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*An excerpt from I am of Cape Cod by John Whelan 4

Photo: Christine Twombly

Dan Cape Air founder & CEO, Dan Wolf Dan.Wolf@capeair.com

Photo: Kim Roderiques Photography

s soon as I was old enough to pilot, I was lifting off from Chatham, Massachusetts, marveling at the peninsula’s rhythms, fragility and beauty, every changing shoreline, unity and continuity; from a thousand feet, there are no town lines drawn through woods and ponds, there is one Cape Cod, one hooking arm, one place to cherish.” * A pilot, a fisherman, a blacksmith, artists, writers, activists, and many more, are all featured in a new book by John Whelan and Kim Roderiques. I was proud to be asked to join this amazing line-up to talk about a place Profiled in a new book “I Am of Cape Cod: People and Their Stories,” Cape Air founder we love, Cape Cod. and CEO Dan Wolf, along with 138 other residents of Cape Cod, spent time with author John Whelan and photographer Kim Roderiques. The result is a stunning and evocative As a regional airline, all of us at look at a wide range of people who call Cape Cod home. Cape Air are keenly aware of our responsibility in serving the needs of our local communities. Be it Sidney, Montana or Saranac Lake, connecting our passengers with the national air transportation system is only one part of our commitment to both local residents and visitors. We take great pride in our support of local non-profit organizations that are making a difference. I am proud of our volunteer policy for Cape Air team members which includes paid time off for anyone volunteering for a non-profit in their community. On behalf of all of us, thank you for welcoming us into your town and we sincerely appreciate your many years of support. Happy Fall to one and all,

Dan Wolf and daugher Zoë accepting an award for Cape Air’s support of the arts

*Make our customers happy and have a good time doing it. B I R D’S

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FA L L 2017

Lake Elmore, Vermont PUBLISHER: Dan Wolf EXECUTIVE EDITOR: Michelle Haynes Michelle.Haynes@capeair.com CONTRIBUTORS: Lisa Ballard, Brian D’Ambrosio, William Ferral, Leslie Linsley COPY EDITOR: Jim Hanson DESIGN & PRODUCTION: Chuck Anzalone graphicsgroup@comcast.net ChuckAnzalone.com

Photo: Kent Shaw ADVERTISING SALES: Kimberly.Corkran@capeair.com

12 Vermont/ New Hampshire

Rosemary Dooley 508.274.6755

20 Maine

Bobbi Fawcett doitnow141@gmail.com

39 Adirondacks, NY

Joe.Lachimia@ BirdsEyeViewMagazine.com

46 Nantucket 64 Martha’s Vineyard

Bird’s Eye View is published by Cape Air, 660 Barnstable Road Hyannis, MA, 02601

76 Provincetown

© Bird’s Eye View, 2017 Reproduction in whole or in part PHOTO EDITOR: without permission is prohibited. Nancy Woods Advertising rates are available BirdsEyeViewMagazine@gmail.com upon request. 410.829.1101

FINANCIAL WIZARD: Laurie Jacobson For billing inquires: Laurie.Jacobson@capeair.com

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Find us at:

BirdsEyeViewMagazine.com

88 Cape Cod 92 Boston 95 St. Louis Cover: (detail) And Rockwell Kent Sailed By —Tenth is a Suite of Untoward Occurrences on Monhegan Island, by Jamie Wyeth, 2017

96 Montana 100 Caribbean 5


Veterans Day is approaching and in honor of the day we set aside to honor the men and women in our Armed Forces, we share a true story by Cape Air’s Station Manager Carola Prewett from Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, home to a U.S. Army training facility.

THE LOST PEN By Carola Prewett

A Soldier’s Memorial—“I was pretty thrilled to receive this special pen back in my possession. It has quite a bit of emotional value to me.” — Colonel David Niesen, Brigade Commander, 1st Brigade-Engineer

Photo: Tim Johnson Colonel David Niesen Brigade Commander, 1st Brigade–Engineer

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Cape Air Captain Okke vanOudgaarden

e all lose pens pretty frequently in our day-to-day activities. Most of the time we write it off as a minor loss and continue with our lives. That most certainly cannot be said about one particular pen. Constructed with a wood core, and a brass 7.62 shell casing with engravings, this was not your typical pen and when he found it in a side pocket of his plane, Cape Air Captain Okke VanOudgaarden realized this pen was special to someone. Captain Okke put the pen in his jacket pocket and continued to fly the rest of the day. He had every intention to start making calls to return this special pen to its rightful owner, but the very next day he was repositioned to the Caribbean to cover flying in that region and that was quickly followed by another transfer to the Northeast. Captain Okke is a “swing” pilot and flies all over the Cape Air route map.

