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GARDEN FACES

BIRMINGHAM ROSE SOCIETY JANUARY

AMERICAN ROSE SOCIETY AFFILIATE Editor: Glenda Boudreaux ambghbmsn.com (205) 337-7100

2011 OUR NEXT MEETING Monday, January 31st, 6:30 p.m. Birmingham Botanical Gardens - Hodges Room ART & LITERATURE NIGHT View an exhibition of art and photography by Bob Bamberg. Hear Jane Hinds and others discuss their favorite Rose Gardening Books. EVERYONE is encouraged to bring your favorite rose gardening book for others to view. If you have rose gardening books or periodicals that are no longer of use to you, and you are willing to donate them to someone else in our society please bring them to place on our “FREE” table. HOSTING: George Ann Hamilton and Chris and Tina VanCleave

MEMBERSHIP FEES Membership fees are due this month. $15.00 individual or $25.00 for couple. Gloria Purnell will be collecting the dues

CONSULTING ROSARIAN REPORT By Bob Eskew, Master Consulting Rosarian

Happy New Year! Time to plan for the year 2011. Make your pruning schedule, spray program and schedule, purchase materials needed, and last but not least, pick new roses for your garden in 2011. Roses for 2011 will be a challenge, as we have several companies go out of business in the last few years. In years past at this time of the year I would have received many rose catalogues. To date I have received two; one from Edmonds Roses and one from Chamblee Roses. Clayton Richards and I have, as co-chairs for the Friends of the Birmingham Botanical Garden Spring Plant Sale 2011, contacted several companies and will have roses from Chamblee Roses, Petals of the Past and K and M Roses. We will have old garden roses, earth kind roses, climbers, shrub, miniatures, mini-floras, hybrid teas, and floribundas. We will also have exhibition and garden varieties at a good price and many of them will be in the bud and bloom stage. The sale will be April 14th- 17th. Check with Clayton or me if you want to know if we have a variety you are looking for in one of our orders. Plan to buy your roses at the sale and support the Birmingham Botanical Garden in April. If you have a rose variety that you want, there are several rose companies listed in the American Rose Society Magazine and they may have it. You can also look on the Internet sites. I think roses will be in short supply this year so plan ahead. If anyone has a variety they want from K and M Roses let me know what it is and we will try to have it in the order for the sale. E-mail at daddybobsq@aol.com.


A ROSE GROWER’S JOURNEY By Martha Tate, from the December Issue of Wind Chimes, Newsletter of the Central Florida Rose Society, Editor, Elaine Pawlikowski,

The Beginning … I remember it so well. After reading an article in Martha Stewart Living I decided that I wanted to start growing roses. I proceeded to plant 6 of her top 10 varieties. They were hard to find and I searched all over, but was able to locate them from an heirloom rose supplier in Oregon. That was my first mistake (of many more to come)! I ended up a year later with lovely, tall bushes; full of green leaves, but with no blooms, not a single one! I tried every fertilizing plan I could find and still only leaves. After a number of phone calls and finally a conversation with the chief rose caretaker for Leu Gardens, I learned that what I had were “once- a- year bloomers” and our climate was too hot for them to even bloom once, even though the catalogue indicated they were fine for our zone. I was determined to solve the “mystery” of growing roses and discovered an article in Southern Living featuring Jennie Sommer, a woman who created an incredible rose garden at her home in Winter Park. I contacted her and she was very helpful, sharing with me information she had learned. Jennie enthusiastically praised the Central Florida Rose Society as her best source of information. She offered to meet me at the next function and there my real journey with roses began. I learned all about Fortuniana rootstock and varieties that did well in our climate. Two of my earliest resources for information were CFRS members Ron and Shirley Kast. I was directed to them at the first meeting as the source of knowledge for roses that did well in arrangements. When I first started growing roses, this was my chief criteria for selection. How does this rose perform as a cut flower and how long does it last in a vase? Expansion of Cutting Garden ... Through the years I have dug up every tropical plant that we had in our back yard and began putting in rose bushes everywhere I could squeeze them. I had many rules early on in my garden. First there was the “no reds” rule. Then came Veteran’s Honor and that rule was broken. I had a “no two roses of the same variety” rule. The first time that rule was broken was thanks to Moonstone. The question I often asked was whether this variety was the best producer of cut flowers for the space it took in the garden, or would another variety perform better in its slot? As a result, 10 favorite varieties that have proven worthy of more than one bush are: Veteran’s Honor, Moonstone, Bride’s Dream, Black Magic, Uncle Joe, St. Patrick, Mavrik, Brigadoon, Hot Princess, and Gemini. Several bushes have not been as strong a cut flower but have survived my shovel because of their incredible fragrance. I cut them as very tight buds because they open faster or have fewer petals than my favorite cut flower varieties but their wonderful, strong scent can add fragrance to an entire bouquet. Those varieties are Tiffany, Fragrant Plum, Double Delight and Mr. Lincoln. Bumps Along the Rose Garden Path ... Over the past 9 years, I have had a number of bumps along the road. Several family illnesses and a house renovation caused me to get behind and seriously neglect my garden … to the point that I wondered if it would ever recover. The roses have also had several serious infestations of Chili Thrips and one very unusual cane fungus that almost made me give up rose growing entirely. Utter despair and the removal of all bushes was averted however, thanks to the intervention of consulting rosarians Elaine Pawlikowski and Jim Small. At various times through the years they have each helped diagnose my rose problems and have helped me implement treatment plans to deliver me safely through the crisis. The resources available to us through our team of consulting rosarians are a gift beyond measure. If you are ever stumped, need an answer to a problem you cannot solve, please use their email addresses or give them a call. You won’t regret it and don’t wait until you are at the end of your rope, with shovel in hand. Exhibiting – Never say “Never” ... For many years I never saw myself exhibiting roses. I had many misconceptions and fears associated with it. I thought I would have to give up my cut flower varieties, or my sentimental favorites in lieu of “exhibition varieties.” I was afraid I would not be able to enjoy normal blooms, fearful I would only see the flaws in search of “the perfect bloom”. It turns out that I was wrong on all counts. I had not realized the fact that many of the characteristics that make for an excellent cut flower are the same qualities that make a good exhibition variety. The same was true for minis. Interestingly enough, for years I had been ordering miniature roses from a supplier


