he responded to the

Continued from 1A shooting rampage in Arizona. But he confronts the political reality is that he must to lead a divided government for the first time, with more than half of all Americans disapproving of the way he is handling the economy. Over his shoulder a reminder of the shift in power on Capitol Hill: Boehner, in the seat that had been held by Democratic Speaker Nancy Pelosi. Obama conceded that everything he asked for would prompt more partisan disputes. “It will take time,” he said. “And it will be harder because we will argue about everything. The cost. The details. The letter of every law.”

health: 69 percent said their pet was too sick to live on, 52 percent too sick to be cared for at home. But there are other reasons as well, including about one in 10 (9 percent) who, like Rosenthal, said their animal was too dangerous to keep. One-third (34 percent) of current pet owners said it

would be “extremely” or “very” difficult if they were forced to choose between a pet and a family member who became allergic. Another 20 percent would find the choice somewhat difficult and 46 percent said it would be “not too difficult” or “not difficult at all.” The AP-Petside.com Poll

FROM 1A

century will be considered our past century,” Ryan said in televised remarks. “The days of business as usual must come to an end. We hold to a couple of simple convictions: Endless borrowing is not a strategy; spending cuts have to come first,” Ryan added. Speaking from a budget panel hearing room that will be ground zero in the upcoming battle over cutting spending, Ryan echoed familiar GOP arguments. “We need to reclaim our American system of limited government, low taxes, reasonable regulations and sound money, which has blessed us with unprecedented prosperity,” Ryan said. “And it has done more to help the poor than any other economic system ever designed.” In an unusual move, tea party favorite Michele Bachmann, R-Minn., followed Ryan’s response with high profile speech of her own. It was originally aimed just at tea party activists but was also carried live by CNN. “After the $700 billion bailout, the trillion-dollar stimulus and the massive budget bill with over 9,000 earmarks, many of you implored Washington to please stop spending money we don’t have,” Bachmann said. “But, instead of cutting, we saw an unprecedented explosion of government spending and debt. It was unlike anything we have seen before.”

Your partner or your pet? does like the dog a lot. Women are far more likely than men to say the humanpet choice would be a tough one (40 percent among women compared with 26 percent among men). Both genders were equally likely to go with their spouse or significant other, according to the poll conducted by

GfK Roper Public Affairs and Corporate Communications. There was also no difference between dog and cat owners: 35 percent of each said the choice would be a hard one and more than eight in 10 would choose their spouse. Urban dwellers (47 percent) are more likely to say they’d have a difficult

time choosing than did suburbanites (35 percent) or rural residents (25 percent). About six in 10 adults (57 percent) have had to give up a pet at some point in their lives, with current pet owners (64 percent) a bit more likely to have done so. The most common reasons had to do with the pet’s

Continued from 1A was conducted October 13 to 20, 2010 by GfK Roper Public Affairs and Corporate Communications. It involved landline and cell phone interviews with 1,501 adults nationwide including 1,000 pet owners. Results among all adults have a margin of sampling error of plus or minus 3.3 percentage points.

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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 2011 City approves another $15,000 for park project

‘King’s Speech’ rules with 12 Oscar nominations

PAGE 2B

PAGE 5B

WWW. BISMARCKTRIBUNE . COM

Column’s impact immense In the summer of 2007, I received an interesting e-mail from Tribune Editor John Irby. He was relatively new on the scene in Bismarck and was looking for a regular, local conservative columnist. He wondered if I had any suggestions.

S ECTION B

Oil’s impact has tripled Study looks at N.D. from 2005 to 2009 By JAMES MacPHERSON Associated Press The economic impact of North Dakota’s oil industry more than tripled between 2005 and 2009, from $4.2 billion to $12.7, according to a study from North Dakota

State University study released Tuesday. The $30,000 study paid for by the North Dakota Petroleum Council looked at the gross business volume of oil and gas production, exploration, refining, payroll and other activity. Gross business volume accounts for “dollars circulated and re-circulated in the economy,” said research scientist Dean Bangsund, one of the study’s authors.

The direct impact of oil and gas development in the state increased from $1.29 billion in 2005 to $4.9 billion in 2009, the study said. Ron Ness, president of the North Dakota Petroleum Council, said the study validates what most people in North Dakota already know: “The industry is growing substantially.” The oil industry accounted for 18,328 full-time jobs in North

House OKs bill on building accessibility

Temptations JULIE FEDORCHAK

I read the e-mail many times, and thought about it. Finally I read it to my husband. “I’m tempted to suggest myself,” I said gingerly, not sure what kind of reaction to expect. “You should,” he quickly replied. “You’d be perfect.” I wasn’t at all sure about that, but his confidence was contagious. I promptly drafted an e-mail expressing my interest and waited for John’s response. It arrived the next day. Turns out I wasn’t what he had in mind — too much of this, not enough of that. So I dutifully offered him some names of people I knew wouldn’t do it and said I would keep thinking. A couple of days later, to my delight, I received another e-mail from John saying he had reconsidered and thought perhaps I offered an interesting demographic after all. I spent hours writing my first column, which appeared on Sept. 27, 2007. I re-read it recently and was struck by the ways my life has changed and also stayed the same. At the time, my three children were under 5 — today they are under 10. Sigh. Have I appreciated them, loved them and laughed with them enough during that time? Have I been kind, wise and supportive? I said in my first column, “Our society is so busy being busy, I think many of us are guilty of doing more than thinking. This column is my opportunity to stop and think.” I had no way of knowing how valuable that opportunity would be. This regular, biweekly deadline has prompted me to think through political and cultural issues like abortion, government spending, bailouts and the exploitation of women. It’s caused me to ponder forgiveness, mercy, love, patience, joy and it’s given me a unique platform to pay tribute to people who inspire and are dear to me. Most importantly, this column has helped me pay attention to little things — like floating down a river with my kids, spending a day with my 4-yearold or completing an amazing early morning jog — and to preserve these precious memories in vivid written detail. In my introductory column I talked about the crossroads we all face and the way our decisions permanently alter the course of our lives. Writing this column was one of those crossroads. And I’ve recently come upon another. I’ve joined the in-state staff of North Dakota’s Sen. John Hoeven, an opportunity that allows me to pursue my dual interests in public policy and politics, and work with Sen. Hoeven. I had hoped to continue in my capacity as a local columnist for the Tribune, but that prospect raised flags for both the Tribune and the Senate. So I must reluctantly put this column to rest. My sincere thanks to the Tribune and John Irby for giving me this amazing opportunity. Appearing on the Dakota section with the other local columnists whose writing I enjoy and respect has been a real honor. Continued on 6B

Dakota in 2009, more than triple the jobs in 2005, the report said. The number of active oil wells increased from 3,391 in 2005 to 4,190 in 2009. Each new well adds an estimated $3 million impact on the state’s economy, the study said. Bangsund, who wrote the report with Larry Leistriz, a professor in NDSU’s agribusiness and applied economics department, said the Continued on 6B

By REBECCA BEITSCH Bismarck Tribune

MIKE McCLEARY/Tribune

Love interests Amanda Pitzer and Andrew Hager, front, are influenced by the invisible and fiendish characters played by Amber Rae Bernhardt, left, John Clemo, back center, and Austin Flemmer during dress rehearsal of the dark comedy “Screwtape” at Dakota Stage Ltd. in Bismarck. The play opens Thursday night.

‘Screwtape’ ponders good and evil, with dark comedy By KAREN HERZOG Bismarck Tribune When the lights go up, the audience at two performances of “Screwtape” at Dakota Stage will get a chance to pepper some theater and theology experts about the themes that C.S. Lewis explores in “The Screwtape Letters,” from which the production is adapted. Lewis, well-known British author of “The Chronicles of Narnia” and other works, many with Christian subtexts, wrote “The Screwtape Letters” as a darkly comic correspondence between a Screwtape, a “senior devil,” and his nephew, Wormwood, in which Screwtape advises Wormwood on the tactics and temptations to use in obtaining a young man’s soul. “The Screwtape Letters” gives Lewis a vehicle to play with the themes of good and evil, heaven

and hell, and the nature of faith. Jane Greer, English instructor at Bismarck State College, will be on discussion panels following two Friday performances, Jan. 28 and Feb. 4. Greer said she has read the book three or four times and admires Lewis, both for what he does with language and for how well he communicates the big ideas of Christianity so that anyone can understand them. “These days, nobody thinks about sin or hell very much; they don’t talk about them and not many preach about them,” she said. “I think that one of the ways God shows he loves us is to give us free will — the book and play point this out,” Greer said. “At any time, (the main character) could make the wrong decision. Part of the message is that there’s always hope. God does love

us and wants us, but (doesn’t) make us slaves.” This Friday, Greer will be on a panel along with Dan Rogers, associate professor of theater at BSC, and the Rev. Craig Schweitzer, pastor at Good Shepherd Lutheran Church in Bismarck. On Feb. 4, the panel consists of Greer, Lori Horvik, associate professor of theater at North Dakota State University, and the Rev. Chad Gion, pastor at Spirit of Life Catholic Church in Mandan. Admission to the discussions are free and open to the public. While often portrayed at a purely theological or Christian work, the book and play are hilarious, Greer said. “There are always those deeper questions, but it’s entertainment first and foremost,” she said. Gion loved “The Screwtape Letters” when he first read it as a teen, Continued on 6B

Both chambers of the Legislature passed several bills with little deliberation Tuesday, including a measure that would require buildings to be more accessible to the disabled if they get state economic development money. R e p . R a e A n n Ke l s c h , R-Mandan, brought forward House Bill 1158 on behalf of her constituent Francis Herauf, who is confined to a wheelchair. Under the bill, retail businesses getting more than $100,000 in economic development funds would have wheelchair accessible ramps and curbing in front INSIDE of the stores as More from well as automatic the state legislature, 3B doors — the portion that is most important to Herauf but is not required by federal disability law. The bill provides an exception to installing any of the accessibility features if the structure or finances does not allow. “Right now, look at all these new buildings coming in and not one has electric doors,” said the 53-year-old Herauf. “I’m tired of fighting these doors.” Herauf said the doors benefit not only those with wheelchairs but also people using strollers and any returning veterans who have lost limbs in war. “They’re fighting for our rights; they shouldn’t have to come back and fight doors,” he said. The bill applies only to new buildings, but Herauf said he’d prefer it include remodeled buildings or, in a perfect world, that business owners would retrofit buildings even though not required to by law. He said he Continued on 3B

First superintendent candidate interviewed By SARA KINCAID Bismarck Tribune After 20 years in one school district, Peter Ansingh wants a change of scenery. He is one of the finalists for the superintendency in the Bismarck School District. He was the first person interviewed by the representatives of the community, employees, students, administrators and school board. He talked about his thoughts on dealing with bullying, substance abuse among teens and taking tests, during a session with parents Tuesday afternoon at the BPS Career Academy. “You have to address it,” Ansingh said about bullying. “It cannot be tolerated.” A school can have policies in place to address bullying, but they need to be followed through, and students need to feel comfortable reporting bullying, otherwise the

PETER ANSINGH ■ Superintendent, West Valley School District, Yakima, Wash. ■ 5,000 students ■ Budget: $71 million ■ Salary: $134,959 ■ Education: Pacific Lutheran University, bachelor’s degree; University of Wyoming, master’s degree; Seattle University, doctorate

policies are not as effective, he said. Drug and alcohol abuse also needs a zero tolerance policy, but it is tougher to tackle at school because it could be ingrained as acceptable in the community or within a student’s home, he said. Testing has its purpose, from state assessment tests to final exams. Tests, however, need to have a purpose, such as driving instruction in the classroom or preparing students for the future,

such as final exams, he said. Ansingh, the superintendent of West Valley School District in Yakima, Wash., has been superintendent there since 1991. There are 5,000 students in the district. He has a bachelor’s degree from Pacific Lutheran University, a master’s degree from the University of Wyoming and a doctorate from Seattle University. He has five other applications out for superintendent jobs. The other finalists for the position are Stan Mack II of Minneapolis; Tamara Uselman of Perham, Minn.; and Richard Faidley of Yuma, Ariz. Mack will be interviewed today. He is the executive director of the Minnesota Board of School Administrators. He was last superintendent of New Hope, Minn., a district of 12,350 students. Uselman will be interviewed Thursday. She is superintendent of the Perham-Dent Township in Continued on 6B

TOM STROMME/Tribune

Peter Ansingh is a finalist for the job of superintendent of Bismarck Public Schools. He is superintendent of West Valley School District in Yakima, Wash.


Page 2B ■ Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Cause of motel fire still not known The Bismarck Fire Department is still investigating the cause of the fire that destroyed the Bismarck Motor Hotel on Monday. Assistant Fire Chief Darrol Hopfauf said the cause has not been determined. The fire was ruled completely out, and the property was turned over to the owner, Dan Frank, on Tuesday, he said. Firefighters were on the scene of the blaze, which displaced 55 long-term residents at the motel, at 4:30 a.m. Monday. The fire destroyed the northwest section of the 60-year-old motel Monday morning and injured one firefighter. The American Red Cross, Bismarck-Burleigh Public Health and other agencies are working with the residents to secure basic needs such as food, clothing, places to sleep and shower facilities. A shelter has been set up at Charity Lutheran Church for the residents. — Jenny Michael

Tools stolen from construction site Someone stole more than $2,500 in tools from a Bismarck construction site. Bismarck Police Sgt. Mark Buschena said someone stole $2,540 in saws, staplers, nailers, drills, an air compressor and other tools used to frame a basement from a construction site at 2301 Langer Way. Buschena said the tools were in a trailer belonging to Gregory Builders. The items were stolen between Jan. 19 and Monday. — Jenny Michael

Man pleads not guilty in shooting DICKINSON (AP) — A Texas man has pleaded not guilty to aggravated assault and reckless endangerment in the shooting of a Louisiana man in North Dakota’s oil patch. James Gresham faces up to 10 years in prison if convicted of the charges. Police say Gresham, of Vidor, Texas, and Dustin Darce of Kinder, La., were in North Dakota working on a pipeline project. Authorities say they got in an argument in a mobile home park last October, and Gresham allegedly shot Darce in the leg and stomach. Darce was treated at a hospital and later released.

Trial begins in Wyndmere shooting WAHPETON (AP) — A jury has begun hearing testimony in the trial of a Wyndmere man accused of shooting another man in a Wyndmere bar. Steven Rowland pleaded not guilty to murder and attempted murder charges in the March 18, 2010, death of Gordon Vosberg. The jury chosen Monday listened to a tape recording of emergency calls to 911 dispatch and heard testimony from deputies who arrested Rowland at a farm. Attorneys said they expect the trial to last five days.

Woman sentenced in nail file attack A North Dakota woman has been sentenced to two years of probation for attacking a person with a nail file. U.S. Attorney Timothy Purdon says 20-year-old Alicia Hosie of Garrison must spend six months of her probation on home confinement with electronic monitoring. She also must pay nearly $900 in restitution. Authorities say Hosie slashed the victim’s face with the nail file several times during an argument last March while the two were driving around the White Shield area and drinking. Purdon says the victim required medical attention but he did not elaborate, nor did he identify the person. Hosie pleaded guilty last November to assault with a dangerous weapon. — Associated Press

Dakota

Bismarck Tribune ■ Bismarcktribune.com

City approves another $15,000 for park project By LEANN ECKROTH Bismarck Tribune The Bismarck City Commission will allow up to another $15,000 be spent for its share of the Liberty Memorial Bridge park project. City Engineer Mel Bullinger said final construction costs have exceeded what federal, state and city partners had projected. He said commissioners had previously agreed to pay $165,000, about 9 percent of project costs, a n d t h e c i t y ’s s h a r e increased to $190,000. The park bill now totals $2.2 million. Bullinger said the city’s shortfall totals $25,000 for the park work. “About $10,000 of that is utility-funded for the driveway to the horizontal collector well. That means the special road project fund will be tapped for $15,000,” he said after the meeting. The park project features a piece of the original Liberty Memorial Bridge, plaques, benches, land-

to decide if the special April 19 smoking ban election should be paid for through sales tax revenue. The home rule charter proposal will be publicized in the upcoming weeks before the special ballot. Commissioners set the special election date after their original vote to make Bismarck Public Works all city bars smoke-free was Director Jeff Heintz said fre- suspended through a referquent, smaller snow events endum petition. are dipping into street maintenance funds and Commissioners went sand supplies. In the past three months, he has spent into executive session for more than $1.2 million for 25 minutes to negotiate a cleanup. He said it snowed possible sale of city-owned 23 of the first 24 days in Jan- property to an unidentified party. uary. City Administrator Bill “It looks like our sand is half full. We should end up Wocken said the details of OK with our sand we have t h e s a l e w i l l n o t b e for the year. We produce announced until after sale that in the fall of the year,” has been finalized. He said no public deciHeintz said. “Fuel use is up. We’ll sions about the property continue to monitor that. sale were announced when It’s early. We’re only in Janu- commissioners returned to the public portion of the ary,” he said. meeting. (Reach reporter LeAnn Commissioners agreed Eckroth at 250-8264 or to amend Bismarck’s home leann.eckroth@bismarckrule charter to allow voters tribune.com.)

scape work, a parking lot, lighting features and signs. It complements the new Liberty Memorial Bridge project, dedicated in 2008 for $62 million, according to a North Dakota Department of Transportation Web site.

Snow cleanup

Sale of city property

Home rule charter

Wyo. bill recognizes ‘wind rights’ CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — A bill that aims to establish wind as a property right in Wyoming won initial approval Tuesday in the state Senate. Senate File 22 was approved on a voice vote but must be considered two more times in the state Senate before it can advance to the House of Representatives. The bill establishes that land in Wyoming comes with wind rights along with surface and mineral rights. The idea is to establish wind rights so landowners can be compensated for wind produced on their property. Supporters say the legislation is significant because the wind energy indus-

try is growing rapidly in Wyoming. “Keep in mind where we are right now is a state of infancy,” Sen. Tony Ross, R-Cheyenne, said. The bill, which was sponsored by the Legislature’s Joint Judiciary Interim Committee, would allow landowners to lease their wind energy rights to a wind farm developer. In addition, it sets a 10-year time limit for wind energy producers to start developing land they’ve leased or the leases would be canceled. Wind farms that have stopped operating for 10 years would see contracted wind rights revert to the landowner.

Victim of pickup rollover ID’d WA H P E T O N ( A P ) — Authorities have identified a man who died in a pickup rollover west of Wahpeton. The Highway Patrol says 18-year-old Keenan Dunn died Monday morning when the truck he was driving rolled on state Highway 13 near the Interstate 29 overpass. The patrol says there was patchy ice on the road and blowing snow in the area at the time. Dunn was alone in the vehicle. He died at the scene.

NDSU fined for manure spill FARGO (AP) — The state Health Department has fined North Dakota State University $5,000 for a manure spill last July. The department’s director of water quality, Dennis Fewless, said up to $4,000 can be dismissed if the university meets certain conditions to prevent future spills. A total of 110,000 gallons of cow manure and liquid w e re a c c i d e n t a l l y d i s charged when a pump malfunctioned at a dairy barn. NDSU was able to recover all but 2,000 to 2,500 gallons of waste, which eventually ended up in the Red River.

$800K in damage in apartment fire GRAND FORKS (AP) — Authorities say a fire last week at an apartment building in Grand Forks caused just under $800,000 in damage. Fire Department Battalion Chief Rod Hadland said the building suffered about $550,000 in damage, and damage to tenants’ belongings is pegged at $240,000. The Thursday night blaze displaced 16 residents. No one was hurt. Authorities cited unattended cooking as the cause.

Unemployment rises in 20 states, falls in 15 WASHINGTON (AP) — The unemployment rate rose in 20 states last month as employers in most states shed jobs. The Labor Department says the unemployment rate rose in 20 states and fell in

15. It was unchanged in another 15 states. That’s nearly the same as in November, when the rate rose in 21 states, fell in 15 and was the same in 14. The report is evidence that the job market is barely

improving even as the economy grows. Most economists expect hiring to pick up this year, although the unemployment rate will likely remain high. Nevada, still suffering from a massive housing

bust, posted the nation’s highest unemployment rate at 14.5 percent. North Dakota’s unemployment rate of 3.8 percent was the nation’s lowest. It’s followed by Nebraska and South Dakota.

NUBS OF THE NEWS BIRTHS Medcenter One Son, Rebecca Harrington and Justin Massey, Mandan, 7:35 a.m., Jan. 24.

St. Alexius Medical Center

Daughter, Hayley Myers and Nathan Speten, Mandan, 3:53 p.m., Jan. 21. Son, Renee Baker and Brent Giardini, Mandan, 5:25 p.m., Jan. 21. Son, Tina Valeu-Strube and Ernie Strube, Bismarck, 6:27 p.m., Jan. 21. Son, Mariah Foss, Hazen, 1:10 p.m., Jan. 22. Daughter, Donna Twinn and John W. Seewalker, Fort Yates, 3:25 a.m., Jan. 23. Son, Natalie (Rothacker) and Brett Allery, Bismarck, 12:03 p.m., Jan. 25.

SEX OFFENDER LOCATION INFORMATION For information about the locations of sex offenders in the community, visit www.sexoffender.nd.gov. The website contains data bases of sex offenders and offenders against children, as well as an e-mail notification system in which the public can be notified every time an offender in the area changes his or her information.

CRIME STOPPERS Call Bismarck Area Crime Stoppers at 224-TIPS (2248477) to report information about any crime in Bismarck, Mandan, Burleigh County or Morton County. Information can be given anonymously and you may be eligible for cash rewards if the information leads to an arrest.

COURT POLICY Nubs of the news information comes from district and municipal courts in Burleigh and Morton counties. In nubs of the news, the Tribune publishes all felony sentences; and misdemeanor sentences with fines of $500 or more and/or a jail term, including suspended sentences.

COURTS (Cases closed from Sept. 9 to Sept. 15) Burleigh County Judge Bruce Romanick Minor in possession: Tyler J. Haugen, 21, 2883 Country Road 139A, Mandan, 30 days, 20 days suspended for one year. Fleeing in a motor vehicle: Savoy J. Fog In The Morning, 23, 1218 Third St. N.E. No. 9, Mandan, 30 days, 27 days suspended for one year. Drove in actual physical control (second in five years): Tommy L. Buckman, 39, 3315 University Drive No. 71, $1,000 and 30 days, 20 days suspended for 18 months, also driving under suspension: 30 days, 20 days suspended for 18 months, jail time served concurrently.

worth, 19, 7900 27th St. N.E., 30 days, 26 days suspended for 18 months. Driving under the influence: Dawn M. Schumaier, 42, 904 Poplar St., Mandan, $500 and 30 days, 25 days suspended for 364 days. Elizabeth N. Scott, 24, 1800 E. Capitol Ave. No. 254, $350, $100 and 10 days suspended for 364 days. Jimmy J. Veach, 60, Minot, $350, $100 and 10 days suspended for 364 days. Tanya J. Simonson, 27, 1219 S. Washington St., $350, $100 and 10 days suspended for 364 days, 30 hours community service. Driving under suspension: Nathan S. Schumacher, 20, 1608 E. Omaha Drive, $100 and 30 days, 26 days suspended for one year. Drove or in actual physical control: William G. Johnson, 43, 5121 Sumter Circle, $350, $100 and 10 days suspended for 364 days.

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Bismarcktribune.com ■ Bismarck Tribune

Teacher incentives are part of $100M education bill Gov. Jack Dalr ymple made his pitch in the Legislature on Tuesday for an education bill he helped to write when he was lieutenant governor. The $100 million bill increases state aid for classroom instruction. It has mentoring programs for teachers and principals. It includes $7.5 million for teacher merit pay, which Grand Forks Sen. Raymon Holmberg calls a major step in education reform. It says students who take the ACT college exam must take both the essay and multiple-choice tests. Dalrymple says the essay results will be used to assess student wr iting skills. The North Dakota Senate’s Education Committee is reviewing the bill. It was written by the state Commission on Education Improvement. Dalrymple has been the commission’s chair man since it was formed in January 2006. — Associated Press

Wednesday, January 26, 2011 ■ Page 3B

Legislation looks at gun rights of mentally ill By REBECCA BEITSCH Bismarck Tribune The House Judiciary Committee held a hearing Tuesday on a bill that would allow people with mental illnesses to petition to restore their gun rights. Rep. Karen Karls, R-Bismarck, sponsored House Bill 1269. She

said it helps North Dakota come into compliance with a federal gun law passed after the Virginia Tech shootings. That law requires that mental history be part of the criminal background check for purchasing a gun and says those with certain mental diseases are then not eligible to purchase one.

Karls said her bill would provide a mechanism for people who are no longer a danger to the public to restore their gun rights, guaranteeing the civil liberties of citizens. Chief Deputy Attorney General Tom Trenbeath said the bill would help North Dakota have reciprocal gun agreements with other states

Proposal would reduce N.D. oil tax

Senator backs umbilical cord blood By REBECCA BEITSCH Bismarck Tribune Sen. Margaret Sitte, R-Bismarck, is pushing a bill that would require the state to distribute information on the use of umbilical cord blood. Umbilical cord blood is full of adult-like, rather than embryonic, stem cells and is used to treat more than 70 wide-ranging diseases. Sitte said she wants the Health Department to start distributing information on the process and its risks and benefits. Sitte said she sees it as “a matter of common sense

that the state be proactive in this regard,” because so often the cord blood is discarded as medical waste when it could instead be harvested, and due to it’s flexibility, face a much lower chance of rejection in the treatment process. The bill got the backing of the Catholic community, in part because the blood does not contain stem cells, and the medical community because doctors would not be held liable for distributing any material on the subject. While no one testified in opposition, Senate Health and Human Services Com-

mittee Chair Sen. Judy Lee, R-West Fargo, questioned Sitte at the bill’s hearing Tuesday, as to why the state needed to push this when doctors already have their patients’ interests at heart. Sen. Spencer Berry, a Republican and a doctor from Fargo who sits on the committee, said sometimes measures like these don’t get put in place at a busy practice. The committee did not take any action on the bill. (Reach reporter Rebecca Beitsch at 250-8255 or 2238482 or rebecca.beitsch@bismarcktribune.com.)

Building accessibility Continued from 1B will still work to amend the bill to include remodeled buildings. The bill passed the House 58 to 41. It will now go to the Senate. Also passed in the House was House Bill 1271, which will give veterans of the Korean War the option to seek an honorary high school diploma. That measure passed 89 to 2. House Bill 1273 also passed, which gives schools the option of giving kindergarten teachers an extra two days to meet with students and their parents one-onone before the first day of

school to assess the child’s needs. “This will enable teachers to plan effectively for each student in class,” said Rep. Robert Hunskor, R-Newburg, rather than possibly taking partway through the year to realize the child has a special need. That bill passed 90 to 0. The Senate passed a bill that would lower the cost of medical care for inmates by reducing reimbursement rates to the same that are paid for procedures under Medicare. The measure, Senate Bill 2024, passed unanimously.

One notable exception to a string of bills passed was the killing of a bill that would brand those convicted of drunken driving “Scarlet Letter” style by requiring them to get a license plate starting with the letter “W.” The bill failed 90 to 1 with Rep. Ed Gruchalla, D-Fargo, the only one to support it. “The problem of repeat offenders is not going way,” said Gruchalla, a retired highway patrolman. He said other states have made it work, and so could North Dakota. “Sometimes you have to change something if you want different

but said one possible amendment would be to include those with past substance abuse issues as possible petitioners for their gun rights. Alex Schweitzer, head of the State Hospital, said he’s seen only a handful of people under the state’s care petition to once again carry a weapon.

results,” he said. (Reach reporter Rebecca Beitsch at 250-8255 or 2238482 or rebecca.beitsch@bismarcktribune.com.)

Two lawmakers from western North Dakota’s oil country want to cut the state’s top oil tax rate and simplify the tax itself. The bill would reduce North Dakota’s oil tax from 11.5 percent to 9.5 percent. It would eliminate most of the drilling incentives that make the oil tax complicated. Dickinson state Rep. Shirley Meyer and Parshall Rep. Kenton Onstad are sponsoring the bill. They say North Dakota’s top oil tax rate is too high, and its structure puts higher taxes on new companies that are coming into the oil patch. North Dakota has two oil taxes — a 5 percent production tax and a 6.5 percent extraction tax on top of it. The bill would cut the extraction tax to 4.5 percent. — Associated Press

$50M loan sought for oil refinery Supporters of a new oil refinery in western North Dakota want state subsidies and a guaranteed loan for the project. Parshall Rep. Kenton Onstad’s bill would provide $5 million in matching money to the project’s developer for permit expenses. The Bank of North Dakota would also guarantee up to $50 million in loans. The North Dakota House’s Industry, Business and Labor Committee reviewed the bill Tuesday. A study last year said the project isn’t likely to attract private investment without some government incentives. The study says a small refinery that makes diesel fuel and naphtha has the most market potential. The naphtha would be sold to Canadian oil producers as a thinning agent to allow heavy crude oil to be shipped through pipelines. — Associated Press

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Page 4B ■ Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Iglesias show is rescheduled Due to a death in the family, comedian Gabriel Iglesias has a new date for his “Fluffy Shop Tour” standup show scheduled for Thursday at the Belle Mehus Auditorium in Bismarck. The new date will be April 28 at the Belle, 201 N. Sixth St. Show time remains the same at 8 p.m. All current tickets will be honored at the new date. Ticket refunds are available at point-of-sale on or before the originally scheduled date, after which they will be valid for the new show only.

Jazz festival set for Friday, Saturday The 38th annual University of Mary Jazz Festival is Friday and Saturday. Grammy-award winner Jeff Coffin will perform at the jazz festival concert at 8 p.m. Friday, at the Bismarck Civic Center. “Jeff Coffin is an incredible musician and an outstanding clinician,” said Anthony Williams, who is producing his first University of Mary Jazz Festival. “I am so excited for the festival attendees to witness his passion for music.” Williams is a new instructor at the University of Mary from The LeMoyne-Owen College in Memphis, Tenn., and was second trombonist with the Jackson Symphony Orchestra. He teaches applied low brass, low brass chamber ensembles, jazz ensemble, jazz lab band, pep band, jazz studies, jazz pedagogy/history and introduction to music. Joining Coffin at the concert will be vocalists Vijay Singh and Michele Weir; drummer Tom Giampietro; pianist Vladen Milenkovic and the university’s jazz ensemble and vocal jazz group. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased through the University of Mary Music Department at 355-8301, at Eckroth Music and Lee’s Hallmark at Kirkwood Mall.

Grape Growers to meet in Bismarck The North Dakota Grape Growers Association will hold its annual meeting in Bismarck on Feb. 5 at the Doublewood Inn, 1400 E. Interchange Ave. Harlene Hatterman-Valenti, North Dakota State University high-value crops specialist, and John Stenger, NDSU graduate student, will update the group on grape breeding efforts at NDSU. Hatterman-Valenti also will discuss the collection of native V. riparia vines for the NDSU repository. An update will be given on legislative funding efforts. The NDSU Extension Service has requested funds from the Legislature for grape research. Tami Bredeson of Carlos Creek Winery will talk about marketing for wineries and vineyards. Some of the presentations in the morning will be split into grape growing and winery sections. Updates from the Grape and Wine Program Committee and the Grape Breeding Program will be presented in the afternoon. A silent auction will be held during the meeting. Proceeds will be used as matching funds for grape research in North Dakota. There will be wine tasting prior to the banquet, so attendees are invited to bring samples of their homemade wine to share. Early registration for this year’s meeting is $40 for members and $50 for nonmembers. After Feb.1, the fee goes up by $10 per person. Meals and refreshments are included in the registration.

Garden Club wants yards to tour The local Garden Club is looking for people who will open up their yards for garden club members to tour this summer. Summer tours are planned for June 21, July 19 and Aug. 16; only members would tour, not the general public. Anyone willing to have members tour their yards may call Diane Gronfur at 220-6494. Club meetings are planned on the following dates: ■ Feb. 15 with speaker Tom Kalb of the North Dakota State University Burleigh County Extension office on “Starting a Backyard Orchard in North Dakota”; ■ March 15 with speaker Susan Holland, garden coach and member of Garden Writers on “New Plants for North Dakota”; ■ April 19, a small plant sale plus a presentation on bonsai. All meetings are at 6:30 p.m. at the Bismarck Public Library. On May 24, a plant sale for members only is planned from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Burleigh County Extension office. Garden Club dues are $10 per year.

God’s Child Project plans ball

Dakota

Bismarck Tribune ■ Bismarcktribune.com

Pipeline may boost crude prices By MARIA SUDEKUM FISHER Associated Press KANSAS CITY, Mo. — TransCanada Corp. said Tuesday that it expects to see an increase in prices for Canadian heavy crude oil in the Midwest if its Keystone XL pipeline is approved to move oil from Canada down through several states to the Gulf of Mexico. That mirrors a forecast in a report that TransCanada presented to Canada’s National Energy Board in 2009 in which the Calgarybased company said existing markets for Canadian crude are oversupplied, which has led to lower prices — especially in its Midwest region. That report also said those lower prices would likely end if Keystone XL begins transporting about 500,000 barrels of crude a day to the Gulf Coast. Canadian crude prices have been weak because of a glut to the large Gulf Coast market, the company said. The proposed Keystone pipeline would help boost the market price of Canadian crude by reducing the oversupply in the Midwest region. Canadian oil producers could see a price increase of at least $3 a barre l i f Ke y s t o n e X L begins moving oil to the U.S. Gulf Coast in 2013, according to the report. Tr a n s C a n a d a s p o k e s m a n Te r r y Cunha said Tu e s d a y that the $3a-barrel increase is still expected. He said it is focused on several states in T r a n s Canad a ’ s M i d -

west region, where about 400,000 barrels a day are currently being shipped on a sister Keystone pipeline. Those states are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, the Dakotas, Ohio, Oklahoma, Tennessee and Wisconsin. “But Canadian crude oil is still the cheapest crude oil available to Americans by volumes,” Cunha said. Canadian crude generally fetches $25 a barrel less than most oil on U.S. markets, in part because of the difficulty in transporting it. “Therefore an increase in price of $3 does not impact American refiners’ ability to purchase this, but promotes more Canadian production moving to the U.S., allowing them to purchase more cheap Canadian crude,” Cunha said. The proposed 1,980mile-long Keystone XL pipeline, which is designed to move crude from Alberta’s oil sands to the Gulf Coast, still requires a permit from the State Department because it would cross the U.S.-Canada border. Several environmental groups have pushed the State Department to reject TransCanada’s application. They say the pipeline would speed the expansion of oil

sands extraction to a rate that could exacerbate global warming. The company has said it expects to get State Department approval by mid-year. Cunha said the $3 increase is a “result of having a larger market” and would affect only Canadian heavy crude. Last week, TransCanada announced that it had secured enough contracts to ship 65,000 barrels of oil daily from Montana and North Dakota on its proposed oil pipeline from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico. But Cunha said that would not affect the expected price increase. “Taking Bakken crude won’t impact this situation. However, we would expect that Bakken producers might get better prices because they will not have to spend as much in trucking or rail to get their barrels to market,” Cunha said in an e-mail. The earlier report estimated that the higher crude price could boost annual revenue to the Canadian producing industry of $2 billion to $3.9 billion in 2013. “The increased revenue could apply for several years as long as refinery demand

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N.D. House says schools must have lockdown drills

The God’s Child Project has scheduled its sixth annual Dream Makers Ball, to be held Feb. 12 at the Seven Seas Inn in Mandan. The evening begins at 6 p.m. with a social and silent auction. After dinner, a live auction will feature numerous “Dream” items as well as a horse race. The Joe Friday Band will provide music for the dance. Tickets are available at the God’s Child Project office, 721 Memorial Highway in Bismarck, by calling 255-7956 or online at http://godschild.org.

North Dakota’s House has approved a bill to require schools to conduct “lockdown” and other emergency drills. A lockdown drill is done if there’s an intruder in the building. Students take shelter and the school’s doors and windows are locked until there’s notice that the incident is over. M a n y No r t h D a k o t a schools already do emergency drills. Bismarck Rep. Lisa Meier says it’s important to practice them, given recent outbreaks of school violence across the country. The House approved the bill 90-0 on Tuesday. It now goes to the Senate for another review. At first the legislation required schools to form committees to plan lockdown drills and said schools needed to hold at least two drills each school year. Those provisions were removed. — Associated Press

Only trace pesticides in N.D. rivers Agriculture Commissioner Doug Goehring says a statewide study has found only minimal amounts of pesticides in North Dakota’s rivers and streams. Goehring says the fact that officials found only trace amounts of nine commonly used products shows that regulations and enforcement are proving effective. The study was done by the state Health Department and the U.S. Geological Survey. Officials took water samples from 33 sites from April through October last year and sent them to a lab in Oregon for testing. — Associated Press

Dorms might become senior living WAHPETON (AP) — Three minimally used dormitories at the North Dakota State College of Science might be turned into senior living facilities. Officials at the Wahpeton campus are in discussions with Lutheran Social Services. College President John Richman says the talks began after a campus space study showed there was extra capacity in the residence halls. At the same time, the city identified a need for more housing for seniors. Richman says the dorms were built decades ago and are not the type of residence halls desired by today’s college students. The buildings would be renovated if they’re turned into senior living. The Wahpeton City Council supports the idea. The state Board of Higher Education would have to approve any arrangement.

and pipeline capacity exceed Canadian heavy crude supply,” it said. The National Wildlife Federation, which issued a lengthy e-mail about the price increase this week, has been critical of the pipeline. Jeremy Symons, vice president of the group, said that once Keystone XL begins moving Canadian crude to the Gulf Coast region, where it can get the “full global prices,” the Midwest supply will be “choked.” “All we know for sure is that prices are going to spike in 2013,” Symons said. “The bottom line, there’s no question that they not only see prices going up . . . but that they’ll see a big payoff for Canadian oil producers.” A $3 a barrel increase would mean consumers paying about 7 cents a gallon more for gasoline, Symons said. Sections of the Keystone pipeline network operating n ow m ov e m o re t h a n 400,000 barrels a day to Illinois, and by the end of March it’s expected to begin using an additional line to Oklahoma. The addition of Keystone XL line would mean another 500,000 barrels a day moving on the Keystone system. (Associated Press writer James MacPherson in Bismarck, N.D., contributed to this report. )

TOM STROMME/Tribune

SET UP: Gene Jaremczuk, left, and Douglas Robertson prepare a booth for the 32nd Annual Energy Generation Conference in the Bismarck Civic Center on Tuesday afternoon. Both are with Flowserve Corp. and will be among the 251 vendors from 20 states at the event that is coordinated by Bismarck State College. The conference begins at 8 a.m. today and continues through 5 p.m. Thursday’s hours are 8 a.m to 4:30 p.m. Jaremczuk said Flowserve is a company that deals primarily in industrial pumps and seals.