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The pen continued to ride along in the jacket pocket until a brisk, chilly morning when he put on his jacket for the first time in quite a while. It was at this moment he felt the unusual object he had forgotten about and he instantly remembered the pen. Months had gone by, but the Captain called me and described the pen. It was a bullet with six names including the name, Colonel David Niesen. Okke said that he believed it to be very important, and that surely someone on the military base would recognize the name and know how to contact the Colonel. B I R D’S

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Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri

Cape Air team members: Sabine and Carola in Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri. Every Friday at Cape Air is “Red Shirt Day.” R.E.D.—Remember Everyone Deployed.

He sent the pen to me here in Fort Leonard Wood. At first glance I instantly felt the same way about the pen’s significance and finding the owner became a top priority. Something inside told me that this is someone’s special pen and it has a greater meaning than we all know. FALL

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A couple of days later a passenger was checking in for his flight and after looking at his I.D., I noticed that his rank was a Lieutenant Colonel. I shared the pen with him. He said he would send out some emails and get back to me. A couple of days later I received a call from the pen’s owner, Colonel David Niesen. He was beside himself that we had the pen that he had frantically tried to find for months. He confirmed our suspicions of its significance. The engravings were the names of the six soldiers lost in Iraq while they were under his command. The brass shell casing was from the 21-gun salute during the military burial ceremony. I was so proud and honored to hand Colonel Niesen his pen.“This is a prime example of people caring,” he said. Oh behalf of Captain Okke and all of us here in Fort Leonard Wood we are happy to have played a small part in returning this special pen to the rightful owner and we thank Colonel Niesen and the rest of the men and women serving in the Armed Forces for their service to the country. From all of us to all of you, Happy Veterans Day. 7


Photo: Kim Corkran

Executive Editor, Bird’s Eye View Michelle.Haynes@capeair.com 8

*Make our customers happy and have a good time doing it.

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Photo: 5iveLeaf Photography/ courtesy of the Farnsworth Art Museum

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amie Wyeth is sending us an image of his latest painting for the Bird’s Eye View.” I almost dropped the phone from my hand when I received the call from Bird’s Eye View photo editor Nancy Woods. The youngest member of America’s most famous artistic dynasty has a home on what I refer to as “magical Monhegan,” a Never-Land of an island off the coast of Maine. Seeking affirmation on what a huge deal this is, my next call went to Christine McCarthy, executive director of the prestigious Provincetown Art Association and Museum. Her response was immediate. “Influenced Jamie Wyeth at a 2017 event honoring his father Andrew by a family of artists, at Rockland’s Strand Theatre Jamie Wyeth honed his artistic “The Farnsworth Art Museum has had a long-standing path, which has spanned six relationship with the work of all three generations of decades, with an imaginative Michelle on the moors at Nantucket’s Altar Rock, the approach to realism. His mark Wyeth painters, N.C., Andrew and Jamie. It was in 1944, highest point on the island. four years before the Farnsworth opened to the public, on American art history is that the museum purchased for its collection five works highly significant producing portraits of Andy Warhol, John F. Kennedy, Rudolf Nureyev among others. His of a young, still unknown Andrew Wyeth from his first authentic chronicling of America—its landscape and solo show at the Macbeth Gallery in New York City.” occupants—has positioned him as one of the most —David Troup, Farnsworth Art Museum, Rockland, Maine important notable painters of our time,” says McCarthy. From the bottom of our collective hearts, we thank Jamie Wyeth for honoring us with the image of his beloved Monhegan Island. Sincere thanks also to Nancy, our photo editor and Jamie Wyeth’s amiable assistant Mary Beth Dolan for their help in bringing this brand new work to the Bird’s Eye View. If you are looking for a fall escape check out what makes Monhegan Island so special. In this issue we take you to this tiny fishing community doubling as an artist’s haven. The plane, car and ferry boat needed for access are well worth the trip.


W E LOV E O U R P H OTO G R A P H E R S!

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e do not kid ourselves. Few of our passengers read the Bird’s Eye View for the (ahem) brilliant copy. Like the sports magazine featuring swimsuits, it is always about the images. Please meet our talented family of photographers who are always ready to go above and beyond to get that often elusive perfect shot. They are hardworking, dedicated and definitely fun to work with. All of us at the Bird’s Eye View thank them for all they do. If you find yourself in any of their destinations and want the perfect wedding, family, vacation shot, or whatever, please call on them.

