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Curriculum VITAE Rossall School Fleetwood 1991 - 2006 • 3 A Levels Art and Design - B Media Studies - A Geography - C

Next Generation Media June - November 2010 Role - Graphic Designer

• 1 AS Level English - B

Responsible for liasing with clients to create print advertisements to be placed within wedding and Bereavment guides on a local and national scale.

• 8 GCSE’s

Working to tight deadlines and client brief specifications.

English - A English Literature - B Geography - B Art - B History - A Maths - C German - C Combined sciences - C

Blackpool and Fylde College 2006 - 2007 • Foundation degree in Art & Design (BTEC) Pass with Merit Shillington College Manchester • Certificate IV in Graphic Design

Sourcing an inhouse printer, and then managing the print setup on the local network. October 2010 - Present Role - Freelance Graphic Designer Worked with the head designer for the 02 academy, Leeds. Producing Posters for groups such as Booka Shade and Groove Armada. Also had a role in designing monthly club listings and preparing the files for publication in the local press.

Adobe photoshop, illustrator, indesign, flash Basic Web Design Knowledge of large scale print


ARTS & CULTURE


BOOKA SHADE z

LIVE LIVE LIVE LIVE LIVE LIVE LIVE

2020SOUNDSYSTEM LIVE LIVE LIVE LIVE LIVE LIVE LIVE LIVE

MOTOR CITY DRUM ENSEMBLE DEATH ON THE BALCONY / GRAZ DAN HARE / MARSDEN / DAVID HARE PRE PARTY AT DISTRIKT

11/11/10 ALLADVANCE TICKETS £10 / 24 HOUR TICKET HOTLINE 0844 4772000 ticketweb.co.uk / ticketarena.co.uk / skiddle.co.uk

Crash Records 01132436743 / Jumbo records 01132455570

For Info contact - Stu 07738990337 or Foz 07517441158

10PM till 5AM

O2 ACADEMY LEEDS / 55 Cookridge Street / Leeds / LS1 3AW

Poster for the Booka Shade gig at the 02 Academy Leeds (2010)


the perfect secret.

By Andrew Mooney, as told to Andy Morris

Last year, Central Coast kid Andrew Mooney spent some time with a bunch of American film graduates, making a documentary on exploration in isolated areas. The young film crew had their eyes on a particularly remote stretch of jungle coastline, and, in what Mooney was fairly sure was the middle of nowhere, they found the wave of his life. The only other surfer in the group agreed never to spill the beans on their whereabouts and sure enough he stayed true to his word. With no stills photographer on board and with the documentary still unreleased, there was no photo evidence of the wave. But the memory of the place kept pulling at Mooney, and for a year, he watched the charts and tried to convince a crew to return with him. This is Mooney’s story.

When I found the wave on the original trip, it was pure luck. We were supposed to get on a boat and steam ahead up a coast we’d already checked because we knew the conditions were right, but we didn’t know what was the other way. The boat never showed, so I grabbed a moped and went back the other way and checked all along the coastline. When I first laid eyes on the reef, I wasn’t sure how good it was. I could tell it was a long left barrel but I wasn’t sure about the reef that was in front of it or how the right-hander was breaking. I sure didn’t know it was a perfect A-frame! Since that trip I’d been keeping an eye on swell movements and knew I’d missed a few classics, but I’d never had a crew ready to go. Marti Paradisis and photog Stuart Gibson were firing this time, and the forecast was bigger than the original swell I’d surfed. It’s not the kind of place where you jump on a plane from Sydney and you’re paddling into screamers the next day. Or even the next. It’s a solid three-day slog to get to this neck of the jungle. Five planes, then six hours on eroded roads and we were in the exact same place I found myself over a year ago. A place where I knew there were waves. The whole purpose of this trip was to go back and surf this freaky A-frame I had stumbled on but there was so much more. I grabbed my board from the hut and by the time I got back to the rest of the crew the boat had arrived. Everyone wanted to get in the boat and the driver said I had to get in too, but I told the guys this wave looked too good and I had to go and check it properly. I rode back on the bike with a filmer, falling off the scooter trying to hold my board, and the cameraman went down too. We were frothing and rushing too hard. But it was even better than I could have hoped. When it finally turned on, I was flabbergasted to discover just how real the wave was. It’s hard to believe there’s a wave so good that has been left unturned. We couldn’t comprehend it. The days when it was 3-4 foot we were doing turns then flicking off and just screaming and laughing. We couldn’t believe we were the only two people in the whole world surfing this perfect wave. We sussed the takeoff zone quickly, but during lulls we did lose our bearings and the first wave would sometimes catch us out. There was a 30-metre section between the take of zone of the left and right. You’d be surfing the left, getting shacked, and you’d see three to four sets reel off on the right which you’d see spitting from the back. So you’d paddle to the right and get three to four bombs, then see the left reel off and you’d be like shit, I’ve got to get back over to the left.

“It felt surreal pioneering a wave, paddling out knowing you must be the first.”

There were times when Marti would sit over on the right and I’d be on the left. We’d yell out to each other, asking about each wave, cause you could see them from the back going mental. It got too much just having two people out there. You almost needed two people on the left and two on the right cause there were so many sick waves going unridden. The peak hadn’t been named so we did the honours. The left is now ‘Luke Wardell’s’. It was a barrel and you’d just lock in for 100 meters or so. The right is called ‘Matt Mooneys’. It had a long barrel section after takeoff, then you’d cut back and fade into the bowl, which kegged hard. I’ve never surfed the Mentawais, but Marti and Stu reckon the left is better than Green Balls’ and the right more perfect than Lance’s’. That might have just been all the excitement or perhaps they are genuine calls.

Four page editorial for the online surf magazine Rebel (2009)


rythym & Bliss

High -jack Records 2010 all copyrights to lewis campbell graphics ben holland

CD Cover Design for dubstep producer Nemmz (2010)


ISSUE ONE SPRING 2010

CEMENT TOWN REPORT BY HANS LOOS

A BIG BREATH FLORENCE AND THE MACHINE

ESSAY:THE MAN WHO BUILT HIS OWN HOUSE

Concept for arts and culture magazine entitled “Prefab”. (2010)


Leaflet design for Posing a Threat catwalk show (2010)



2011 Portfolio