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Entertainment

Bismarcktribune.com ■ Bismarck Tribune

‘King’s Speech’ rules with 12 Oscar nominations

Associated Press

Colin Firth portrays King George VI in “The King's Speech.” The film received 12 Oscar nominations on Tuesday. Christian Bale was nominated for “The Fighter.” The best-actress field shapes up as a two-woman race between Annette Bening for “The Kids Are All Right,” who won the Globe for actress in a musical or comedy, and Natalie Portman for “Black Swan,” who received the Globe for dramatic actress. The supporting-actress Oscar could prove the most competitive among acting prizes. Melissa Leo won the Globe for “The Fighter,” but she faces strong challenges from that film’s co-star Amy Adams and 14-year-old newcomer Steinfeld, who missed out on a Globe nomination for “True Grit” but made the cut for supporting actress at the Oscars. “I’m still reeling from the Golden Globe and its extraordinary and unique recognition,” said Leo, whose film emerged late last year as a low-budget underdog that parallels the story of “The Fighter,” about a late-blooming boxer who gets a title

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Best Picture: “Black Swan,” “The Fighter,” “Inception,” “The Kids Are All Right,” “The King’s Speech,” “127 Hours,” “The Social Network,” “Toy Story 3,” “True Grit,” “Winter’s Bone.” Actor: Javier Bardem, “Biutiful”; Jeff Bridges, “True Grit”; Jesse Eisenberg, “The Social Network”; Colin Firth, “The King’s Speech”; James Franco, “127 Hours.” Actress: Annette Bening, “The Kids Are All Right”; Nicole Kidman, “Rabbit Hole”; Jennifer Lawrence, “Winter’s Bone”; Natalie Portman, “Black Swan”; Michelle Williams, “Blue Valentine.” Supporting Actor: Christian Bale, “The Fighter”; John Hawkes, “Winter’s Bone”; Jeremy Renner, “The Town”; Mark Ruffalo, “The Kids Are All Right”; Geoffrey Rush, “The King’s Speech.” Supporting Actress: Amy Adams, “The Fighter”; Helena Bonham Carter, “The King’s Speech”; Melissa Leo, “The Fighter”; Hailee Steinfeld, “True Grit”; Jacki Weaver, “Animal Kingdom.” Directing: Darren Aronofsky,

“Black Swan”; David O. Russell, “The Fighter”; Tom Hooper, “The King’s Speech”; David Fincher, “The Social Network”; Joel Coen and Ethan Coen, “True Grit.” Foreign Language Film: “Biutiful,” Mexico; “Dogtooth,” Greece; “In a Better World,” Denmark; “Incendies,” Canada; “Outside the Law (Hors-la-loi),” Algeria. Adapted Screenplay: Danny Boyle and Simon Beaufoy, “127 Hours”; Aaron Sorkin, “The Social Network”; Michael Arndt, John Lasseter, Andrew Stanton and Lee Unkrich, “Toy Story 3”; Joel Coen and Ethan Coen, “True Grit”; Debra Granik and Anne Rosellini, “Winter’s Bone.” Original Screenplay: Mike Leigh, “Another Year”; Scott Silver and Paul Tamasy and Eric Johnson and Keith Dorrington, “The Fighter”; Christopher Nolan, “Inception”; Lisa Cholodenko and Stuart Blumberg, “The Kids Are All Right”; David Seidler, “The King’s Speech.” Animated Feature Film: “How to Train Your Dragon,” “The Illusionist,” “Toy Story 3.”

Art Direction: “Alice in Wonderland,” “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1,” “Inception,” “The King’s Speech,” “True Grit.” Cinematography: “Black Swan,” “Inception,” “The King’s Speech,” “The Social Network,” “True Grit.” Original Score: “How to Train Your Dragon,” John Powell; “Inception,” Hans Zimmer; “The King’s Speech,” Alexandre Desplat; “127 Hours,” A.R. Rahman; “The Social Network,” Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross. Original Song: “Coming Home” from “Country Strong,” “I See the Light” from “Tangled,” “If I Rise” from “127 Hours,” “We Belong Together” from “Toy Story 3.” Costume: “Alice in Wonderland,” “I Am Love,” “The King’s Speech,” “The Tempest,” “True Grit.” Documentary: “Gasland,” “Inside Job,” “Restrepo,” “Waste Land,” “Exit through the Gift Shop.” Visual Effects: “Alice in Wonderland,” “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1,” “Hereafter,” “Inception,” “Iron Man 2.”

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BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. — The British monarchy saga “The King’s Speech” reigned at the Academy Awards with 12 nominations, including acting honors for Colin Firth, Helena Bonham Carter and Geoffrey Rush, positioning itself to challenge “The Social Network” for best picture. “ T h e K i n g’s Sp e e c h” gained momentum against the Facebook drama “The Social Network,” which dominated early Hollywood awards. Along with those two films, other best-picture nominees Tuesday for the Feb. 27 Oscars were the psychosexual thriller “Black Swan”; the boxing drama “The Fighter”; the sci-fi blockbuster “Inception”; the lesbian-family tale “The Kids Are All Right”; the survival story “127 Hours”; the animated smash “Toy Story 3”; the Western “True Grit”; and the Ozarks crime thriller “Winter’s Bone.” “True Grit” ran second with 10 nominations, including acting honors for last year’s best-actor winner Jeff Bridges and Hailee Steinfeld. “The Social Network” won best drama at the Golden Globes and was picked as the year’s best by key critics groups, while “The King’s Speech” pulled an upset last weekend by winning the Producers Guild of America Awards top prize, whose recipient often goes on to claim best picture at the Oscars. “I’ve been texting people in between interviews, and there’s a lot of excitement going on across the globe from our team. It’s really wonderful. It’s sort of like ‘Ben-Hur’ proportions. It all seems a bit crazy, you know?” said supporting-actor nominee Rush, an Oscar winner for 1996’s “Shine.” Along with Rush, bestactor favorite Firth and supporting-actress contender Bonham Carter, “The King’s Speech” had nominations for director Tom Hooper and screenwriter David Seidler, plus honors in such categories as cinematography, costume design, art direction and musical score. Supporting-actor favorite

shot. “Is it art imitates life, or life is imitating art? What happened?” Adams found out she had won her third Oscar nomination when the phone rang. “This one is special in that I really played a role that was so different for me and it was nerve-racking and it’s just so nice that it’s being recognized and being recognized with the film.” For the second-straight year, the Oscars feature 10 best-picture contenders after organizers doubled the field from the usual five to open the awards up to a broader range of films. But even in a field of 10, the prize likely comes down to two films. “The Social Network” casts Jesse Eisenberg as Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg, who’s depicted as an interpersonal lout in one-onone relations but a genius for the masses, creating an online hangout where half a billion people now keep connected with friends. “The King’s Speech” stars Firth as Queen Elizabeth II’s father, the stammering George VI, who reluctantly came to the throne after his brother abdicated in 1936, a terrible time for a stuttering monarch as British subjects looked to their ruler for inspiration via radio as World War II approached.

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Wednesday, January 26, 2011 ■ Page 5B

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Page 6B ■ Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Bismarck Tribune ■ Bismarcktribune.com

Seven-day forecast

Today

High Low today tonight Turning partly cloudy.

Thursday

Noon

10

Evening

31

Wind (mph): NW, 5 to 15

31

Saturday

Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

36/22

24/5

6/-11

Partly to mostly Windy, light cloudy. snow, turning cooler.

-2/-17

Sharply colder, mostly cloudy.

4/1

14/3

State forecast overview: Today and Thursday will be mainly dry statewide, with the exception of the east. Areas along I-29 may pick up a few flurries on Thursday. Then a cold front passes through on Friday. It will bring with it wind, some snow and much colder temperatures. Be ready for frigid temperatures this weekend.

Icy cold despite Cold and sunny. Mostly cloudy a little sun. and very chilly.

H

Next week

Cool

Yesterday in N.D.

Today across the state 281

85

34 / 21

2

Williston

Bismarck Devils Lake Dickinson Fargo Garrison Grand Forks Hettinger Jamestown Minot Williston

26 / 14 Devils Lake 2

Minot

33 / 18

Grand Forks

Garrison

22 / 12

29 / 17 34 / 21

83 52 Bismarck

34 / 18

Mandan

85

94

Hi 32 25 31 22 28 25 32 26 32 29

Lo Prcp 16 0.00" 10 0.00" 20 0.00" 11 0.01" 18 0.00" 10 0.00" 15 0.00" 6 0.00" 22 0.00" 20 Trace"

Jamestown

27 / 16

83

Fargo

21 / 13 29

31 / 22

Five-day jet stream

Hettinger

Yesterday’s state extremes: High: 32 at Bismarck Low: 5 at Hettinger

L H

L

H L H Monday

10-day outlook Precipitation

Near Normal

Today’s weather history 1983 - The California coast was battered by a storm which produced record high tides, thirty-two foot waves, and mudslides, causing millions of dollars damage. The storm then moved east and dumped four feet of snow on Lake Tahoe. (22nd-29th) (The Weather Channel)

Sanford $100M gift to target breast cancer SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — A $100 million gift to Sanford Health from retired banker and philanthropist T. Denny Sanford will target breast cancer as part of a plan to establish a national institute fighting the disease. Brian Mortenson, president of Sanford Health Foundation, said an estimated 10 million women are living with diagnosed breast cancer. “This is a very personal cause for nearly everyone, whether it be with a mother, wife, sister, daughter or friend,” Mortenson told the Argus Leader newspaper. Officials said further details of the initiative will be explained in August, likely in conjunction with what the health care system calls its annual children’s gala. Sanford has given more than half a billion dollars to the former Sioux Valley Hospitals & Health System that became Sanford Health in 2007. The Sioux Falls-based health system in 2009 merged with Fargo, N.D.based Meritcare, forming what officials say is the nation’s largest not-forprofit rural health care provider.

Column’s impact Continued from 1B Thank you to my husband, Mike, for encouraging me to try this and for saving me from myself so many times in the process. As my chief (and cheap) editorial assistant, his honest and meaningful feedback has helped me find my voice. And to readers. You have been the biggest surprise of all. I hoped you would read my writings, but never dreamed you would take time to respond. Your notes, letters, phone calls and personal words of support and appreciation at church or the grocery store made my effort worth the while. Thank you. I hope our paths will cross again.

Almanac

Regional facts and forecasts

Bismarck-Mandan Statistics through 5 p.m. yesterday from Bismarck Municipal Airport.

Temperatures Yesterday High/low: 32 / 16 Normal high/low: 17 / -3 Record high: 49° in 2002 Record low: -32° in 1950 0.00" 0.82" 0.38" 0.82" 0.38"

Snowfall Yesterday: Total month to date: Normal month to date: Season to date:

Normal season to date:

0.0" 11.3" 7.3" 45.9" 27.3"

24hr. change Discharge

Temp.

Oahe 1605.18 + 0.04

21600 cfs

33

25600 cfs

33

Sakakawea 1840.18 - 0.14

Minnesota City

Today Yesterday Hi Lo Prcp Hi Lo W

Detroit Lakes 21 19 Duluth Minneapolis 18 St Cloud 15

9 14 13 5

n/a" Trace" Trace" Trace"

20 13 22 10 21 11 18 11

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City

Today Yesterday Hi Lo Prcp Hi Lo W

Baker Billings Bozeman Butte Glasgow Glendive Great Falls Helena Miles City Sidney Wolf Point

33 39 37 38 29 34 50 47 37 33 29

15 Trace" 31 Trace" 26 0.01" 18 0.05" 19 0.00" 21 0.01" 33 0.06" 28 0.00" 25 0.00" 15 Trace" 15 0.00"

36 45 40 35 35 39 48 40 40 39 37

24 33 23 17 18 21 31 32 26 21 13

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South Dakota Yesterday Hi Lo Prcp Aberdeen 26 9 0.00" Buffalo 34 22 0.00" Faith 34 14 0.01" Huron 24 10 0.00" Mobridge 32 11 0.00" Pierre 33 5 0.00" Rapid City n/a n/a n/a" Sioux Falls 36 15 Trace" Watertown 22 5 0.00"

City

Snow season runs Sept. 1 to May 31

River stages

Montana

Area lake levels Elev.

Precipitation Yesterday: Total month to date: Normal month to date: Year to date: Normal year to date:

L

H

Warm

Dickinson

Near Normal

Cold

North Dakota facts and forecasts

Weather notebook

20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100

Cool

Wind (mph): Wind (mph): W, 5 to 15 NW, 10 to 20

Wind (mph): NW, 5 to 15

Temperature

The nation today -20 -10 0 10

Cold

34 18 Morning

Friday

Stage Change

Missouri, Bismarck11.41 + 0.01 1.00 - 0.12 Heart, Mandan Sun&moon Sunrise Sunset 8:15 AM 5:37 PM Today Thursday 8:14 AM 5:39 PM Last New First Full Jan. 26 Feb. 3 Feb. 11 Feb. 18

Today Hi Lo W 24 15 pc 35 24 pc 35 25 pc 26 20 pc 31 20 pc 34 22 pc 46 24 pc 22 16 pc 20 15 pc

Valid Noon Today

Yesterday’s national extremes: High: 82 at Naples, Fla. Low: -23 at Houlton, Maine

Around the nation City Albany,N.Y. Albuquerque Amarillo Anchorage Asheville Atlanta Atlantic City Austin Baltimore Birmingham Boise Boston Brownsville Buffalo Burlington,Vt. Casper Charleston,S.C. Charleston,W.Va. Charlotte,N.C. Cheyenne Chicago Cincinnati Cleveland Columbia,S.C. Columbus,Ohio Concord,N.H. Dallas-Ft Worth Dayton Denver Des Moines Detroit El Paso Evansville Fairbanks Flagstaff Grand Rapids Greensboro,N.C. Hartford Spgfld Honolulu Houston Indianapolis Jackson,Miss. Jacksonville Juneau Kansas City Knoxville, TN Las Vegas

the option of breathing into an alcohol tester at the county jail twice a day or wearing a bracelet that detects alcohol in perspiration and alerts law officers when someone has been drinking. The Senate Judiciary Committee voted unanimously Tuesday to allow the ignition interlock devices to

Today Hi Lo W 32 20 ls 49 23 pc 45 22 pc 30 17 ls 38 25 ls 44 26 ls 42 32 r 62 30 pc 35 28 ls 42 26 mx 43 26 pc 34 26 ls 66 47 pc 30 21 pc 30 16 ls 41 25 pc 60 38 sh 37 23 ls 43 28 r 39 28 pc 27 19 pc 34 20 ls 30 19 mc 46 30 r 32 19 c 31 19 ls 58 33 pc 29 17 mc 43 29 pc 25 13 pc 31 19 pc 58 30 pc 34 22 pc 7 -9 pc 41 15 pc 30 16 mc 42 26 mx 33 25 ls 78 70 sh 59 36 su 28 18 pc 49 30 pc 63 39 pc 33 14 ls 31 16 mc 41 24 mx 64 42 su

Tomorrow Hi Lo W 30 13 ls 53 20 su 59 26 pc 26 17 ls 37 21 ls 47 30 pc 38 21 pc 63 33 su 34 19 pc 48 31 pc 44 27 pc 32 15 ls 66 48 pc 28 17 ls 26 7 lsr 42 28 pc 54 38 pc 31 23 ls 45 27 pc 48 30 pc 27 22 mc 31 20 pc 28 19 ls 50 28 pc 28 18 mc 30 9 lsr 57 37 pc 28 18 mc 54 34 pc 32 21 pc 27 18 ls 58 30 pc 35 23 mc 6 -5 pc 45 16 su 27 15 ls 44 25 pc 34 12 ls 78 69 pc 61 40 su 29 20 ls 54 35 pc 57 37 su 32 15 ls 38 24 pc 40 24 pc 63 43 pc

City Little Rock Los Angeles Louisville Lubbock Memphis Miami Beach Midland-Odessa Milwaukee Nashville New Orleans New York City Norfolk,Va. North Platte Oklahoma City Omaha Orlando Pendleton Philadelphia Phoenix Pittsburgh Portland,Maine Portland,Ore. Providence Raleigh-Durham Reno Richmond Sacramento St Louis Salt Lake City San Antonio San Diego San Francisco San Juan,P.R. Santa Fe Seattle Shreveport Sioux City Spokane Syracuse Tampa-St Ptrsbg Topeka Tucson Tulsa Washington,D.C. Wichita Wilkes-Barre Wilmington,Del.

Yesterday Hi Lo Prcp 47 33 0.00" 76 49 0.00" 43 35 Trace" 52 18 0.03" 42 33 0.37" 76 70 Trace" 51 27 0.00" 30 22 0.00" 45 38 0.27" 65 51 1.04" 38 27 0.04" 49 30 Trace" 43 9 0.00" 51 31 0.00" 32 18 0.00" 80 61 0.80" 54 41 0.02" 39 26 Trace" 69 43 0.00" 36 33 0.04" 17 2 0.05" 52 42 Trace" 33 11 0.14" 51 30 0.01" 56 26 0.00" 53 24 0.00" 63 38 0.00" 36 20 0.00" 35 31 0.08" 62 41 0.00" 72 50 0.00" 68 44 0.00" 82 73 0.05" 43 14 0.00" 49 45 0.05" 55 41 0.62" 26 15 0.00" 37 33 0.24" 28 9 0.14" 79 61 1.25" 42 13 0.00" 66 35 0.00" 49 25 0.00" 46 29 0.00" 49 17 0.00" 29 17 Trace" 40 26 0.00"

Today Hi Lo 47 27 78 49 33 23 53 21 40 25 76 52 56 27 27 15 36 23 55 38 37 29 50 34 39 18 45 24 25 14 68 42 47 30 37 28 70 44 36 20 33 29 52 39 35 29 46 29 51 27 43 28 65 35 30 18 42 25 62 33 75 52 65 50 80 73 41 13 56 42 54 31 22 14 42 28 33 19 68 43 30 17 66 40 45 23 37 29 39 23 38 25 36 27

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Tomorrow Hi Lo W 46 28 pc 80 49 su 32 26 mc 60 26 pc 42 32 pc 71 51 pc 58 25 pc 27 19 mc 36 27 pc 55 42 pc 36 21 pc 45 29 pc 48 23 pc 58 32 pc 36 20 pc 63 40 pc 45 29 fg 36 20 pc 71 44 su 29 17 ls 32 22 ls 56 39 fg 34 16 ls 47 27 pc 52 27 pc 43 24 pc 61 38 pc 35 21 pc 45 30 pc 65 35 su 74 48 su 66 49 su 80 73 sh 45 15 pc 57 43 pc 53 34 pc 33 21 pc 40 30 fg 26 13 ls 62 42 pc 42 23 pc 69 42 pc 48 31 pc 37 21 pc 52 26 pc 33 15 pc 35 20 pc

Around the world City Baghdad Bangkok Beijing Berlin Buenos Aires Cairo Calgary Edmonton Frankfurt Havana Helsinki

Today Hi Lo W 53 45 sh 92 76 pc 29 10 pc 34 22 ls 91 71 th 70 50 pc 34 22 ls 33 27 r 34 26 pc 79 64 th 15 -7 pc

S.D. bill would OK ignition devices PIERRE, S.D. (AP) — Ignition locking devices that prevent people who have been drinking from starting their vehicles may soon be added to a South Dakota program that lets people convicted of drunken driving avoid jail as long as they remain sober. The state’s 24/7 Sobriety Project now gives people

Yesterday Hi Lo Prcp 23 1 0.06" 45 22 0.00" 51 19 Trace" 32 24 Trace" 36 24 0.27" 42 37 0.48" 46 26 0.00" 60 36 0.00" 45 25 0.00" 43 40 0.32" 44 27 0.02" 32 12 0.05" 70 51 0.00" 32 27 0.03" 26 3 0.05" 35 24 0.00" 53 45 0.44" 48 32 0.00" 45 24 0.07" 36 13 Trace" 29 21 0.00" 40 34 0.11" 31 27 Trace" 49 35 0.26" 36 32 Trace" 17 -2 0.05" 53 38 Trace" 32 26 0.00" 45 14 0.00" 27 22 Trace" 29 27 Trace" 52 27 0.00" 37 30 0.00" -8 -21 0.00" 48 20 0.00" 31 27 0.02" 48 24 0.02" 29 7 0.15" 79 65 0.00" 58 46 0.11" 32 18 Trace" 49 45 1.62" 63 39 2.61" 41 38 0.35" 36 20 0.00" 45 36 0.08" 64 42 0.00"

City Hong Kong Istanbul Jerusalem Johannesburg Kabul London Madrid Mexico City Montreal Moscow Nairobi

Hi 67 42 63 79 35 42 46 66 29 10 80

Today Lo W 63 sh 37 sh 47 sh 55 sh 13 pc 28 r 27 pc 38 pc 13 ls 4 pc 50 pc

City New Delhi Oslo Paris Rio de Janeiro Rome Seoul Singapore Sydney Tokyo Toronto Vancouver

Hi 69 11 40 85 50 18 82 87 43 27 45

Today Lo W 41 pc 2 pc 30 r 70 th 43 sh 4 pc 76 th 65 th 26 pc 15 ls 40 pc

Forecasts and maps prepared by:

SPECIAL DELIVERY

be added to the program, which gives those convicted of alcohol-related crimes like drunken driving a chance to stay out of jail as long as they are monitored daily for alcohol use. The bill next goes to the full Senate. Cars equipped with the devices will not start if a driver’s breath shows any alcohol.

Oil’s impact Continued from 1B results “shouldn’t come as a surprise to anybody.” North Dakota’s oil boom started in the mid-2000s with advances in horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing techniques. Hydraulic fracturing, a process that uses pressurized fluid and chemicals to break open oilbearing rock some two miles underground. Cracks, propped open by injected sand or ceramic materials, provide a pathway for oil to flow to the well. Bangsund and Ness pre-

dicted the 2009 economic impact numbers will soon be overshadowed by those from 2010, a year of record production. “Last year will be a magnitude bigger than 2009 but we don’t have all the data to look at that yet,” Bangsund said. State officials estimated North Dakota produced about 110 million barrels in 2010, up from 79.7 million in 2009. Ness estimated the number of jobs in the industry has increased to

25,000, and there are now about 5,300 producing oil wells. North Dakota mineral rights owners received $559 million in lease and royalty payments in 2009, up from $302 million in 2007, the study said. Lease and royalty payments from 2005 were not available, Bangsund said. The study said that every dollar spent in the state by the oil industry in 2009 generated $1.58 in additional business activity.

‘Screwtape’ and has grown to appreciate “the little insights into human behavior on every page” with the years, he said. Everyone asks the question: “Why do I do what I do?” Gion said. Lewis presents humans as creatures with both a body and a soul, he said. When we are what we were made to be, “we find happiness,” Gion said. “When we work against what we were made to be,” we don’t. To Lewis, “God is reality. God is truth,” he said. “To find God is find one’s pur-

pose, one’s meaning, to live in reality.” In “Screwtape,” Lewis doesn’t portray the demonic powers as having an alternate theory of existence, and uninterested in providing another truth. “They (only) care about (creating) confusion, about supplanting reality with unreality, any unreality,” he said. “Screwtape” runs Thursday to Jan. 30 and Feb. 2-6. Performances are at 7:30 p.m. all days except Sundays, when performances start at 2 p.m. Tickets are $18 for adults and $15 for

Continued from 1B students, seniors and military personnel. Reservations may be made online at www.dakotastageltd.com, by calling 258-4998, or at the door before each show. “Screwtape” stars John Clemo in the title role of Screwtape. Wormwood is played by Austin Flemmer. Other cast members include David Puma, Amanda Pitzer and Dakota Stage Executive Director Amber Rae Bernhardt. Anne Green is the director. (Reach reporter Karen Herzog at 250-8267 or karen.herzog@bismarcktribune.com.)

Superintendent candidate Continued from 1B Indiana. It serves 1,400 students. Faidley will be interviewed Friday. He is an associate superintendent in the Yuma Unified School District. It has 11,300 students. A search firm was hired in 2010 after former superintendent Paul Johnson resigned for a job opportunity in Bulgaria. The first search netted five finalists,

none of whom was chosen to fill the vacancy. An interim superintendent was selected so another search could be done. The board tapped Assistant Superintendent John Salwei for the interim. A new superintendent could be selected by the end of the week. (Reach reporter Sara Kincaid at 250-8251 or sara.kincaid@bismarcktribune.com.)

TOM STROMME/Tribune

READY FOR TRANSPORT: Medical personnel from St. Alexius Medical Center and Metro Area Ambulance Service demonstrate loading a neonatal transport isolette into an airplane on Tuesday morning at the Bismarck Airport. In front are Darcy Herr, RN, left, of St. Alexius, and Jackie Knoll of the ambulance service. In back are Paul Peters, left, of the ambulance service and Pam Rangen, a respiratory therapist at St. Alexius. The state-of-theart isolette will allow St. Alexius’ neonatal intensive care unit to transport complex cases from outlying areas. Bonnie Cook, RN, the coordinator of the air and ground transportation team at St. Alexius, said the isolette is a welcome addition for the hospital. “I’m very proud of our team and of Metro Ambulance and the doctors,” said Cook. “We all work together.”

Mont. gay couples go to court HELENA, Mont. (AP) — An attorney for six gay couples seeking the same legal protections as married pairs asked a judge Tuesday to order Montana to establish civil unions, domestic partnerships or another system that ensures they’re not denied those rights. District Judge Jeffrey Sherlock heard arguments in the first court hearing of what is likely to be a lengthy legal process that will ultimately be decided years from now by the state Supreme Court. “It’s a journey of 1,000 miles and we’re taking the first few steps,” said plaintiff Mike Long.

Wyo. gay marriage vote bill OK’d CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — A bill that would allow Wyoming voters to decide whether the state should recognize same-sex marriages has won preliminary approval in the state Senate. The Senate voted 21-7 Tuesday in favor of a resolution sponsored by Republican Sen. Curt Meier of LaGrange. The proposal faces two more votes in the Senate before it can advance to the House for debate.


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 2011 Easy ribs: Prep and walk away PAGE 2C

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NEWS Local foods summit slated Feb. 18-19 Dakota Grown, a two-day conference on producing, processing and using locally-grown foods and food products, is scheduled for Feb. 18-19 at the Doublewood Inn, 1400 E. Interchange Ave., Bismarck. Agriculture Commissioner Doug Goehring said that the local foods movement is gaining momentum around the nation and in North Dakota, and that anyone with an interest in local foods is welcome to attend. The conference will include breakout sessions on hoop houses, horticulture, community-supported agriculture, farm-to-school programs, growing local foods businesses and why people should care about local foods. There also will be networking opportunities to visit with growers from the region. The keynote speaker Feb. 18 will be Michelle Wall from Dale Carnegie Training, who will discuss business skills for developing positive and steady results. Chris Young from the Rainmaker Group will speak on “Making a Difference in Local Foods… Making a Difference in the World” during the Feb. 18 social and banquet. The North Dakota Department of Agriculture and the North Dakota Farmers Market and Growers Association are sponsoring the conference. Registration is $40 per person and includes all sessions and meals. Registration information is included in a conference brochure available at www.agdepartment.com/Programs/ LocalFoodsInfo.htm or by calling 3284763 or e-mailing info@farrms.com.

Beef Spring Rolls with Carrots and Cilantro

RECIPES Eating more grains “The New American Plate” from the American Institute for Cancer Research contains recipes that are weighted toward higher amounts of vegetables and whole grains.

Brown Rice with Pineapple and Shiitake Mushrooms 1 /2 cup long grain brown rice or brown basmati rice 1 cup water 1 tablespoon canola oil 1 /2 medium red bell pepper, diced 8 shiitake mushrooms, stems removed, and diced 1 cup chopped green onions 1 /2 cup crushed canned pineapple, drained Bring water to a boil. Add brown rice, bring to boil again, then cover and reduce heat to low simmer. Cook rice for 45 minutes or until all water is absorbed. While rice is cooking, saute red pepper and shiitake mushrooms in canola oil for 3 minutes. Add green onion and pineapple. Continue to saute for 1 more minute. Using fork, add rice to vegetables in pan. Cook, breaking up rice and stirring, until well combined and hot. Serve immediately. Makes 4 servings. Per serving:166 calories, 4 g total fat, 30 g carbohydrate, 3 g protein, 3 g dietary fiber, 12 mg sodium.

Take flavors East with Asian-style beef dishes By KAREN HERZOG Bismarck Tribune

Beef Banh Mi

Hearty beef meals are welcome in cold weather, but sometimes the same old-same old, gets ... old. Heading in a new direction with meals — say, East — can perk up beef cuts with garlic, ginger, cilantro and sauces such as teriyaki and fish sauce. Asian flavors and styles such as spring rolls, banh mi and satay help us remember there’s a world of great food out there beyond the snowbanks.

Beef Banh Mi 1 beef chuck shoulder pot roast, about 2 pounds, cut into 1-inch cubes 1 cup thinly sliced carrots 1 cup thinly sliced radishes 1 /2 cup rice vinegar 1 /4 cup plus 1 tablespoon packed brown sugar, divided 11/2 cups plus 1 tablespoon water, divided 1 tablespoon fish sauce (nam pla) 2 cloves garlic, thinly sliced 2 slices (1/8 inch) fresh ginger 1 tablespoon cornstarch

6 banh mi or soft hoagie rolls (each 5 inches long), split 6 tablespoons reduced-fat or regular mayonnaise Toppings: Thinly sliced cucumber, thinly sliced jalapeno peppers and fresh cilantro leaves (optional) Combine carrots and radishes in large bowl; set aside. Heat rice vinegar and 1/4 cup brown sugar in

small saucepan over medium heat 1 to 3 minutes or until sugar dissolves, stirring occasionally. Pour over vegetables. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve. Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Combine beef pot roast, 11/2 cups water, remaining 1 tablespoon brown sugar, fish sauce, garlic and ginger in stockpot over medium heat stirring constantly until sugar dissolves; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover tightly. Continue cooking in 325-degree oven 13/4 to 21/4 hours or until beef is fork-tender. Remove beef; keep warm. Skim fat from cooking liquid. Measure 11/4 cups cooking liquid; discard remaining liquid. Return reserved cooking liquid to stockpot. Dissolve cornstarch in remaining 1 tablespoon water; stir into cooking liquid. Bring to a boil; cook 1 to 2 minutes or until sauce is thickened, stirring occasionally. Return beef to cooking liquid; cook additional 1 to 2 minutes or until heated through, stirring occasionally. Strain vegetables from rice vinegar mixture; discard liquid. Slightly hollow out centers of split rolls. Spread 1 tablespoon mayonnaise

on top and bottoms of each roll. Evenly fill each roll with beef and vegetables. Garnish with toppings, as desired. Makes 6 servings Tip: Use bread pieces removed from rolls for bread crumbs for later use. To make bread crumbs, place bread pieces in food processor or blender container. Cover; pulse on and off to form fine crumbs. Tip: If cooking liquid is less than 11/4 cups, add enough water to equal 11/4 cups. Tip: Two tablespoons reducedsodium or regular soy sauce may be substituted for fish sauce. Tip: Banh mi rolls can be substituted with long crusty rolls such as baguettes. Per serving, using reduced fat mayonnaise: 420 calories; 15g fat (4g saturated fat); 66mg cholesterol; 598mg sodium; 43g carbohydrate; 2.5g fiber; 29g protein.

Beef Spring Rolls with Carrots and Cilantro 1 pound beef top sirloin or top round steak, cut 3/4 to 1 inch thick or flank steak Continued on 2C

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Page 2C ■ Wednesday, January 26, 2011

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W H AT ’ S G O I N G O N W ednesday, Jan. 26 ARTS-ENTERTAINMENT-MUSIC: ■ Live solo acoustic music by Mike Swenson, 5:30-7 p.m., Bruno’s Pizza, 910 E. Front Ave. FAITH: ■ 24-hour, seven-day-a-week adoration at Christ the King Church, 505 10th Ave. N.W., Mandan. ■ F.L.A.M.E. youth group, 7 p.m., Capital Christian Center, 3838 Jericho Road. GOVERNMENT: ■ Bismarck Planning and Zoning Commission, 5 p.m., City/County Building. View: Government Access, cable channel 2 or www.freetv.org. ORGANIZATIONS: ■ Keep It Simple AA, 6:30 a.m., noon and 7 p.m., Serenity Place. ■ Retired men’s breakfast, 6:30-9 a.m., VFW Club, 1326 E. Broadway Ave. Info: David, 223-0254. ■ Leaders, 7-8 a.m., Cracker Barrel. ■ Energy Generation Conference, 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Civic Center. Info: www.info.bismarckstate.edu/ceti/energy. ■ Bismarck Golden Kiwanis, 9:30 a.m., Municipal Country Club. ■ Bismarck Rotary, noon, Bismarck Elks Lodge. Featured speaker and meeting. ■ Capital City AA, noon and 8 p.m., 1351 S. 12th St., door 1202. ■ New Hope AA, noon, New Freedom Center, 905 E. Interstate Ave. ■ Sertoma Club, noon, Country Club. ■ Former smokers support group, 6:30 p.m., BismarckBurleigh Public Health, 500 E. Front Ave., use north entrance. Info: 355-1597. ■ TOPS North Dakota 347, 6:45 p.m., 1705 Sunset Drive, Mandan. ■ Old-Timer’s NA (OP, WC), 8 p.m., Trinity Lutheran Church, 502 N. Fourth St. PUBLIC EVENTS: ■ Preschool Adventures, 9:30 a.m., 10:15 a.m., Bismarck Public Library. Story Time for children 3-6 years of age. ■ Gymnastic registration, noon-7 p.m., Dakota Star Gymnastics, Mandan. ■ Parents Forever, 5:30-9:30 p.m., Morton County Courthouse, Mandan. Pre-registration required: 667-3340. Pre-payment required: $55. ■ Jaycees speed dating event/Bis-Man Bombshellz Roller Derby Meet and Greet, 6 p.m., Westside Bar and Grill, Mandan. Registration for speed dating starts at 6:30 p.m. $15. Portion of proceeds goes to Relay for Life. SERVICES: ■ Blood drive, 8 a.m.-6 p.m., United Blood Services. Info: 258-4512. ■ Well baby clinic, noon-2:30 p.m., Birth Place, St. Alexius. Info: 530-4270. ■ Wellness screenings, 1-4 p.m., Center for Family Medicine, Mandan. Fast two hours prior. Cost: $15. Appt: 530-5550. ■ Custer Health regular immunizations, 2-5:30 p.m., 210 Second Ave. N.W., Mandan. Appt: 667-3370.