Steve Simonsen and Friend, Caribbean stevesimonsen.com

Lisa Densmore Ballard, Saranac Lake, NY & Montana LisaDensmore.com 10

Kelly Thompson and Sky, Vieques viequesinsider.com

Elizabeth Cecil, Martha’s Vineyard elizabethcecil.com B I R D’S

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PHOTOGRAPHERS

Photo: Ann Murphy

Cary Hazlegrove, Nantucket — hazlegrove.com “I am known for my Nantucket landscape photography work. This winter I began collecting things that I find around the island. I am turning my attention to single objects found on Nantucket which, I hope, gives them relevance.” — Cary Hazlegrove

Kit Noble, Nantucket NantucketStock.com

Greg Hinson, Nantucket NantucketStock.com

Carol Latta, Maine amazingmaine.com

Eliza Magro at Cape Air’s downtown office in Rockland Maine, Caribbean elizamagrophotography.com FALL

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VERMONT

Peacham Congregational Church is one of the oldest and most photographed churches in Vermont. 12


Photo Courtesy of the Vermont Department of Tourism

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VERMONT

Rutland, Vermont’s Hathaway Farm Kidventurous — Parents Magazine names Hathaway Farm & Corn Maze

“Top 10 Corn Mazes for Families.” The Mini-Maze is specially designed for younger children.

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VERMONT/NEW HAMPSHIRE

Photos courtesy of the Hathaway Farm & Maze

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welve acres of twists and turns and a fair share of dead ends can be found at the award-winning Hathaway Farm and Corn Maze in Rutland, Vermont. This is maze fun in the digital age so look for a number of Smart Phone clues and games along the way. You can also use the GPS function and pull up the map of the maze on your phone. If getting lost makes you twitch there is a special feature that allows you to see exactly where you are in the maze. You’ll still be lost, but you will be able to see just how lost you are. For the next two months take advantage of Moonlight Madness when the maze stays open until 9 pm and you have star filled Vermont sky to guide you.


Trailing Vermont’s Foliage

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Vermont’s Burnt Rock Mountain trail is a moderate 4.5 mile lightly trafficked back trail and dogs are welcome to join you.

Hiking Vermont’s Long Trail

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Photo: Sheri Larsen

e one with the glorious colors of Vermont this fall with a hike along the oldest long-distance trail in the United States. Often referred to as the ‘footpath in the wilderness,’ the 272-mile Long Trail, easily accessed from your Cape Air arrival in Rutland, Vermont or Lebanon, New Hampshire, takes you through back trails of the Green Mountains. The well-marked foot path features 185 miles of side trails and is a hiker’s paradise with no shortage of streams and ponds, mountain vistas and plenty of camp sites and overnight shelters. To get started, reach out to the Green Mountain Club, the group entrusted with the care and protection of this glorious resource. The helpful folks can supply you with detailed maps, and answer all of your questions. greenmountainclub.org B I R D’S

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Photo: Nathanael Asaro

VERMONT/NEW HAMPSHIRE

Photo: Vermont Department of Tourism and Marketing

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R U T L A N D, V E R M O N T

Meet a few stars of the largest and longest-running Halloween parade in the United States.

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uper heroes and the folks who write them, read them, and love them are the inspiration for this Halloween tradition that dates back to 1960. When Rutland resident and comic book lover Tom Fagan thought super heroes would make for a great parade, he brought along his friends in the comic book world to join the fun. A parade was born and has flourished ever since. Thousands of locals and visitors line the Rutland streets and celebrate their favorite comic book character while collecting bags of candy from the parade folks. It is the best free show in town and it all happens on October 28th, 2017. Photo: Robert Layman

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MAINE STARRY STARRY NIGHT The 9th Annual Acadia Night Sky Festival September 21-24

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Photo: Tim Little, Cape Night Photography


BAR HARBOR, MAINE

Photo: Brent Ander Lunar eclipse over Great Head

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aine’s Acadia National Park is home to a number of natural wonders including Cadillac Mountain and Thunder Hole, but for one of the area’s most notable attractions, wait until dark and look up. Billed as the eastern seaboard’s premiere night sky, the stars shining down on Bar Harbor are the brightest to be found east of the Mississippi and a great reason to party. A number of experts, astronomers and star gazers flock to Bar Harbor every fall for the annual festival. “There is now national attention being paid to the rapid loss of dark skies to light pollution and we have stars, lots of stars,” says Bar Harbor Chamber of Commerce spokesman Alf Anderson. “For the past decade we have had a local ordinance in place requiring ‘night sky-friendly’ outdoor lighting on all new construction. Our goal is to prevent any further light pollution to our local skies.”