and my sole criteria was minis with lasting form, which did not shatter quickly. I keep minis around my pool and wanted ones that would maintain their form as they faded instead of falling apart in my pool. Come to find out, many of the same qualities that made them retain their form, also made them great exhibition minis. I entered my first show several years ago because our consulting rosarians stressed how important it is to share our blooms with the public so they could see the wide array of roses that could be grown here. They told us that it was not about competing; it was about displaying the fruits of our gardens to the community so others could learn about growing roses. As the years have passed, I have grown more enthusiastic and excited about each rose show I have entered. They have proven to be a wonderful way for me to learn more about growing better roses. I have learned lessons through exhibiting that I am not sure I would have picked up otherwise. I have also learned tips on how to better display my blooms throughout the year when giving them away. “Showing roses” has taught me how to make the most out of every bloom. It took several years for me to realize how much giving roses and showing roses had in common. I highly recommend it because the lessons you learn through exhibiting will be ones you will use for as long as you grow roses. Maintenance in Small Doses … At this writing I have 50 hybrid teas and 15 miniatures. I envy those growers who say they “let them go in the summer and pick back up when the weather cools off.” For me, living in the city with a smaller lot means that my rose garden is, in essence, my back yard. Therefore, if I am going to enjoy using my back yard in the summer I have to maintain it, even through the heat. However, if I wait until the weekend to perform all my gardening tasks, then it is too overwhelming and feels more like work than a hobby I enjoy. I have a full time career and a family with two very active sons. For me, finding time to maintain the garden (to the level that I strive for) can be quite challenging at times. I have found one very simple approach that has helped lighten my load tremendously. Instead of just using the weekends for my rose tasks, I take 15 minutes every night after dinner (or sometimes in the morning before work). I turn on some classical music outside and spend a few minutes every night just doing a few things ... removing black spotted or yellowing leaves, deadheading my hybrid teas, watering my potted roses, or seeing if water seems to be adequately reaching all of the in -ground roses, etc. I have found that by “checking in on them” more frequently I have been able to catch signs of trouble early before they have a chance to take hold. This seems to happen more quickly for me in the summer months. Some nights I might mix up a small dose of my spray and just tackle a section of the garden and do the same to the other section the next night. One night I might spread granular fertilizer. I just try to accomplish a couple of small, quick tasks each night. I’m amazed at how relaxing just a little bit of rose tending each day can be. I look forward to it and now I never miss it. It is like the one thing in my day that I do for me. Within that brief amount of time I leave the garden feeling as though I have also left the stresses of the day behind me in the mulch. I leave the garden feeling relaxed, while at the same time I have also slowly chipped away at my maintenance list. The best part is that when the weekend rolls around the garden looks much better and I feel much less overwhelmed with the tasks before me. “I hope that you are enjoying your rose gardening journey! If not at the moment, hang in there, be persistent and don’t give up ... If there is a more rewarding hobby, I haven’t found it yet!” Martha shares her “Lessons Learned” ... #1 - Don’t trust magazine articles and catalogues to know which roses are best for our Central Florida climate. #2 - Think of our consulting rosarians as the top coaches in their sport, who want nothing more than to help you build success in your garden. Their help is golden! #3 - Passionately love each variety that you plant by researching and asking questions before you buy. Talk to members of the rose society to make sure you are selecting the best varieties to meet the selection factors that you deem important. #4 - Exhibiting is a wonderful experience. Embrace it and don’t waste valuable learning time being afraid like I was! #5 - Break up your gardening tasks into small doses, spreading them out so you don’t get burned out on the weekends.