Thursday, Jan. 27 ARTS-ENTERTAINMENT-MUSIC: ■ “Rope” (USA, Hitchcock), Cinema 100 film series, 3 and 5:30 p.m., Grand Theatre. ■ Live solo acoustic music by Brian Gray, 5:30-7 p.m., Bruno’s Pizza, 910 E. Front Ave. ■ Diane Grotewold and Denis Montplaisir perform easy listening music, 6-8 p.m., Elks Club dining room. ■ Sushi night with music by Shaun Oban, 7 p.m., Bistro. ■ “Screwtape,” 7:30 p.m., Dakota Stage Ltd. Cost: $15-$50. ■ Karaoke with DJ Paul Berge, 8:30 p.m.-close, Westside Bar and Grill, Mandan. FAITH: ■ The Banquet, a feeding ministry to serve people with needs of Bismarck and Mandan, 5:30-7 p.m., Trinity Lutheran Church, Third Street and Avenue B. Free meal served. GOVERNMENT: ■ Burleigh County Social Services, 3:30 p.m., City/County Building. View: Government Access, cable channel 2 or www.freetv.org. ■ Morton County Planning and Zoning Commission, 5:30 p.m., Commission Room, Morton County Courthouse, Mandan. ORGANIZATIONS: ■ Alcoholics Anonymous: General Service Office, www.aa.org; and Area 52 North Dakota, www.aanorthdakota.org. ■ Meadowlarks Toastmasters, 6:30 a.m., Church of Corpus Christi. Info: Joe Mathern, 223-1786. ■ Energy Generation Conference, 8 a.m.-6 p.m., Civic Center. Info: info.bismarckstate.edu/ceti/energy. ■ TOPS 160, 9:30 a.m., First Presbyterian Church basement, Mandan. ■ TOPS, 9:30 a.m., First Lutheran Church, Mandan. ■ TOPS No. 319, 10 a.m., McCabe United Methodist Church. ■ Moms in Touch International, 10:45-11:45 a.m., Charity Lutheran Church, 120 Aspen Ave. ■ Capital City AA, noon and 8 p.m., 1351 S. 12th St., door 1202. ■ Capital City Lions Club luncheon meeting, noon, Municipal Country Club. ■ Club Fed Toastmasters, noon-1 p.m., Federal Building, Third Street and Rosser Avenue, Room 164/166. ■ Keep It Simple AA, noon, Serenity Place. ■ Mandan Optimist Club, noon, A&B Pizza, Mandan. ■ New Hope AA, noon, New Freedom Center, 905 E. Interstate Ave. ■ We in Black, 12:30-1 p.m., Boulevard Avenue and Sixth Street. ■ Moms in Touch prayer group, 2:15-3:15 p.m., Shiloh Christian School. ■ TOPS North Dakota 123, 5:30 p.m., McCabe United Methodist Church. ■ Grief support group, 6:30 p.m., Good Shepherd Lutheran Church south campus library. Open to anyone grieving the loss of a loved one. ■ Domestic violence support group, 7 p.m., Abused Adult Resource Center, free, and free child care is available. Info: 222-8370. ■ GamAnon support group, 7 p.m., Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, Washington Street and Divide Avenue. ■ Mandan Historical Society, 7 p.m., Morton Mandan Public Library. ■ New Leipzig AA group, 7 p.m. MST, New Leipzig City Hall (back room). ■ North Star Lions, 7 p.m., AMVETS. ■ Echo AA, 7:30 p.m., New Bethel Congregational Church, Hazen. ■ City Center AA, 8 p.m., Serenity Place. ■ Eastenders NA (OP, WC), 8 p.m., Grace Lutheran Brethren Church, 503 N. 24th St. ■ Fort Yates AA group, 8 p.m., Fort Yates Episcopal Church.

Bismarck Tribune ■ Bismarcktribune.com

Easy ribs: Prep and walk away By ALISON LADMAN For The Associated Press Nothing says game time like eating meat off the bone. Though ribs take a long time to cook, most of the cooking is unattended. In this recipe, the ribs get rubbed with a dry seasoning mixture, then slowly roasted until tender. They are finished with an easy glaze, then roasted until sticky, g o o e y, s w e e t - h o t - a n d tangy. W h e n d e c i d i n g h ow much to cook, plan for 1 to 11/2 pounds per person. If desired, you can rub the ribs with the dry rub in advance, then refrigerate until ready to cook.

Apricot Chili Baby Back Ribs St a r t t o f i n i s h : 2 t o 21/2 hours (30 minutes active) Servings: 6 For the rub: 2 tablespoons garlic powder 2 teaspoons dried thyme 2 tablespoons paprika 2 tablespoons sugar 4 teaspoons salt 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper 2 teaspoons ground black pepper 2 tablespoons dry mustard For the ribs: 7 pounds baby back ribs 1 /4 cup vegetable oil For the glaze:

Associated Press

You can’t go wrong with the classic pairing of Super Bowl and ribs. These Apricot Chili Baby Back Ribs are basted in the sauce before the final roasting and need little attention while cooking so you can concentrate on the pre-game festivities. 11/2 cup apricot jam 2 tablespoons Dijon 4 teaspoons red pepper mustard 1 /2 cup apple cider vinegar flakes Heat the oven to 325 F. 2 teaspoons salt

Line 2 baking sheets with foil and set a rack over each. To assemble the rub, in small bowl mix together the garlic powder, thyme, paprika, sugar, salt, cayenne, black pepper and mustard. Set aside. If the ribs still have the membrane on the back, remove it. Cut each rack into 3 pieces. Lightly rub the ribs all over first with the vegetable oil, then with the dry rub. Arrange the ribs on the racks over the baking sheets. Bake for 2 to 21/2 hours, or until tender and the meat starts to pull back from the bone at the ends. Meanwhile, make the glaze. In a blender, combine the jam, pepper flakes, salt, Dijon and vinegar. Puree until smooth. When the ribs are done, remove them from the oven. Increase the oven temperature to 375 F. Paint the glaze over the surface of the ribs. Return the ribs to the oven and bake until the ribs are sticky and starting to caramelize, about another 30 minutes. Cut into individual ribs and serve. Nutrition information per serving (values are rounded to the nearest whole number): 716 calories; 402 calories from fat (56 percent of total calor ies); 45g fat (14g saturated; 0g trans fats); 122mg cholesterol; 56g carbohydrate; 25g protein; 0g fiber; 1,869mg sodium.

Beef goes East /4 cup plus 3 tablespoons stir-fry sauce and marinade, divided 8 rice paper wrappers (8 to 9 inch diameter) 1 cup shredded carrots 1 cup lightly packed fresh cilantro Additional prepared stirfry sauce and marinade (optional) Cut beef steak lengthwise in half, then crosswise into 1 /8- to 1/4-inch thick strips. Combine 1/4 cup stir-fry sauce and beef in medium bowl. Cover and marinate in refrigerator 30 minutes to 2 hours. Heat large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat until hot. Add half of the beef; stirfry 1 to 3 minutes or until outside surface of beef is no longer pink. (Do not overcook.) Remove from skillet. Repeat with remaining beef. Fill large bowl with warm water. Dip 1 rice paper wrapper into water for a few seconds or just until moistened. Rice paper will still be firm but will continue to soften during assembly. Place on work surface. S p o o n 1/ 4 c u p b e e f , 2 tablespoons carrots and 2 tablespoons cilantro evenly in a row across center of wrapper, leaving 1-inch bor1

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der on right and left sides; drizzle with about 1 teaspoon reser ved stir-fr y sauce. Fold right and left sides of wrapper over filling. Fold bottom edge up over filling and roll up tightly. Repeat with remaining wrappers and filling ingredients. Cut each spring roll diagonally in half. Serve with additional stir-fry sauce, if desired. Makes 4 servings. Tip: Eight large lettuce leaves may be substituted for rice paper wrappers. Per serving, using beef top sirloin steak: 321 calories; 6g fat (2g saturated fat); 49mg cholesterol; 420mg sodium; 33g carbohydrate; 0.9g fiber; 31g protein. Per serving, using top round: 256 calories; 5g fat (2g saturated fat); 61mg cholesterol; 740mg sodium; 21g carbohydrate; 0.9g fiber; 31g protein.

Ginger Beef Noodle Soup 1 pound ground beef 1 /2 teaspoon salt 1 /2 teaspoon ground ginger 1 /4 to 1/2 teaspoon pepper 2 cups water 1 can (13.75 to 14.5 ounces) ready-to-serve vegetable broth 1 package (3 ounces)

beef-flavored instant ramen noodles, broken up 3 cups frozen broccoli stir-fry vegetable mixture Heat large nonstick skillet over medium heat until hot. Add ground beef; cook 8 to 10 minutes, breaking into 3 /4-inch crumbles and stirring occasionally. Pour off drippings; season with salt, ginger and pepper. Stir in water, broth and seasoning packet from ramen noodles; bring to a boil. Stir in noodles and vegetables; return to a boil and continue cooking 2 to 3 minutes or until noodles are tender. Serve immediately. Makes 4 servings. Per serving: 310 calories; 26g protein, 11g carbohydrate, 18g fat, 985mg sodium, 81mg cholesterol.

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Continued from 1C micelli or thin spaghetti 2 tablespoons vegetable oil 1 /2 c u p s e e d e d a n d chopped cucumber Cut steak into 1/8-inch thick strips. Add 2 tablespoons teriyaki sauce to beef strips; toss to coat evenly. Combine remaining 3 tablespoons teriyaki sauce, peanut butter, water, red pepper and ginger. Cook vermicelli in salted boiling water according to package directions; drain and rinse. Toss vermicelli with peanut butter mixture to coat well. In a large nonstick skillet or wok, heat oil over medium-high heat until hot. Add beef (half at a time) and stirfry 1 to 2 minutes or until outside surface is no longer pink. (Do not overcook.) Add to noodles; toss lightly. Sprinkle with chopped cucumber. Serve immediately. Makes 4 servings. Per serving: 308 calories; 27g protein; 29g carbohydrate; 9g fat; 767mg sodium; 61mg cholesterol. — Recipes and photos courtesy of The Beef Checkoff (www.BeefItsWhatsFor Dinner.com). (Reach reporter Karen He r zo g a t 2 5 0 - 8 2 6 7 o r karen.herzog@bismarcktribune.com.)

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Advice

Bismarcktribune.com ■ Bismarck Tribune

Wednesday, January 26, 2011 ■ Page 3C

Couple wants gay son to see ‘error of his ways’ Dear Annie: Our son, “Colin,” is 19 years old and a sophomore in college. He was always helpful and a good student. Last spring, Colin became rude and condescending. We found out he was living with a 33-year-old man who is infected with HIV. This man was controlling and used sexual blackmail to keep Colin in line. We finally got our son back home, but it was a long, difficult summer. When Colin announced that he was gay, my husband and I sought advice from several clergy. Most of them said to turn our backs on him until he asked for our forgiveness for living sinfully. We decided instead to take the advice of our priest, who said to accept his orientation, hard as that has been. All we’ve asked of Colin is that he do well in school, get a job to help pay off the legal bills that resulted from extricating him from his previous relationship

BRIDGE

By PHILLIP ALDER Let’s go straight to the nub of today’s deal. South is in four spades. West leads the club two. How should East plan the defense? On Monday I pointed out (again) that when third hand plays high, he tables the bottom of his equivalently high cards. He does not do that when he holds ace-king-doubleton. Then he wins the first trick with the ace and cashes the king, showing his doubleton. He might also win with the ace first in this situation. First, though, a comment on the auction. South was right to rebid his good sixcard suit, not to raise clubs with four low cards. How should East read his partner’s lead? Assuming it isn’t a falsecard (which is rarely a good idea), a twolead is either low from a suit headed by at least one honor, or a singleton. Here, East knows West does not have a club honor, so should assume a singleton (despite the bidding). However, if East wins with his king, cashes the ace, and leads the six as a suit-preference signal for hearts (the higher-ranking of the other two side suits), West will not be sure whether the six is high or low. Suppose South does not play his eight. West might think East began with A-K-8-6. To help West, East should win the first trick with his ace, cash the king, then lead the six. West should take the ace-before-the-king sequence as a suit-preference signal for hearts. Note that if West shifts to a diamond at trick four, South gets home, his heart losers disappearing on dummy’s two diamond honors.

Mock city rises at Marine base SAN DIEGO (AP) — A mock city roughly the size of downtown San Diego has risen in a remote Southern California desert to train military forces to fight in urban environments. The $170 million urban training center was unveiled Tuesday at the Twentynine Palms military base, 170 miles northeast of San Diego. The 1,560-building facility will allow troops to practice and refine skills that can be used around the world, the Marine Corps said. Fake markets, hotels and other businesses are complete with actors who create scenarios that pose a full range of challenges from relief efforts to direct combat.

ANNIE’S MAILBOX

and not be sexually promiscuous. Colin contracted various STDs and should avoid sexual contact anyway. Our requests seemed reasonable to us. Unfortunately, when Colin returned to school, he became sexually involved with at least two different men and even asked to bring one home for the holidays. Of course, we said no. We could live with his orientation if he would live a moral lifestyle. So far, he has not tested positive for HIV, although that is still a worry. We have told him we will not pay any more medical

bills, since we can’t afford it. From the horrible way he treats us, I regret that we were so kind to him over the summer. Counseling didn’t help him see the error of his ways. He is a bad influence on his little sister. How should we handle this? — Heartbroken Parents Dear Parents: We know Colin’s sexuality is disturbing to you, but try to separate his orientation from his impulsive lifestyle. He is 19 and living away from home for the first time. In college, many children, gay or straight, become sexually active. Unfortunately, some also are promiscuous, drink too much, do drugs, engage in risky behaviors and otherwise behave like wild animals let loose. Most kids settle down eventually, and the hope is that they don’t do any permanent damage in the interim. Please contact PFLAG (http://pflag.org) for some emotional support and practical suggestions.

Caregivers need breaks

Fixing the slobs

Dear Annie: I have been caring for my disabled husband while working full time and raising two children. I haven’t had time alone in 15 years. Now my children are grown, and they want to give me a minivacation as a gift. They offered to stay with Dad while I go away for a four-day weekend. My husband is upset and says if I truly cared for him, I would not want to get away. He is doing his best to make me feel guilty. Is he being selfish, or am I? — Need a Break Dear Need: Your husband has become completely dependent on you and fears your absence. All caregivers need to recharge their batteries. Reassure your husband that you love him, that you will come back refreshed, and that the kids will do a wonderful job taking care of him. Then have a great time.

Dear Annie: I read the letter from “Loving and Missing all at the Same Time,” whose daughter is an inconsiderate slob. When my kids were in high school, I got tired of their stuff scattered all over the house. I said if I found anything lying around when I got up in the morning, I would wake them to put it away. The rub was, I wouldn’t tell them what or where it was. Sometimes, by the time they found it, they were wide awake and irritated. My daughter was a slow learner. Many days, she would come home and her clothes would be scattered in the front yard. Fortunately, we had understanding neighbors. — Omaha, Neb. (Annie’s Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. E-mail questions to anniesmailbox@comcast.net.)

Reader swears that water ionizer improves health D E A R D R . G OT T: Please do some research on a company named Enagic. They are the premier manufacturer of Kangen water ionizers. I have been using this water for three years, lost 40 pounds, run faster and longer than I did at age 25, got off Plavix and simvastatin, and am now trying to reduce my diabetic numbers. I think the fact that I can drink way more water is an important thing, but the antioxidant value and the higher alkaline helps the body undo many health issues associated with acidosis. I am not a quack. I was CEO of a financial institution for 27 years, and nowhere in this career did anyone mention how important alkaline is. So far, my weight loss and the 10 miles of running I do have not produced many results. I’m looking at a genetic test to see what might work for my genetic makeup. Your comments? DEAR READER: I don’t in any way doubt your intelligence regarding water, nor would I have a negative statement for the CEO of a financial institution or anyone else, for that matter. However, you asked me to do

DR. PETER GOTT

some research, so I did. According to Multi Level Marketing, an E n a g i c w a t e r i o n i ze r costs about $4,000. A comparable unit can be purchased from other companies at a substantially lower price. None of the companies is backed by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. A water filter with some simple natural additions to the water will provide the same benefits at a more potent level for far less money. Kangen water is alkaline, ionized water. The unit contains a filter and ionizing chamber similar to all others. The quality of Kangen or alkaline water is measured by how acidic or alkaline water becomes (pH) and by how much ionization occurs. There is much debate over whether ionized water provides genuine health benefits. Enagic distributes water ionizers via network marketing, meaning that people who use

the product can receive commissions and generate income. There are some reports detailing the benefits for intestinal and digestive issues, but some Enagic distributors claim sensational results. Have your water tested by a re p u t a b l e f i r m . Determine whether it is potable. Visit your family physician for a complete examination and for laboratory testing to determine whether you are at risk for diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, anemia, thyroid disorders or other health concerns. Your 40-pound weight loss and elimination of both medications (perhaps through a program of exercise) speak well in terms of you taking care of your body. You are certainly doing something right, and if you believe a Kangen water ionizer has played a role, then stay the course. There’s no s e n s e i n ro c k i n g t h e boat. (Dr. Gott is a retired physician and the author of the book “Dr.Gott’s No Flour, No Sugar Diet.” Quill Driver Books, www.quilldriverbooks.com; 800-605-7176. Readers can write to Dr.Gott in care of United Media, 200 Madison Ave., fourth floor, New York, N.Y. 10016.)

HOROSCOPES BY HOLIDAY By HOLIDAY MATHIS ARIES (March 21-April 19). You will someday be in a position where others promote you. Until then, you have to do it yourself. It’s the same for everyone, even those you see as being above it all. TAURUS (April 20-May 20). Your list is too long, and it’s stressing you out. But the answer is a scissors snip away. Write it all down in order of importance, and then cut. Never put off until tomorrow what you can avoid doing altogether. GEMINI (May 21-June 21).When others make a fuss over your accomplishments, it may feel awkward to you. In a private moment, you will know the proud rush of success, and that’s all the acknowledgement you need right now. CANCER (June 22-July 22). You get the job done like a professional, whether or not you’re getting compensated for your efforts. You will attract the attention of a power player who shares your work ethic. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22). An issue persists. There are many possible solutions to consider. You’re not likely to come to a conclusion on this matter today, though you may take action in a certain direction just because you’re tired of thinking about it. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). No matter how fast you zip along life’s highway, anyone going faster seems like a reckless crazy person. You

will enjoy people who have a similar sense of pacing and avoid the others. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). It’s not so difficult for you to forgive your loved ones. You may need more time, and some distance wouldn’t hurt, either. But ultimately, you will allow your burdens to drop and your bonds to heal. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 21). Your friends love that they don’t have to explain themselves to you. You know why they do what they do. Furthermore, you can predict what they will do in the future. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21). Excitement and adventure will happen close to home. A whole new world will open up because you have the confidence to talk to someone interesting. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19). You’ll be drawn out of yourself — pulled out of your routine and into the drama of a fascinating person. You are especially vulnerable to the charms of Taurus and Sagittarius people. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18). The one who was closed to you suddenly opens up. This likely has to do with a change in his or her status — nothing to do with you and nothing to take personally. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20). You have many admirers, and this makes you even more admired. People will compete for your attention. You are, quite simply, “on.” However, don’t let it go to your head, or the spell will be broken.

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Page 4C ■ Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Comics

Bismarck Tribune ■ Bismarcktribune.com

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Wednesday, January 26, 2011 ■ Page 5C

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ASSISTANT CFO Mountrail County Health Center in Stanley ND has an immediate opening for an Assistant Chief Financial Officer. This position will have excellent prospect for rapid advancement and will work directly with the Chief Financial Officer in an effort to develop the successful candidate into an effective replacement. The Assistant CFO will work with the CFO, CEO, and Board of Directors to ensure the overall financial integrity of the organization, including analysis, planning and reporting, budgeting, and reimbursement for 57 bed nursing home, 11 bed Critical Access Hospital, rural health clinic, and 12 unit independent living apartments. Prefer Bachelor’s degree in accounting with at least 2 years of healthcare accounting experience. Competitive salary and benefits. Applications available at: www.stanleyhealth.org or contact Linda in Human Resources at 701-628-2442 or e-mail resume to: HR@stanleyhealth.org EOE

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Page 6C ■ Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Bismarck Tribune ■ Bismarcktribune.com

Employment Southwest Healthcare Services of Bowman offers competitive wages and benefits, as well as, paid time off and extended sick leave hours that can be earned after a 90 day orientation period. We offer a caring environment with emphasis on community, family and compassion.

Become The Newest Member Of Our Team Of Healthcare Professionals - Apply Today! Full-time (36-40 hrs) Physical Therapist needed for consolidated healthcare system in Bowman, North Dakota: acute; swing; long-term care; outpatient; and home care. Applicant must have or be able to obtain a current ND License. No holidays or weekends. New grads welcomed. Ask us about our Sign-On Bonus, Relocation Assistance and Loan Repayment Options. For more information or to obtain application, contact: Jeanine Clendenen, Human Resources 802 2nd St. NW - Bowman, ND 58623 jclendenen@swhealthcare.net 701-523-3214 Or visit us at www.swhealthcare.net/Employment.asp Check out our community at: www.bowmannd.com

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NORTH BISMARCK ROUTE OPPORTUNITIES

Friday

(Rt. 104) Grimsrud Dr, Thompson, Turnpike, Xavier. . .45 Papers.....$155 (Rt. 178) Brunswick Circle, Buckskin, Mustang. . . .91 papers.....$315 (Rt. 237) Buckskin, Kingston, Arabian..............54 papers.....$185 (Rt. 192) E. Calgary, Montreal, Normandy, Renee. . .86 Papers.....$300 (Rt. 193) Coleman, E. Calgary, Montreal, Valcartier...72 papers.....$250 (Rt. 220) Coolidge, Hoover, N 23rd..................53 papers.....$180

Tough Puzzle

Saturday Super Tough Puzzle Solution to last Sudoku puzzle

CENTRAL BISMARCK ROUTE OPPORTUNITIES (Rt. 39) E. Highland Acres, Midway......................31 Papers.....$105 (Rt. 134) E. Highland Acres, Pioneer....................44 Papers.....$150 (Rt. 239) S. Highland Acres.................................26 Papers.......$95 (Rt. 42) Divide, N. 26th..................................22 Papers......$75 (Rt. 60) Ave. D, Lora, Curtis.............................74 Papers. . . .$260 (Rt. 156) N. 14th St., N 15th St, N 16th St. . . . . .72 Papers. . . .$280

For more information on routes, contact: Ron at 250-8215 ron.mosbrucker@bismarcktribune.com

Laurel at 355-8826 laurel.faber@bismarcktribune.com

Sunday More Easy Puzzle Solution, tips and computer program at www.krazydad.com/sudoku/ © Puzzles by Krazydad.com

LABORATORY MANAGER

We invite you to become part of our healthcare team! We have a full-time, 80 hours per two-week payperiod, opening for a Lab Manager. Responsibilities are to provide technical and administrative oversight of a Joint Commission accredited 25-bed Critical Access Hospital Lab services. Responsible for department operations including: Personnel and dept. budget, quality assurance and risk mgmt. Responsible for integrating departmental services with hospitals primary functions. Benchwork required. BS degree in Clinical Laboratory or related field is required. Candidate must possess a national MT/ASCP/CLS certification and hold or be eligible for ND licensure. Recent Laboratory supervisory experience and excellent time management and communication skills are preferred. Background check is required. Must be able to meet the physical requirements listed in the job description. Jamestown Hospital provides an excellent benefits package, competitive wages, and a friendly working atmosphere.

Qualified candidates should apply to:

Jamestown Hospital Attn: Human Resources 419 5th Street NE Jamestown, ND 58401 701-95 2-4813 ~ EOE www.jamestownhospital.com

A skilled nursing facility is now hiring for the following positions: • RN’s • LPN’s • CNA’s • CMA II/CNA’s • CNA-Dining/ Activity Assistant • Culinary Services Cook • PT or FT Speech Therapist Please visit or apply online at:

www.stgabriels community.org

701-751-5102 • EOE


Bismarcktribune.com ■ Bismarck Tribune

Wednesday, January 26, 2011 ■ Page 7C

Merchandise/Ag

Chapter 7 & 13

Director for Training and Technical Assistance

The Community HealthCare Association of the Dakotas (CHAD) is seeking an exceptional individual to serve as the Director for Training and Technical Assistance on matters related to strengthening, expanding and improving the quality of care in HRSA funded health centers. This position can be located in CHAD’s Bismarck, ND or Sioux Falls SD office. This position is responsible for meeting the needs of members related to managing and supervising the organizations training and technical assistance program, providing requested high level organizational facilitation to member health centers, and program evaluation of the services provided. Qualifications: • Bachelor’s degree, a Master’s degree preferred in health care, health education, social work or related field. • Three to five years of progressively responsible experience in group facilitation; services or social services related to training, technical assistance and supervision. • Experience in facilitating organizational planning • Experience in the community health center operations preferred • Must be able to communicate effectively through public speaking, training, technical writing and general correspondence. CHAD offers competitive salary and benefits. To apply please send salary requirements, cover letter, resume and references by Feb 4, 2011 to: karen@community healthcare.net full description at www.community healthcare.net

HOTEL GM

Great opportunity to be the opening GM of a new 79-room LTD service hotel in Dickinson. Must have previous hotel management exp. and be able to lead a team to consistently deliver exceptional guest service; sales/marketing experience; training/staff development; able to meet budgets; ensure policies/ standards are followed. Competitive salary/ benefits. Email resume and salary requirements to

stpeteofc@sky hospitality.com

BANKRUPTCY 402-504

DELL GX1 Computer: XP operating system & disk, monitor, speakers, kb, mouse, high speed internet. First $80 Cash... 255-1351

Obedience classes for Puppy, Basic,. Enhanced & CGC with testing. 663-4441 YOUNG PEACOCKS for Sale. Call 701-597-3611

We are a debt-relief agency.

HIGH OUTPUT portable propane heater. Almost new 75,000-250,000 BTUs $60. Call 701-527-0303

Commercial Snowblower 4x4 Ford Chassis Snowgower, 8 ft wide, self propelled, can deliver. Call 320-248-0930

HP F335 DeskJet Printer. All-in-one print, scan, copy, including photos. New ink cartridges and USB cable. First $50 Cash... 255-1351

WANTED! Bolen Snowblower that fits Bolen Garden Tractor. Call (701)250-9123 or (701)527-4168

Connole & Somerville Plumbing, Heating & A/C Inc., Minot, ND is Now Hiring! Experienced FT Sheet Metal Journeyman. 8 years experience a plus. Need to know layout & installation. We offer competitive salary and benefits. Come join our team! Please contact us by email at: julied@srt.com or give us a call @ (701)-839-7944

HELP WANTED GENERAL CONSTRUCTION & E.I.F.F. Call 391-7585 or 255-7585

HAY: (WANTED) All Grades Lg. Square Bales of Straight Alfalfa and Alfalfa / Grass Mix. 308991-3432 Negotiable on Location and Quantity. 308-991-3432.

NEW KODAK digital camera 10.2mp, 3x zoom, NI-MH batteries and charger, 2gb memory card, case, cable. First $80 Cash... 255-1351

ZENITH 36” STEREO TV: has 2-tuner color P-I-P for sports fans; great picture & features, universal remote. First $150 Cash... 255-1351

GIVEAWAY 27in Console TV w / Remote Control. Works Good on Cable. Nice Cabinet. Just come and get it. 663-7618

LAPTOP: Dell Inspiron 1750 laptop computer 250GB hard drive 4GB memory CD/DVD and cd burner. $400.00 cash Call 204 2441

Not too late for Ice Fishing season! Portable Ice House, propane with 12 volt lighting system, 8ft wide by 18ft long (body size) retractable wheels to sit down on ice. Pulls great! 6 holes, stove top for cooking, sink, couch included! Barely used! $6,200. Call (701)400-7701

Mens cross country ski package-Karhu skis, Tyrol size 10 boots, poles and bindings.$75. 667-1284

ND Class II Concealed Weapon Testing, Sat. Feb. 5th

REPEAT PERFORMANCE will pay you cash on the spot or consign your WOMENS & PETITES gently used clothes & accessories. 2 yrs old or newer. Call 255-0096 for more info. www.consignrepeat performance.com

REMODELING SALE @ SELECT INN

UT 5 yr. 34 + STATE Concealed Weapon permit course. 10am-1:30pm

EOE

To setup appointme nt.

TWO UPHOLSTERED rocker/recliners $50 ea; two swivel rocker chairs $35 ea; oak table formica top $60; dark seven drawer desk $15. 701-258-2196

Earthwork Superintendent

to manage Veit earthwork projects in North Dakota. Travel to various North Dakota projects is required. Knowledge and proven application of all phases of commercial & landfill earthwork services is necessary plus 5 years direct experience.

For more info, and to apply, please go to: www.veitusa.com

With Papers. Bought at Knowles Jewelry. Has 8 round diamonds and 4 square diamonds on each side of the ring. Middle stone is a little over 1/2 carret marquis diamond. Very clear, clean diamonds. Selling for $4,800. Retails for $7000. Call 701-221-9626

WEDDING DECORATIONS

All items new, never used. Includes lots & lots of Maroon candles, over 40 crystal plates to put candles on and decorative beads to go on the plates around the candles. Makes beautiful center pieces. Decorative Maroon ribbon & some maroon and gold ribbon, large and small maroon bows (could be used for the church pews). Also about 200 generic wedding invitations (silver & white). All for $200. 701-221-9626

2 BLACK and tan miniature Dachshund puppies. Shots & papers. 701-324-2861

AKC REG Champion bloodlines bulldog pups, health guarantee w/contract, $2000 Call Melissa 406-249-5985

NEED CASH? We Buy, Sell, Trade & Pawn. 1000 + Guns In Stock. Stop by today!

LOST in Bismarck: OLIVE green pouch with several rings and 3 loose stones. Call 701-258-7410

FOUND CAR REMOTE starter, very nice, found around Jan. 7th, on 2nd Avenue in Mandan. Call to identify 701-426-7474 FOUND CAT Brownish tabby cat with white chest and feet. Near Century and North Washington St. 258-4190

IRET Properties Ideal Locations 701-221-0500 701-222-8992 701-223-9165

HIGH RIDGE NORTH MANAGER ~ 222-2918 2 bdrms, garage, frplc., well maintained, very nice grounds! Pool & Tennis Courts. ROCKY GORDON & CO. 701-223-8568

AKC SHELTIE pups, Sable, $300. clearviewshelties.com 605-285-6302. starter kit.

Home is where the Heart is ...

Fall in love with our 1, 2, & 3 Bdrm. floor plans No pets, Call Today 701-250-7110 Offering Rental Concession

Gun City

is life’s greatest gift. Love, security and family await your baby. Expenses Paid. Roseanne & Robert 866-212-7203

Bon Jovi Tickets Great Seats. I have two Bon Jovi tickets for Saturday, March 19, 2011 in Las Vegas at the MGM. The seats are Section 8, Row L, Seats 11-12. These are the bottom risers with a great view. Selling for the face value of $491.55 for the pair including all taxes and fees. I will also accept any reasonable best offer. Phone 701-220-1894.

A simple reminder: Just as it is important to use caution when replying to suspicious offers in email or on the phone, you should also use caution when replying to classified advertisements that require advance payment. The North Dakota Attorney Generals’ Consumer Protection Division is available to offer assistance and answer questions if you think an offer or company is questionable. If you have any questions, you can reach them at 701-328-3404 or 1-800-472-2600.

Rentals

HEAT YOUR SHOP with waste oil. New & used waste oil furnaces, Lanair parts & service, Jim Grothe Electric 701-223-2311. Outdoor Wood & Coal Burning Furnaces, All Stainless Steel. Lifetime Warranty. Order now & Save up to $1355. Dealer Inquiries. Also, The best floor heat Water Tubing. Guaranteed Lowest Prices. Free Estimates! www.mikesheating.com 1-800-446-4043

JUNK BATTERIES Wanted Paying 25¢/lb for all types of lead batteries. Also buying nicd, nimh, nife, li-ion absolyte. 701-361-5821

WANTED! Quality, Older, Hardcover Books, F.M. Mabin, 226-4804

Moving must Sell: Small white microwave, works great! $20 701-870-0439

Lrg. 2bdrm, new appl & cabinets, no smoke/pets. $550+ lights. 471-6618, 258-8831 Rent Your Home, Own your Life!! Many floor plans to choose from! 701-255-5452 EHO www.goldmark.com

1 BDRM., Nice, Lndry., Prkg., Prvt. entrance, no smoking/ pets. $340 +lights. 222-0136. 3 bdrm., older unit, gar, W/D hook ups 223-8568 Rocky Gordon & Company

Monthly Unique Visitors: Monthly Page Views:

3.5 million

DISPLAY MODEL CLOSEOUT!! Samples: 28x52 $59,900; 32x64 $79,900; 32x80 $99,900. All homes total drywall, primed & painted. Delux trim packages, upgrade appl. Call for details Liebelt Homes 1-605-225-3222 ask for Don *10 more to choose from, all at discounted prices!

Bismarcktribune.com, the #1 website in the region, will help build your brand, increase market share and create top of mind awareness to drive traffic to your business.

2 BDRM. apts. with W/D, with or without gar., Also Luxurious Lakewood Apts., Call 663-7975 or 226-8964. 709 5th Ave NW, 2 bdrm, 1 bath w/gar. $600 mon+util. $600 dep. Eric (701)202-9564 Downtown FURN. 1 bdrm. $425 includes util. cred check req. 663-5165 or 220-2779.

MARINA BAY AREA SE Mandan. Newer 1 bdrms, Double Garage, W/D, Heat & Water Paid. Call 701-663-2600.

Never been lived in

Spacious 1 & 2 Bdrm. apts., Avail. NOW Elevator, CA, microwave, DW, sec. bldg. Breakfast island, heat incl., in unit Lndry hookup, coin Lndry on each floor, reserved off st. prkg. Comm room. (water, sewer, garbage pd). No pets/smoke. 710-1175 sq. ft. EHO IMM Apts, Mandan Place, 101 1st Ave NW & Main Ave. Mandan Call Today 701-250-7110 Offering Rental Concession

AVAIL 2/1, 3 bdrms, side by side, garage, C/A, 107 West Interstate Ave. $850+utilities & deposit. 701-220-9710

CONDO: 2 BDRMS, 2 bath, all appliances, W/D included, 2 car garage with openers. $1000/mo. Call 701-400-4543 ask for Steven. Waterfront twnhm 3BR, 2.5BA, DBL GAR, new construction, Lakewood, private dock. $1400/M. 701-663-1517

CLEAN 2 bdrm., (in older 4 unit house). $450 +elect. Min. 3 yr. rental ref. req. 258-5515

1 & 2 BDRMS., W/D incl., heat & water paid, gar. incl. Avail. now, 220-8729. 2 BDRMS Now 12-plex. Call Marvin 222-3749 or Rocky Gordon & Co. at 223-8568. 2 BEDROOM, Carpet, Appliances, A/C, Parking, $585/month. Call 220-3440. Calgary & Century East Apts. have openings for 2 & 3 bdrms. 255-2573

CHIHUAHUAS 1F-2M. W/tan APRI Reg. $350-$400. Robin 701-220-9327

Deluxe Furn 2 bd. updated. Short term ok. all util incl. No smoking/pets. 220-1302.

GIVEAWAY BLACK Lab cross house trained loves kids. Call after 5pm 701224-8347.

LRG 1 bdrm, 2 bath, no pets no smoking. Age 55+ $695. Most util. pd. 223-3040 x173.

506-556

BRENDEL HOMES New Condos & Homes Available. www.brendelhomes.com or call Pete anytime for showing at 701-471-9571

3 BDRM, private entry, Garage. Call 223-8568 Rocky Gordon & Co.

2 BDRM, Bis. WD, CA, shed, deck, fncd yard, no pets /smoking. 258-6205 2 or 3 Bdrms. W/D, Close to School. HAP Welcome! VCZ, INC. ‘ 258-9404. NICE USED MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT. Call 663-9219 or 391-0633

2 ROOMS 9x12, 12x20 lwr lvl Anderson Bldg., 200 W. Main Bis. $250/mo. 701-319-0895 Professional Building 5th & Rosser ph. 258-4000

Now renting 2 bdrm. apts at Fairview Community. EHO Call today 557-9049

SHIH TZU/ Maltese male puppy, 4 mo old. Non shedding. $100. Call 701-891-9905

THE NUMBERS:

We List, We Sell, We Buy, We Trade, We Finance! Call Liechty Listing Service, LLS. 223-0555 or 202-1640

602-646

WANTED! 1950’S & 60’s Comics, F.M. Mabin, 226-4804

GIVEAWAY TIGER striped female kitty. 701-471-5127

BUY quality homes in Arizona at foreclosure pricings. Then use winter rentals to pay majority of cost. Get some sunshine for you too! 480-600-0766 scottsdalecitylights.com

EHO www.immapartments.com

Cats Welcome!!

WEDDING DRESS, very beautiful, long sleeves, full of beads and a beautiful long cathedral train. Size 6-7. Paid $1200 at Bridal’N More, asking $175. Call 701-221-9626

NICE 2 BDRM Twin Home, 1.5 baths, full basement, nice carpet and drapes, sprinkler system. Call 701-222-6379

257,051

ADOPTING YOUR NEWBORN

212 W. Main, Bis. Phone: 701-223-2304

Announcements

SPECIAL $150!!!! Roof Top Snow Removal. Call Corey 701-870-2762

LOST 1/19: Panasonic portable hand held phone between Kingston Dr & Kirkwood area. 701-255-4939

Partially furn. 1 bdrm., off-st prkg., plug ins, w/d $375 + lights. 255-0622 or 391-0495

AKC TOY POODLE PUPS, DOB is 11/25/10. 1 Male & 1 Female, $400. 701-663-9192

SNOW REMOVAL. Reasonable. Roof tops, sidewalks & driveways. 701-390-0954.

We have it all~ heat paid, garages incl, snow and more snow removal! 2 bdrms. start at $680. Many floor plans to choose from!

immapartments.com

Veit is an EEO employer.

ROOF TOP & Snow removal: Bobcat & forklift with snow bucket & snow blower avail. 220-3756.

702-732

ENGAGEMENT / WEDDING RING

Veit & Company,

based in Rogers, MN, is currently seeking an experienced

Portable Fish House! Not too late for Ice Fishing season! propane with 12 volt lighting system, 8ft wide by 18ft long (body size) retractable wheels to sit down on ice. Pulls great! 6 holes, stove top for cooking, sink, couch included! Barely used! $6,200. Call (701)400-7701

Reduced Prices! 1505 Interchange Ave Contact Michelle 701-527-8568 from 8am-5pm, M-F

We’ve had a lot of visitors lately.