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BAR HARBOR, MAINE

Bass Harbor Head Lighthouse Keeping watch since 1858

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o Maine feature is complete without a photo of the state’s iconic lighthouses. Maine’s rocky coastline and New England’s weather challenges forever seal the lighthouse beacon as a lifesaving resource for boaters. Topping the list as one of Maine’s most recognized lighthouses is the fully operational Bass Harbor Head Lighthouse. Although the actual lighthouse is closed to the public you are welcome to tour the grounds. The ever helpful team at the Bar Harbor Chamber of Commerce can also help you with a number of lighthouse tours of the area.

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BAR HARBOR, MAINE

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UPSCALE DOWNSIZING By Leslie Linsley

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can’t move. I have too much stuff,” said a woman I interviewed for my new book, Upscale Downsizing. Whatever the circumstances—empty nest, job transfer, life change—people are downsizing everywhere in the country and doing it with style. While it’s a chance to reinvent your lifestyle, it’s hard to throw away grandma’s teacups or family albums. On the other hand, it can be liberating to get rid of what you don’t need while keeping the things you cherish. So what’s the trick? Attitude! If you can’t streamline your possessions, find new and creative ways to use it all. Eventually you’ll eliminate what doesn’t work. Photo: Jon Aron

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ack in the day, before Martha was Martha, Leslie Linsley was a popular journalist/decorator in a number of magazines including fifteen years as contributing craft editor for Family Circle. Seventy-plus books later Linsley’s sage advice is seen everywhere and includes everything from sheet thread counts, (how high do you need?) to figuring out how to make your house look like a million and still stay on budget. Her newspaper column “At Home With Leslie Linsley” appears weekly in the Nantucket Inquirer & Mirror and The Key West Citizen. Leslie and her graphic designer husband, Jon Aron live on Nantucket Island.

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Photos: Jon Aron Create an elegant outdoor dining area in a small space with layers of table linens, good chinaware and always fresh flowers.

GETTING STARTED:

Get rid of things that won’t fit into your smaller space. It’s harder to get rid of them once you’ve moved in. 1. Letting go lightens the load and frees you to move forward. 2. The more time you invest in reminiscing about each item the slower the process. 3. Hold a yard sale, and then another if need be.

A small living room needs only a few comfortable pieces of furniture. The colorful rug livens an all-white room. Interior design by Elisa Allen

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4. Offer things to relatives so they stay in the family. 5. Donate items to a worthy cause. 6. Give yourself a reasonable deadline. 7. Buying exactly what you need for the new space is more satisfying than trying to make do with the old. The following ideas apply to downsizing, but are useful for de-cluttering your current home. A. Go room-by-room photographing things you can’t live without and put into a notebook. B. Later assign each item to a room. C. Be realistic about what furniture will fit where. A queen-size bed may have to replace a king to make a bedroom feel more spacious. D. Refine and reduce bookcase space. E. Weed out kitchen drawers. Replace with one of everything you need and buy the best. F. Determine your priorities: comfort, good-design, space for family visits, lowmaintenance, minimal style or surrounded with memories, etc. This will enable you to design your downsized home for maximum enjoyment. 25


BLUE HILL PENINSULA, MAINE Photo courtesy of Bagaduce Music Lending Library, Blue Hill, Maine

Roochie Toochie & The Ragtime Shepherd Kings celebrate “Maine” at Blue Hill’s Bagaduce Music Lending Library.

S E P T E M B E R 2 4 T H AT 6 : 0 0 PM By Michelle Haynes

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he Pine Tree state prepares to celebrate the season with Roochie Toochie & The Ragtime Shepherd Kings. I smile just writing the name of this popular and quirky band touring Maine this fall. High energy combined with fiddle players, ukuleles, Hawaiian guitars and quite an assortment of mini-instruments are guaranteed to get audiences on their feet. Their rousing performance will rock the bucolic Blue Hill peninsula at a special performance at the renowned Bagaduce Music Lending Library, home to one of the nation’s largest repositories of sheet music. The band is planning to showcase Maine themed songs and sheet music covers. Wait until you see what they come up with! The double win here is the location, for the Blue Hill Peninsula is true gem featuring rolling hills bordered by the sea, and quintessential Maine villages offering no shortage of glorious fall color. Leaf peepers take note, crowds and traffic are non-existent.