BIRMINGHAM ROSE SHOW AWARDS By Ann Jones, Consulting Rosarian

Awards are being gathered for the Birmingham Rose Show in May. Over 80 awards will be given. Anyone who might wish to “recycle” a previous award or otherwise have suitable items that could be used for awards should either bring them to the next meeting or call Ann Jones in order to make arrangements for pick-up. If you wish to sponsor/name an award for our Rose Show in May, the following opportunities are still available: $60 – Queen (Multiple Bloom Floribunda) $60 – Queen (Miniature) $60 – Queen (Miniflora) $40 – King (Multiple Bloom Floribunda) $40 – King (Miniature) $40 – King (Miniflora) $40 – Princess (Hybrid Teas or Grandifloras) $25 – Princess (Multiple Bloom Floribunda) $25 – Princess (Miniature) $25 – Princess (Miniflora) Donors receive recognition in two places. First, they will be listed in the Birmingham Rose Show Program on a page naming all sponsors and secondly, they will also be recognized on a placard by each designated rose. Checks should be made payable to the Birmingham Rose Society and given/sent to Ann Jones, 1510 Smolian Place, 35205, or brought to Ann at the next BRS meeting. For questions, please call 939-3559 or akcejones@aol.com. While the advice and information in this newsletter is believed to be true and accurate at the time of publication, neither the authors nor the editor accept any legal responsibility for any errors or omissions that may have been made. The Birmingham Rose Society makes no warranty, expressed or implied with respect to the material contained herein.

GLENDA BOUDREAUX 4493 PRESERVE DRIVE HOOVER, AL 35226


MINUTES OF THE NOVEMBER 29TH MEETING By Georgiana Hamilton, Recording Secretary

Frank Baier, President, called the meeting to order. We had a total attendance of thirty-seven. Included in this number were three guests: Ruth and George Jones, Rosemary and new member Betty Bamburg. Chris VanCleave, Vice President, introduced our speaker David Clements and his wife Tammy from Grant, Alabama. David is a hybridizer. He has 250 roses in his garden and two of those are hybrid teas. The program was titled Thoroughbred Roses. David names his roses to honor thoroughbred racehorses. The program outlined how he hybridizes roses to start a new rose step by step. You must set your goals if you want to be a hybridizer. A question and answer period followed his presentation. David has shown his roses at the Birmingham Rose Show for many years. Our Christmas Dinner will be held 7:00 p.m. Monday December 6th in the Ireland Room at a cost of $12.00. We will have a $10.00 gift exchange for those who would like to participate. The minutes from the October 25th meeting were approved as printed in the October issue of Garden Faces. A correction is made regarding the cost of the Christmas Dinner. The cost of the dinner is $12.00 per person not $15.00. Hyacinth Prince gave the Treasurer’s Report. The checking account balance as of November 29th, 2010 is $5,642.71 and the Certificate of Deposit balance is $5,000.00. Old business: Regarding dues if a newcomer becomes a member after September 30th no dues will be charged for the last quarter. Rose Society dues become due on January 1st, 2011. A motion was made to adopt this new policy regarding dues and the motion was seconded and passed in all favor. Gloria Purnell, membership, passed out labels with corrections for the new directories. Corrections of new addresses, phone numbers and new members will be handled this manner. Gloria also asked that we keep Jean Settle in our thoughts and prayers. Bob Eskew and Clayton Richard are in charge of the Spring Plant Sale. The roses for this event will cost approximately $22/$25 dollars each and they are hoping the society will do their part and support this effort. Hyacinth Prince, Sylvia Potts and Lavonne Glover were thanked for providing the refreshments tonight. The meeting was adjourned at 8:00 P.M.