Come Warm up in a Cool place to live..

at 1300 East Capitol Ave. Bismarck Days Inn, Horizon Room 9am-10am

234 W Broadway Antiques & Collectibles. Open Fri & Sat. 10-5, Sunday Noon-5.

Blue Jeans From JC Penney NEW with Tags. Sizes: 2 pr. 32x32 2 pr. 36x30 $12.00 pr. Call 223- 6680 Leave a message.

ARIKARA APT’S. 2 bdrm. Spacious, gar. avail., near Arrowhead & Capitol. 255-2880 Rocky Gordon & Co. 223-8568.

Missing An Animal? check: www.petfinder.com

Fingerprinting & pictures avail. Call TAK 701-720-9958 to register

BED: QUEEN size mattress & box brand new, still in plastic, never used $175. Also brand new King PT set $395. Call 221-3011 or 400-9157.

Real Estate

EHO

NEW ATDEC LCD/PLAZMA 32 to 63” universal tilting wall mount. Supports up to 200lbs and is theft resistant. First $60 Cash... 255-1351

EMERSON COMBINATION VHS & DVD player with remote $25. Call 701-527-0303

Hwy Maint. Worker II

or contact Human Resources @ (701) 222-6669 or e-mail at ajhorner@nd.gov

REWARD OFFERED for any information leading up to an arrest for home and van vandalized 3 miles South of Mandan. Will keep all information confidential. Call 701-221-9664 or 471-9664

Reward! Lost: unique 3 lg & 4 tiny diamonds in gold ring. finder contact: 701-825-6492 Or skeetergin@aol.com ALFALFA HAY for sale approximately 1150 pound bales, 35-40, $45 per bale. Call 701-400-3157 or 701-220-3333

Call 701-751-4091 or Cell 701-391-5470

iretproperties.com

Health Oxy-twist device for joint pain releif- New-$125.00 (Jiggling George) 222-0015

Must possess a clean ND Class A driver’s license with a tanker endorsement. Located in Bismarck shop. For more information, go to http://burleighco.com/jobs/

Over 30 yrs exp. We are a Debt Relief Agency. We help people file for Bankruptcy Relief under the Bankruptcy Code. Flat fee in most cases. Call 701-222-8131 coleslaw@btinet.net

27 inch Aiwa colored TV, works Great! $60 Call 701-870-0439

FOR SALE: Bottomless Guardrail Feedbunks 26’x4’x 27’’. Only $675/bunk! Cow, calf, & sheepbunks available. Built strong to last forever, easily move, and keep cows out. Delivery and discounts available. Call 605-848-0291.

2 BDRM,. 2 bath, security bldg, dbl gar, W/D hook-ups, balcony. $895+ H&L 223-8568 Rocky Gordon Co.

Large cold storage units available!

15’x50’ units & 1 L shape unit (15’x50’ bay & 15’x30’ bay) 12’x14’ overhead door Temp. plugins avail. Fenced in paved yard. Access 24 hrs. per day.

CHAP. 7/13 BANKRUPTCY COLES LAW FIRM

Desk with chair, good condition. $25. Call 701-870-0439

FT Sheet Metal Journeyman

DYER & SUMMERS, PC

223-2099

7’ Tree Cultivator. $600.00 220-4469

2 Bdrm - Garage & Swimming Pool ROCKY GORDON & COMPANY • 223-8568

Ed Dyer Over 35 Years Experience

Toll Free: 1-888-695-4936

HP 7960 Photosmart Printer: LCD display to edit pictures, memory card slots, new ink, manual, CD and USB cable. First $80 Cash... 255-1351

PARKWOOD APTS. Manager • 255-4472

MAPLETON APT’S 2 &3 bdrm,2 bath, garage W/D, C/A, heat & water pd. 391-5795 / 222-8171

24X26 htd. dbl. garage w/opener, 110 & 220 power, good lighting: Also 12x26 cold storage w/9x8 door. 426-3369 NEW HEATED SHOPS for rent: 24x60. Available now. Call 701-663-2600 Newly Opened! Gold Arrow Storage. 106 1/2 Schlosser Ave. Mandan. Units 10x20, 8x7 1/2, (701) 202-3020

FOR SALE in Mesa, AZ, trailer home in 55+ gated community, furnished, Call 701-663-3979 or 701-527-6806 for more info.

Source: Oct 2009-Dec 2009 Omniture Statistics


Page 8C ■ Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Bismarck Tribune ■ Bismarcktribune.com

FREE DEALMAKER ADS IN PRINT • ONLINE

DEALS, STEALS & BARGAINS OF THE BISMARCK TRIBUNE CLASSIFIEDS

Merchandise/Ag

ANTIQUE TOOLS: Old pipe wrench, Misc.$10. PUMP JACK HANDLE $20. HAND SUCTION PUMP with 18” hose, $30. call 250-6653 or 527-8161.

BUMPER JACKS, 1 with lug wrenches, 1980’s series $10. Call 701-255-1761

GARAGE DOOR: 14” x 7” fiberglass garage door & hardware. 4 Panels with 1 damaged $50.00 701-884-2426

BUNDY ALTO Sax, ready to play $320. Call 701-527-0303

GLASSWARE: Fine stemmed glassware, never used, gift perfect. 12 for $36. 701-255-1761

BURN BARRELS:

55 gallon steel barrels, $5 each. Call 400-7618.

Denim shirts, still in plastic. long sleeve in big and tall sizes. 2x,3x,4x sizes $12.00 each less than 1/2 price. call Scott at 220.4348

Golf Balls $4 to $8 dollar a dozen cash, logo and regular popular golf balls, perfect gift..only few doz. left call 701-663-9391

CABINET HANDLES: (14) w/28 hinges and screws nice selection $8.00 call Jim 701-663-9391

DINING ROOM set: Antique 48in round oak pedestal table with 2 chairs, $150. Call 701-400-0570 or 794-8836.

GRAIN AUGER 4”x16’ with 1/2 hp Farm Duty motor, light weight, in good working order $250. Call 701-690-8712

CABINET, 2 door white metal from early 1940’s, 4 shelves, 24wx11dx63h $75. Call 701-223-0699

DINING ROOM table, beautiful, like new, can seat 12 or more, includes 6 upholstered chairs $495. 701-663-7822

GRILL, CHARBROIL 2 burner with new tank, Reg $140 selling for $100. Call 400-3893

Cab heater: plugs into 110 volt. $30 OBO. 701-462-8151

402-504 “ASTROLOGY SYMBOLS & Signs” Photo history book 198 pages, $12. 605-745-4548 “LEE” BLUE JEANS-Brand New Waists:25,26,27,30,46 Lengths:32,34. $2/Jean while supplies last Call 527-8161 or 250-6653 1999 DODGE Caravan, runs good, $500. 701-527-8727

BABY CRIB metal, very old antique, in excellent cond. $150. Call Jim 701-663-9391 BALDWIN PIANO, good for beginners, $450. Call 258-1467 BAND SAW- Sears 10” Direct Drive Band Saw, Craftsman, $75. Call 701-223-6752 after 5pm. BARGAIN HUNTERS: Any item priced $500 or less is FREE. Special Excludes tickets, food, animals, crafts or side businesses. Call 258-6900 or tollfree 1-866-I-SOLD-IT!

2 large springs for garage door $15; Presto 6 quart pressure cooker canner holds 5 pints for canning $10; 1 1/2 dozen quart canning jars $6. Cash only! 701-667-4199 2 Pair of studded tires, 205X75X14 on 6 hole Aluminum 2 Wheel DR Mazda wheels. $100 per pair. 258- 5352

Basketball shoes (Nike )like new sizes 6 1/2 and size 8 new cost up to $149.00 asking $12.00 cash obo pr cash 701-663-9391 BAT HOUSE Keep bats away from cabin and trailer at the lake or town. get ready for the bat season. $25.00 cash 701-663-9391

CALCULATOR: Victor 12-digit 2-color print desk calculator fr. Fireside Office Supply. Still under warranty, $40, OBO. PH: 221-2774

CAMERA BAG- NEW KODAK Deluxe Digital Camera Bag: zippered storage compartment & pockets, belt loop & carry strap. First $10 Cash... 255-1351

COMBINE, TRUE Scale, Turtle back, 12” long 8” wide, rebuildable, $60 OBO. 258-4585

Commercial Cooler - $1600 new - needs compressor First $500 takes it. Call Matt @ 220-1387

DINING TABLE set: 8 upholstered chairs, 59in long & 42in wide, formica top, 2 leaves. $100. Call 701-223-9506

COMPAQ EVO SYSTEM: 2.5-P4 CPU, LCD monitor, Windows XP, speakers, kb, mouse, high speed internet. First $200 Cash... 255-1351

Dog welcome sign, blk & white Spaniel dog holding welcome sign 12” high $5 734-6173.

2 RECLINERS: blue, good condition, $50 each. Call 701-663-6213 Bed: full size box spring, mattress, frame, includes horse design comforter, 2 pillow cases, fitted sheet $35obo 734-6173

28 INCH dual stage Lambert snow blower, needs engine $175. Call 258-4585

BED: TWIN bed complete with mattress, box spring, & bedding $100; RCA 25in console tv, works very good $25. 701-751-4848

Cell phone chargers Blackberry 3-car, 1-home chrgr, blue and a blk case w / belt clip $15 obo 734- 6173 CHAINS 10 FT $10. MISC CHAINS $1 TO $3. CLEAVIS $5 SMALL TRAILOR BALL$5 MISC ITEMS, sand hand shovel, crescent wrenchs 10” 12” $9. Farm pins, snake, $2 to $10. Grease Gun plus 3 tubes$8.00 Call 527-8161 or 250-6653

GUNS - variety of 22’s from $50-$325. Call 701-220-6451, 701-224-8837

DOLL: SHIRLEY Temple doll $115. Call 701-223-8419 COOKIE JAR Collector Dog, no chips $15. 701-258-3020

HIGH CHAIR $25; Forward facing carseat $25; Extension mirrors for pickup $15; 2 Gun rack for pickup $5: Lennox sound digital compact radio player $45. Cash only! 701-667-4199

30” SAMSUNG TV, Slimfit flat tube HDTV, Built in HDTV Tuner, 2 HDMI inputs, c component inputs, 1 S video input, 2 composite inputs, Purchased 12/7/06. $150 cash. Call 223-8880. 4 Tires BFGoodrich LT 305X65X17 All Terrain $250. - 527-8936 or 701- 663-4445

Chairs: six (6) dining room chairs. $40.00 Each Call 222-0790

BIKES: Iron Horse mountain bike with approx. 18” frame. $100. 1 Clash Lazer mountain bike aluminum with front shocks, 24” wheels, $30 701-223-7428

Chenille bedspread, white Queen size. Antique but looks nearly new. Use as spread or for crafts. $24.00 701-258-3020 CHRISTMAS LIGHTSwhite, blue & multi-colored. Exc. cond. Indoor lights $1/set; $5/set outdoor. Still in boxes. 701-319-1917

4 TIRES: set of 4 unalog wire spoke wheels 15X7 with 21565R/15 tires, $500. Call 701-220-3271.

4pc. wooden Hawaiian bowl, platter, candy dish, salt / pepper set never used $75.00 cash perfect gift 701-663-9391

Black leather jacket. Men’s size 38. Hill & Archer is the maker. Genuine leather. Like new. No tears or scratches. Soft leather. Soft knitted cuffs and waist band. Very nice. $35.00. 701-258-3020 BLINDS - 2” wood blinds, hunter green, approx. 49” W, 46” L, inside mount hardware, nice cond. $25. 701-794-3200

COOKIE JAR Collector Vase & Covered Jar, no chips $20. 701-258-3020

DOLLS: 1980 Mattel dolls. Walk behind stroller or ride in stroller. 15” high. Set for $30.00. Call 701-258-3020

Hypertech Max Energy Power Programmer for 96-04 Ford Gas/Truck/SUV. $350 OBO Call 701-943-2420

Jeep Grille: $25. 527-8936 or 701-663-4445 JERSEY-NEW WITH tags Brett Favre Vikings Jersey $50. Call 701-471-3376

Dresser: dark oak dresser, wood sliding no roller drawers, $15 obo 734-6173 Drill: NIKITA DRILL cordless works good, charger, battery & case $20. Call 701-667-8802

CIVIL WAR Buffs, 22 Magazines, Date of mag from 2005-2007. All for $25. Call (701)258-4585

COUCH & LOVESEAT for sale. Color is Country Blue, very clean, in good condition, and very very comfortable, $395. Call 701-221-9626

ENTERTAINMENT CENTER- Good condition. $40. Call 701-663-5683 or 202-6925

Coat: Mens XL winter coat, green $5. Call 701-223-3697

Antique egg crate. Includes all original dividers. Good shape. Reduced to $40. 701-258-3020

COUCH AND Chair, antique furniture, $100 OBO. (701) 278-8044. BOB GRAY, cast iron,m International Harvester Farmall F-30, 8 inches long, 4 1/2 inches tall, $65. Call (701) 258-4585 BOOKCASE, SOLID wood, revolving, for office or home, $395.Custom made, Excellent Condition, Collector. Call (701) 319-1917

Antique gas fired iron. 1800’s. Good shape. $80.00 $85. 701-258-3020 ANTIQUE STAMP collection $200;TIRES: (4) P265/75R17 Hercules All Season tires $80; DISHWASHER Maytag $50. 701-663-6058 lv. msg.

Collectible 4pc Crystal set. Pitcher, candy dish, sugar dish / spoon, ash tray, $150.00 cash never used 701-663-9391

COUCH - very good condition. Like new. $75. Call 701-333-8218.

Boot covers: MENS SIZE 12 over the boot galoshes, ankle high $3. Call 701-223-3697 BREAD MACHINE Panasonic, includes recipe books, no problems. $45 (was $200 new). Call 701-794-3200

BUG DEFLECTOR fits most Mazda pickups. $5. Call 400-3893.

Ladies Coat: Red in color and dressy, size 14. Like new. $25. Originally paid $200. Call 223-5268

FAIRBANKS SCALE with weights,Good Condition $200 or Best offer Call 527-8161 or 250-6653

Collectors item..Old fashioned mower and cultivator, in excellent condition $89.00 cash obo call Jim 701-663-9391 COMIC BOOKS: 124 for $100. Call 701-471-3376

COVERALLS- NEW short sleeve, gray, size 56 tall. Zipper front 1/2 price! $25. Call 701-258-0575 CRASH BAR for 1100 Shadow Honda, Fits 2003-2007. Reg price $198. First $100 takes it. Call 400-3893

COMPUTER with corner desk. $75. 701-391-8249.

Cushion for wicker loveseat. Hunter green. Good clean condition. $25. Purchased at Pier 1.

COOKIE JAR: Minnie Mouse cookie jar in box $25. Snowman Cookie jar in box $10; two other jars $8 ea. Call 701-222-7503.

Custom Wood Blinds by Bali 2” Oak. 6 - 22 1/4 x 60 and 223 1/4 x 60 $30 @ call Janet 471-2231

FANNY FARMER CANDY Silliutte. One of a kind. Collector’s item $150.00.00 cash call 701-663-9391 Fish House, Eskimo Quick Flip III, good condition, $325 OBO. Call 223-5659. FISHING POLES- (3) Shakespeare Ugly Sticks $35. Call 7 0 1 - 2 2 0 - 6 4 5 1 , 701-224-8837 FRAME- Kodak Digital Frame 8 Inch—Retails $100 will sell for $70. Touch screen, home decor kit. 751-2906 Hockey skates, RBK Fitlite, size 3 $10. CALL 319-1917.

Quilted Twin Bedspread & Sham. Chocolate Brown. Good Condition. $25. Call 701-258-0575. ROLODEX OFFICE CARD FILE:Card size 2 1/4”x4”+ A-Z Index tabs included. Brand new.$15.00 Call 527-8161 or 250-6653

Rotisserie: electric, for kitchen range. Universal. New. $45 Call 258-0575. Screen Door. Larson invisible screen, 36in white w / brass. NEW wrong size for me. New $220 asking $150 you haul. 471-1092

SERVING TRAY: Antique wooden serving tray. Original condition, no cracks or chips. Paint show age. $30. 701-258-3020 NEW DW983 14.4v Dewalt, includes: 3 speed drill, battery, charger, case & manual, industrial high torque unit. First $140 cash. 255-1351.

Snow boots: Air Force Bunny Boots, cold weather boots. size 8. $15 Call 701-223-3697 SNOWBLADES: Clean sidewalks & driveways fast & easy with heavy duty 30”-36” snowblades, $65-$75. 701-223-7579

NEW TASK FORCE Circular Saw: powerful 12A ball- bearing motor, 7.25 inch blade, manual and wrench. First $40 Cash... 255-1351

SOFA - sectional sofa next to new. Forest green color. $400. Call 701-220-6451, 701-224-8837 SONY STEREO system with sub woofer speakers, 1 year old, Orig. $99. First $50 Takes it. Call 400-3893

NEW! CEN-TECH Digital multi-tester. This 7-function meter is great for testing anywhere. First $10 Cash... Call 701-255-1351 NINTENDO GAMECUBE with power pack cord. $15. Call 701-319-1917 Nursing Covers— Reversible, Generously sized. Cute, fun modern quality fabrics. 751-2906. $30

PAPERBACKS: LOUIS LAMOUR paperbacks, real good condition. 27 books for $35. Bismarck 701-751-1253

MENS GLOVES: Greenbay size lrg winter gloves, never worn, $20. 701-223-0699

WEDDING DECORATIONS

All items new, never used. Includes lots & lots of Maroon candles, over 40 crystal plates to put candles on and decorative beads to go on the plates around the candles. Makes beautiful center pieces. Decorative Maroon ribbon & some maroon and gold ribbon, large and small maroon bows (could be used for the church pews). Also about 200 generic wedding invitations (silver & white). All for $200. 701-221-9626

WEDDING DRESS Beautiful! Ivory beaded sleeveless with v-neck and cathedral train and shall. Never been worn, size 16 20. Asking $250. Call 701-425-1525

Table: Old heavy 30” square table pedestal, wood & metal top, cast iron frame, model T958-28 self adjusting legs, $55. Call 255-1761. TABLES - set of 3 tables, 2 endtables, 1 cocktail table. Asking $100 cash. Call 701-221-9855 Lv. Msg. WEDDING DRESS, very beautiful, long sleeves, full of beads and a beautiful long cathedral train. Size 6-7. Paid $1200 at Bridal’N More, asking $175. Call 701-221-9626 Tackle Box, antique very old, pullout trays with dividers good condition, $135.00 cash for details call Jim 701-663-9391

WEIGHT bench set $75. Call 701-391-8525 Wheel covers: 8 ~ 15” Cadillac metal wheel covers. 1980 series, nice condition, take all for $75. Call 255-1761. Wheels:FOUR RALLEY wheels, ‘80 Chevy truck, 5 bolt with rings & centers. $100 OBO. Call 701-255-0230 WHITE 5 SHELF, $100. Call 701-223-3466

Pewter antique lawn ornament, your children or grandchildren can ride them, lamb $125.00 call 701-663-9391

Lexicon Universal 21 volume encyclopedia $30. New never out of box. Cash only! 701-667-4199

MEN’S BOOTS: Western boots, good cond., $35. New homemade pony bead necklaces, assorted colors, $14ea. 1 set of 3 antique jewel tea bowls, $95. 223-8419

Washer/dryer: KENMORE HD Super Capacity 2 speed washer, 3 years old. $225; Kenmore HD Dryer exc cond. $125. Call Pat 258-6894.

STAINLESS STEEL electric Coffee Pot, $20. Portable Telephone, $10, Cheese Tray with glass cover, $15. Call 258-1467

PAINT BRUSHES:Never used assorted sizes $1 to $10 Call 527-8161 or 250-6653

Leather gloves XLGE Male, misc. selection. Including leather winter gloves and leather mittons with wool liners. $2-$20 Call 527-8161 or 250-6653

Mattress: LIKE NEW King size Therapeutic foam mattress new $1500, asking $500. Call 701-471-3376

Wagner Cast Iron Skillets I have a #10 $45.00 and (2)#8 $35.00.ea.. all for $85.oo cash call Jim 701-663-9391

SOCCER: MANCHESTER United soccer clothes. Jacket $10, Tshirt & 2 sweatshirts $5 ea. 701-319-1917.

LAZYBOY RECLINER Earth tone color, clean, good condition, $65. Call 701-221-9626

Loveseat deep blue and burgundy, like new $75. brown loveseat, $30. Rocker, clean, light rust, $20 obo. 3 hanging lamps, $10 ea obo. 25”console TV $25. 751-4848

Vanity, 48” wide 21” deep, 341/2” tall. midcontinent oak with medium stain. brand new! 2 doors and 2 drawers. 200.00 cash. call scott at 220-4348

Natural knotty pine bunk beds. Accessories available. $495 Call 222-0790

Parts Only: 1990 Mazda B2600 2WD Ext cab. 4 Cyl Eng runs good $225 Auto trans $125. Some good body parts. 258-5352

LION BANK Cast Iron 4” tall, 1 1/2” wide, $70 or reasonable offer. 258-4585

Books: AUTO HISTORY book on lemon cars with photos $6. 605-745-4548

BRIDAL GOWN with train. Gorgeous sequin & pearl gown, size 8, beautiful, never worn, Asking $300. New $1000, 258-5494 or 391-8525. Antique Stroller. 1940’s blue stroller or walker. Wheels are good. Can be used. $85 701-258-3020

COUCH - exc. condition, leather, 88” long, camo color, $250. Call 701-425-1759

Kitchen table set white, 4 chairs, 1 leaf, $300 OBO. Porcelain dolls $10 & up. Call 223-3466 or 226-5589.

ELECTRIC SANDER, Black and Decker 25.00 Call 527-8161 or 250-6653

EVERGREEN CONES, 2 bags full for $5. Call 258-1467.

Coat, Brand New, Men’s Wilson Leather lamb skin, XL, Brand new, $150. Sells for $280. (701)400-3893

Multiple items of apple decor for sale $50 for all to go. Canisters, pictures, wall hangings. 258-2297 after 9 am

JACKET tan with fur collar, XL, new $25. Leather jacket size large, good condition, $30. Call 701-223-1995

DOLLS: 4 battery operated dolls. Sing EIEIO. 9” sitting dolls. All for $40.00 258-3020

COOLER - Westinghouse Coca-Cola Cooler, 50’s model. $350 Call 7 0 1 - 2 2 0 - 6 4 5 1 , 701-224-8837 COUCH $50, 1 pair mens boots, black 10D $10. Call 701-258-6546.

Motor: 350 Chevy motor, $250 OBO. Call 701-255-0230

HOME GYM - Wieder 1200 home gym/weight set like new, 3 sets of extra dumbbells included. Mint condition. $275. 701-391-8525

JACKET: NEW XL Carhart winter coat, asking $30, new $50. 701-223-3697

BEER Pitcher, Schmidt beer, very good cond. collector condition $75.00 cash call Jim 701-663-9391

MISC. JEWELERY:Many to choose from.Bracelets /Necklaces $2 to $15 Call 527-8161 or 250-6653

HATS: Western xxxxxxx Beaver tan/silver, 7 5/8inch, $50. Assorted caps/winter up to $20. Call 250-6653 or 527-8161.

Horse trailer light short wire harness, $5 Call 527-8161 or 250-6653

COOKIE JAR Collector Lion, has a chip inside the cover $8. 701-258-3020

MIRROR, BLACK with cowboy and horse design, 24 1/2”x 30 1/2”, from Pier 1, $30. Lamp, black metal animal, 19” high, $15. Moving Blankets, 5, $5ea. Call 250-0614

HEART SHAPED cake pan set, 13’x3, 10”x3 and 7”x3”. $15 for set. Call 222-3217

COOKIE JAR Collector Cat, no chips $8. 701-258-3020

2 plastic gun cases, 1 for a benelli, $15 / both 734-6173

GUNS - Saco Colt 7mm safety needs work. $325. Call 7 0 1 - 2 2 0 - 6 4 5 1 , 701-224-8837

Harley Exhaust - Soft Tail. Fits 2000 and up. New. $40. 527-8936 or 701-663-4445 DOC MARTENS “ Air Wair” Mens Size 8, very nice shape, $55. Call 258-4585

CARBORATOR: Rebuilt Edelbrock manual carborator for $100. CAll 701-880-4514 Carpet: 12X12 BURGUNDY carpet, new, $100. Call 701-391-8250

DINING TABLE a counter height table and 8 dining chairs, asking $400 cash only. Call 701-221-9855 LM.

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Tea pot, flower vase, collectible 25th Anniversary set, china hand painted never used $75.00 cash 701-663-9391 Tires:6 spoke 15in aluminum wheels and tires 235/75R15 for Chevy, sharp, $250. Call 701-391-8250 TOOL BOX: Gullwing Across the Bed Tool Box, aluminum tread plate $50.00. Call 701884-2426

PICTURE, EARLY North Dakota Oil Drilling Rig, wooden derrick and boiler, My grandpa invested in 1926, 19”x23” overall copy of his picture, enlarged, matted, frame with history. $55. Call (701) 258-9508 Pictures frames: like new, assorted 11x14 & larger $2 ea 701-223-3697 POKEMON CARDS and binders, back pack on wheels, $5ea. Call 319-1917.

TV - Good working condition. $25. Call 701-255-4724. TV: 32” SONY TRINITRON COLOR TV. Excellent Condition! $50. Phone 255-1966. TWO 1970’S snowmobiles, Yamaha 396 & Raider twin track 440. $300. 701-442-3102 TWO UPHOLSTERED rocker/recliners $50 ea; two swivel rocker chairs $35 ea; oak table formica top $60; dark seven drawer desk $15. 701-258-2196

WINE CARAFE 3pc. set collectible, 2 heart glasses, 1 heart flower vase, never used. $45 Cash. 701-663-9391 WINTER COATS: 3 Men,s 46 to 48 And 2 womens XLGE. $20 to $50 Call 250-6653 or 527-8161. WOOD STOVE, Parlor size, glass doors, brass trim. $275. Call 391-8250.

Classified Ads*

RECEIVER HITCH for Chevy $50. Call 701-391-8250 ROLLER BLADES with knee pads size 11, $40. Disney toys; Marble Works set of 2 $15. Wooden rocker $15. Call 701-258-6820 SNOWBOARD, BURTON brand $50.00. 701-471-3376

Verizon LG cell phone chargers, 3 car, 1 home, spare battery $15. 734- 6173

*Some categories excluded

FREE ADS FOR ITEMS PRICED $500 OR LESS! Call 258-6900 or go to www.bismarcktribune.com/ads and click on POWER PACKAGE

Items priced $500 or less.

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Bismarcktribune.com ■ Bismarck Tribune

Wednesday, January 26, 2011 ■ Page 9C

Recreation 1995 Dodge Grand Caravan SE, remote start, leather, rear heat & AC, good tires, runs great, 190,500 mi, $2,200. Call 701-223-5098

2001 BUICK Lasabre 3.8 V6 full loaded, 136,000 miles, Nice car. $4500. Call Ed at 701-336-7822 or 400-0264.

802-818

2008 HONDA Odyssey Minivan. Low miles 29K. Fussy lady’s van. Factory Warranty. No accidents or smoke. Must Sell $22950 Consider trade 701-390-3166 Bismarck. 2005 BUICK LeSabre, 4dr, 3.8 V6, air, dual pw seats, full power, remote start, like new, 83K, $9988. Wentz Auto Napoleon (701)226-1114

2001 Sea Ray 260 Sundancer, with Mercruiser 5.7 ltr, Bravo 3 with dual stainless steel props, sleeps 4, has a microwave, stereo w/2amps 5-CD disc chang- er and Polk Audio speakers, ac/dc fridge, cook top, hot water, shower, vacuFlush head, OB discharge, macerator, wet bar, bimini top, camper and cockpit canvases, stern drive, snap in carpet and Lowrance HDS5 with Sirius satelite radio and radar weather. Price includes a triple axle bunk trailer with surge breaks. This boat has been stored indoors every winter and has been well-maintained. Bismarck. Call 471-6908. $37,700!

80 Used Outboards We’ve Expanded!

06 F60 Merc 09 F40 Merc Tiller 04 F75 Yamaha 01 F80 Tiller Yamaha 07 F150 Yamaha 06 F25 Tiller Merc 05 F70 Johnson 03 F115 Yamaha 04 F225 Yamaha 00 F90 Mercury 05 90 Mercury 99 F70 Evinrude 99 150 EFI Mercury 99 115 Mercury 96 150 Mercury 00 60 Johnson 98 50 Johnson 94 40 Johnson 94 90 Mariner 98 125 Merc 98 115 Johnson All Motors Guaranteed, Trades Considered! We are the Upper Midwest Largest Outboard Remanufacturer

Kovash Marine Certified Outboard Repair 218-233-3300

2003 DUTCH Star- Newmar, 40ft. Motorhome, 330HP, Cat, Diesel. 48K miles. 3 slide outs. New tires all around, have the build sheet. Upgrade ceramic tile in bathroom area, kitchen area, between driver and passenger seats. Couch and recliner are leather as are driver and passenger seats. Couch makes into a bed, 8 way pwr seats, washer/dryer combo, Satellite equipped, CB radio, 10 Disc CD system, Peacan maple hardwood cabintry, power weather awnings, SBS refrig. special full paint, 7.5 diesel gen. And much more. Transferable service plan. Excellent Condition. Asking $101,500. Call 701-751-1542. In Storage and READY TO GO!

AUSA UTV 400 cc, with Dump box 4wd, new tires, 150 hours. Exc. condition. $6800 obo. Call 7 0 1 - 2 2 0 - 6 4 5 1 , 701-224-8837 XR70 HONDA Motorcycle, $800 firm. Also riding gear. Call 701-220-6451,

1998 ARCTIC CAT ZR 600 EFI snowmobile, excellent condition, Call 701-321-1333

‘06 CADILLAC DTS Luxury Sedan. Excellent. Loaded. Remote start, Sunroof & Htd Leather. 68K. Only $17,888. Wentz Auto 226-1114

Cheap Insurance, great gas mileage, ‘05 Sunfire, 2 dr., 30,000 actual mi. $4500 OBO. Call 701-426-4637.

2000 Chevy Cavalier $1999, 35 MPG, NEW TIRES, 4cyl auto. Call 701-663-5381

2001 Chevy Tahoe LT, SALE $9499 WARRANTY, LEATHER, 3rd row seat, loaded, air ride, trades welcome 701-663-5381. 2006 CHEVY Impala LS, 4dr, 3.5 V6, A/C, 60-40 power seat, CD, Chrome wheels, new tires, 41K, 1 owner, BV $12,800. Only $11,800. Wentz Auto. 226-1114

2006 CHEVY Impala LS, 4dr, 3.5 V6, A/C, 60-40 power seat, CD, Chrome wheels, new tires, 41K, 1 owner, BV $12,800. Only $11,800. Wentz Auto. 226-1114

1998 FORD EXPEDITION 4x4 XLT 4.6 V8, fully loaded, rear heat & AC, 6 disc CD, nice clean 2 owner SUV. $6995. Call 701-290-6781.

2003 Ford Taurus SES, $4999, LOW MILES, WARRANTY, loaded, 30 MPG, trades welcome. Call 701-663-5381 .

FOR SALE: 2000 BUICK LeSabre 94,500 miles, new tires, brakes & battery. $5000 obo. Call 701-663-9728 1986 OLDS 98, spent $2500 in repairs, asking $1500 OBO. Call 701-258-6894

‘93 PLYMOUTH Acclaim 2.5L just tuned, dependable, go anywhere, great on gas, starts good in the cold. Nice clean car. $2850. 290-6781

10 Pontiac G-6 GT V-6 Sharp Car Excellent Cond. Rear Spoiler, asking only $14988.00.Wentz AutoNapoleon 800-767-3596 226-1114 or 390-3040

1999 Pontiac Grand Am SE $2999, REMOTE STARTER, LIKE NEW TIRES, loaded, V-6 auto, trades welcome. Call 701-663-5381

#4887- 1992 IHC Thomas 60 passenger – DT360, 170HP, Air Brakes, 257,345 miles, $3,500. Call Mon - Fri 8am-5pm • 800-450-1767

Post your online ad instantly. Extend your reach with an affordable package to put your ad in the next day’s newspaper too!

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2001 CATERPILLAR 140H Motor Grader. Great condition. F.O.B. WY, $122,500. Call ETI at 303-772-5566

03 Silverado 86000mi. loaded w / Bose sound excellent shape but may need transmission. $10,500 obo (701)202-0598 SNOW IS HERE!! ‘99 DODGE Dakota SLT, 4x4, V8, strong runner, mechanically sound, PW, PL, $4700 OBO, no trades. 701-260-3972.

ACROSS 1 Hoarfrost 5 Lion-colored 10 Tribal emblems 12 Mill around 13 Warns 14 Gains admission 15 Hatcher or Garr 16 Peculiarity 18 Jarrett of NASCAR 19 Bahamas resort 22 Oklahoma tribe 25 Connecticut seaport 29 Second showing 30 Turn signal 32 “Walk Away —” 33 Blues street in Memphis 34 Square dance call (hyph.) 37 Jet routes 38 Applied lightly 40 Primary color 43 Tell an untruth 44 Actress 2

1996 CHEVY S10 LS blazer, 4x4 2 door, 4.3 engine, power steering, brakes and seats, very good tires, trailer hitch, $1750. Call 701-870-2028

Powers 48 River in a waltz 50 Seemed pleased 52 Decrees 53 Drawing rooms 54 Physicist Nikola 55 Answered a judge DOWN 1 Kind of model 2 Anatomical passage 3 Pie toppings 4 911 responder 5 Sardine holder 6 Memo abbr. 7 Joyful shout 8 Brain, maybe 9 Time divs. 10 Make doilies 11 Former JFK arrivals 12 Tooth problem 17 Tenet 20 Epic by Virgil 21 Still good 22 Ex-Bruin 3

Answer to Previous Puzzle

Bobby 23 Nut, actually 24 Pisa’s river 26 Gym machine 27 Persia, today 28 Merry king of rhyme 31 Unseld of the NBA 35 Wide valleys 36 Kimono fastener 39 Porgy’s woman 40 Seldom seen 41 Winds down 42 Combat for 5

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two 45 Succulent plant 46 Provide temporarily 47 Classified items 48 Tiny circle 49 Car grill cover 51 Navigation aid

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2004 TOYOTA Tacoma 4X4 Ext Cab. Only 24,265 miles. Like new Condition! ONLY $18,500. 471-6000 Bismarck

V I O L A OR A L M L E T A L O M I R UR B A N S I U E N S CO T C ROY S O UN S HON E MA C AWS I T EM A T H A I N T A N S E

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VOLVO A30C with Klein Tank - F.O.B. WY- $52,500. Call ETI 303-772-5566

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2002 CHEVY Quad Cab

Z71 4x4, 5.3 V8, fully loaded. $7,995. Call Call Ed at 701-336-7822 or 400-0264. 2003 TOYOTA 4 Runner 4X4 SR5. Moon Roof, nice model. Extra Nice Condition. $16,950 or Best Offer! Call 701471-6000 Bismarck

CATERPILLAR 938G Many other loaders available- F.O.B. CO $52,500. Call ETI 303-772-5566

2008 CHEVY Colorado Z71 4X4 XCab 4 Door. Local truck Factory Warranty only 8,088 miles. New Condition $19,950 Call 701-223-8000 Bismarck

‘08 GMC Envoy 4 dr. 4x4, air, sunroof, chrome wheels, full pwr, fact. warr. Only 28k mi. Priced below book, $22,888. Wentz Auto 226-1114

2008 SATURN Aura XR sedan, V6, air, htd leather, full power, remote start, like new, factory warranty, 32K, Only $15,888. Wentz Auto Napoleon. 226-1114

CARGO VAN SALE Chevys & Fords On Sale ½, & ¾ 1 Tons & Box Trucks. 8 to choose from! Call 701-223-8000 Bismarck

03 Chevy Avalanche 1500 4X4 cab, SALE $14999, Very low miles, wrnty 5.3L vortec, loaded, Chrome wheels, trade welcome 701-663-5381

2005 CHEVY 1500 Crew Cab LS, P/W, P/L, white 82k miles, excellent condition. $15,800. Call 391-4335

2002 Ford Escort ZX-2 SALE $3999 WARRANTY, LEATHER, PWR ROOF, NEW TIRES, 35MPG, trades welcome. 701-663-5381 2009 FORD Taurus Limited, leather, power sunroof, loaded, 41,000 miles. Call 701-391-4335

Deadline is February 9th at Noon!

CATERPILLAR 330DL Excavator F.O.B. WY$160,000. Call ETI at 303-772-5566

05 Ford F150 4x4 SuperCrew XLT. SALE $13,499. New tires, loaded, 50k mile WARRANTY. Trades welcome. Call 701-663-5381.

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2000 BMW 323i. White w/ black leather interior and sunroof. 5 speed manual w/ traction control. Like new condition w/ only 64,000 miles. Must see to appreciate. $11,500. 391-1295.

03 Chev 1/2 Ext 4x4 LT1 Astro Start, V-8 Very Nice Truck and only $10988 Wentz Auto- Napoleon 226-1114

Tell your spouse, kids, friends and family how much you love them on Valentine’s Day! These special greetings will publish in Celebrate on Sunday, February 13th. Choose from one of the four price options.