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BLUE HILL PENINSULA, MAINE

PENTAGÖET INN & RESTAURANT CASTINE, MAINE

Award Winning Lodging Fine Food and Wine Storied Village by the Sea 207-326-8616 www.pentagoet.com 26 MAIN STREET, CASTINE, MAINE FALL

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CASTINE: Tastefully restored and updated 1807 Perkins Street gem with 4 en suite bedrooms including one on main level, four fireplaces, modern kitchen, formal dining room, family room in restored antique barn, front parlor, porch, beautifully landscaped yard and views over Castine Harbor. $795,000

www.saltmeadowproperties.com

Main Street, Castine, Maine 207-326-9116 – castine@saltmeadowproperties.com Main Street, Blue Hill, Maine 207-374-5010 – bluehill@saltmeadowproperties.com

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BLUE HILL PENINSULA, MAINE

Off the Beaten Track in Maine Photo courtesy of WoodenBoat

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right turn leaving the Bar Harbor Airport takes you to the Blue Hill Peninsula and towns with names that are most likely new to you. Blue Hill, Brooklin, Brooksville, Castine, Penobscot, Sedgwick, and, further on, the towns of Deer Isle and

Photo courtesy of the Blue Hill Chamber of Commerce

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Stonington are all great choices for a Maine foliage escape, sans the leaf peeping crowds. Back in the 1700s Blue Hill was a center for boatbuilding and quarrying but it was not long before the area’s waterfront, wide open spaces, and quietude became a haven for a number of musicians, artists and writers. Marching to a different pace than neighboring Bar Harbor, Blue Hill has enormous charm and you will find a number of historic inns along with restaurants and unique shops that can easily satisfy your shopping urge. Hiking the trails by day and enjoying fresh seafood and live music in the evening can make for a perfect Maine vacation. bluehillpeninsula.org.

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PE N O B SCOT BAY, M A I N E

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M AINE ’ S PE NOBSCOT BAY

The view from the summit of Mount Battie.

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Photo courtesy of the Penobscot Bay Regional Chamber of Commerce

aine’s Penobscot Bay area including the towns of Rockland, Rockport, Camden and nearby Vinalhaven Island are all offering splendid shows of color right now and a great place to get started for a lay of the land is the doable hike to the top of Mount Battie in Camden Hills State Park. The half-mile hike is relatively easy and well worth the stupendous view from the top. You will find plenty of places to picnic and after you catch your second wind, tackle the nearby stone tower for an even better vantage point.

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Photo: Carol Latta

See what 700,000 tons of granite looks like with a walk along the mile-long Rockland Breakwater. Check the tides, ensure your walking shoes have good grips, and prepare to get a little wet. You will be rewarded with stunning views that include the Owls Head Lighthouse. FALL

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PE N O B SCOT BAY, M A I N E

Photo: Eliza Magro

Photo: PJ Walter

The first Maine moviehouse to showcase the “Talkies,� the historic Strand Theatre opened its doors in 1923 and still enjoys huge popularity today as a showcase for new and classic films as well as live performances. The totally renovated, state-of-the-art theatre is one of those rare finds offering a great place to catch a show. The fall schedule can be found at rocklandstrand.com.


PE N O B SCOT BAY, M A I N E

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PE N O B SCOT BAY, M A I N E

Photo: Eliza Magro

A cozy B&B open year-round, featuring an indoor heated pool, makes Rockport’s Country Inn a great choice for a Maine getaway. FALL

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SOUTHWEST/NORTHEAST HARBOR,MAINE

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MONHEGAN

Photo: Clare Durst

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MONHEGAN, MAINE

And Rockwell Kent Sailed By —Tenth is a Suite of Untoward Occurrences on Monhegan Island, Jamie Wyeth, 2017, Oil on canvas, 40” x 60” Photo: Clare Durst

Be it a painted rock or any one of a dozen-plus galleries dotting the hiking trails, art is around every corner on tiny Monhegan Island. For over a century the island has inspired the world’s best loved artists including our cover artist Jamie Wyeth.

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MONHEGAN, MAINE

Photo © DJ and Gillian Pierce

Heading to Monhegan Island—be sure to make your dinner reservations in advance for the popular Island Inn restaurant.

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Island Inn dining room art by Stan Moeller

aine conservationist Ted Edison can rest easy, for his beloved Monhegan, ten miles out to sea, retains the wild lands that Edison worked so hard to protect and preserve. Thirty minutes from your Cape Air flight taking you from Boston to Rockland, Maine, followed by a quick hop on the mail boat, you are on rocky windswept Monhegan Island. An artists’ haven for over a century, the mile-long island has no need for paved roads for there are no cars. Monhegan lovers like it that way, and in fact, Edison and a group of locals formed Monhegan Associates back in the Fifties to keep development at bay. Other than a new brewery, Monhegan remains the same with miles of hiking trails, a network of small art galleries, and a mini-museum housed in the island lighthouse. Rocky cliffs overlooking the ocean, and a sky full of stars —if you are looking to stop the world for a brief moment in time, Monhegan Island, Maine is great choice.