CONSULTING ROSARIAN REPORT By Bob Eskew, Master Consulting Rosarian

Happy New Year! Time to plan for the year 2011. Make your pruning schedule, spray program and schedule, purchase materials needed, and last but not least, pick new roses for your garden in 2011. Roses for 2011 will be a challenge, as we have several companies go out of business in the last few years. In years past at this time of the year I would have received many rose catalogues. To date I have received two, one from Edmonds Roses and one from Chamblee Roses. Clayton Richards and I have, as co-chairs for the Friends of the Birmingham Botanical Garden Spring Plant Sale 2011, contacted several companies and will have roses from Chamblee Roses, Petals of the Past and K and M Roses. We will have old garden roses, earth kind roses, climbers, shrub, miniatures, mini-floras, hybrid teas, and floribundas. We will also have exhibition and garden varieties at a good price and many of them will be in the bud and bloom stage. The sale will be April 14th- 17th. Check with Clayton or me if you want to know if we have a variety you are looking for in one of our orders. Plan to buy your roses at the sale and support the Birmingham Botanical Garden in April. If you have a rose variety that you want, there are several rose companies listed in the American Rose Society Magazine and they may have it. You can also look on the Internet sites. I think roses will be in short supply this year so plan ahead. If anyone has a variety they want from K and M Roses let me know what it is and we will try to have it in the order for the sale. E-mail at daddybobsq@aol.com.


JOSEPHINE’S INFLUENCE By Linda Rengarts, from the December 2010 Issue of the Gainesville Rose Society Newsletter, Editor Linda Rengarts In the early 1800’s, no one did more to help popularize the rose than Josephine, wife of Napoleon, the Emperor of France. Josephine was born on the Caribbean island of Martinique as Marie-Josephe-Rose de Tascher de la Pagarie. She was called Marie-Rose or Rose throughout her early years. It was Napoleon who wanted her to take on the name “Josephine”. Growing up on Martinique, Josephine developed a deep interest in the lush island foliage and the fragrant flowers. Later in Josephine’s life, she would be honored by the Museum of Natural History in Paris for her botanical contributions. She had a conservatory built at Malmaison which housed rare plant specimens that she collected from around the world. Josephine broke away from the rigid view of the rose as only a medicinal plant. She created interest in growing roses simply for their beauty. Propagation techniques were explored and expanded. Hybridizing and grafting became popular activities for the amateur and professional gardeners. Josephine’s main source for purchasing roses was the Lee & Kennedy Vineyard Nursery in London. At the time, England was at war with France but the British Navy allowed safe passage for Josephine’s plants and allowed her head gardener to travel freely across the channel. Josephine wanted every rose known in the world, and in 1804, through Lewis Kennedy, she was able to acquire the new Chinese roses: Slater's Crimson China, Parson's Pink and Hume's Blush Tea Scented China. These ever-blooming roses were recent imports to England from China, and it was a coup for the Empress (and for France) to have them growing at Malmaison. They became known as stud roses for the modern ever-blooming rose cultivars. By the early 1800’s, she had almost every known species growing in her gardens and her gardeners were creating new varieties. The tea rose, which is in the parentage of most modern roses, was developed at Malmaison. Josephine's rose garden eventually had over 250 varieties. Josephine wanted to record her rare plants in watercolor so she commissioned Pierre-Joseph Redoute, the leading plant illustrator of the day, to paint her flowers, and Etienne-Pierre Ventenat, librarian of the Pantheon in Paris, to write the plant descriptions. She died in 1814, a few years before the publication of this famous work of art. The news of Josephine’s gardens spread across Europe and sparked an interest in growing roses and hybridizing. Eventually this would lead to the modern roses that we know today. France became a leading grower and exporter of the rose in part because of the prestigious gardens at Malmaison. By 1815 there were approximately 2,000 varieties of roses available from different French growers. 10 years later, this number increased to around 5,000 different varieties. Before the Civil War, some French growers were also exporting roses to Louisiana and up the Mississippi River. Some of the China and tea roses were found to be well suited for the warm climate Josephine set a new standard for rose gardening for a long time to come. The wealthy French followed her lead and many joined in the competition to see who could amass the largest collection. Her biggest rival was the Countess of Bougainville. Josephine’s influence was felt in England, as well. The English, wanting to keep up with the French social fashion, also started to collect and hybridize roses. It is not surprising that economically, the rose became the most important flower in France. STAY CONNECTED TO US ONLINE: Our website has a new look! New features: Current meeting info on the homepage Rose of the month featuring your favorite roses Community Involvement Much more! Visit us on the web at www.BirminghamRose.org Become a fan of Birmingham Rose Society on Facebook! Follow us on Twitter @BhamRoseSociety

January 2011 Garden Faces  

Birmingham Rose Society Monthly Newsletter

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