Classified Ads*

1999 Ford F-250 Lariat 4X4, SALE $6499, 6.8L V-10 auto, LEATHER, 4 door, 8ft box, trades welcome. Call 701-663-5381

98 GMC 1/2 ton 2wd, long box, 4.3 V6, 5 spd, very clean & dependable, very good gas mileage. 157,500 mi. $3500 OBO 222-4396 C391-0598.

JOHN DEERE 9400 2 available- F.O.B. WY$65,000 each. Call ETI 303-772-5566

in Celebrate!

HURRY... #1841 - 1985 CHEVY Ward 47 passenger – 366,4/2 manual, 163,676 miles, $1,800. Call Mon - Fri, 8am-5pm • 800-450-1767

1999 FORD F250 Super Duty 4x4, 7.3 diesel, 4 spd auto trans, 151,000 miles, good shape, $10,200. Call Brent (701)226-1488

JD Skid Steers 2003 JD 260 with 1880 hrs, cab$16,500. 2006 JD 325 with 2100 hrs, cab, heat, air-$26000. 701-595-1932 Jason or 701-460-8573 Ron

00 Ford F-150 4X4 Lariat, $10,000, SUPER CHARGER, 4dr,low miles, loaded, leather, new tires, exc. cond. trade welcome 701-663-5381

10

1967 FIBERGLASS GT40 Avenger, no motor, good cond., wire wheels, Goodyear Eagle tires. $3500. Call George 701-212-4703.

2007 DODGE Ram 2500 Laramie 4x4, Gray, 4 door, long box, 6.7 Diesel, Navigation, leather, all options, like new, 170K miles, $24,999. Call Gerald 220-2121

01 Ford F-150 X-cab XLT SALE $6999, 4X4 Offroad 4dr Xcab, 5.4L V-8, auto, loaded, toneau cover, 140K mi, trade welcome 701-663-5381 2005 Cadillac Escalade Loaded, Pearl White, Leather Heated Seats, Sunroof, Custom Rims. Excellent Condition. 122K mi. $18,995 OBO. Call 701-527-4739

2007 Toyota Tundra Crewmax SR5 TRD 4X4. 5.7L V8 with 83,000 miles. NADA retail $27,525. Asking $24,500. (605)390-9266 Use your 2010 tax refund today to get the financing and vehicle you want. Visit Auto Finance Super Center 877-918-4131 or www.yougetautocredit.com

2007 BLACK Hummer H3 Excellent Condition. PS, PB, AC, 4x4. 47,000 miles. $19,995 obo. 701-527-4739

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902-926

2001 GMC Yukon SLT 4X4 SALE $8499, Leather, 3rd row seat, WARRANTY, 135000 miles, 5.3L Vortec, trade welcome 701-663-5381.

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2005 TOYOTA Highlander 4x4, 59K miles, V6 auto, $11,395 OBO. 2007 Honda Fit Sport, 5 doors, 24K miles, auto, $8,895 OBO. Call 701-258-5721

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‘96 680 Ultra SP Polaris, low miles, paddles track, exc. cond. triple piped. 701-348-3926 or 226-4006. SALE: SNOWMOBILES 1994 CR 580. 1995 CR 580. 1996 EXT 580 EFI w/electric start & reverse. 2006 Saber Cat 700 LX Edition with electric start, reverse & remote. 2005 King Cat 900 EFI 162.

CATERPILLAR D9N Good components- F.O.B. WY- $125,000. Call ETI at 303-772-5566

45

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© 2011 by NEA, Inc.

*Some categories excluded

A Daily Crossword By Wayne Robert Williams ACROSS 44 Harsh of Egyptian manner viper 46 Stately Family cars 48 Shaker sect’s Gulf War founder missile 49 Part 3 of Also quote Brunch 52 Very eccenchoice tric Loose stack 54 __ Paulo Start of a 55 Doesn’t lack William Lloyd 56 Supreme Garrison Court Justice quote Kagan Paquin of 60 Scoundrel “The Piano” 64 Contribution Fold in a to the pot drape 66 End of quote Worker’s 68 Yuletide carol equipment 69 Actress KidEx-Dolphin man QB Marino 70 Inc., abroad “Murder, __ 71 Young lady Wrote” 72 Answered Tribal leaders tartly Part 2 of 73 “The Thin quote Man” co-star Cohort of Myrna Larry and Curly DOWN Ziegfeld Fol- 1 On the sumlies, e.g. mit of Movie critic 2 “Heart and Roger __” “54-40 or 3 Sweat outlet fight” presi4 Comforter dent 5 Relative of Like a reedan ostrich choked 6 Fender flaw swamp 7 Choir part Pronounce 8 Stout detecindistinctly tive Wolfe

Answer to Previous Puzzle

9 Fashioned 10 Masseur’s milieu 11 Disney classic 12 Of an arm bone 13 College VIPs 18 Liquid asset 22 Gin flavor 25 Females of the flock 27 Names 28 Diminutive devils 29 Fireplace residue 30 TV station 31 In plain sight 32 More boorish 33 Long-limbed 37 Sorry soul 38 Up a __ (cornered) 40 Fast-food magnate Ray 42 Thanksgiving

veggies 45 Microwave? 47 Well-educated 50 Bushnell and Ryan 51 Small alcove 52 Lashing blow 53 Vietnam’s capital 57 Author/director Kazan 58 World Series semis 59 Book after Joel 61 Four fluid ounces 62 “Do __ others as...” 63 Little whirlpool 65 New wing on a building 67 Public house pint


Page 10C ■ Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Bismarck Tribune ■ Bismarcktribune.com

GLASS

ADVERTISE YOUR SERVICE HERE!

Check out the Service Directory in the Bismarck Tribune Classifieds every day.


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 2011 Catch up with the Australian Open

Wild holds on to beat Blackhawks PAGE 3D

PAGE 5B WWW. BISMARCKTRIBUNE . COM

S ECTION D

Patriots: Repeat on minds UP NEXT WHO: Pittsburgh vs. Green Bay WHAT: Super Bowl XLV WHEN: 5:30 p.m., Feb. 6 WHERE: Cowboys Stadium, Arlington, Texas ON: FOX television, KFYR radio

Raji is on rise Raji’s TD sends Green Bay to Texas; rushing score next up By CHRIS JENKINS AP Sports Writer

TOM STROMME/Tribune file photo

Century’s Brady Spooner and the Patriots are the only undefeated team left in region play. Century hosts Dickinson and Bottineau this week.

Century ready for Bottineau in search of another region title By LOU BABIARZ Tribune Sports Editor Players circle certain games on their calendars. For the Century boys hockey team, Bismarck is always huge. The Mandan rivalry is pretty heated, and Minot is a traditional West Region power. This season, Bottineau is the surprise team at the top of the Patriots’ list. Bottineau and Century are currently 1-2 in the West Region. The Braves are 10-10 in region play, putting them atop the West with 22 points. Century is right behind with 20 points. Thanks to Minot’s win over

Bottineau on Monday, the Patriots (9-0-0) are the last team unbeaten in region play. The two teams will meet at Schaumberg Arena on Saturday. “It’s the biggest game of the year,” Century senior forward Brady Spooner said. “Everybody is looking forward to it, and so are we.” It’s no surprise to see the Patriots battling for the region title. Century finished first in the West last season and is aiming to repeat as regular-season champ for the first time ever. Plagued by low participation numbers, Bottineau had struggled to stay com-

petitive for many years. But the Braves qualified for state for the first time since 1993 last February. And under veteran coach David Hoff, the Braves (14-3-0) are already just one win short of matching last season’s win total. The top three scorers in the West — Seth Serhienko, Logan Millican and Harrison Aide — are all from Bottineau. “It’s interesting the way it pans out,” Century coach Troy Olson said. “Even though they haven’t had much success for a long time, they’ve been wellcoached for years. “I drove out to Jamestown to watch them, and they’ve

UP NEXT Dickinson at Century, 7:15 p.m. Thursday in region play got two quick lines up front,” Olson added. “They’ve got some highly-skilled kids who can shoot the puck and make things happen. … They match up pretty well with us.” Before the big clash with Bottineau, the Patriots must first play Dickinson on Thursday and Williston on Friday. That’s not a bad thing, since the Patriots have played just once since Jan. 8. “It will give us a chance to

get our game legs,” Olson said. The Patriots have won their last four games, including victories over Bismarck and Minot. One of the keys has been the play of Century’s top line — Spooner, Zach Holmen and Logan Rauhauser. Rauhauser is fifth in the region in scoring with 10 goals and 18 assists. Holmen is second on the team in scoring with six goals and 14 assists, with Spooner right behind him with eight goals and 11 helpers. “Me and Holmen get up the ice with the puck and Rauhauser is the shooter,” Continued on 4D

Walsh going back to Mystics

Jaspers jumps in Marauders freshman filling in for Lee in starting lineup By CINDY PETERSON Bismarck Tribune

Coach leaving Century for a return to BSC By CINDY PETERSON Bismarck Tribune Jeni Walsh is coming back to a familiar place. Walsh has resigned from her position as the Century volleyball coach. She was named the coach of the Bismarck State Mystics during a press conference on Tuesday afternoon at the BSC Armory. Walsh coached at BSC in the early 1990s. She was an assistant coach during the 1990-91 seasons and the head

GREEN BAY, Wis. — Watching B.J. Raji rumble into the end zone in real time, Green Bay coach Mike McCarthy was as fired up as any Packers fan. When McCarthy had the chance to watch the key play from Sunday’s NFC Champio n s h i p game victory over the Chicago Bears again Raji on film, he managed to find a few teachable moments. First off, it’s safe to say Raji should tuck the ball away until he’s safely in the end zone next time. And what on Earth was that hip-shaking celebratory dance all about? “He got two minuses on the play — one for holding the ball out, and one for the dance,” McCarthy joked. Risky ballhandling skills aside, Raji’s pivotal play slowed a frantic fourthquarter comeback attempt by the Bears and thirdstring quarterback Caleb Hanie. Raji’s rambling 18yard return turned out to Continued on 4D

MIKE McCLEARY/Tribune

Jeni Walsh, left, is the new volleyball coach at Bismarck State, after resigning at Century. coach for the 1992-93 seasons. Maggie Barth guided the Mystics last season on an interim basis after Linette Olson resigned.

“When I coached here in the early 90s, I was just a young coach starting out,” Walsh said. “I loved it. The people at BSC are very invit-

ing. They are very encouraging and supportive.” Walsh has guided Century for the past eight years. Continued on 4D

University of Mary men’s basketball coach Randall Herbst foresees Jalen Jaspers starting many games for the orange and blue. Being part of the main five began sooner rather than later. Jaspers, a 6-foot-3 freshman from Minneapolis, earned his first start on Saturday against Northern State. Jaspers started in place of senior Cameron Lee, who was sidelined with a sprained ankle. “It was a big deal for Jalen,” Herbst said. “He was next in line to get that starting spot. I didn’t even talk to him about it, and he was fine.” Jaspers hit his first shot of the night, a 3pointer, in the 68-65 win. The win puts the Marauders in a four-way

log jam for second place. UMary is tied with Winona S t a t e , Augustana and St. Cloud State at 9- Jaspers 4 in league play. “It’s nice to be in the mix with those teams rather than in the other direction,” Herbst said. “We are up there with some high powerhouse programs. I really like being up there. Hopefully we can sustain our play and keep getting better.” The Marauders, 13-4 overall, have won six straight and eight of their last nine. The U-Mary men and women play at Bemidji State on Friday and Minnesota-Duluth on Saturday. Continued on 4D

COMING THURSDAY

SPEAKING

TRIVIA

Girls hockey: Bismarck’s Kasandra Cariveau; Class B notebook; Class A hoops polls; Recreation Digest; Bowling

“Tiger Woods can’t start a new year without being reminded of the last one. And the last one wasn’t very good.” — Associated Press golf

Who are the three NBA players to capture the All-Star MVP, NBA MVP and NBA Finals MVP in the same season?

writer Doug Ferguson on Tiger Woods, who will play his first tournament of the season this weekend as the third-ranked golfer in the world.

ANSWER IN MORNING KICKOFF ON PAGE 3D


Sports

Page 2D ■ Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Bismarck Tribune ■ Bismarcktribune.com

AREA SPORTS FOOTBALL NDSU, DAKOTA BOWL CONFLICT

HAZEN 62, GLEN ULLIN-HEBRON 33

FARGO (AP) — A scheduling conflict at the Fargodome might mean the venue or times for next year’s high school football championships will need to be changed. The North Dakota State football team is scheduled to host Youngstown State on Nov. 12. The Dakota Bowl, consisting of four high school championship games, is scheduled Nov. 1112. State High School Activities Association spokeswoman Sheryl Solberg said that three options are being considered: move the prep games to the Alerus Center in Grand Forks, where they’re typically played every other year; move all games to Nov. 11 at the Fargodome; or schedule the Nov. 12 games around the Bison game.

Hazen 18 35 47 62 GU-H 12 20 26 33 HAZEN (62): Dominick Opp 2, Jon Doll 2, Kyle Lindquist 2, Alex Volk 6, Collin Lindquist 13, Stetson Carr 3, Tyler Parker 7, Josh Rothe 14, Michael Maas 12, Austin Cieslak 1. Totals 26 8-9 62. GU-H (33): Dylan Diede 2, Cameron Morman 14, Chandler Schmidt 2, Jalen Schaaf 7, Cole Schlatter 4, Lance Duppong 2, CJ Horst 2, Totals 15 0-2 33. 3-pointers: H 2 (Carr 1, Mas 1), GU-H 3 (Morman 2, Schaaf 1). Fouls: H 14, GU-H 12. Fouled out: None.

CLASS A BOYS BASKETBALL MANDAN 77, JAMESTOWN 64

Mark Zinke led four Braves in double figures with 21 points in a West Region win over the Blue Jays on Tuesday. Devin Coyle added 17 points and Seth Westby tallied 12, while Aaron Janz collected 10 points and 11 rebounds for Mandan. JAMESTOWN (64): Danny Fischer 5-16 45 18, Kasey Gengler 1-3 1-2 3, Matt Johnson 4-9 0-0 12, Chase Marker 1-4 3-4 5, Jordan Thoreson 4-9 2-2 10, Jake Neichno 0-4 0-0 0, Dyllan Anderson 3-6 0-0 7, Jordan Lynch 1-1 0-0 2, Nate Willer 2-4 1-1 5, Tyler Krenz 1-3 0-2 2. Totals 22-59 11-16 64. MANDAN (77): Erron Collins 1-4 3-4 6, Aaron Janz 3-8 3-4 10, Devin Coyle 6-14 12 17, Seth Westby 4-11 4-7 12, Mark Zinke 9-18 3-4 21, Cole Goetz 0-1 0-0 0, Dale Haugen 0-1 0-0 0, Kenny Haugen 0-1 0-0 0, Phaden Marcellais 2-5 0-0 4, Cole Lafferty 00 0-0 0, Jake Watson 2-4 0-0 4, Casey Kautzmann 1-1 0-0 3. Totals 28-68 14-21 77. Halftime: M 44, J 24 3-pointers: J 9-19 (M. Johnson 4, Fischer 4, Anderson), M 7-14 (Coyle 4, Kautzmann, Collins, Janz). Rebounds: J 37, M 47 (Janz 11). Assists: J 9, M 18 (Collins 5, Coyle 5). Steals: J 7, M 8. Turnovers: J 13, M 10. Fouls: J 16, M 16. Fouled out: none.

WEST REGION Region W L Century 7 1 Bismarck 7 1 Minot 5 2 Dickinson 4 3 Mandan 5 4 Jamestown 4 5 St. Mary’s 2 6 Turtle Mountain 1 7 Williston 1 7 Tuesday, Jan. 25 Mandan 77, Jamestown 64 Sidney, Mont., 60, Williston 50 Thursday, Jan. 27 St. Mary’s at Minot, 7:30 p.m. Dickinson at Century, 7:45 p.m.

Overall W L 9 1 8 3 7 3 6 3 8 4 6 5 2 9 4 7 1 9

DICKINSON TRINITY 45, KILLDEER 30 DT 6 20 34 45 Killdeer 11 16 20 30 DT (45): Michael Mann 2, Alex Klug 5, Mason Schiff 2, Christian Olson 17, Jacob Volk 8, Tim Brooke 1, Andrew Klein 1, Isiah Binstock 1, Jesse Kubik 8. Totals 17 4-7 45. KILLDEER (30): Austyn Sadowsky 4, Nick Klatt 2, Colton Mavity 6, Brock Pittlsey 5, Ben Pelton 4, Brody Candrian 9. Totals 9 911 30. 3-pointers: DT 2 (Olson 1, Klug 1), K 1 (Pittsley 1). Fouls: DT 11, K 13. Fouled out: None.

FLASHER 70, NEW SALEM-ALMONT 48 NS-A 15 26 33 48 Flasher 14 33 49 70 NS-A (48): Zach Cofer 3, Camden Toepke 12, Skylar Rebel 13, Duncan Beth 6, Andrew Kreidt 4, Jesse Gutknecht 4, Andrew Hulm 2, Tyler Wehri 4. Totals: 20 5-20 48. FLASHER (70): Shelby Schmidt 16, Taylor Krenz 15, Justin Bentz 14, Cole Harsche 13, J.W. Froelich 6, Zach Schmidt 2, Kyle Miller 2, Kyle Black 2. Totals: 27 14-25 70. 3-pointers: NS-A 3 (Toepke 2, Rebel 1), F 2 (Krenz 1, S. Schmidt 1). Fouls: NS-A 18, F 14. Fouled out: Kreidt.

GARRISON 64, WASHBURN 62 Garrison 16 27 43 64 Washburn 20 38 50 62 GARRISON (64): Jon Price 2, Brookes Reinholt 4, Michael Melhoff 7, Andrew Haugen 4, Kyle Schlehr 16, Ian McDonald 25, Mykle Rud 4, Craig Kolden 2. Totals 27-65 811 64. WASHBURN (62): Jeff Rasmussen 14, Weston Deitz 2, Luke Witty 6, Jordan Gedrose 3, Evan Eberle 10, Kirk Sailer 13, Ryan Kerzman 5, Brett Schriener 9. Totals 23-65 11-19 62. 3-pointers: G 2 (McDonald 2), W 5 (Sailer 2, Schriener 1, Eberle 1, Rasmussen 1). Fouls: G 16, W 13. Fouled out: None.

BEACH 62, SCRANTON 34 Scranton 8 20 29 34 Beach 9 26 48 62 SCRANTON (34): Nathan Pierce 2, Justin Benishek 11, Nevada Turbiville 6, Dalton Reitz 2, Shawn Sanford 5, Caleb Larson 8. Totals 14 2-4 34. BEACH (62): Danny Skoglund 5, Trevor Sime 3, Jake Hardy 15, Brady Zachmann 5, Justin Weinreis 3, Jade Bishop 14, Landon Lechler 17. Totals 26 6-11 62. 3-pointers: S 4 (Benishek 3, Turbiville 1), B 4 (Skoglund 1, Hardy 1, Zachmann 1, Weinreis 1). Fouls: S 13, B10. Fouled out: None.

BOWMAN COUNTY 56, LEMMON, S.D. 54 Lemmon 10 27 40 54 BC 21 34 40 56 LEMMON (54): Brant Haase 14, John Hausauer 2, Cody Schopp 2, Chad Pelkofer 25, Tyler Sigvaldson 2, Jacob Johnson 9. Totals 20-52 9-12 54. BC (56): Mike Palczewski 13, Trevor Smolnikar 5, Andy Hansen 3, Kruze Robinson 2, Tate Wallman 13, Cole Heimer 7, Daniel Ruggels 5, Colter Braaten 8. Totals 23-64 48 56. 3-pointers: L 5 (Chad Pelkofer 3, Haase 2), BC 6 (Braaten 2, Ruggels 1, Smolnikar 1, Palczewski 1, Heimer 1). Fouls: L 10, BC 14. Fouled out: None.

MOTT-REGENT 78, HETTINGER 74 (OT)

EAST REGION Region Overall W L W L Fargo South 8 1 8 3 Fargo Shanley 8 2 9 2 Fargo North 6 3 7 4 Valley City 4 3 8 4 G.F. Red River 5 4 6 5 Wahpeton 5 5 6 5 West Fargo 5 5 6 5 G.F. Central 3 5 3 7 Fargo Davies 1 8 1 9 Devils Lake 0 9 0 11 Tuesday, Jan. 25 G.F. Red River 76, Devils Lake 66 Wahpeton 55, Fargo Davies 53 Grand Forks Central 75, Fargo North 62 Fargo Shanley 60, West Fargo 46 Fargo South 76, Moorhead, Minn., 68 Thursday, Jan. 27 Devils Lake at Fargo North

CLASS A GIRLS BASKETBALL MINOT 59, ST. MARY’S 40

MINOT — Dominique Giesen scored 13 points for St. Mary’s, but it was not enough for the Saints to keep up with Minot. Holly Johnson had a game-high 21 points for the Majettes, while Jayd Eggert added 13. SM (40): Dominique Giesen 13, Taylor Gendreau 8, Sydney Miller 5, Jarren Fallgatter 5, Rachel Power 4, Kaitlyn Saffner 3, Angie Schumacher 2. Totals 15 12-19 40. MINOT (59): Holly Johnson 21, Jayd Eggert 13, Andie Hankla 8, L’Tanya Flythe 6, Alex Bolinske 5, Teresa Vetter 2, Ryleigh Engg 2, Alexis Colbenson 2. Totals 28 7-12 59. Halftime score: Min 27, SM 19.

WEST REGION Region Overall W L W L Century 7 1 10 1 Mandan 7 1 8 3 Bismarck 5 3 6 4 Turtle Mountain 5 3 8 3 Jamestown 4 4 5 5 Minot 4 4 6 5 Williston 2 6 3 7 St. Mary’s 2 7 2 10 Dickinson 0 7 0 9 Tuesday, Jan. 25 Minot 59, St. Mary’s 40 Thursday, Jan. 27 Dickinson at Century, 7 p.m. Jamestown at Mandan, 7:30 p.m.

M-R 17 32 51 64 78 H 18 34 48 64 74 M-R (78): Taylor Zentner 10, McCahen Schweitzer 8, Aaron Keller 3, Nate Fries 16, Chad Mosbrucker 30, Tanner Vesledahl 3, Jacob Greff 8. Totals 30 13-19 78. HETTINGER (74): Justis Caldwell 18, Cory Christman 6, Ben Laufer 27, Stephen Kristy 15, Dylan Chadwick 8. Totals 28 13-17 74. 3-pointers: M-R 5 (Schweitzer 2, Mosbrucker 2, Keller 1), H 5 (Caldwell 2, Laufer 2, Chadwick 1). Fouls: M-R 20, H 17. Fouled out: Caldwell, Kristy.

FOUR WINDS-MINNEWAUKAN 72, WARWICK 60 FW-M 16 32 50 72 Warwick 19 31 47 60 FW-M (72): Chuck Lovejoy 30, Geoff Leftbear 15, Chris Cook 11, Christian Ironroad 10, Joey Greene 6. Totals 28 8-14 72. WARWICK (60): Melvin Langstaff 33, Alden Black 2, Brandon Jackson 6, Colten Little Ghost 6, Alvin Owlboy 6, Wayne Little Ghost 6, Collin Delorme 4. Totals 21 13-16 60. 3-pointers: FW-M 8 (Lovejoy 6, Cook 1, Ironroad 1), 5 (Langstaff 2, W. Little Ghost 1, Jackson 1). Fouls: FW-M 17, W 15. Fouled out: None.

MAX 86, PARSHALL 44 Max 17 39 57 86 Parshall 11 22 33 44 MAX (86): Dylan Kinn 31, Levi Tomlinson 13, Brett O’Grady 12, Weston Delzer 9, Jalen Adams 6, Tyler Balaban 6, Justin McElvein 3, Reid Groninger 2, Craig Talbott 2, Cotlon Schroeder 2. Totals 30 15-24 86 PARSHALL (44): Kenny Wells 13, Greg Oster 11, Starling Bolkan 7, Trey Coffey 7, Mike Herland 3, Dexter Two Crow 2, Jade Moran 1. Totals 17 5-18 44.

NEW ENGLAND 53, HEART RIVER 51 HR 10 22 30 51 NE 19 30 39 53 HR (51): Dylan Northrop 16, Jordan Stecker 14, Dalton O’Brien 9, Seth Ewoniuk 4, Sean Johnson 3, Jarek Haverluk 2, Jordan Zarak 2, Zach Krivoruchka 1. NE (53): Nick Wolf 19, Clarence Binstock 14, Kaine Hanson 9, Mark Frank 4, Devin Plaggemeyer 4, Avery Krebs 3. 3-pointers: NE 4 (Binstock 3, Wolf 1). Fouls: HR 22, NE 17. Fouled out: HR, Ewoniuk. NE, Krebs.

EDGELEY-KULM 57, PINGREE-BUCHANAN-KENSAL 39 Edgeley-Kulm 15 32 43 57 PBK 19 29 33 39 E-K (57): Tallen Berg 11, Logan Hansen 7, Beau Diegel 7, Nathan Elhard 22, Alex Lindgren 2, Steven Geisler 8. PBK (39): Wyatt Guthmiller 3, Shawn Baker 6, Nick Blaskowski 13, Sheldon Harr 2, J.R. Perleberg 8, Scott Bennett 8. 3-pointers: E-K 3 (Elhard 2, Berg), PBK 4 (Guthmiller, Blaskowski, Perleberg, Bennett).

EAST REGION Region W L 7 1 9 2 7 2 6 3 7 4 4 5 3 6 2 8 1 8 0 7

Overall W L 10 1 8 3 9 2 8 3 7 5 5 6 3 7 2 9 2 8 5 5

G.F. Central West Fargo Fargo Shanley Fargo South Devils Lake Fargo North G.F. Red River Fargo Davies Wahpeton Valley City Tuesday, Jan. 25 Grand Forks Central 76, Fargo North 56 Fargo Shanley 63, West Fargo 44 Devils Lake 65, G.F. Red River 51 Fargo Davies 64, Wahpeton 55 Friday, Jan. 28 Fargo North at Devils Lake Grand Forks Red River at Fargo South West Fargo at Fargo Davies Wahpeton at Grand Forks Central Bemidji, Minn., at West Fargo

CLASS B BOYS BASKETBALL SHILOH CHRISTIAN 59, CENTER-STANTON 46 Shiloh 11 28 42 59 C-S 12 21 33 46 SHILOH (59): Joey Dwyer 10, Eris Hultstrand 17, Zane Miller 10, Carson Anderson 6, Klint Miller 4, Matt Rask 12. Totals 19 1727 59. CENTER-STANTON (46): Adam Berger 8, Wendlin Berger 13, Bryan Alderin 8, Jacob Kraft 12, Jesse Henke 4, Robert Barth 1. Totals 19 6-12 46. 3-pointers: S 4 (Hultstrand 2, Dwyer 1, Miller 1), C-S 2 (Adlerin, Kraft). Fouls: S 11, C-S 18. Fouled out: Berg.

BEULAH JV 67, RICHARDTON-TAYLOR 60 Beulah 23 41 54 67 RT 17 35 47 60 BEULAH (67): Jesse Hettich 29, Cody Nelson 13, Karson Hintz 6, Tanner Dolbec 6, Noah Iverson 6, Hunter Heringer 4, Patrick Becker 3. RT (60): Chad Gullickson 13, Jarret Naumann 13, Lane Voltz 11, Zach Rummel 7, Dakota Messer 4, Cade Kuntz 4, Kasey Dressler 2, Paul Koppinger 2, Ryder Bohlman 2. 3-pointers: B 5 (Hettich 3, Nelson 1, Becker 1), RT 4 (Voltz 3, Rummel 1). Fouls: B 18, RT 22. Fouled out: R-T, Naumann.

CLASS B GIRLS BASKETBALL CARRINGTON 46, KIDDER COUNTY 35 Carrington 8 28 38 46 KC 10 20 28 35 CARRINGTON (46): Becca Scherr 18, Sierra Rosenau 8, Brittany Indergaard 2, Noelle Braaten 2, Brittney Roundy 6, Emily Thompson 10. Totals 18 6-15 46. KC (35): Kelsey Dockter 7, Kayla Pfaff 2, Sam Rangeloff 2, Molly Kahl 13, Julia Scherbenske 11. Totals 12 10-14 35. 3-pointers: C 4 (Scherr 4), KC 1 (Dockter 1). Fouls: C 13, KC 15. Fouled out: None.

GRANT COUNTY 69, UNDERWOOD 42 Underwood 11 20 30 42 GC 22 41 66 69 UNDERWOOD (42): Payton Koenig, Tami Heidelberger 2, Emma Lee 10, Alix Auck 12,

Miranda Pochant 6, Abby Landenberger 8. Totals 18 6-12 42. GC (69): Elesha Tatro 6, Sydney Bentz 15, Chelsey Lince 5, Kaci Levorsen 1, Ashley Bentz 26, Sara Wells 12, Kayla Seidler 4. Totals 21 6-13 69. 3-pointers: GC 7 (A. Bentz 4, S. Bentz 3). Fouls: U 12, GC 13. Fouled out: none.

MAX 71, NORTH SHORE-PLAZA 66 NS-P 13 40 54 66 Max 20 39 57 71 NS-P (66): Cassie Bailey 2, Tessa Waltees 22, Hadlie Hansen 22, Whitney Lee 9, Amanda Hauf 11. Totals 26 12-16 66. MAX (71): Mckayla Huesers 1, Brianna Johnson 23, Whitney Huesers 14, Mikali Talbott 21, Mekenzie Sheresky 5, Kimberly Delzer 7. Totals 27 13-21 71. 3-pointers: NS-P 2 (Hansen), M 4 (Talbott 3, Johnson 1).

EDGELEY-KULM 36, PINGREE-BUCHANAN-KENSAL 40 Edgeley-Kulm 8 21 27 36 PBK 10 20 27 40 E-K (36): Kaitlin Ost 4, Jenny Erickson 9, Jasmine Nitschke 4, Roxanne Mathern 2, Jessa Lindgren 17. Totals 16 2-10 36. PBK (40): Kelly Carlson 20, Jacie Pfaff 4, Codi Transgrade 2, Amanda Beckley 2, Kirsten Albrecht 2, Morgan Thomas 6, Danielle Schmoker 4 . Totals 17 4-11 40. 3-pointers: E-K 2 (Jenny Erickson, Jessa Lindgren), PBK 2 (Kelly Carbon, Morgan Thomas). Fouls: E-K 12, PBK 11. Fouled out: none.

D-LEAGUE STANDINGS East Conference

Pct .731 .654 .462 .385 .360 .259 .136

GB — 2 7 8½ 9½ 12½ 14

W L Pct Tulsa 20 6 .769 Rio Grande Valley 17 7 .708 Bakersfield 16 10 .615 Reno 15 11 .577 Utah 12 10 .545 New Mexico 12 13 .480 Texas 11 13 .458 Austin 10 13 .435 Idaho 9 16 .360 Monday’s game Maine 95, Texas 89 Today’s games Reno at Austin Utah at Texas Thursday’s games Tulsa at Springfield New Mexico at Austin Friday’s games Erie at Maine Tulsa at Springfield Rio Grande Valley at Iowa Utah at Texas Fort Wayne at Idaho Bakersfield at Reno Saturday’s games Sioux Falls at WIZARDS, 7 p.m. New Mexico at Austin Rio Grande Valley at Iowa Fort Wayne at Idaho Bakersfield at Reno

GB — 2 4 5 6 7½ 8 8½ 10½

Iowa Erie Fort Wayne Maine Springfield WIZARDS Sioux Falls West Conference

W 19 17 12 11 9 7 3

L 7 9 14 16 16 20 19

MEN’S BASKETBALL NABC/DIVISION II COACHES POLL Rk. Team (1st-place) Rec. Pts. Pre. 1. West Liberty, W.Va. (8) 15-0 200 1 2. Bellarmine, Ky. 17-1 191 2 3. Augusta State, Ga. 16-1 185 3 4. CSU-Dominguez Hills 15-1 176 5 5. Findlay, Ohio 15-1 160 6 6. Alabama-Huntsville 17-2 158 7 7. Fort Hays State, Kan. 16-2 147 8 8. Lincoln Memorial, Tenn. 16-0 142 10 9. Southern Indiana 16-2 136 4 10. Central Oklahoma 18-2 128 13 11. Missouri Southern 15-1 119 14 12. Minnesota State 15-2 101 15 13. Incarnate Word, Texas 14-2 98 9 14. Central Washington 15-2 96 16 15. Grand Valley State. 15-3 78 18 16. Tampa, Fla. 17-1 73 12 17. Hillsdale, Mich. 14-2 67 11 18. Georgia Southwestern 13-3 61 21 19. Harding, Ark. 14-2 59 22 20. West Texas A&M 15-2 53 23 21. Wayne State, Mich. 13-3 44 25 22. Humboldt State, Calif. 14-2 25 20 23. Arkansas Tech 13-3 19 NR 24. Kentucky Wesleyan 13-4 15 17 25. Saint Anselm, N.H. 14-3 11 NR Others receiving votes: Christian Brothers (Tenn.) 10, Northern Kentucky 10, Indianapolis (Ind.) 9, Mercyhurst (Pa.) 7, Bentley (Mass.) 6, Alaska-Anchorage 4, Bowie State (Md.) 3, Winona State (Minn.) 3, American International (Mass.) 2, Colorado School of Mines 2, Kutztown (Pa.) 2.

NJCAA DIVISION II POLL

Bismarck State received votes in the latest national poll. School Record Points 1. South Mountain 20-0 180 2. South Suburban 20-2 162 3. Erie 15-1 153 4. Mott 19-2 150 5. Louisburg 17-1 134 6. Kirkwood 17-4 104 7. Orange County 17-2 99 8. Columbus State 19-3 98 9. Johnson County 14-4 77 10. Triton 18-4 52 11. Lincoln 15-5 45 12. John Wood 14-6 37 13. Cecil 15-5 34 14. County College of Morris13-4 30 15. St. Louis 15-6 26 Receiving votes: Bismarck State; Clarendon; Danville Area; Des Moines Area; Henry Ford; Iowa Central; St. Clair County.

MILES 78, WILLISTON STATE 73 MILES (78): Anthony Williams 1-4 1-2 3, Tyree Anderson 6-11 5-6 19, John Bayo 0-0 0-0 0, James Sparkman 8-8 5-6 22, Jeremy Nicolas 5-13 0-1 10, Kwahmere Gredic 1-4 3-5 5, Travis Peevy 0-0 0-0 0, Mitch Buerkle 1-2 0-0 3, Ashante Ross 3-3 3-4 9, Ayibakuro Preh 2-3 1-2 5, David Stinson 1-2 0-0 2. Totals 28-50 18-26 78. WSC (73): Thad Perry 4-7 2-4 10, Derik Hawkey 4-11 2-5 11, Blake Nash 5-11 2-2 12, Charles Ward 9-21 2-3 20, Matt Kvernum 2-2 0-0 4, Marc Price 0-0 0-0 0, Nick Mrkovich 5-7 0-0 13, Jake Reynen 1-2 0-0 2, C.J. Vinger 0-0 1-3 1. Totals 30-61 9-17 73. Halftime: M 44, W 34. 3-pointers: M 4 (Anderson 2, Buerkle 1, Sparkman 1), W 4 (Markovich 3, Hawkey 1). Rebounds: M 33 (Nicolas 5), W 27 (Nash 7). Assists: M 7 (Kwahmere 3), W 4 (Hawkey 2). Steals: M 3 (Buerkle 1, Sparkman 1), W 9 (Nash 4). Turnovers: M 9, W 4. Fouls: M 15, W 21. Fouled out: None. Technical fouls: None.

NDSCS-WAHPETON 91, BISMARCK STATE 75 (Monday) BSC (75): Isiah Kampeska 4-10 4-4 12, Kyle Weisbeck 8-23 4-6 25, Martin Wind 3-8 0-0 8, Jordan Maurer 3-4 3-7 9, Sheldon Weisbeck 1-1 2-2 5, Karl Bartholomay 1-1 00 3, Shawn Kuntz 0-1 0-0 0, Jalen Finley 58 3-7 13. Totals 25-58 16-26 75. WAHPETON (91): Norris Rumph 8-13 2-4 18, Joe Terfehr 5-8 4-5 14, Hanif NixonHughes 11-17 4-5 26, Trent Thomas 5-9 00 14, Shavon Scott 4-10 0-2 10, Anthony Hendricks 0-1 0-0 0, Greg Tucker 0-5 2-2 2, Jeremy Newton 3-4 0-0 7, Dantrell Edwards 0-3 0-0 0. Totals 36-70 12-18 91. Halftime: W 47, B 38. 3-pointers: B 9 (K. Weisbeck 5, Wind 2, Bartholomay 1, S. Weisbeck 1), W 7 (Thomas 4, Scott 2, Newton 1). Rebounds: B 37 (K. Weisbeck 10), W 39 (Nixon-Hughes 15, Terfehr 11). Assists: B 12 (Kampeska 3, Maurer 3), W 26 (Rumph 9). Steals: B 2 (K. Weisbeck 1), W 8 (three with two). Turnovers: B 14, W 7. Fouls: B 14, W 21. Fouled out: None. Technical fouls: None.