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“To preserve for posterity the ‘wild-lands’ of Monhegan Island, Maine, and its environs, as well as the simple, friendly way of life that has existed on Monhegan as a whole.” —Ted Edison, 1954

Monhegan champion, Ted Edison The youngest son of Thomas Edison—yes, that Thomas Edison.

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MONHEGAN, MAINE

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THE ADIRONDACKS

Ascending the “squeezer.” Photo: Lisa Ballard

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Photo: Lisa Ballard

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Bear-proofing your campsite is an important first step

isa Ballad’s first line says it all, “The Adirondack Park is a hiker’s nirvana.” Award winning writer, photographer and Bird’s Eye View contributor, Ballard’s new updated hiking guides are your first step when planning your visit to the six-million acre hiking paradise. “Born and raised in Saranac Lake, I am as native as you can get,” says Ballard. “The water, mountains, and lack of crowds make the Adirondacks an absolute pristine area for hikers and I love sharing the dozens of trail choices available to everyone from novice to 46-rs.”* As for her favorite hike Ballard is quick to name Lyon Mountain, six miles round trip, with the entrance a quick drive from your Cape Air arrival at Saranac Lake. “The view atop Lyon is amazing and on a clear day you can see the highest peaks in New York, Vermont and Montreal.” Where to go and what to see? Ballard’s easy-to-read guides also feature fascinating tidbits like, “San Francisco’s Golden Gate Bridge is made up of ore mined from Lyon Mountain.” Who knew? Find the these invaluable Adirondack guides at your local bookstore. (If not in stock, they can order) *46-rs —Name given to hikers who climb all of the Adirondacks’ four thousand foot mountain peaks

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THE ADIRONDACKS, NEW YORK

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THE ADIRONDACKS, NEW YORK

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SARANAC LAKE, NEW YORK

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ADIRONDACKS: AMPERSAND BAY RESORT & BOAT CLUB By Lisa Ballard

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s your Cape Air flight nears Saranac Lake, the eye-candy includes the highest mountains in New York and a myriad of lakes, but beaches? A beach getaway is not something usually associated with the Adirondacks, unless you go to the Ampersand Bay Resort & Boat Club. Upon arrival at Ampersand Bay, its broad swath of manicured sand with its artistic concentric circles calls 44

Photos: Lisa Ballard

to you. The resort’s beach bows gently to the water’s edge and a to-die-for view down Lower Saranac Lake, a six-mile long lake and the northernmost body of water in the 17-mile long Saranac chain. The resort lies at the top its namesake bay where people have vacationed since the mid-1800s. The Ampersand Bay Resort & Boat Club dates back to 1948. “The ‘Rustics’, our five cabins that have been here B I R D’S E Y E V I E W


THE ADIRONDACKS, NEW YORK

Photos: Lisa Ballard Ampersand Bay Resort & Boat Club’s, Julie Swanson

since the beginning of time [the 1960s], have been updated, but they have the same feel as the original era,” says general manager Julie Swanson. “You still pull down a ladder to get up to the loft. The Rustics appeal to young families and fishermen. They can run out their front door to the beach.” The resort also includes more modern condos and cabins all oriented toward the water. “All of the lodgings are set up to live in, with all the amenities you have at home, even a grill,” says Swanson, “You only have to go to the grocery store.” Each evening guests gather at the firepit on the beach. “It’s a place to connect,” says Swanson, “If you’re by yourself, you’ll meet people. It’s so tranquil, looking at the fire, the stars, the water. It’s a great way to regroup. Some families have been coming here for generations. They have their reunions here. It’s their happy place.” It’s also their active place! Want to kayak? Grab a lifejacket, paddle and go. Want to catch a bass? Stop by the fishing office. Want to play beach volleyball? Head to the sand. Want to rent a pontoon boat? Walk onto the dock. You can also moor and fuel your own boat. But if you would rather curl up with a good book in an Adirondack chair with the water gently tickling your toes, you can do that, too. Originally a summer destination, starting this year, the resort is open year-round, except in December and January. Why poke along in traffic to see the fall foliage, when you can enjoy it from your private deck, dock, and of course, the beach? ampersandbay.com

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NANTUCKET’S Annual Cranberry Festival

Photo: © Kit Noble/NantucketStock.com

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NANTUCKET

Photo: © Greg Hinson/NantucketStock.com Photo: © Cary Hazlegrove/NantucketStock.com

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ver two million cranberries are harvested every year on Nantucket. Think of that number the next time you open a can of cranberry sauce. A much better option is to get yourself out to the island’s Milestone Cranberry Bog and pick up your own bag of fresh picked berries. The bog is jumping during the annual festival happening October 7th from 11 am until 4 pm. This is a jam-packed day featuring music and food, including a huge barbecue with their infamous pulled pork sandwiches, followed by chocolate-covered cranberries. Also happening are hay rides, sack races, a petting zoo, bog tours and no end of fun facts about New England’s most famous export, cranberries. Admission is free although there is a parking fee, so your best bet is to rent a bike and ride out there or take the handy Wave bus that runs around the island.