WOMEN’S BASKETBALL USA TODAY ESPN DIVISION II TOP 25 COACHES’ POLL Rk. Team (1st-place) Rec. 1. Lander (S.C.) (27) 1 2. Clayton State (Ga.) 3 3. Delta State (Miss.) 4 4. Fort Lewis (Colo.) (1) 5 5. Arkansas Tech 2 6. Wayne State (Neb.) (1) 7 7. Northeastern State (Okla.) 9 8. Western Washington 10 9. Washburn (Kan.) 6 10. Michigan Tech 8 11. Dixie State-Utah 13 12. Grand Canyon (Ariz.) 12 13. Bentley (Mass.) 18 14. Emporia State (Kan.) 11 15. Metro State (Colo.) 14 16. Quincy (Ill.) 21 17. Alaska-Anchorage 15

Pts. 19-0 18-0 16-1 17-1 14-2 16-1 14-2 15-1 14-2 14-2 14-1 15-2 15-2 12-4 16-1 17-1 15-5

Pre. 722 682 656 620 568 548 492 479 464 403 369 338 308 290 265 257 230

18. South Carolina-Aiken 17 17-4 212 19. Rollins (Fla.) 16 16-3 191 20. Millersville-Pennsylvania 23 13-3 182 21. Holy Family (Pa.) 22 11-3 175 22. Grand Valley State 19 13-4 136 T23. NW Missouri State NR 14-2 109 T23. Tarleton State (Texas) 25 14-2 109 25. Seattle Pacific (Wash.) 20 12-4 107 Others receiving votes: CSU-Monterey Bay 104; California-Pennsylvania 45; Johnson C Smith (N.C.) 41; Tampa (Fla.) 32; West Liberty (W.Va.) 27; Harding (Ark.) 24; Franklin Pierce (N.H.) 23; West Texas A&M 23; West Alabama 21; Colorado Christian 20; Edinboro (Pa.) 19; Indianapolis (Ind.) 18; Wisconsin-Parkside 17; Indiana-Pennsylvania 14; Gannon (Pa.) 13; American International (Mass.) 11; Pace (N.Y.) 11; Fort Valley State (Ga.) 8; Drury (Mo.) 7; Glenville State (W.Va.) 6; Florida Southern 5; West Virginia Wesleyan (W.Va.) 5; Assumption (Mass.) 3; Francis Marion (S.C.) 3; Augustana (S.D.) 2; Cal Poly-Pomona 2; CSU-Chico 2; Florida I of T 2; CSU-San Bernardino 1; Elizabeth City State (N.C.) 1; Georgia College & State 1; Missouri S & T 1; Tusculum (Tenn.) 1.

MILES 76, WILLISTON STATE 59 MILES (76): Shaye Murphy 4-11 0-0 8, Christen Lopez 3-6 1-2 9, Micah Kirkpatrick 3-8 1-2 7, Echo Thurston 0-3 2-2 2, Ieva Jansone 2-9 6-8 10, MaKenzie Johnson 0-1 0-0 0, Taylor Henderson 1-6 0-0 3, Kassie Barta 4-6 4-4 13, Bailey Wilson 4-6 0-0 10, Ivana Domljanovic 5-8 4-4 14. Totals 26-64 18-22 76. WSC (59): Sam Heier 5-12 0-0 13, Tiara Maxon 1-4 1-2 4, Kyli Locken 4-8 0-0 8, Shari Hewson 0-3 3-4 3, Dani Sadowsky 23 3-5 8, Domenique Whitmore 2-3 0-0 5, Rachel Mehus 0-2 2-2 2, Toni Johnson 2-4 2-4 8, Kinsi Olson 0-2 0-0 0, Tarryn Macpherson 4-10 0-0 8, Melanie Russell 0-0 0-0 0. Totals 20-51 11-17 59. Halftime: M 41, W 28. 3-pointers: M 6 (Wilson 2, Lopez 2, Henderson 1, Barta 1), W 8 (Heier 3, Johnson 2, Maxon 1, Sadowsky 1). Rebounds: M 43 (Lopez 9), W 31 (Macpherson 6). Assists: M 12 (Lopez 5), W 14 (Locken 4). Steals: M 19 (Jansone 4), W 13 (Macpherson 3). Turnovers: M 14, W 21. Fouls: M 18, W 14. Fouled out: M, Jansone. Technical fouls: None.

(Monday) BSC (67): Lacey Petersen 9-17 7-8 25, Macie Harris 3-6 0-0 8, Carlie Buechler 4-10 1-1 10, Amanda Vander Wal 0-3 2-4 2, Alyssa Hummel 5-13 0-2 10, Chelsea Carlson 3-7 0-0 9, Megan Toepke 0-1 0-0 0, Emily Hardy 1-3 0-0 3. Totals 25-60 10-15 67. WAHPETON (75): Kaylin Sheets 6-13 4-5 17, Karis Phillips 4-8 0-0 10, Haley Hoyer 27 6-6 11, Dericka Griffs 7-15 7-9 21, Ashley Holmstrom 2-4 3-4 8, Michelle Reif 2-2 0-0 4, Whitney Holmstrom 0-0 0-0 0, Amanda Schultz 0-1 0-0 0, Samantha Schmit 2-3 0-0 4, Siri Gylland 0-2 0-0 0. Totals 25-55 20-24 75. Halftime: W 31, B 29 3-pointers: B 7 (Carlson 3, Harris 2, Buechler 1, Hardy 1), W 5 (Phillips 2, Sheets 1, Hoyer 1, A. Holmstrom 1). Rebounds: B 37 (three with seven), W 33 (A. Holmstrom 9). Assists: B 12 (Petersen 4), W 14 (Griffs 4). Steals: B 6 (Petersen 1, Buechler 1), W 7 (three with two). Turnovers: B 16, W 11. Fouls: B 18, W 16. Fouled out: B, Vander Wal. Technical fouls: None.

NAHL STANDINGS CENTRAL DIVISION Team W L OTL Owatonna 23 12 4 BOBCATS 22 11 3 Coulee Region 21 13 4 Alexandria 17 15 4 Aberdeen 13 22 3 Austin 12 20 3 NORTH DIVISION Team W L OTL St. Louis 29 9 4 Janesville 24 11 3 Motor City 23 13 1 Traverse City 22 12 1 Michigan 20 12 3 Springfield 17 18 3 Chicago 8 25 4 Port Huron 3 32 1 SOUTH DIVISION Team W L OTL Topeka 27 8 2 Amarillo 24 8 3 Texas 23 10 5 Wichita Falls 17 18 4 Corpus Christi 16 22 2 New Mexico 10 24 3 WEST DIVISION Team W L OTL Fairbanks 27 11 2 Alaska 25 16 1 Wenatchee 23 15 2 Kenai River 19 17 4 Dawson Creek 15 25 2 Fresno 14 20 4 Wednesday, Jan. 26 Kenai River at Fresno Michigan at Port Huron Owatonna at Alexandria Thursday, Jan. 27 New Mexico at Amarillo Alaska at Dawson Creek Friday, Jan. 28 Alexandria at BOBCATS, 7:15 p.m. Coulee Region at Aberdeen Owatonna at Austin Amarillo at Corpus Christi Port Huron at Traverse City New Mexico at Wichita Falls Chicago at Janesville Michigan at Motor City Alaska at Dawson Creek Kenai River at Fresno Texas at Wenatchee

Pts 50 47 46 38 29 27 Pts 62 51 47 45 43 37 20 7 Pts 56 51 51 38 34 23 Pts 56 51 48 42 32 32

COLLEGE HOCKEY WCHA Team

Conference Overall W L T Pts W L T Denver 12 3 3 27 16 5 5 Minn.-Duluth 12 4 2 26 17 5 3 North Dakota 13 5 0 26 18 7 2 Neb.-Omaha 10 6 2 24 13 9 2 Wisconsin 9 7 2 20 17 8 3 Colorado Coll. 8 8 0 16 14 11 1 Minnesota 7 7 2 16 10 9 3 St. Cloud St. 7 8 1 15 11 11 2 Ala.-Anchorage 6 10 2 13 7 12 3 Bemidji St. 5 11 2 12 9 13 2 MSU-Mankato 4 11 3 11 10 11 5 Mich. Tech 1 14 1 3 3 18 3 Friday, Jan. 28 North Dakota at Colorado Coll., 8:30 p.m. Alaska-Anchorage at Minnesota MSU-Mankato at St. Cloud State Wisconsin at Michigan Tech Alabama-Huntsville at Nebraska-Omaha

BOYS HOCKEY WEST REGION Region Overall W L T OL Pts W L T Bottineau 10 1 0 0 22 14 3 0 Century 9 0 0 0 20 10 4 0 Minot 8 3 0 0 16 8 5 0 Bismarck 6 3 2 0 14 8 6 2 Jamestown 5 5 1 0 11 6 8 1 Mandan 3 7 1 2 9 3 10 1 Hazen-Beulah 3 7 2 0 8 4 8 3 Williston 1 10 0 0 2 1 11 1 Dickinson 1 10 0 0 2 1 13 0 NOTE: Teams get one point for an overtime loss in region play. Overtime losses also count in the loss column. Monday, Jan. 24 Minot 2, Bottineau 1 Tuesday, Jan. 25 Fargo North 4, Jamestown 3 Thursday, Jan. 27 Dickinson at Century, 7:15 p.m. Minot at Mandan, 7:30 p.m. West Fargo at Jamestown

EAST REGION Region Overall W L T OL Pts W L T West Fargo 7 4 1 0 19 10 4 2 G.F. Red River 7 2 0 0 18 10 4 0 G.F. Central 5 1 2 0 14 9 3 2 Fargo North 5 4 1 0 13 8 5 1 Grafton-PR 5 4 1 0 13 8 8 1 Devils Lake 4 3 3 0 11 9 3 3 South-Shanley 2 6 1 0 7 4 9 1 Fargo Davies 1 5 1 0 3 7 7 1 Wahpeton 0 7 0 0 0 4 10 0 NOTE: Teams get one point for an overtime loss in region play. Overtime losses also count in the loss column. Tuesday, Jan. 25 Fargo North 4, Jamestown 3 G.F. Central 5, West Fargo 4 Thursday, Jan. 27 Devils Lake at Fargo Davies G.F. Central at Grafton-Park River East Grand Forks at G.F. Red River West Fargo at Jamestown

GIRLS HOCKEY STATE STANDINGS Conf L T OL 1 0 0 2 1 0 2 0 0 2 0 0

COLLEGE TRACK AND FIELD U-MARY’S COOMBS HONORED

Chris Miller, NBC, def. Jared Schumacher, 81. 130: Sebastian Schill, NBC, pinned Rylan Jacob, :46. 135: Brett Schurman, NBC, def. Brock Nagel, 9-8. 140: Andrew Braget, NBC, pinned Eric Roemmich, 1:30. 145: Clay Jacob, Lin, won by forfeit. 152: Wendal Lafferty NBC, def. Mike Oien, 12-4. 160: Jon Oien, Lin, def. Alex Deannger, 5-4. 171: Jeff Wirtz, NBC, def. Ethan Roemmich, 12-2. 189: Cole Carner, NBC, won by forfeit. 215: Justin Gibson, NBC, pinned, Cody Schlosser, 1:15. 285: Levi Roemmich, Lin, pinned Trey Lafferty, 4:59.

NORTH BORDER-CAVALIER 45, HARVEY-WELLS COUNTY 29 112 pounds: Jeff Ulvog, NBC, pinned Cody Devogt. 119: Jesse Schurman, NBC, pinned Connor Glasner. 125: Quinten Koble, H-WC, def. Chris Miller. 130: Sebastian Schill, NBC, def. Wyatt Lautt. 135: Brett Schurman, NBC, pinned Casey Muscha. 140: Andrew Braget, NBC, def. Tanner Keller, Maj dec. 145: Devin Arnold, H-WC, pinned Cody Hornbaker. 152: Wendel Lafferty, NBC won by forfeit. 160: Casey Schuh, H-WC, pinned Alex Deannger. 171: Aaron Ponzer, H-WC, def. Jeff Wirtz, maj dec. 189: Cole Carrier, NBC, pinned Steven Schild. 215: Justin Gibson, NBC, won by forfeit. 285: Michael Lafferty, NBC, won by forfeit. 103: Carson Koble, HWC, won by forfeit.

University of Mary’s Nicketa Coombs was named women’s track athlete of the week in the NISC on Tuesday. The junior sprinter won two individual events in national provisional qualifying times, placed third in the HARVEY-WELLS COUNTY 41, LINTON 30 55-meter dash (7.32), and 119 pounds: Andrew Leier, Lin, pinned Glasner. 125: Quinten Koble, H-WC, e n d e d t h e e v e n i n g by Connor pinned Jared Schumacher. 130: Rylan anchoring the winning 1,600 Jacob, def. Lin, Wyatt Lautt, maj dec. 135: Muscha, H-WC, pinned Brock Nagel. relay teams with a provision- Casey 140: Tanner Keller, H-WC, won by forfeit, Garrett Roemmich, Lin, pinned Devin al qualifying performance 145: Arnold. 152: Clay Jacob, Lin, won by forfeit, (3.53.89) at the Montana 160: Casey Schuch, H-WC, won by forfeit, 171: Aaron Ponzer, H-WC, pinned Ethan State Open in Bozeman, Roemmich. 189: Steve Schild, H-WC, won by forfeit. 215: Cody Schlosser, Lin, won by Mont., on Friday night. forfeit. 285: Levi Roemmich, Lin, won by forCoombs won the 200 feit. 103: Chase Jacob, Lin, pinned Carson Koble. 112: Cody Devogt, H-WC pinned with a time of 24.85 and the Josh Schlosser. 400 in 56.73 to record the top BOYS SWIMMING times in the NSIC this year. MANDAN 123, BISMARCK 61

NDSCS-WAHPETON 75, BISMARCK STATE 67

W West Fargo 13 Grand Forks 9 Bismarck 10 Fargo South 10

Fargo North 7 4 0 0 18 9 5 0 Minot 6 6 1 0 13 6 7 2 Jamestown 4 7 0 1 9 4 8 1 Williston 3 10 1 0 7 5 10 1 Devils Lake 2 10 1 0 5 2 10 3 Dickinson 1 10 0 0 2 3 12 0 Mandan 1 12 0 0 2 2 13 0 NOTE: Teams get one point for an overtime loss in region play. Overtime losses also count in the loss column. Tuesday, Jan. 25 Grand Forks 5, Fargo North 4 West Fargo 5, Fergus Falls, Minn., 2 Friday, Jan. 28 Bismarck at West Fargo, 7:30 p.m. Mandan at Devils Lake, 7 p.m. Williston at Fargo South Minot at Jamestown

Pts 26 21 20 20

Overall W L T 15 1 0 10 4 1 12 3 0 11 3 0

Women’s field athlete of week: MSUMankato senior pole vaulter Lauren Stelten. Men’s track athlete of week: Northern State sophomore hurdler Luke Hauert. Men’s field athlete of week: Wayne State junior thrower Ross Bunchek.

U-MARY WOMEN 18TH IN NATION

The Marauders women’s team is ranked 18th in the latest national ranking. UMary is ranked first in the Central Region. The Marauder men are ranked sixth in the region. COLLEGE SOFTBALL U-MARY PICKED EIGHTH IN NSIC

The University of Mary is predicted to finish eighth in the preseason poll. The Marauders collected 93 points. Rk. Team (first-place votes) 1. Wayne State (9) 2. Augustana (2) 3. Winona State (3) 4. MSU-Mankato 5. Concordia-St. Paul 6. Minnesota-Duluth 7. Southwest Minnesota State 8. U-Mary 9. St. Cloud State 10. Upper Iowa 11. Northern State 12. MSU-Moorhead 13. Bemidji State 14. Minnesota-Crookston

Points 177 168 163 147 126 120 116 93 91 77 57 52 38 31

CLASS A WRESTLING MANDAN 44, ST. MARY’S 27

Three straight forfeits staked Mandan to a 18-0 lead and the Braves rolled to a 44-27 victory over visiting St. Mary’s in a West Region wrestling dual on Tuesday. Mandan won six of the 10 matches with four forfeits. Keenan Ternes and Tate Schwagler won by fall for the winning Braves. Austin Huck, Brock Krumm and Christian Boechler garnered pins for St. Mary’s. The dual was wrestled at Mandan’s For t Lincoln school. At Fort Lincoln 189 pounds: Anthony Lueder, M, won by forfeit. 215: Taylor Hellman, M, won by forfeit. 285: Logan Massee, M, won by forfeit. 103: Curt Zachmeier, M, def. Tate Barnhardt, 9-4. 112: Austin Huck, SM, pinned Blake Allickson, 3:08. 119: Keenan Ternes, M, pinned Matt Cleary, 1:14. 125: Brayden Renner, SM, won by forfeit. 130: Thomas Peterson, M, def. Dane Fischer, 10-4. 135: Alex Koppy, M, def. Josh McCormick, tech. fall, 24-7. 140: Adam Stein, M, def. John Schwartz, 8-6. 145: Alex Willey, SM, def. Jered Keller, 12-6. 152: Brock Krumm, SM, pinned Sam Ravnaas, :43. 160: Tate Schwagler, M, pinned Reed Hessman, 5:28. 171: Christian Boechler, SM, pinned Alex Spillman, 3:24. Records: St. Mary’s 0-7 West Region, 2-9 overall; Mandan 2-4, 7-8.

WEST REGION Region Overall Team W L W L Century 5 0 14 2 Bismarck 4 0 9 0 Turtle Mountain 5 2 12 5 Dickinson 4 3 7 5 Williston 3 2 6 4 Jamestown 3 4 10 9 Mandan 2 4 7 8 Minot 1 5 4 10 St. Mary’s 0 7 2 9 Tuesday, Jan. 25 Mandan 44, St. Mary’s 27 Thursday, Jan. 27 Williston at Bismarck, 7 p.m. Dickinson at Century, 6 p.m., Horizon Mandan at Jamestown, 7 p.m. Turtle Mountain at Minot

CLASS B WRESTLING LINTON 42, ROLLA 23 At Harvey 112 pounds: Josh Schlosser, L, won by forfeit. 119: Jade Jacob, L, won by forfeit. 125: Rylan Jacob, L, pinned Keaton Graber, :34. 130: No match. 135: Brock Nagel, L, won by forfeit. 140: Garret Roemmich, L, won by forfeit. 145: No match. 152: Cole Haberstroh, R, def. Mike Oien, default. 160: Jon Wallette, R, def. Jon Oien, 6-4. 171: Wilson Hallaway, R, def. Ethen Roemmich, tech. fall, 17-2. 189: Cody Schlosser, L, won by forfeit. 215: Stephen Bonn, R, won by forfeit. 285: Seth Anderson, R, def. Levi Roemmich, decision, score unavailable. 103: Kyle Moch, L, won by forfeit.

HARVEY-WELLS COUNTY 60, ROLLA 22 103 pounds: Carson Koble, H-WC, won by forfeit. 112: Cody Devogt, H-WC, won by foefeit. 119: Connor Glasner, H-WC, won by forfeit. 125: Quinten Koble, H-WC, pinned Keaton Graber. 130: Wyatt Lautt, H-WC, won by forfeit. 135: Cody Muscha, H-WC, won by forfeit, 140: Tanner Keller, H-WC, won by forfeit. 145: Devin Arnold, H-WC, pinned Cole Haberstroh. 152: Jon Wallette, Rolla, won by forfeit. 160: Wilson Hallaway, Rolla, def. Casey Schuch, maj dec. 171: Aaron Ponzer, H-WC, won by forfeit. 189: Steve Schild, HWC, won by forfeit. 215: Carl Nelson, Rolla, won by forfeit. 285: Stephen Bon, Rolla, won by forfeit.

NORTH BORDER-CAVALIER 45, LINTON 21 103 pounds: Chase Jacob, Lin, pinned Brayden Horgan, :35. 112: Jeff Ulvog, NBC, def. Josh Schlosser, 13-1. 119: Jesse Schurman, NBC, ded. Andrew Leier, 11-1. 125:

Individual results 200 medley relay: 1. Mandan (Eric Mayer, Gabe Ellison, Jordan Barth, Matthew Poppe), 1:54.27. 2. Bismarck, 2:04.46. 200 freestyle: 1. Cale Schafer, M, 1:57.12. 2. Ellison, M, 1:59.04. 3. Ian Ballantyne, B, 2:03.54. 4. Shawn Berger, M, 2:04.02. 5. Craig McDaniel, B, 2:27.05. 6. Sonny Schmidt, B, 2:35.11. 200 individual medley: 1. Austin Schmidt, B, 2:19.17. 2. Mayer, M, 2:22.17. 3. Tyler Riedinger, M, 2:23.72. 4. Eric Curtiss, M, 2:24.90. 5. Josh Riepl, B, 2:30.23. 6. Matthew Steffes, B, 2:30.89. 50 freestyle: 1. Poppe, M, 23.52. 2. Curtiss, M, 24.93. 3. Tyler Bier, M, 25.29. 4. Isaac Jensen, B, 26.84. 5. Nick Erlandson, B, 27.74. 6. Taylor Werner, B, 28.12. Diving: 1. Barth, M, 269.60. 2. Josh Heldstab, M, 192.35. 3. Nathan Berger, M, 168.30. 4. Bryce Kern, B, 98.00. 100 butterfly: 1. Thomas Stomme, B, 1:01.05. 2. Riedinger, M, 1:04.48. 3. Bier, M, 1:04.72. 4. A. Schmidt, B, 1:05.14. 5. Ben Wanner, M, 1:06.16. 6. Isaac Jensen, B, 1:09.48. 100 freestyle: 1. Poppe, M, 52.03. 2. Curtiss, M, 55.23. 3. Matthew Steffes, B, 1:00.02. 4. Remmington Wanner, M, 1:01.01. 5. Jordan Schmaltz, B, 1:01.15. 6. Alex Horner, B, 1:04.38. 500 freestyle: 1. Schafer, M, 5:19.97. 2. Ballantyne, B 5:39.57. 3. S. Berger, M, 5:44.19. 4. Austin Tenunissen, B, 5:53.41. 5. Wyatt Schafer, M, 5:56.52. 6. Taylor Werner, B, 6:22.44. 200 freestyle relay: 1. M (Popple, Ellison, Curtiss, Schafer), 1:37.39. 2. B, 1:38.21. 100 backstroke: 1. Mayer, M, 1:04.82. 2. Riepl, B, 1:07.60. 3. Barth, M, 1:08.73. 4. B. Wanner, M, 1:10.41. 5. Jordan Schmaltz, B, 1:12.24. 6. Dylan Kern, B, 1:12.89. 100 breaststroke: 1. Ellison, M, 1:10.01. 2. Drew Sagsveen, B, 1:22.62. 3. Curtiss, M, 1:15.68. 4. Drew Sagsveen, B, 1:22.62. 400 freestyle relay: 1. B (Riepl, Stomme, Schmidt, Ballantyne), 3:41.66. 2. M 3:44.83.

MINOT 124, MANDAN 62 Individual results 200 medley relay: 3. Man (Eric Mayer, Gabe Ellison, Jordan Barth, Matthew Popple), 1:54.27. 200 freestyle: 3. Cale Schafer, Man, 1:57.12. 4. Ellison, Man, 1:59.04. 6. Shawn Berger, Man, 2:04.02. 200 individual medley: 2. Mayer, Man, 2:22.17. 4. Tyler Riedinger, Man, 2:23.17. 6. Eric Curtiss, Man, 2:24.90. 50 freestyle: 1. Poppe, Man, 23.52. 4. Curtiss, Man, 24.93. 6. Tyler Bier, Man, 25.29. Diving: 1. Barth, Man, 269.60. 3. Josh Heldstab, Man, 192.35. 5. Nathan Berger, Man, 168.30. 100 butterfly: 4. Riedinger, Man, 1:04.48. 5. Bier, Man, 1:04.72. 6. Ben Wanner, Man, 1:06.16. 100 freestyle: 3. Poppe, Man, 52.03. 5. Curtiss, Man, 55.23. 6. Remmington Wanner, Man, 1:01.01. 500 freestyle: 1. Cale Schafer, Man, 5:19.97. 4. Berger, Man, 5:44.19. 5. Wyatt Schafer, Man, 5:56.52. 200 freestyle relay: 2. Man, (Poppe, Ellison, Curtiss, Schafer), 1:37.39. 100 backstroke: 3. Mayer, Man, 1:04.82. 5. Barth, Man, 1:08.73. 6. B. Wanner, Man, 1:10.41. 100 breaststroke: 2. Ellison, Man, 1:10.01. 5. Curtiss, Man, 1:15.68. 400 freestyle relay: 3. Man, (Curtiss, Mayer, Bier, Schafer), 3:44.83.

COLLEGE VOLLEYBALL TORR STEPS DOWN AT MINOT STATE

Minot State volleyball coach Johnna Torr has resigned from her position. Torr, who finished her fourth year at the helm, leaves the school with a record of 3574. COLLEGE ATHLETICS VALLEY CITY STATE TURF PROJECT GETTING PUBLIC TAX MONEY

VALLEY CITY (AP) — A project to replace the turf at Valley City State’s Lokken Field is getting an infusion of public tax money. The Valley City TimesRecord reports that city commissioners voted to contribute $100,000 in sales tax money dedicated to economic development. University Foundation Executive Director Larry Robinson says about $950,000 has now been pledged. The turf project is expected to cost between $1 million and $1.25 million. NORTH DAKOTA SCOREBOARD TUESDAY BOYS BASKETBALL Barnes County North 46, Midkota 43 Central Valley 37, Finley-Sharon-HopePage 32 Dakota Prairie 68, May Port CG 36 Divide County 65, Ray 58 Grafton 47, Midway-Minto 32 Hatton-Northwood 63, Thompson 60 Hettinger 78, Mott-Regent 74, OT Hillsboro 61, Northern Cass 58 Kenmare 92, Glenburn 38 Kindred 68, Campbell-Tintah-Fairmount 46 Langdon 50, Rolette-Wolford 33 Milnor 91, North Sargent 90, 3OT North Star 69, St. John 34 Oakes 61, Hankinson 59, OT Powers Lake 60, Burke County 24 South Border 72, Hoven-Edmunds Central, S.D. 37 Starkweather-Munich 67, Benson County 51 Trinity Christian 63, Tioga 39 Velva 68, Drake-Anamoose 34 Wahpeton 55, Fargo Davies 53 Watford City 63, Stanley 35 GIRLS BASKETBALL Bowman County 47, Richardton-Taylor 39 Divide County 52, Ray 41 Grafton 66, Midway-Minto 18 Kindred 50, Campbell-Tintah-Fairmount 42 Oakes 62, Lisbon 47 Thompson 68, Hatton-Northwood 57


Sports

Bismarcktribune.com ■ Bismarck Tribune

Wednesday, January 26, 2011 ■ Page 3D

Clijsters, Zvonareva into Australian Open semifinals By JOHN PYE AP Sports Writer MELBOURNE, Australia — Kim Clijsters moved into an Australian Open semifinal showdown with secondranked Vera Zvonareva, beating Agnieszka Radwanska 6-3, 7-6 (4) today as air force planes flew in formation overhead as part of celebrations for the national holiday. Cannons went off earlier when Zvonareva started the Australia Day proceedings at Rod Laver Arena with a 6-2, 6-4 win over Petra Kvitova. Thursday’s semifinal will be a rematch of the last U.S. Open final, where Clijsters collected her third Grand Slam title. Clijsters is the only Grand Slam winner into the women’s semis, although she’s still seeking her first major title outside of America. No. 1-ranked Caroline

Wozniacki and China’s Li Na meet in the other half of the draw. “I hope the experience can help me a little bit,” Clijsters said. “But there are some tough players out there, we have Nos. 1, 2, 3 still in and Li Na has been playing really well. So it is going to be really tough. “I lost to Vera at Wimbledon last year, I beat her in finals of U.S. Open.” Zvonareva has lost the last two Grand Slam finals, to Clijsters in New York and Serena Williams at Wimbledon. Clijsters was up a set and a break before Radwanska r a l l i e d , w i n n i n g t h re e straight games to lead 5-4 with a chance to serve for the second set. With six Royal Australian Air Force “Roulettes” flying overhead, Clijsters converted her fourth break-point chance to tie it at 5 and the set went to a tiebreaker.

“I think the planes kind of took me up higher!” joked Clijsters, long a crowd favorite in Australia, where she’s still called “Aussie Kim.” She also was engaged for a time to former No. 1-ranked Lleyton Hewitt. “Happy Australia Day everybody,” she said in a salute to her supporters. Clijsters now has reached the semifinals five times in Australia. Her best run remains her trip to the final in 2004, when she lost to fellow Belgian Justine Henin. Zvonareva wore a black ribbon on her hat in honor of the 35 victims of the suicide bombing at a Moscow airport this week. Her quarterfinal also featured a couple distractions. Zvonareva and Kvitova were surprised when cannons went off in a nearby

park. And Zvonareva asked that the match be stopped for a few minutes while a woman in her sightline was given medical attention in the stands, but chair umpire Mariana Alves told them to continue. “I didn’t know they were going to start this noise during our match, it was a difficult moment,” said Zvonareva, who led the final set 3-0 before the disruptions but saw Kvitova level it at 4-4. “You’re here to play tennis ... I was trying to keep my concentration.” On Tuesday, Roger Federer was reluctant to talk about possibly playing Rafael Nadal in the Australian Open final, and with good reason. After all, he’s playing Novak Djokovic in the semifinals. Federer and Nadal have dominated the Grand Slam tournaments, winning 21 of t h e l a s t 2 3 t i t l e s. B u t

Djokovic is dangerous, and Federer knows his onematch-at-a-time mantra is sound strategy. “He takes it to the opponent,” Federer said. Federer routed Stanislas Wawrinka 6-1, 6-3, 6-3 in the first all-Swiss quarterfinal at a major. Djokovic eliminated Wimbledon finalist Tomas Berdych 6-1, 7-6 (5), 6-1 on Tuesday night. On the women’s side, Wozniacki beat Francesca Schiavone 3-6, 6-3, 6-3 in one quarterfinal, and Li defeated Andrea Petkovic 62, 6-4 in the other. It was at this stage of the 2008 Australian Open that Djokovic beat Federer before going on to win his first and only Grand Slam singles title. Federer also lost to Djokovic after having two match points in the U.S. Open semifinals last September. A mental lapse at Flushing Meadows cost Federer.

“I was playing good enough to win,” Federer said. “But I was a bit confused mentally, maybe, because we played the second session. ... Maybe I just felt like I have to get out of this match as quick as I could to save energy to play Rafa the next day. I think it ended up hurting me losing the match at the end.” It ended a sequence for Federer of six straight finals appearances in New York. And then Djokovic lost to Nadal in the final, giving the Spaniard his first U.S. Open title. That set him on the path toward his Rafa Slam — Nadal is aiming to be the first man since Rod Laver in 1969 to hold all four major titles at once. Nadal plays the night quarterfinal today against David Ferrer. He has an 11-3 lead in head-to-heads. A win could set up a semifinal against Andy Murray.

AP TOP 25 MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL ROUNDUP

NBA ROUNDUP

No. 1 Ohio St. 87, No. 12 Purdue 64

Celtics 112, Cavaliers 95

best 24 points and Connecticut overcame a tough shooting COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — William Buford had 19 points, game from Kemba Walker (14 points) with a 13-0 run late in Jared Sullinger added 17 and Ohio State played almost flaw- the second half to win. lessly in rolling to a win Tuesday night. No. 6 Kansas 82, Colorado 78 JaJuan Johnson had 22 points for Purdue, while E’Twaun BOULDER, Colo. (AP) — Kansas built a big lead with 3Moore added 16. pointers, then won it at the free throw line, scoring their last nine points from there to hold on. Josh Selby led the winners Seton Hall 90, No. 9 Syracuse 68 SYRACUSE, N.Y. (AP) — Jeremy Hazell led a long-range with 17 points, while Marcus Morris added 15. barrage with 28 points and suddenly hot-shooting Seton Hall No. 24 Florida 104, Georgia 91, 2OT pulled off a stunning upset. ATHENS, Ga. (AP) — Chandler Parsons (18 points, 12 Kris Joseph scored 17 points and Rick Jackson added 12 and rebounds) took control in the second overtime after the teams 11 rebounds for Syracuse, which suffered its third straight loss. traded tying last-second shots, leading Florida to a victory. Erving Walker and Kenyon Boynton each scored 24 points for No. 5 Connecticut 76, Marquette 68 MILWAUKEE (AP) — Freshman Jeremy Lamb had a career- the winners.

BOSTON (AP) — Paul Pierce scored 24 and Kendrick Perkins (seven points and six rebounds in 16 minutes) returned for the first time since injuring his knee in the NBA finals to help Boston send Cleveland to its 18th consecutive loss.

Mavericks 112, Clippers 105 DALLAS (AP) — Jason Terry scored a season-high 28 points and J.J. Barea added 25, lifting Dallas to a victory over suddenly Eric Gordon-less Los Angeles.

Nuggets 120, Wizards 109 WASHINGTON (AP) — Carmelo Anthony scored 23 points, Nene and Al Harrington each scored 21 and Denver beat Washington.

NHL ROUNDUP Wild 4, Blackhawks 2 CHICAGO (AP) — Antti Miettinen scored the go-ahead goal, Niklas Backstrom made 31 saves and Minnesota beat Chicago on Tuesday in the teams’ final game before the All-Star break. The Wild go into the break on a roll, with four wins in five games after the comeback victory. Pierre-Marc Bouchard, Chuck Kobasew and Martin Havlat also scored for Minnesota, while Bouchard, Kobasew, Kyle Brodziak, Andrew Brunette, Matt Cullen,

Mikko Koivu and Jared Spurgeon Jason Blake scored for the Ducks. each added an assist. Sabres 3, Senators 2, OT University of North Dakota OTTAWA (AP) — Shaone Morproduct Jonathan Toews tallied risonn scored 1:59 into overtime two assists for the Blackhawks. and Ryan Miller made 27 saves to give Buffalo a victory over Ottawa. Ducks 3, Blue Jackets 2 UND product Drew Stafford COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Teemu Selanne had a goal and an collected an assist for the Sabres. assist, and All-Star goalie Jonas Penguins 1, Islanders 0 Hiller made 35 saves for his NHLPITTSBURGH (AP) — Marcbest 25th win as surging Anaheim Andre Fleury made 29 saves for his held on to beat Columbus in the second shutout, Craig Adams last game for both teams before the scored in the third period and PittsAll-Star break. burgh won again without its superFighting Sioux product product star duo of Sidney Crosby and

SCOREBOARD FOOTBALL NFL PLAYOFFS Conference Championships Sunday’s games NFC: Green Bay 21, Chicago 14 AFC: Pittsburgh 24, N.Y. Jets 19 Pro Bowl — At Honolulu Sunday, Jan. 30 AFC vs. NFC, 6 p.m. (FOX) Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 6 At Arlington, Texas Pittsburgh vs. Green Bay, 5:30 p.m. (FOX)

BOWL GLANCE Saturday’s game At Mobile, Ala. Senior Bowl, 3 p.m. (NFLN)

BASKETBALL NBA EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct Boston 34 10 .773 New York 23 21 .523 Philadelphia 19 25 .432 New Jersey 13 32 .289 Toronto 13 32 .289 Southeast Division W L Pct Miami 31 13 .705 Atlanta 29 16 .644 Orlando 29 16 .644 Charlotte 17 25 .405 Washington 13 31 .295 Central Division W L Pct Chicago 31 14 .689 Indiana 16 25 .390 Milwaukee 16 26 .381 Detroit 17 28 .378 Cleveland 8 37 .178 WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct

GB — 11 15 21½ 21½ GB — 2½ 2½ 13 18 GB — 13 13½ 14 23 GB

San Antonio 38 7 .844 — Dallas 29 15 .659 8½ New Orleans 30 16 .652 8½ Memphis 22 23 .489 16 Houston 21 25 .457 17½ Northwest Division W L Pct GB Oklahoma City 28 16 .636 — Utah 27 17 .614 1 Denver 26 18 .591 2 Portland 25 21 .543 4 Minnesota 10 34 .227 18 Pacific Division W L Pct GB L.A. Lakers 32 13 .711 — Phoenix 20 23 .465 11 Golden State 19 25 .432 12½ L.A. Clippers 17 27 .386 14½ Sacramento 10 32 .238 20½ Monday’s games New Jersey 103, Cleveland 101 Detroit 103, Orlando 96 Philadelphia 105, Phoenix 95 Memphis 100, Toronto 98 New York 115, Washington 106 Chicago 92, Milwaukee 83 Houston 129, Minnesota 125 New Orleans 91, Oklahoma City 89 Sacramento 96, Portland 81 San Antonio 113, Golden State 102 Tuesday’s games Denver 120, Washington 109 Boston 112, Cleveland 95 Dallas 112, L.A. Clippers 105 Charlotte at Sacramento, n Utah at L.A. Lakers, n Today’s games Orlando at Indiana, 6 p.m. Memphis at New Jersey, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Toronto, 6 p.m. Denver at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. Atlanta at Milwaukee, 7 p.m. Oklahoma City at Minnesota, 7 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Houston, 7:30 p.m. Charlotte at Phoenix, 8 p.m. San Antonio at Utah, 8:30 p.m. New Orleans at Golden State, 9:30 p.m.