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Photo: © Greg Hinson/NantucketStock.com

NANTUCKET


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Get out of Town…a Fall Meander in Nantucket By Michelle Haynes

Photo: Ann Murphy Photos courtesy of the Linda Loring Nature Foundation

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or an off-the-beaten track Nantucket experience, grab a picnic and head to the Linda Loring Nature Foundation, a 104-acre preserve where the only sound is the family of ospreys tending to their nest. Ms. Loring’s love of nature and preservation led her to the establishment of this preserve dedicated to education and conservation. Open year-round, a series of sign posts and a handy guide leads you through the mile-long loop trail where you are apt to see a variety of wildlife along with rare plants and sweeping views of Nantucket Sound. Admission is free, although donations are gratefully accepted. The foundation is about a fifteen-minute car ride from Main Street or, depending on how fast you can pedal, a 45-minute bike ride. If you are looking for the Nantucket they write about, in her most natural state, this is the place. B I R D’S E Y E V I E W


NANTUCKET

Photos courtesy of the Linda Loring Nature Foundation

“A regular visitor, a Black-capped Chickadee enjoying a sunflower seed. We have a bird “photo booth” camera and capture some funny images!” —Kitty Pochman, Executive Director, Linda Loring Nature Foundation

”If we do not protect the earth our plants and animals will disappear and we are already seeing that impact. Learning to care and protect what we have starts in young children. Linda Loring loved animals and kids and understood the importance of having a place where kids could both learn and enjoy nature. This was a driving force for her to create this wildlife center” —Kitty Pochman, Executive Director, Linda Loring Nature Foundation

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Photo © Lisa Frey/nantucketeventmedia.com

Nantucket Arts Festival SEPTEMBER 30–OCTOBER 8

Photo: © Cary Hazlegrove/ NantucketStock.com

The festival’s theme, Imagination at Sea, highlights art, theater, film, music & literature.

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or an island situated thirty miles out to sea, a fall festival theme of Imagination at Sea makes perfect sense and in Nantucket everyone gets in the act. Now in its 23rd year and produced by the Nantucket Arts Council, the festival’s lineup of events gives every aspect of the arts a chance to shine.

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Photos © Lisa Frey/nantucketeventmedia.com Nantucket Baroque Concert

HIGHLIGHTS INCLUDE:

Opening night reception

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• Nantucket Arts Council opening exhibit showcasing amateur and professional artists’ work not typically seen in the island’s galleries. Opening night reception is Saturday, September 30. • Nantucket Baroque Concert—Wednesday, October 4, at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church on Fair Street. Familiar and rarely heard classical music of the baroque era, performed by professional local and visiting musicians at twilight, in the historic St. Paul’s. Built in 1902, the church features Tiffany stained glass windows, considered by many art historians to be among the best art glass ever created. • Nantucket Music Center stages its annual Organ Crawl through five downtown Nantucket churches the morning of Saturday, October 7. Historic organs are played at St. Mary’s Church, First Congregational Church, Unitarian Church, St. Paul’s, and United Methodist Church. Performances are timed so that listeners can travel from church to church in succession. • Nantucket Shorts Festival shows two hours of video films by local amateur and professional filmmakers, on Saturday, October 7, at Nantucket Dreamland. Themes range from moody to comedy and animation. • Artists Association of Nantucket presents its annual Wet Paint Auction and benefit dinner on Sunday, October 8. Member artists create work throughout the weekend, with a showing Sunday afternoon in the Cecilia Joyce & Seward Johnson Gallery at 19 Washington Street, followed by a live auction and benefit dinner. • Other participating arts organizations include the Theatre Workshop of Nantucket, White Heron Theatre Company, Nantucket Music Center, Nantucket Atheneum, Nantucket Dreamland Film and Performing Arts Center. • Not to bury the lead here but it bears noting—most of the events are free or have modest admission. You will need a score card to keep track of it all. nantucketartscouncil.org 55


Photos: Shay Farah

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Filming “Grey Lady” in Nantucket.

Grey Lady Probes the Soul of Off-Season Nantucket By William Ferrall

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n Nantucket, fog happens. Barely a week goes by on the island without a damp, heavy mist rolling down Main Street or creeping through the island’s moors. It’s that atmosphere that permeates Nantucket in Grey Lady, the compelling new feature film by John Shea, the actor and writer-director known for his many appearances on stage, film, and television.