MORNING KICKOFF Trivia answer

FROM 1D: The three NBA players to capture the AllStar MVP, NBA MVP and NBA Finals MVP in the same season are Shaquille O’Neal in 2000, Willis Reed (1970) and Michael Jordan (1996). O’Neal did it for the L.A. Lakers, Reed did it for the New York Knicks and Jordan did it for the Chicago Bulls.

Playback 10 YEARS AGO (2001): The Williston State men’s and women’s basketball teams beat Bismarck State with the men winning 79-77 and the women prevailing 79-67. For the Tetons men, Marlon Samuels had 20 points and 12 rebounds, Derek Daniels added 15 points and 10 rebounds, Cody Lee scored 14 points, one more than Robert Dobson, and Tom Volesky came through

AP TOP 25 SCHEDULE Sunday’s games No. 18 Wisconsin 78, Northwestern 46 No. 21 West Virginia 56, South Florida 46 Monday’s game No. 15 Notre Dame 56, No. 2 Pittsburgh 51 Tuesday’s games No. 1 Ohio St. 87, No. 12 Purdue 64 No. 5 Connecticut 76, Marquette 68 No. 6 Kansas 82, Colorado 78 Seton Hall 90, No. 9 Syracuse 68 No. 24 Florida 104, Georgia 91, 2OT Today’s games No. 4 San Diego State at No. 9 BYU, 9 p.m. No. 7 Texas at Oklahoma State, 6:30 p.m. No. 8 Villanova at Providence, 6 p.m. No. 16 Minnesota vs. Northwestern, 7:30 p.m. No. 21 Georgetown vs. St. John’s, 6 p.m. No. 23 Louisville vs. West Virginia, 6 p.m.

USA TODAY/ESPN WOMEN’S TOP 25 W-L 1. Baylor (20) 18-1 2. Connecticut (9) 18-1 3. Duke (2) 19-0 4. Stanford 16-2 5. Texas A&M 17-1 6. Tennessee 19-2 7. Xavier 16-2 8. West Virginia 19-1 9. Notre Dame 17-4 10. UCLA 16-2 11. Michigan St. 18-2 12. Oklahoma 15-3 13. Maryland 16-3 14. North Carolina 17-3 15. Florida St. 16-4 16. Wis.-Green Bay 18-1 17. DePaul 19-2

with 11. For the Mystics men, Wylee Bearstail taliled 17 points, one more than Pa t r i c k A l d e n , C h u c k Archambault added 14, and Quinn Austin came through with 11 points. For the WSC women, Melini Mayer led the way with 23 points and 1o re b o u n d s, w h i l e Ky l e e Hutchins had 10 points. For the BSC women, Shawna Emil scored 20 points and Kystal Cook chipped in 16. 20 YEARS AGO (1991): In Class B boys basketball, New England Public knocked off Scranton 66-62 in overtime, while Linton toppled Gackle 69-66 in an extra period. Elliott Ehlis led New England with 18 points and Warren Buffalo added 15, while Jason Gullickson had 14 and Jared Fritz chipped in 11 points.

Pts Pvs 761 1 748 2 715 3 683 4 629 5 628 6 583 7 546 9 503 10 493 8 454 12 412 13 387 14 346 11 325 16 313 15 302 18

18. Kentucky 15-4 271 19 19. Georgetown 15-5 209 17 20. Iowa St. 13-5 178 20 21. Iowa 15-5 135 21 22. Miami 18-2 112 22 23. Ohio St. 13-6 63 — 24. Georgia 16-3 59 — 25. Texas Tech 16-3 50 25 Others receiving votes: St. John’s 34, Bowling Green 29, Syracuse 23, Arkansas 19, Marquette 16, Marist 14, Georgia Tech 11, Gonzaga 4, Middle Tennessee 4, Oklahoma State 4, Louisiana Tech 3, Rutgers 3, Boston College 2, Tulane 2, Florida Gulf Coast 1, Texas 1.

HOCKEY NHL EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W LOT Pts GF Phildlpha 50 33 12 5 71 174 Pittsburgh 50 31 15 4 66 154 N.Y. Rangrs 52 29 20 3 61 148 N.Y. Islandrs48 15 26 7 37 117 New Jersey 48 16 29 3 35 100 Northeast Division GP W LOT Pts GF Boston 49 27 15 7 61 150 Montreal 50 27 18 5 59 130 Buffalo 49 23 21 5 51 137 Toronto 49 19 25 5 43 124 Ottawa 50 17 25 8 42 108 Southeast Division GP W LOT Pts GF Tampa Bay 51 31 15 5 67 154 Washngtn 50 27 14 9 63 140 Atlanta 51 23 19 9 55 151 Carolina 49 24 19 6 54 149 Florida 48 22 21 5 49 130 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W LOT Pts GF Detroit 48 29 13 6 64 163 Nashville 49 27 16 6 60 133 Chicago 50 26 20 4 56 157 St. Louis 48 22 19 7 51 129 Columbus 49 23 21 5 51 130

Cam Hodell scored a game-high 20 for Scranton, while Shawn Pierce added 12 and Kelly Pierce contributed 10 points. Scott Schumacher scored 26 for the Lions, while Randy Davis netted 18 and Kyle Freier tallied 10 points. Andy Lehr poured in 30 points for Gackle, while Steve Muller made 10. 50 YEARS AGO (1961): The Bismarck Junior College cagers and their loyal band of rooters had themselves a ball, all at the expense of long-time nemesis, the Jamestown College Jimmies. The Mystics trounced Jamestown 85-64. Fiery guard Dick Geiger led the way for BJC, netting 22 points. Howie Unterseher also pushed through with 22 points. Jim Mohler added 13 points, while Lee DeForest and Harry Morrison each tossed in 10.

GA 130 114 126 158 143 GA 111 123 144 153 160 GA 154 128 166 153 129 GA 142 117 139 142 152

Evgeni Malkin, over New York.

to for its fifth straight victory.

Panthers 4, Rangers 3

Flyers 5, Canadiens 2

NEW YORK (AP) — Defenseman Mike Weaver’s first goal in 42 games, scored off the back of New York’s Artem Anisimov, broke a third-period tie and lifted Florida to a victory. Tomas Vokum made 32 saves for the winners.

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Jeff Carter, Claude Giroux and Kimmo Timonen scored power-play goals and Philadelphia head into the AllStar break leading the league in wins after a victory over Montreal.

Lightning 2, Maple Leafs 0

PHOENIX (AP) — Dustin Penner scored with 21 seconds left in regulation and Edmonton got a rare power-play goal to beat Phoenix and end a five-game losing streak.

TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — Dwayne Roloson made 26 saves in his third shutout in 10 games this month, Teddy Purcell had a goal and an assist, and Tampa Bay beat Toron-

Northwest Division GP W LOT Pts GF GA Vancouvr 49 30 10 9 69 163 120 Colorado 49 25 18 6 56 159 160 Minnesota 49 25 19 5 55 130 134 Calgary 50 23 21 6 52 140 151 Edmonton 48 15 25 8 38 121 165 Pacific Division GP W LOT Pts GF GA Dallas 49 29 15 5 63 144 136 Anaheim 52 28 20 4 60 140 146 Phoenix 50 24 17 9 57 144 143 San Jose 49 25 19 5 55 137 135 Los Angeles49 26 22 1 53 140 122 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Monday’s games N.Y. Rangers 2, Washington 1, SO Carolina 6, Toronto 4 Calgary 3, Nashville 1 Colorado 4, St. Louis 3 Vancouver 7, Dallas 1 Los Angeles 2, Boston 0 Tuesday’s games Florida 4, N.Y. Rangers 3 Pittsburgh 1, N.Y. Islanders 0 Anaheim 3, Columbus 2 Philadelphia 5, Montreal 2 Buffalo 3, Ottawa 2, OT Tampa Bay 2, Toronto 0 Minnesota 4, Chicago 2 Edmonton 4, Phoenix 3 Today’s games Florida at Boston, 6 p.m. Carolina at N.Y. Islanders, 6 p.m. Washington at Atlanta, 6 p.m. New Jersey at Detroit, 6:30 p.m. Edmonton at Dallas, 6:30 p.m. Phoenix at Colorado, 8 p.m. St. Louis at Calgary, 9 p.m. Nashville at Vancouver, 9 p.m. San Jose at Los Angeles, 9:30 p.m.

WILD 4, BLACKHAWKS 2 Minnesota 1 2 1— 4 Chicago 2 0 0— 2 First period—1, Minnesota, Havlat 14 (Brodziak), 1:47. 2, Chicago, Sharp 26 (Kane, Toews), 3:49 (pp). 3, Chica-

Jim Larson, the former Bismarck High and BJC flash, paced the Jimmies with 17 points; Jim Simle, another BHS cage great, chipped in with 13, and Paul Kranz, who set the Missouri Basin Conference on fire with his play for Underwood last year, tallied 10.

Oilers 4, Coyotes 3

go, Brouwer 15 (Toews, Campbell), 9:24. Second period—4, Minnesota, Kobasew 9 (Spurgeon, Bouchard), 2:31. 5, Minnesota, Miettinen 9 (Brunette, Koivu), 16:13. Third period—6, Minnesota, Bouchard 4 (Cullen, Kobasew), 10:23. Shots on Goal—Minnesota 8-9-5— 22. Chicago 12-11-10—33. Goalies—Minnesota, Backstrom. Chicago, Crawford. A—21,247 (19,717). T—2:20.

TENNIS AUSTRALIAN OPEN Tuesday at Melbourne Park, Melbourne, Australia Purse: $24.7 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Hard-Outdoor Singles — Men — Quarterfinals Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def. Stanislas Wawrinka (19), Switzerland, 6-1, 6-3, 6-3. Novak Djokovic (3), Serbia, def. Tomas Berdych (6), Czech Republic, 6-1, 7-6 (5), 6-1. Singles — Women — Quarterfinals Li Na (9), China, def. Andrea Petkovic (30), Germany, 6-2, 6-4. Caroline Wozniacki (1), Denmark, def. Francesca Schiavone (6), Italy, 36, 6-3, 6-3.

TRANSACTIONS TUESDAY BASEBALL American League MINNESOTA TWINS—Agreed to terms with RHP Kevin Slowey on a one-year contract. OAKLAND ATHLETICS—Agreed to terms with LHP Craig Breslow on a one-year contract. SEATTLE MARINERS—Agreed to terms with RHP Chris Ray on a minor league contract. TORONTO BLUE JAYS—Acquired

Bottineau, 8 p.m. Women’s basketball: Bismarck State at DC-Bottineau, 6 p.m. Boys basketball: St. Mary’s at Minot, 7:30 p.m.; Dickinson at Century, 7:45 p.m.; Shiloh Christian at Washburn, 7:30 p.m. Girls basketball: Dickinson at Century, 6 p.m.; Jamestown at Mandan, 7:30 p.m.; Center-Stanton at Shiloh Christian, 7:30 p.m. Boys hockey: Dickinson at Century, 7:15 p.m.; Minot at Mandan, 7:30 p.m. College wrestling: U-Mary at Dickinson State, 6 p.m. MST. High school wrestling: Dickinson at Century at Horizon, 6 p.m.; Williston at Bismarck, 8:30 p.m.; Mandan at Jamestown, 7 p.m.

FRIDAY

TV TODAY MEN’S BASKETBALL 6:30 p.m. ESPN — Texas at Oklahoma St. ESPN2 — North Carolina at Miami

NBA 7 p.m. FSN — Oklahoma City at Minnesota 8:30 p.m. ESPN — San Antonio at Utah

NHL 6:30 p.m. VERSUS — New Jersey at Detroit

TENNIS 8:30 p.m. ESPN2 — Australian Open, women’s semifinals, at Melbourne, Australia 2:30 a.m. ESPN2 — Australian Open, men’s semifinal, at Melbourne, Australia

NAHL: Alexandria at Bobcats, 7:15 p.m. College hockey: UND at Colorado College, 7:30 p.m. MST. Men’s basketball: U-Mary at Bemidji State, 8 p.m.; United Tribes at Trinity Bible, 6 p.m. Women’s basketball: U-Mary at Bemidji State, 6 p.m. Boys basketball: Williston at Mandan, 7:45 p.m.; St. Mary’s at Dickinson, 7:30 p.m. MST. Girls basketball: Williston at Mandan, 6 p.m.; St. Mary’s at Dickinson, 5:45 p.m. MST. Boys hockey: Williston at Century at Schaumberg, 7:15 p.m. Girls hockey: Mandan at Devils Lake, 7 p.m.; Bismarck at West Fargo, 7:30 p.m. High school wrestling: Bismarck at St. Mary’s, 7 p.m.; Century at Belle Fourche, S.D., Tournament. Boys swimming and diving: Bismarck vs. Century, 5 p.m. College track and field: U-Mary at Montana State Invitational.

SATURDAY

SCHEDULE THURSDAY Men’s basketball: Bismarck State at DC-

D-League: Sioux Falls at Wizards, 7 p.m. NAHL: Alexandria at Bobcats, 7:15 p.m. College hockey: UND at Colorado College, 7 p.m. MST.

RHP Frank Francisco and cash considerations from Texas for C Mike Napoli. National League CHICAGO CUBS—Agreed to terms with RHP Todd Wellemeyer on a minor league contract. HOUSTON ASTROS—Agreed to terms with LHP Wandy Rodriguez on a three-year contract. NEW YORK METS—Announced OF Jason Pridie and RHP Tobi Stoner cleared waivers and were assigned outright to Buffalo (IL). BASKETBALL National Basketball Association MILWAUKEE BUCKS—Signed G Garrett Temple to a 10-day contract. FOOTBALL National Football League ATLANTA FALCONS—Agreed to terms with LB Robert James on a two-year contract. CAROLINA PANTHERS—Named Ray Brown assistant offensive line coach. CLEVELAND BROWNS—Named Chris Tabor special teams coordinator. DENVER BRONCOS—Named Ron Milus secondary coach and Richard Smith linebackers coach. OAKLAND RAIDERS—Named Al Saunders offensive coordinator. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS—Named Brad Seely assistant head coach/special teams coordinator and Kevin Tolbert assistant strength and conditioning coach. HOCKEY National Hockey League NEW YORK ISLANDERS—Suspended G Evgeni Nabokov for not reporting to the team after being claimed off waivers from Detroit. OTTAWA SENATORS—Recalled G Mike Brodeur from Binghamton (AHL). SAN JOSE SHARKS—Recalled G Alex Stalock from Worcester (AHL).

Men’s basketball: U-Mary at MinnesotaDuluth, 8 p.m. Women’s basketball: U-Mary at Minnesota-Duluth, 6 p.m. Boys basketball: Williston at Century, 4 p.m.; Jamestown at Bismarck, 6 p.m.; Minot Ryan at Shiloh Christian, 6 p.m. Girls basketball: Jamestown at Bismarck, 4 p.m.; Williston at Century, 5:45 p.m. Boys hockey: Williston at Bismarck, 3:15 p.m.; Wahpeton-Breckenridge at Mandan, 4:15 p.m.; Bottineau at Century at Schaumberg, 7:15 p.m. Girls hockey: Bismarck at Fargo North, 1 p.m.; Mandan at Grand Forks, 2 p.m. High school wrestling: Century at Belle Fourche, S.D., Tournament. Boys swimming and diving: Jamestown Invitational, 11 a.m.

SUNDAY D-League: Sioux Falls at Wizards, 3 p.m. Men’s basketball: Lake Region State at United Tribes, 3 p.m. Women’s basketball: Lake Region State at United Tribes, 1 p.m. College track and field: U-Mary at Northern State Multi.

CONTACT US Lou Babiarz, Tribune sports editor, 2508243 or 888-684-2293 after 3 p.m. (e-mail: lou.babiarz@bismarcktribune.com) Steve Thomas, Tribune sportswriter, 2508244 or 888-684-2293 after 3 p.m. (e-mail: steve.thomas@bismarcktribune.com) Cindy Peterson, Tribune sportswriter, 2508245 or 888-684-2293 after 3 p.m. (e-mail: cindy.peterson@bismarcktribune.com) Michael Weber, Tribune sportswriter, 3558839 or 888-684-2293 after 3 p.m. (e-mail: mike.weber@bismarcktribune.com) Eric Hammond, Tribune sports copy editor, 250-8246 or 888-684-2293. (e-mail: eric.hammond@bismarcktribune.com) Send faxed results to 223-2063. E-mail to: sports@bismarcktribune.com


Sports

Page 4D ■ Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Bismarck Tribune ■ Bismarcktribune.com

Packers defensive tackle B.J. Raji

Spooner Continued from 1D

be the winning score, setting the Packers up to play the Pittsburgh Steelers in the Super Bowl on Feb. 6 at Cowboys Stadium. “It really kind of happened so quickly that once the game ended, I felt like I was living the dream,” Raji said. “Everything slowed down for me. I go in the locker room, and the postgame, the stage is set up. So I’m like, ‘Man, this is really happening.’ I’m turning around and people are handing out the NFC Championship hats and T-shirts. I’m like, ‘Man, this is coming true.’ It’s just a blessing.” And it was another big step in what has been an impressive second NFL season for Raji. While the former Boston College standout isn’t nearly as well-known as fellow 2009 first-round Packers draft pick Clay Matthews, he has been critical to the success of the Packers defense this season. Given the Packers’ lack of defensive line depth, Raji doesn’t leave the field very often. And despite the heavy work load, Raji seems to be getting better as the season goes on. Now there’s no telling what’s next for the Packers’ big man, although he does have an idea. Would you believe ... a 337-pound running back? Raji already has taken a handful of snaps as a Green Bay fullback, and is subtly lobbying for a chance to carry the ball. “I’m more worried about winning,” Raji said. “If Coach feels he’s giving me the ball to win, I’m very ecstatic about that. If Coach feels he needs me to block so he can run play action stuff or run the ball, I’m fine with that as well. As long as we win, I’m happy.”

Associated Press

Green Bay’s B.J. Raji celebrated his interception return for a touchdown a little early, but it worked on Sunday. Already, Raji’s limited exploits on offense have earned him a nickname: “The Freezer,” a tip of the hat to former Chicago Bears player William “The Refrigerator” Perry. “I was miked up for the Atlanta game, and one of the trainers came to me and said, ‘You look like The Fridge out there,’” Raji said. “And I was just playing around, ‘I’m the Freezer.’ I was making a joke, just making light of the situation and having a good time with it.

MINNESOTA SPORTS DIGEST Twins agree with Slowey on 1-year, $2.7M deal

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — The Minnesota Twins and right-hander Kevin Slowey have come to agreement on a one-year, $2.7 million contract to avoid arbitration. The 26-year-old went 136 with a 4.45 ERA in 28 starts for the Twins last season. Slowey missed some time last year because of injuries and was inconsistent on the mound in his third full season with the Twins. He will enter spring training competing with Brian Duensing

and Nick Blackburn for the final two spots in the starting rotation behind Francisco Liriano, Carl Pavano and Scott Baker. The agree- Slowey ment leaves the Twins with two arbitration-eligible players on their roster to negotiate with — Liriano and left fielder Delmon Young. Both are in line for big raises after impressive 2010 seasons.

Walsh to BSC She leaves the Patriots with a 228-80 record. She coached Century to a Class A state championship in 2008 and state runner-up finishes in 2005, ‘06 and ‘09. The Patriots finished fourth at state in 2003 and ‘04 and fifth in ‘07. Walsh is now ready to return to the college ranks. “When this opportunity came up, I thought it was a good time to make the move,” said Walsh, who works as an environmental scientist for the North Dakota Department of Health. “New challenges are always refreshing, and I feel like Bismarck State College is in the midst of new and exciting changes.” Walsh said she’s eager to get out in the region and recruit. “With the contacts I’ve made in the past 23 years in coaching, I’m comfortable with being able to recruit locally, regionally and in the states surrounding North Dakota,” Walsh said. “I’m confident this will be a win-win situation for everyone.” Walsh had initially left the college ranks to raise her daughter and son. Her daughter, Hailee, plays volleyball at the University of Mar y. Her son, Hunter, is 15. Now that her kids are older, Walsh sees this as a

Continued from 1D perfect opportunity to move back to the college level. She is excited about coaching only 14 girls instead of being in charge of an entire high school program. “I’m looking forward to having more one-on-one coaching with the girls,” Walsh said. “I’m looking forward to having off-season workouts, spring practices and those kinds of things.” Walsh is familiar with most of the returning Bismarck State players. She has either coached them at Century or during the Optimist All-Star series or coached against them. “I went to a few of their matches,” Walsh said. “We have some great athletes that are coming back. We will see what’s out there in recruiting.” Middle blocker Markie Henry is excited to begin her sophomore season at B S C . Wa l s h c o a c h e d Henry when she prepped at Century. “She’s really good at telling me exactly what I need to do and how to fix any problem I have,” Henry said. “I feel really comfortable knowing she’s my coach.” Walsh also coached at the University of Mary and Bismarck High. She was also the director for the Missouri Valley Junior Olympic program.

So I guess, in retrospect, I came up with the name.” Despite any offensive aspirations Raji might have, his primary responsibility remains on defense, where he’ll be expected to disrupt the middle of the Steelers’ offensive line. And he knows he’ll have his hands full with Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger. “He’s a very big guy,” Raji said. “We played him last year and we had trouble bringing him down. I think

we missed about four or five sacks on him just because he eluded us.” And maybe he’ll catch Roethlisberger by surprise like he did Hanie, dropping back in coverage and grabbing a pass out of the air. “He jumps in front of the ball, quarterback never saw him,” McCarthy said. “Just to catch and show his athletic ability (is impressive).” Charles Woodson was impressed with Raji’s hands. “As a lineman, you don’t get to handle that ball

Vikings sign CFL wide receiver to 3-year deal

Lions. He was undrafted out of Alcorn State in 2009, but worked out for eight NFL EDEN PRAIRIE, Minn. teams in December after (AP) — The playing well for the Lions. Minnesota Arceneaux joins a Vikings Vikings have receiving group in flux. Percy signed former Harvin will be back, but SidCFL receiver ney Rice could become a free Emmanuel agent and Bernard Berrian Arceneaux to struggled through an inefa three-year fective season. Veterans Greg Lewis and Hank Baskett procontract. duced little as well and may The 6-footnot return. 2 Arceneaux Arceneaux caught 130 passes for 1,972 yards and 12 Wild’s Havlat added to touchdowns in the previous NHL All-Star roster two seasons with the B.C. ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) —

much,” Woodson said. “So for him to come up with a catch and get into the end zone, that was huge.” Raji got mixed reviews on his celebration dance, where he put his hands on his hips and began to swivel. He said some people loved it — and others joked that he needed some lessons. “I got 170 text messages after the game,” Raji said. “I haven’t read half of them yet. It’s just been a crazy couple days.”

Minnesota Wild forward Martin Havlat has been chosen for this w e e k e n d ’s All-Star game. H a v l a t ’s addition was announced Tu e s d a y by Havlat the league for Sunday’s game. He’s one of three forwards picked as injury replacements for Sidney Crosby, Evgeni Malkin and Ales Hemsky. This will be the 29-year-

Continued from 1D Spooner said. “He’s the goal-scorer, and we set him up.” That tr io has been together all season and played together some last year as well. Spooner and Holmen have been working together longer than that. They spent three seasons as doubles partners in tennis, finishing second at the state tournament last fall. “We know each other pretty well,” Spooner said. Well enough that they don’t need to talk much to communicate, on the court or on the ice. “I went to watch them play tennis, and I don’t think they said two words the whole time,” Olson said with a laugh. “It was kind of fun to see. It shed some light on (how they play) on the hockey side.” One thing that will make Saturday’s game unusual is the setting. Schaumberg hasn’t played host to a boys hockey game this important in well over a decade. “Bottineau came here last year, and they said, ‘Jeez, we thought it was a going to be like playing in a barn, but this place is pretty nice,’” Olson said. “It may not be fan-friendly, but it’s player-friendly.“ Olson said the Patriots may have less of a homeice advantage than they would in the familiar environs of VFW Sports Center, though they did practice once at Schaumberg. But Spooner said Century is looking forward to playing in the old rink. “We’ll still have our fans there, and the ice is just fine — maybe even better,” Spooner said. “It’s a different kind of atmosphere, and it’s kind of fun playing there for a change.”

old Havlat’s second All-Star appearance. He went in 2007 while with the Chicago Blackhawks. After a slow first season, Havlat has had a much stronger second season with Minnesota. He has 13 goals in 48 games and leads the team with 30 assists. He’ll join defenseman Brent Burns as Wild representatives this weekend. This is the second time in the Wild’s 10-year history they’ll send two players to an All-Star game. Filip Kuba and Dwayne Roloson both went in 2004.

College notebook Continued from 1D Lee is still listed as day-today. “ H e ’s s t i l l m a k i n g progress,” Herbst said. “I’d be surprised if he didn’t get some minutes this weekend.” Guard Jordan Wilhelm of Bismarck needed seven points on Saturday to score his 1,000th career point. The senior finished the game with seven to reach the milestone. The Marauders are ranked nationally in several statistical categories: No. 2 in turnovers with 11.2 per game; No. 4 in 3-point field goal percentage (42.5 percent); No. 15 in scoring defense (61.9 points per game); No. 21 in 3point field goals made per game (8.4); No. 27 in assists to turnover ratio (1.2); No. 35 in 3-point field goal percentage defense (30.1); No. 40 in field goal percentage defense (40.6). Point guard Anthony Moody is 31st in points per game with 20.4.

Ross dismissed United Tribes point guard Ashley Ross is no longer a member of the Thunderbirds’ women’s basketball team. The freshman from Ft. Thompson, S.D., was suspended for a conduct rule. Ross, a 5-foot-5 guard, had been leading the Thunderbirds with 17.7 points a game and had netted 64 3-pointers on the season. Jayli Fimbres, a freshman from New Town, stepped in place for Ross on Sunday at Lake Region State. “Jayli is a hard worker,”

cross country. She’s really coming into her own. It’s exciting for her and for us, from a team perspective.” Thorson was pleased with t h e w a y t h e m e n’s a n d women’s teams bounced back after a so-so showing at North Dakota State in their previous meet. The women won seven events at Montana State with six provisional marks. For the men, Ben Jacobson recorded provisional marks in shot put and weight Agnew looking impressive the Melissa Agnew helped throw. Anderson on a roll lead the UU-Mary wrestler Brady Mary women’s Anderson has cross country been storming team to the through his national meet, competition. ear ning AllThe 184American honpounder from ors along the Hamilton, way. Mont., won six The sophos t r a i g h t m o r e f r o m Agnew matches last O n a m i a , Anderson Minn., has started the indoor week by a comtrack and field season in a bined score of 54-6. positive fashion. “To get that many wins Agnew set a school record this past weekend at Montana definitely helps his confiState in the mile with a time of dence,” U-Mary coach Ben 4:55.65, which is also a provi- Berogan said. “Even when he sional national-qualifying loses, he’s still pretty confident. His losses are always time. Ashley Colbrese held the close and to good people.” Berogan said that Anderold record of 4:59.63, set in son is ahead of where he was 2006. “She is running better than at this point last season. “Last year at regionals, he than she did in cross country, which is hard to believe,” U- put together a good tournaMary coach Mike Thorson ment,” Berogan said. “He’s said. “That’s scary when you trying to get back to that same think about what she did in level or even better.” UTTC coach Daryl Bearstail said. “She will give us some intensity on the defensive end. She’s a little inexperienced in hand l i n g t h e Fimbres p o i n t - g u a rd position. Jayli is accepting the challenge.” United Tribes is now down to seven players.

Short shots

■ Tyler Johnson of Bismarck picked up a 9-3 decision for the North Dakota State wrestling team over Brandon Kammerzell of Northern Colorado at 165 pounds on Sunday. The victory clinched the match victory for the Bison, their first Western Wrestling Conference victory of the season. Johnson earned three takedowns and a reversal in the first two periods and only allowed an escape in the final period to cement his win. ■ Whitney Carlson of Buchanan set a meet record in the long jump last weekend for NDSU while competing at the Jack Johnson Classic in Minneapolis. The senior’s leap of 19 feet, 6 3/4 inches broke the old record, which was set in 2010. Carlson also won the 60meter hurdles in a seasonbest time of 8.58 seconds. ■ Montana center Brian Qvale recorded his fourth consecutive double-double of the season with 17 points and 18 rebounds in a 75-61 victory over Montana State on Saturday. It was also the 6-foot-11 senior’s sixth double-double of the season. Qvale is ninth in the Big Sky in scoring with an average of 14.1 points per game. He leads the league in rebounding (9.0) and blocked shots (3.2) per game. Qvale has 216 career blocked shots, a Montana and Big Sky record.


Bismarcktribune.com ■ Bismarck Tribune

National Football League

Wednesday, January 26, 2011 ■ Page 5D

Hornung picks Packers in Super Bowl By WILL GRAVES AP Sports Writer

Cowher

made the playoffs three times, won three AFC North titles and have secured two berths in the Super Bowl. Their worst season under Tomlin? 9-7. Not bad. “Coach Tomlin took over the team right away,” said Hoke, a 10-year veteran with Pittsburgh. “He put his imprint on this team when he first got here — two different teams, two different personalities, two different coaching styles. They both do great. I was very close to Coach Cowher. I think Coach Tomlin is a great coach. I’m close to him. Two different styles, but two different ways of winning and they both win.” Townsend knows that all too well. He, like so many other teammates, developed a strong relationship with Cowher over nine seasons and was part of a veteran core that wasn’t used to change. This was Pittsburgh, after all, the one NFL team that doesn’t have much fluctuation in the coaching department. And initially — while the aforementioned respect was there to an extent — there was a hint of skepticism among some of the players with “the new guy.” Tomlin was much harder on his players than Cowher was, so that became a sticking point. During his first training camp in 2007, in fact, the Steelers were in pads and hitting more often, running more, being forced to finish plays with more vigor during early fundamental drills. “We were doing things that we weren’t used to doing,” Townsend said, “and that led to some complaining about how we were practicing and some of the stuff that was going on during practice.”

naturally — to beat the Steelers by a field goal and thinks this could be the start of a dynasty similar to the one he helped the team build in the 1960s, when coach Vince Lombardi led

Green Bay to five NFL titles and victories in the first two Super Bowls. Hornung pointed to the large number of injuries Green Bay had this season as proof even better days are

PUBLIC NOTICE REQUEST FOR BIDS The Board of Park Commissioners of the Bismarck Parks and Recreation District will receive sealed bids for tree planting at Cottonwood Park Recreational Trail. All bids will be received by the Board of Park Commissioners of the Bismarck Parks and Recreation District in the Administrative Office located at 400 East Front Avenue, Bismarck, ND 58504, until 2:30 pm on February 2, 2011, at which time the bids will be publicly opened and read. All bids shall be sealed and endorsed “2011 Tree Planting – Cottonwood – Recreational Trail Bids”. Bids must be submitted on forms provided by the Bismarck Parks and Recreation District and in accordance with specifications and conditions therein contained. Copies of bid proposal forms and general specifications may be obtained from the Bismarck Parks and Recreation District Office. The Board of Park Commissioners of the Bismarck Parks and Recreation District reserves the right to hold all bids for a period of thirty (30) days after the date fixed for the opening thereof and to reject any or all bids and to waive irregularities whenever it is for the best interest of the District. Dated this 11th day of January 2011. BISMARCK PARKS AND RECREATION DISTRICT /s/Randy Bina Randy Bina,Assistant Director Bismarck Parks and Recreation District 1/19 & 26 - 606259

Injured Packers players: Let us in team photo

Michael Ward ) Eaton,Van de Streek & Ward ) 201 S. Main St., Suite 200 ) P.O. Box 1697 ) Minot, ND 58702 ) Telephone: (701) 852-4837 ) Attorneys for the Personal ) Representative ) Probate No. 11P0005 IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF BURLEIGH COUNTY, STATE OF NORTH DAKOTA In the Matter of the Estate of Imogene Ward Christensen, Deceased. NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed co-personal representatives of the above estate. All persons having claims against the said deceased are required to present their claims within three months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be presented to Mary Claire Christensen & Christopher Ward Christensen, personal representatives of the estate in care of Michael Ward, Eaton, Van de Streek & Ward, 201 South Main, Suite 200, Minot, North Dakota 58701 or filed with the Court. Dated this 8th day of Jan. 2011. /s/Mary Claire Christensen Mary Claire Christensen, Personal Representative /s/Christopher Ward Christensen Christopher Ward Christensen, Personal Representative /s/Michael Ward Michael Ward EATON & WARD Attorneys for the Personal Representatives 201 South Main, Suite 200 Minot, ND 58701 701 852 4837 1/19, 26 & 2/2 - 606277

GREEN BAY, Wis. (AP) — If linebacker Nick Barnett and tight end Jermichael Finley couldn’t play for the Green Bay Packers in the Super Bowl, they at least wanted to be included in the team photo. Both players posted complaints on their Twitter on Tuesday after finding out players on injured reserve will not be in the team picture taken at the Super Bowl. Barnett called it “sad,” and Finley said it was “not cool.” “It was a team decision,” Packers spokesman Jeff Blumb said. “It was based primarily on the sheer number of players we have on injured reserve. Our primary goal in Dallas is to get the team ready to win a game.” Green Bay now lists 16 players on IR. Injured players will join the team late next week and will be on the sideline during the game against Pittsburgh. “They will be in our bench area on game day and part of our team,” Blumb said. Both players softened their criticism later in the day. “I was not trying to be a distraction nor was I downing the organization they have done so much for me,” Barnett wrote Tuesday afternoon. Another potential concern for the injured players is the team photo takes place during Tuesday’s media day, and the Packers’ injured players aren’t scheduled to join the team until Thursday. If the team were to bring injured players to Dallas earlier, the players would end up missing nearly a week of their injury rehabilitation. “This next two weeks is about the unbelievable success of my teammates and last thing I want is to be (is a) distraction,” Finley wrote.

ADVERTISEMENT The City of Bismarck is seeking cost proposals for the collection of the City’s recyclable material listed as follows: Proposal A – Good Iron, Aluminum & Copper Proposal B – White Goods & Scrap Metal Material Proposal C – Aluminum & Tin Cans The agreement will be effective April 1, 2011 through March 31, 2012. Proposals for the collection and disposal of recyclable items for the City of Bismarck will be received in the office of the City Administrator, until 3:00 p.m. CDT, Monday, February 14, 2011. Bids will be opened at 4:00 p.m. on Monday, February 14, 2011 in the 1st floor conference room at City Hall, 221 N 5th Street, Bismarck, North Dakota. Any and all service proposal bids received after the deadline will not be considered and will be returned unopened. Bids will be received by the Board of City Commissioners on Tuesday, February 22, 2011. The proposals must be mailed to the City Administrator (PO Box 5503, Bismarck, ND 58506-5503) or otherwise deposited with the City Administrator (221 N 5th Street, Bismarck, ND) and shall be sealed and endorsed: “Proposal for Recyclable Material” Name of the person, firm or corporation submitting the bid. If the bid is to be faxed, the bid must be sent to a bidder’s agent, independent of the City of Bismarck, placed in a sealed envelope, labeled according to this specification and delivered to the office of the City Administrator prior to the deadline. Bid must be submitted on blanks furnished

Digital copies of the PLANS and SPECIFICATIONS (Contract Documents) are available at www.bartwest.com or www.questcdn.com. Bidding documents may be downloaded for $50.00 by entering the Quest project number 1438657 on the project search page.There will be no refund for this deposit. Please contact QuestCDN.com at 952.233.1632 or info@questcdn.com for assistance with membership registration or questions regarding downloading of the bid package. Optional 11” x 17” paper copies of the Drawings and Specification Books may be obtained from Bartlett & West at the above address upon receipt of a non-refundable deposit of $100 for each set of documents obtained; checks to be payable to Bartlett & West, Inc. No refunds will be made. The Engineer will furnish to any prospective BIDDER a copy of such Contract Documents upon request. All BIDS will be made on the basis of cash payment for such WORK. The State of North Dakota, acting through the State Water Commission, reserves the right to select any combination of Base Bid and/or Alternates under which the bids are to be compared and the CONTRACT awarded, to reject any and all bids, to consider other factors in selecting the bid which is in the best interest of the State Water Commission, and to waive any and all irregularities in any bid. The OWNER reserves the right to hold all BIDS for a period of sixty-one (61) calendar days after the date of the bid opening to complete financial arrangements. Dated this 21 day of January, 2011 /s/Todd Sando, P.E. Chief Engineer and Secretary to the Commission North Dakota State Water Commission Bismarck, North Dakota 1/26, 2/2 & 9 - 606290

issued at least 10 calendar days before the date of the Bid Opening) and a BIDDER’s Security in a sum equal to five percent of the full amount of the BID, executed by the BIDDER as Principal and by a SURETY, conditioned that if the Principal’s BID is accepted and the CONTRACT awarded to the Principal, the Principal, within fifteen days after notice of award, shall execute a CONTRACT in accordance with terms of the BID and a CONTRACTOR’s BOND as required by law and the regulations and determinations of the North Dakota State Water Commission (NDSWC). Bidders are advised that the funding and/or regulatory agency for this project (in whole or in part) is the US Bureau of Reclamation (USBR). Bidders on this work will be required to comply with the Presidents Executive Order Nos. 11246 as amended, the Copeland "Anti-Kickback" Act, the Clean Air Act, the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, the Byrd Anti-Lobbying Amendment, the Endangered Species Act, as well as complying with other requirements. The requirements for bidders and contractors under these orders are explained in the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR) Supplemental Provisions. Goals and timetables for Minority Utilization shall be included in all Federal and Federally assisted construction CONTRACTs and subcontracts in excess of $10,000. The goals are applicable to the CONTRACTOR's aggregate on-site construction workforce, not merely that part of the workforce that is performing WORK on a Federal or Federally assisted contract or subcontract. The goals and timetables for Women and Minorities are available from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Contract Documents are on file at the offices of the North Dakota State Water Commission, and Bartlett & West/AECOM, Bismarck, North Dakota, where they may be seen and examined between the hours of 8:00 A.M. and 5:00 P.M., local time, Monday through Friday. Address of Engineer's office is: BARTLETT & WEST/AECOM 3456 East Century Avenue P.O. Box 1077 Bismarck, ND 58502-1077 Telephone: (701) 258-1110 Fax: (701) 258-1111

by the City of Bismarck and in accordance with the specifications and conditions therein contained. Copies of proposal blanks and specifications may be obtained from the City of Bismarck’s Administrator, 221 N 5th Street and the Public Works Director of Service Operations, 601 S 26th Street, Bismarck, North Dakota. Failure to honor a winning bid will result in the loss of bidding privileges for a 3-year period on Recyclable Material bids. All bidders are invited to be present at the opening of the proposals. The right is reserved to hold all bids for a period of thirty (30) days, to reject any and all bids, to waive technicalities or to accept such as may be determined to be for the best interest of the City of Bismarck. City of Bismarck W. C.Wocken City Administrator 1/26 & 2/2 - 606289 ADVERTISEMENT FOR CONSTRUCTION BIDS NORTH DAKOTA STATE WATER COMMISSION Owner 900 E. Boulevard Ave. Bismarck, ND 58505 Address Separate sealed bids for construction of OMND Regional Service Area, Center Elevated Tank, Contract 5-16 will be received by the North Dakota State Water Commission (NDSWC), Bismarck, ND until 1:30 P.M., Local Time on the 3rd day of March , 2011 where and at which time they will be publicly opened and read aloud. The scope of WORK generally consists of furnishing and installing one elevated composite, or spheroid style steel potable water storage tank, 750,000 gallons (min.), 175’ to overflow, complete with access road, inlet/outlet piping, foundation, site piping, appurtenances, painting, sitework, outlet structure and other appurtenant items as required by the Project Drawings, Specifications, and Contract Documents. The Center Elevated Tank site is located in Oliver County, approximately 12 miles south of the City of Beulah, North Dakota. Each BID must be accompanied by a separate envelope containing a copy of a current and valid North Dakota Contractor's License (must have been

PUBLIC NOTICES

-----

North Dakota newspapers also post public notices that are printed in newspapers on www.ndpublicnotices.com at no additional charge to units of government.

RESOLUTION OF NECESSITY RESOLUTION DECLARING THE NECESSITY OF AN IMPROVEMENT IN STREET IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT NUMBER FOUR HUNDRED THIRTY TWO (432) BE IT RESOLVED by the Board of City Commissioners of the City of Bismarck, North Dakota, as follows: 1. It is hereby found, determined and declared that it is necessary and expedient for the City of Bismarck to construct an improvement in and for Street Improvement District Number Four Hundred Thirty Two (432), such improvement to consist of concrete pavement, curb and gutter, sidewalk, storm sewer, water main, roadway lighting, traffic signing and signals, and landscaping and related work, for the following areas: Unit No. 1 East Century Avenue – Hamilton Street to Yorktown Drive Centennial Road – Trenton Drive to Jericho Road Centennial Road – Trenton Drive to I-94 Right-of-Way All in accordance with and as described in the resolution creating said district, adopted December 28, 2010, the preliminary report of the engineer, approved by this Board on December 28, 2010, and the plans and specifications for the improvement prepared by the engineer and approved by this Board on January 11, 2011, which are on file in the office of the City Engineer, and subject to inspection by anyone interested therein. 2. The cost of the improvement will be paid for by special assessments to be levied against properties benefited by the improvement in amounts proportionate to and not exceeding such benefits. The estimated cost by the Engineer for said improvements is in the amount of $12 million. 3. The Special Assessment Analyst is hereby authorized and directed to cause this resolution, together with a map of the city showing the improvement district, to be published once each week for two consecutive weeks in the official newspaper of the City. The owners of property within said improvement district and liable to be specially assessed for said improvement shall be afforded the opportunity to file written protests with the Special Assessment Analyst at any time within thirty (30) days after the first publication of this resolution. The Board of City Commissioners shall, at its next meeting after the expiration of said period, to-wit, February 22, 2011, at 5:15 p.m. meet at the City Hall for the purpose of hearing and determining the sufficiency of any protests so filed and to take such other and further action with reference to said improvement as may then be deemed necessary and expedient. BOARD OF CITY COMMISSIONERS Bismarck, North Dakota Attest: Keith J. Hunke Assistant City Administrator Dated this 11th day of January, 2011.

5 9 4 18 3 8 6 37 19 17 2 20 7 16 21 12 22 40 15 23 14 13 41 14 15 16 42 64 24 33 32 13 25 43 31 12 26 34 44 11 14 27 45 13 10 28 35 46 12 9 15 36 11 29 8 10 30 16 7 9 47 17 48 6 49 8 18 7 50 5 19 51 6 4 26 20 52 5 3 21 53 4 2 54 22 1 3 23 55 5 24 2 56 25 6 1 4 57

1

38

39

63

1

1

7

1

2

8

59

1

2

60

5

4

7

13 14

44

13

46 54

47

4

14 15

48

6

2 1

4

6

19 20

50

51 52

1

22

10 2

2

21

1

2

3

5

8

14

5

2 1

1 5

7

10

9

8

3

7

1

4

1

1

1

6

4

5

5 6 7

3

4

7 8

2

1

22 3

2

11

6

3 2

3

8 9

7

18

2

1

12

4

1 2

4

1 2

4 3

4

3

3 2

53

6

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

1

12

11

3

10

9

8

7

10

9

15

16

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

19

20

21

22

23

24

1

12

11

10

9

8

7

13

14

15

16

17

18

2 13

2

14

18

12

11

10

9

8

7

13

14

15

16

17

18

1

3

6

5

4

3

2

1

12

11

10

9

8

7

19

20

21

22

23

24

13

14

15

16

17

18

4 5

6

5

4

2

3

1

6

5

4

3

2

1

19

20

21

22

23

24

2

6

5

4

3

2

1

19

20

21

22

23

24

3

9 10 11 12 13 14

3

26

25

2

2

4

FRANKLIN AV

15

6

1

2

1

1

1

12 3

21

3

14

15 16 17 18 19 21

1

20

11

1

3

6 4

2

5

7

9

8 9 10 11 12 13 14

22

1 21

3

2

6

2 3

5

4

18

1

8 9 10 11 2

3

1

4 2

8

5

5

16

16

7

1

3 7

4

2

24

5

8

9

7

10 11 12

6

2

8 7 9

25

26

6

10 11

5

I-94

I-94

1/19 & 26 - 606274

1

4

12 13

3

3

14

6 5 4

2

3

1

1 11

2 3

2

2 2

23

4

2

15 16

3 17

4

1

1

1

5

2 2

1 2

2 3

6

44 55

2

3

4

4 5

5

5 6

18

35 36

6

44

37

3 2

38

1

CENTURY AV E ARLINGTON DR N 1 LP 1 GE ID AR L C PATRIOT DR

7

3

1 3 4

4

19

2 34

33 27 28 29 30 31 32

3

4

1

1

14 13 16 15

5

4

6 7 8 9

3

10

1

13 14 15 16 18 19 17 19

1

18 17 16 15

2 3 4 5 6

6 14

7 8 11

13 12 11 10

17

1

16 1 2 3 4

14

5 6 7

15

13

6

12

7

8

11 10 9

5 4

83 2

1

2 3

8

7

3

10 10

11

9 8

4

14 11

10

10

5

8

9 10 11

TRACT B TRACT C

9

11

26

9

22 21

7

12

7

7

20

8

6

13

9 8

10

6 6

18

13 6

17 19

25 24 23

3 4

5

2

10

33 4

14

11

22

9

1

17 9 18 10 19 11 12 21 20 13 22 14 23 15

18

20

7

39

2 38 3 37 4 36 5 35 6 34 7 33 8 32 31 9 10 30 11 29 12 28 27 13 26 14 25 15 24 23 16 22 21 20 17 19

8

19

5

4

15 17

9

10

10

7

6

5

2

25

22 23 24

12

1

14 15 16

11

4

3

43

2

17 16 15

13 12

2 2

18

7

6

1 2 3 4 5 6

6

8

11

1

1 1

21 19

66

16 15

17

5

12

3

3

8

15

4

3

1

4 5

5

7

14

1

20

44 1515

11 12 13 14

18

29 28 27 26

30

2 4

6

12

11

13

2

8

3

5

4

12

1

4 5

19

17 16

8 9

10 1

15

13

20

2

1

1 3

10

21

18

7

4

10 6

6

TRENTON DR

2

3

6 9

5

7

23

19

1

9

8

7

22

3

1

22 1 2 3 20 4 19 5 18 6 17 7 16 8 15 9 14 10 11 13 12

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

24

6

9

6

5

2

1

1

28 27 26 25

3

24 23 22 21 20

1

2

5

2

5

1

3

4

4

2

3

2 3 1

TRACT A

8

4

2

4

10

3

1

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SI 432 UNIT 1

GREENSBORO DR

Tomlin

Associated Press

Paul Hornung was a Green Bay Packer for nine years.

CENTENNIAL AV

PITTSBURGH (AP) — Coach Mike Tomlin still is only 38 years old, still hasn’t played a down of NFL football, and still has only one year as a coordinator on his resume. But after his Pittsburgh Steelers secured their second Super Bowl appearance in his four seasons as coach, the last thing Tomlin has to worry about is whether he’s gained the respect of his players ... past or present. “I think a lot of guys,” Pittsburgh defensive tackle Chris Hoke said, “would love to come play for coach Tomlin.” Former Steelers cornerback Deshea Townsend concurs. And he should know. He played for both Bill Cowher and Tomlin, and was a key member of that Pittsburgh transition phase. “He had to put his identity on the team. He had to do things he felt would make us better, and he had to do his own way,” Townsend said of Tomlin. “He was coming in for an established coach, one that guys respected. So, not only was he the new guy, he was the new guy for a guy who had been there a long time.” Whatever he did, it worked. After all, he’s already a Super Bowl champion, and is on the cusp of joining an exclusive club of two-time winning coaches — before his 40th birthday, no less. Maybe that’s why Tomlin appears to be as beloved by his players as any other NFL coach. “It was a different feel to have a young guy, this coordinator from Minnesota who came up through the ranks pretty quickly coming in h e re,” Tow n s e n d s a i d . “Before he had spoken to us, there was this type of unknown of how it was going to be. “But all that disappeared when he came on. When he first got there, he was so wellreceived, and the way he addressed us as men, guys gained an instant respect for their new coach.” The rest is history. In four seasons, the Steelers — who will meet the Packers in the Super Bowl on Feb. 6 — have

HAMILTON ST

Pittsburgh players look up to Tomlin

NEBRASKA DR

Assocated Press

Former Steeler Deshea Townsend played for Pittsburgh coach Mike Tomlin and ex-Steelers coach Bill Cowher.

LOUISVILLE, Ky. — Paul Hornung believes Brett Favre will one day be welcomed back with open arms by the Green Bay faithful. The Hall of Famer just thinks it will take time. Having the Packers win a Super Bowl with another quarterback while Favre limps into retirement — perhaps for real this time — would help speed up the healing process. “Then everybody will be over it,” Hornung said with a laugh. The former Green Bay star says Favre’s departure from the team three seasons ago was difficult for all involved, but added those days seem like a distant memory now that the Packers are soaring under budding star Aaron Rodgers. “He’s getting better every game and he’s the best quarterback in the league right now,” Hornung said. Rodgers will get a chance to prove it on the game’s biggest stage when he leads Green Bay into the Super Bowl against the Pittsburgh Steelers on Feb. 6. The 75-year-old Hornung is picking his old team —

ahead. The Packers placed 16 players on injured reserve during the season. When those players are healthy, watch out. “Next year when everybody’s back, they’re going to have the best football team in America, they’re really going to be special,” Hornung said. Some of the Packers already are in Hornung’s mind, namely Rodgers, who has deftly guided the team to its fifth Super Bowl appearance while stepping out of Favre’s considerable shadow. “This quarterback has had a special year, he’s been absolutely double-sensational,” Hornung said. “He’s the best passer I’ve ever seen running to his left. I’ve never seen somebody come out of the pocket and control the ball like he does. He is very, very accurate.” Hornung would know. He played alongside fellow Hall of Famer Bart Starr in Green Bay and was a pretty decent passer in his own right during his career Notre Dame, where he won the 1956 Heisman Trophy and earned the nickname “The Golden Boy” for his flowing locks and his playmaking ability on both sides of the ball.

4

5

INTERS

HY TATE 94


Money

Page 6D ■ Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Bismarck Tribune ■ Bismarcktribune.com

NYSE Close Change Year A 12.83 -.11 +5.3 58.41 -.23 +3.5 51.31 -.70 +1.3 15.57 +1.11 -4.9 7.21 -.20 -7.4 29.43 -.52 -15.2 28.76 +.28 -2.1 47.96 -.21 +.1 7.48 -.20 -8.6 24.43 -.76 -.9 33.50 +.46 +9.8 3.31 +.05 +11.8 16.24 -.19 +5.5 37.63 +.03 +2.3 75.75 +.85 +1.8 .76 -.04 -13.6 31.79 +.51 -.3 24.29 -.13 -1.3 23.94 -.33 +5.0 14.44 ... -1.3 36.66 -.09 +1.9 44.80 -.99 +4.4 41.36 -.59 -14.3 51.37 +.36 -.5 75.70 -1.56 -.6 17.77 -.01 -.8 45.56 +.55 -1.0 122.64-1.28 +2.9 37.88 +.47 -.7 32.18 -.66 -8.2 33.34 -.08 +10.8 30.04 +.05 +5.0 15.06 -1.01 -14.9 33.03 +.03 +5.9 29.58 +.40 +1.8

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B BB&T Cp 27.90 BP PLC 47.21 BakrHu 62.32 BcoBrades 19.63 BcoSantand 12.05 BcoSBrasil 12.38 BkofAm 13.63 BkAm wtB 2.55 BkNYMel 31.67 Bar iPVix rs 31.19 BarrickG 46.13 Baxter 50.98 BerkH B 83.25 BestBuy 35.14 BlkHillsCp 31.12 BlockHR 13.07 Boeing 72.24 Boise Inc 8.70 BostonSci 7.03 Brinker 23.25 BrMySq 26.03 C CBS B 20.61 CIGNA 41.62 CSX 70.25 CVS Care 35.16 CampSp 35.01 CapOne 48.21 Carnival 46.22 Caterpillar 94.39 CedarF 17.75 Cemex 10.56 CntryLink 42.20 ChesEng 27.43 Chevron 94.08 Chimera 4.16

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EMC Cp EQT Corp EKodak EdisonInt ElPasoCp Elan EldorGld g EmersonEl EnCana g Equifax EuroEqFd Exelon ExxonMbl

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IntlGame IntPap Invesco ItauUnibH IvanhM g JPMorgCh JohnJn JohnsnCtl JnprNtwk Kellogg Keycorp KimbClk Kimco KindME Kinross g Kohls Kraft Kroger LDK Solar LSI Corp LVSands LennarA LillyEli Limited LizClaib LloydBkg LaPac Lowes LyonBas A MBIA MGIC MGM Rsts Macys

18.09 28.63 23.90 22.48 28.38 J 44.87 61.08 38.61 34.82 K 51.73 8.91 65.61 17.87 72.59 16.32 52.55 31.18 21.65 L 13.37 5.91 45.04 19.77 34.73 28.42 4.99 3.97 10.47 25.56 35.70 M 11.37 8.94 14.58 23.33

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OfficeMax OilSvHT OldRepub Olin Omnicom

17.72 -.05 143.62 +.51 12.85 -.01 19.55 -.24 45.91 +.18 PQ PMI Grp 3.04 +.03 PNC 60.88 +.40 PPL Corp 25.83 -.04 PallCorp 49.05 -.19 PatriotCoal 23.52 -.41 PeabdyE 60.50 +1.21 Penney 32.13 -.39 PepsiCo 65.77 -.41 PetChina 134.13-2.56 Petrohawk 18.21 -.49 PetrbrsA 32.55 -.70 Petrobras 36.02 -.71 Pfizer 18.47 +.02 PhilipMor 57.53 +.43 PlumCrk 41.78 +.38 Polaris 75.94 +.07 Potash 162.93-2.19 Praxair 91.24 -.20 PrUShS&P 22.53 -.01 ProUltQQQ 87.52 +.19 PrUShQQQ 10.76 -.04 ProUltSP 50.55 -.02 ProUShL20 38.16 -.74 ProUShtFn 14.83 +.02 ProUSR2K 12.58 -.04 ProUSSP50017.89 -.01 ProUltCrude10.92 -.40 ProUSSlv rs12.62 +.06 ProctGam 66.70 +.12 ProgrssEn 45.39 +.13 ProgsvCp 19.85 -.02

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ProLogis PulteGrp QntmDSS QstDiag QwestCm

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MARKET SUMMARY

cent after the phone company’s profits surged. Another Dow member, American Express Co., fell 2.2 percent after reporting earnings late Monday that came in below analysts’ expectations. The Dow lost 3.33 points, or less than 0.1 percent, to 11,977.19. It had been down as many as 82 points earlier. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index inched up 0.34, or less than 0.1 percent, to

NONFERROUS METALS

1,291.18. The Nasdaq composite index gained 1.7 points, or 0.1 percent, to 2,719.25. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note fell to 3.34 percent from 3.39 percent late Monday. Bond yields move in the opposite direction of their prices. Three stocks rose for every two that fell on the New York Stock Exchange. Consolidated volume came to 4.6 billion shares.

FOREIGN EXCHANGE

GOLD Selected world gold prices, Tuesday. London morning fixing: $1326.00 off $17.00. London afternoon fixing: $1324.00 off $19.00. NY Handy & Harman: $1324.00 off $19.00. NY Handy & Harman fabricated: $1429.92 off $20.52. NY Engelhard: $1326.90 off $19.03. NY Engelhard fabricated: $1426.42 off $20.46. NY Merc. gold Jan Tue. $1332.30 off $12.20. NY HSBC Bank USA 4 p.m. Tue. $1332.00 off $5.00.

NEW YORK (AP) — Spot nonferrous metal prices Tue. Aluminum -$1.0864 per lb., London Metal Exch. Copper -$4.3128 Cathode full plate, LME. Copper $4.2190 N.Y. Merc spot Tue. Lead - $2485.00 metric ton, London Metal Exch. Zinc - $1.0337 per lb., London Metal Exch. Gold - $1324.00 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Gold - $1332.30 troy oz., NY Merc spot Tue. Silver - $26.750 Handy & Harman (only daily quote). Silver - $26.811 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Tue. Platinum -$1791.00 troy oz., N.Y. (contract). Platinum -$1784.20 troy oz., N.Y. Merc spot Tue. n.q.-not quoted, n.a.-not available r-revised

Australia .9930 .9983 1.0071 1.0017 Britain 1.5798 1.5995 .6330 .6252 Canada 1.0006 1.0051 .9994 .9949 China .1518 .1519 6.5876 6.5824 Denmark .1834 .1829 5.4526 5.4675 Euro 1.3675 1.3638 .7313 .7333 Hong Kong .1284 .1282 7.7882 7.7973 Japan .012174 .012123 82.15 82.49 Mexico .082747 .083029 12.0850 12.0440 Russia .0336 .0335 29.7354 29.8507 Sweden .1530 .1520 6.5359 6.5789 Switzerlnd 1.0612 1.0531 .9423 .9496 CANADIAN EXCHANGE $1 Canadian = 93 cents U.S. for sale to customer and 90 cents U.S. purchase from customer At the Bank of North Dakota Tuesday

OIL PATCH Tuesday, Jan. 25, 2011 Posted price for N.D. Sweet Crude (40 gravity) FLINT HILLS, BULLETIN 20110014 (Jan. 24), price per barrel .......... $78.00 NEW YORK MERCANTILE EXCHANGE Crude oil, light sweet (NYM) 1,000 barrels, price per barrel March Last Change Open High Low 86.26 -1.61 87.70 87.85 86.12 NUMBER OF RIGS OPERATING Friday (Jan. 20, 2011) Year ago 165 85

SILVER NEW YORK (AP) — Handy & Harman silver Tuesday $26.750 off $0.520. H&H fabricated $32.118 off $0.606. The morning bullion price for silver in London $26.700 off $0.860. Engelhard $26.830 off $0.530. Engelhard fabricated $32.196 off $ NY Merc silver spot month Tuesday $26.811 off $0.507.

INTEREST RATES 3-month T-Bill 1-year bill 10-year T-Note 30-year T-Bond

0.16 0.27 3.31 4.47

0.155 0.27 3.36 4.56

Bond Buyer Muni Idx Fed Fds Target 30-year T-Bond

-0.02 ... -0.09

5.80 .13 4.47

AG PRICES Dakota Cash Grain Prices Sp Wht Sp Wht Winter Durum Corn 14% 15% Wht 12%

9.55 9.21 9.58 9.31 .... 9.41 9.66 9.58 9.53 9.41 9.58 9.51 9.60 9.58 9.58 9.19 9.51 9.44

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16.01 7.29 25.22 16.98 6.80 17.98 33.98 27.07 1.66 36.31 88.50 32.52 78.25 56.23 14.01 28.02 37.06 44.72 16.77 U 44.06 10.13 93.02 24.09 26.76 6.09 36.27 57.30 81.73 40.62 V 35.50 31.39 24.32 47.20 35.79 42.50

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Visa VMware

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CienaCorp Cisco CitrixSys ClinicData Comcast CorinthC Costco Dell Inc DirecTV A DryShips ETrade rs eBay EagleBulk ElectArts EricsnTel F5 Netwks FifthThird Finisar Flextrn Genoptix

24.19 -.54 +14.9 21.54 +.37 +6.5 61.95 -2.75 -9.4 26.77 +1.60 +68.3 23.34 -.26 +6.7 5.40 +.10 +3.6 72.46 -.16 +.3 13.74 +.02 +1.4 42.88 +.07 +7.4 4.76 -.15 -13.3 15.53 -.22 -2.9 30.91 +.40 +11.1 4.01 -.51 -19.5 15.38 +.09 -6.1 12.19 +.46 +5.7 107.53 +.97 -17.4 14.43 +.09 -1.7 30.01 -1.47 +1.1 8.18 -.14 +4.2 24.88 +.02 +30.8

GileadSci GluMobile HudsCity HuntBnk HutchT Intel InvRlEst JA Solar JDS Uniph KLA Tnc KnCtyL Level3 LodgeNet MannKd MarvellT MaximIntg McGrathR MelcoCrwn MicronT Microsoft

38.16 2.80 11.06 6.90 3.21 21.55 9.18 7.35 16.14 43.67 32.46 1.23 3.38 5.41 19.79 26.42 25.71 7.07 9.98 28.45

-.15 +.49 +.03 -.01 -.17 +.31 +.07 -.44 -.35 +.56 +.77 ... +.03 -.02 -.18 -.56 -.04 -.27 -.08 +.07

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Momenta Mylan NetApp NewsCpA Nvidia OnSmcnd Oracle Patterson PattUTI PeopUtdF PetsMart Popular Power-One PwShs QQQ Qualcom RF MicD RschMotn Riverbed s SanDisk SavientPh

12.50 23.80 53.70 15.65 23.97 11.23 32.29 32.80 20.75 13.36 40.56 3.20 10.74 56.53 51.52 7.66 61.40 32.39 48.55 10.16

-3.30 -16.5 +.28 +12.6 -1.85 -2.3 -.12 +7.5 -.76 +55.6 -.04 +13.7 -.11 +3.2 +1.20 +7.1 +.35 -3.7 +.16 -4.6 +.22 +1.9 -.02 +1.9 -.53 +5.3 +.08 +3.8 +.03 +4.1 -.24 +4.2 -1.29 +5.6 -1.92 -7.9 -2.13 -2.6 +.26 -8.8

SeagateT SiriusXM SkywksSol Solarfun Staples StarScient Starbucks SunPowerA Symantec TD Ameritr Tellabs TevaPhrm UranmRs ValenceT h Vodafone Windstrm Xilinx YRC Ww rs Yahoo ZionBcp

13.50 1.58 30.01 9.02 23.44 1.68 33.65 14.23 17.83 20.13 5.69 54.57 2.52 1.52 28.84 12.80 31.98 4.24 16.02 23.54

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18.10 24.18 2.49 12.88 .52 3.83 4.67 3.09 3.30 2.27 11.99 .79 12.42 1.24 1.54

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-.06 -.06 -.15 -.14 +.01 -.01 -.03 +.13 +.28 +.02 -.31 ... -.03 ... -.06

19.85 6.95 15.88 33.83 42.62 77.57 37.90 23.44 7.25 19.50 55.95 17.98

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Unisys UPS B US Bancrp Vodafone WaddellR WalMart WellsFargo WendyArby Westmrld WirelessT XcelEngy

28.00 72.83 26.76 28.84 36.07 57.26 32.70 4.65 13.20 1.08 24.07

+.11 -.38 -.08 +.07 -.14 +1.21

AMEX

QUOTES

Beach Bismarck Bowman Cleveland Dickinson-Woody’s Harvey Hensler Lemmon, S.D. McLaughlin,S.D. Max Napoleon New Salem Scranton Sterling-SCG Taylor Tuttle Underwood Watford City

-7.3 -14.1 +3.5 +12.1 -12.4 +.3 +18.3 +8.9 +17.7 +4.2 +.3

Sherwin 86.09 SilvWhtn g 29.24 SmurfStn n 36.38 SnapOn 56.72 Sothebys 39.42 SouthnCo 38.46 SwstAirl 12.50 SwstnEngy 38.48 SprintNex 4.36 SP Matls 37.93 SP HlthC 32.15 SP CnSt 29.64 SP Consum 37.99 SP Engy 70.16 SPDR Fncl 16.41 SP Inds 36.20 SP Tech 26.20 SP Util 32.08 Standex 29.43 StateStr 47.69 StillwtrM 21.33 Stryker 58.37 SturmRug 15.08 Suncor gs 37.71 Suntech 8.87 SunTrst 29.18 Supvalu 7.25 SwiftTrns n 14.45 Synovus 2.80 Systemax 13.65 T TCF Fncl 15.75 TECO 18.22 TJX 48.56 TaiwSemi 13.22 Target 55.95 TeckRes g 59.30

NASDAQ

Stocks remain flat Tuesday NEW YORK (AP) — Stock indexes finished about where they started Tuesday after a round of disappointing corporate earnings and another drop in home prices. Trading was muted ahead of President Barack Obama’s State of the Union speech, in which he was expected to outline a plan to reduce the United States deficit. Four of the 30 companies in the Dow Jones industrial average reported results before the market opened: DuPont, 3M Co., Verizon Communications Inc. and Johnson & Johnson. 3M lost 2 percent after the manufacturing company’s income fell because of higher costs. Johnson & Johnson lost 1.8 percent after reporting a 12 percent drop in income. The maker of Tylenol and other drugs was hammered by costly recalls of its products. DuPont’s income fell but still beat expectations. Its stock rose 0.3 percent. Verizon’s stock gained 1.6 per-

+1.4 +10.8 +3.0 +4.3 -8.7

11.50 10.76 11.08 .... .... .... 11.16 11.28 11.28 10.41 11.33 11.26 11.10 11.33 11.28 .... 11.01 11.19

7.30 .... 7.19 .... .... 7.86 7.58 7.53 8.08 7.56 7.88 7.48 7.20 7.88 7.53 .... .... 7.10

9.00 .... 9.25 .... .... .... .... .... .... 9.30 .... .... 9.25 .... 9.50 .... .... 9.58

5.85 5.74 .... 5.54 .... 5.49 .... .... 5.62 5.29 5.64 5.80 .... .... .... .... .... ....

Barley feed

Oats

4.50 3.95 3.85 .... 3.75 3.85 .... .... .... 4.00 3.90 4.15 3.70 .... 4.15 3.80 .... 3.98

.... 3.21 .... .... 2.90 .... .... .... 2.55 2.30 .... 3.05 .... .... 2.10 2.50 .... 1.13

FUTURES WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 11 845¿ 845¿ 820ß 838Ÿ +3 May 11 858 866Ÿ 848 865¿ +3ß Jul 11 885 885 866Ÿ 882¿ +3ß Sep 11 892ß 896¿ 881Ÿ 896¿ +3Ÿ Dec 11 900ß 908¿ 893¿ 908Ÿ +2Ÿ Prev. sales 92391 Prev. Open Int. 529975 chg.+8468 CORN 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 11 643 655 639Ÿ 644 -11Ÿ May 11 649ß 664ß 649¿ 654Ÿ-10ß Jul 11 652 669¿ 652 659 -10¿ Sep 11 609Ÿ 619 606Ÿ 612ß -8¿ Dec 11 580 588 575Ÿ 579 -8Ÿ Prev. sales 271798 Prev. Open Int. 1628475 chg.+4647 OATS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 11 381 392ß 379 381 -6 May 11 387Ÿ 398Ÿ 387 389 -6 Jul 11 399 402 390ß 392¿ -5¿ Sep 11 368 369 366 367¿ -1¿ Dec 11 360ß 362 358Ÿ 360¿ -1¿ Prev. sales 429 Prev. Open Int. 13695 chg. +13 SOYBEANS 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 11 1374¿ 1408 1370Ÿ 1374¿ -30 May 11 1391 1418 1381Ÿ 1385¿-29¿ Jul 11 1393¿ 1425Ÿ 1387ß 1392Ÿ-29ß Aug 11 1372Ÿ 1400¿ 1366Ÿ 1371 -26 Sep 11 1342Ÿ 1365Ÿ 1338 1340¿-24ß Prev. sales 153023 Prev. Open Int. 656306 chg.-5829 SOYBEAN OIL 60,000 lbs- cents per lb Mar 11 56.00 57.43 55.75 55.78-1.40 May 11 56.48 57.89 56.29 56.29-1.35 Jul 11 56.96 58.19 56.74 56.74-1.31

Aug 11 57.05 57.74 56.88 56.88-1.26 Sep 11 57.17 57.75 57.00 57.01-1.22 Prev. sales 62991 Prev. Open Int. 381446 chg. +767 SOYBEAN MEAL 100 tons- dollars per ton Mar 11 373.50 380.80 371.80 372.60-7.60 May 11 376.30 383.40 374.50 375.20-7.70 Jul 11 377.10 383.90 375.30 376.00-7.90 Aug 11 369.00 373.00 367.00 367.60-6.50 Sep 11 359.10 363.00 357.90 357.90-5.60 Prev. sales 42913 Prev. Open Int. 210082 chg. -965 CATTLE 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Feb 11 106.10 106.92 106.05 106.25 -.52 Apr 11 111.12 111.87 111.07 111.15 -.52 Jun 11 111.00 111.77 110.85 110.95 -.80 Aug 11 111.57 112.35 111.32 111.67 -.70 Oct 11 114.22 115.00 114.15 114.47 -.50 Prev. sales 39024 Prev. Open Int. 356470 chg.+2357 FEEDER CATTLE 50,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Jan 11 126.15 126.15 125.90 125.97 -.38 Mar 11 124.92 125.72 124.52 125.12 -.43 Apr 11 125.62 126.45 125.35 125.90 -.40 May 11 125.95 126.85 125.72 126.25 -.45 Aug 11 126.80 127.35 126.25 126.90 -.40 Prev. sales 4206 Prev. Open Int. 54207 chg. +588 PORK BELLIES 40,000 lbs.- cents per lb. Feb 11 106.50 Mar 11 107.50 May 11 106.70 Jul 11 103.50 Aug 11 102.50 Prev. sales Prev. Open Int. 2 chg.

Flax Sunflower Soybeans seeds

13.00 15.10 .... .... .... 15.20 .... .... 13.00 15.80 15.25 .... .... .... 15.45 15.00 15.20 ....

29.50 28.50 .... .... .... 28.00 .... .... 24.40 .... 25.30 26.20 .... 25.20 .... .... 24.85 ....

.... .... .... 12.74 .... 12.85 .... .... 12.54 12.34 .... 12.70 .... .... .... .... .... ....

SIOUX FALLS LIVE

Previous Day’s Slaughter: Cows 6850 Bulls 550 Compared to Monday, slaughter cows and bulls steady to 2.00 higher. Lean Boners Breakers Premium White 90 Pct Lean 85 Pct Lean 75 Pct Lean 500 lbs and up 130.00-137.00 127.00-132.00 105.00-125.00 134.00140.00 400-500 lbs 131.00-133.00 120.00-129.00 95.00-125.00 350-400 lbs 125.00-131.00 Slaughter Bull Carcasses 92 Pct Lean 600 lbs and up 141.00-143.00 500-600 lbs 137.00-143.00

MINNEAPOLIS FUTURES SPRING WHEAT 5,000 bu minimum- cents per bushel Mar 11 948 957Ÿ 937 956 +6¿ May 11 960 965ß 946Ÿ 965 +5¿ Jul 11 959¿ 968¿ 946¿ 967ß +10 Sep 11 951 960¿ 937Ÿ 959ß +10 Dec 11 953¿ 963 941Ÿ 961¿ +10 Prev. sales 7663 Prev. Open Int. 68293 chg. +327

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-.04 -.36 -.77 +.04 +.03 -.02 -1.35 -.19 -.01 +.01 +.07 +.09 -.01 +.08 -.25

-17.7 +50.8 -17.7 +1.9 -10.2 -18.2 -6.7 +25.8 -5.3 -6.9 -13.8 +4.6 +24.1 +4.0 -9.9

LOCAL COMPANIES AMR AT&T Inc Aetna Allete AmExp BP PLC BarnesNob Baxter Citigrp CocaCl CollctvBrd ConAgra

7.21 28.76 33.50 37.73 44.80 47.21 16.49 50.98 4.82 62.96 20.72 23.58

-.20 -7.4 +.28 -2.1 +.46 +9.8 +.28 +1.3 -.99 +4.4 -.87 +6.9 +.27 +16.5 +1.31 +.7 -.04 +1.9 -.29 -4.3 +.13 -1.8 +.08 +4.4

Cott Cp CrackerB DeanFds Deluxe DineEquity DblEgl Exar Fastenal GenElec HarvNRes LSI Corp LeeEnt

7.85 52.44 10.53 24.33 51.96 5.90 6.63 59.24 19.98 10.62 5.91 3.00

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MDU Res McDnlds NACCO NashF Nordstrm NorthropG OfficeDpt ONEOK Pt OtterTail Penney PepsiCo Pfizer

21.29 75.48 104.90 38.05 41.56 69.51 5.34 80.40 22.72 32.13 65.77 18.47

-.06 +.10 -.10 +.62 -.62 +.60 -.25 -.49 +.05 -.39 -.41 +.02

+5.0 -1.7 -3.2 -10.5 -1.9 +7.3 -1.1 +1.1 +.8 -.6 +.7 +5.5

ProgsvCp QwestCm RadioShk RobtHalf StJude SearsHldgs ShawGrp Staples Supvalu SykesEnt Target Tesoro

+8.1 +.3 -.8 +9.1 +2.2 +6.2 +5.5 -.17 +.6 -.10 +10.6 -.03 +24.1 +2.2

Fresh round of falling prices By ALEX VEIGA and CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER AP Business Writers A second wave of falling home prices is battering some cities that had escaped the worst of the housing market bust. Prices in Seattle, Charlotte, N.C., and Portland, Ore., have hit their lowest points since peaking in 2006 and 2007. Denver and Minneapolis are nearing new lows. High unemployment and rising foreclosures are taking a toll even on markets that never overheated during the boom years. Home values are dwindling in nearly every American market. Prices fell in November in all but one of the 20 cities in the Standard & Poor’s/Case-Shiller index released Tuesday. Eight of those markets hit their lowest point since the housing bubble burst. The damage from the real estate bubble has spread well beyond Las Vegas, Phoenix and Miami, which built frantically dur-

ing the mid-2000s, and is sapping prices from coast to coast. In many places, prices are expected to keep falling for at least the next six months. In Charlotte, homes are going for 2004 prices. Last year, more than half of the homes sold in surrounding Mecklenberg County were foreclosures, says Mark Vitner, a senior economist with Wells Fargo. The banking industry, which helped Charlotte boom over the past two decades and accounts for roughly one in every 11 jobs there, was hit hard during

the recession. The city lost 12 percent of its financial jobs in 2008 and 2009, according to the Labor Department. Adding to the region’s economic woes, about a third of jobs tied to the auto industry also vanished in the downturn, said Michael Walden, an economist at North Carolina State University in Raleigh. Charlotte’s unemployment rate was 12.8 percent a year ago, well above the national rate. It has fallen to 10.8 percent, still more than twice what it was when the recession started.

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Bismarck Tribune - Jan. 26, 2011