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This original thriller, written by Shea from a story idea by Hollywood producer and Nantucket homeowner Armyan Bernstein, brings suspended Boston policeman Doyle to Nantucket in the off-season. He’s there to unravel the mystery of why his sister and girlfriend were murdered back in Boston, for what emerges as reasons possibly connected to the island. Doyle’s sojourn into life on Nantucket results in him finding romance and uncovering family secrets, with violent outcomes and leaving his and others’ lives changed. Because Shea has made the island his family’s home for decades, he knows the spirit of Nantucket more assuredly than others who’ve used it for cinematic storytelling. His understanding of the local temperament and his spot-on portrayal of local life makes it even more absorbing. Real Nantucketers play half the roles, and admirably so. This is Nantucket behind the scenes of summer festivals and off the pages of travel articles. Since it’s set on the edge of a Nantucket winter, you won’t see yachts, wedding parties, or luxury SUVs. Instead, Grey Lady visits a mellow outdoor party with a live band, a gallery opening, and steamship arrivals and departures. Rundown cars, alcoholism, and crimes ranging from petty to serious figure in the plot. “The complex background of the island started getting woven into the film,” said Shea. Familiar local businesses and streets provided stages for the action. The island’s longtime arts collaborative X Gallery became part of the story as did Nantucket residents of Cape Verdean heritage. B I R D’S

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A scene from thriller “Grey Lady” with Carolyn Stotesbery and Chris Meyer.

Classic movies by Raymond Chandler, Dashiell Hammett, and James M. Cain echo throughout Grey Lady. For the fans of detective murder mysteries, Grey Lady offers enough surprises and nuances to make it a praiseworthy example of the genre. Because its ending leaves Doyle facing an uncertain future, Grey Lady could give rise to the Boston cop following trouble to other locations. “Imagine a series of Grey Lady type thrillers featuring the character of Doyle,” suggested Shea. Already, he has returned to drafting a sequel to Grey Lady set on the Puerto Rican island of Vieques, one of several other island locations he and Bernstein considered early on as the setting for their movie. A 2000 New York Times travel article described Nantucket as “aglow in shades of gray.” For those of who call it home, Shea’s Grey Lady peels away the gray to unveil the island’s hot embers of passion, friendship, and creativity that smolder and mingle in the fog—a fitting cinematic tribute to the mystery and allure of living on Nantucket year-round. Doing double-duty actor/director John Shea on set as Nantucket’s police chief.

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By Michelle Haynes Photos: © Elizabeth Cecil

Photo courtesy of the Martin House Inn

N A N T U C K E T — View Favorites

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oes one choose a place to stay because of the granola served at breakfast? You do if it is Nantucket’s Martin House Inn. Scrumptious, to die for granola is only one reason to book this historic sea captain’s house. A bowlful of their homemade crunchy delight, along with freshly baked pastries and you are pretty much set until dinner. Located minutes from downtown, the inn also features fireplaces in the rooms, and no shortage of cozy nooks to curl up on a chilly autumn day. Rates hover around $200 per night with specials and mid-week deals available. A bonus for Cape Air passengers — anyone who mentions this article will receive a 15% discount. Thank-you Martin House!

Breakfast at the Martin House

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NANTUCKET

Photo: Kim Corkran

Located in the heart of Nantucket’s historic district, the Brass Lantern Inn is an elegant bed and breakfast perfectly placed for the “Old World” Nantucket vibe, and yet steps away from cobblestoned Main Street. A long time member of the Bird’s Eye View family, the seventeen room inn is compleley renovated with all of the accoutrements travelers enjoy including one and two bedroom suites, and homemade pastries with your morning coffee, alongside lemon curd and Stonewall jams. Afternoon is tea time with, warm from the oven, cookies. For pet lovers, the Brass Lantern is pet-friendly offering specially-designated dog-friendly rooms. The outdoor garden and patio offer a great respite for both of you. Fall rates at the inn start at around $155 per night, but do check with them for specials and packages. brasslanternnantucket.com Photo courtesy of Harborview Nantucket

Location makes the difference at Harborview Nantucket featuring luxury suites steps from the harbor. No car needed for you are literally minutes from both the beach and downtown, yet the serene waterfront setting feels like a world away. Perfect for couples, a girl’s getaway or families, the rooms feature one to four bedrooms, and a fully equipped kitchen that can be stocked and ready for you upon arrival. Fireplaces to ward off the fall chill and a number of special packages make the Harborview a great choice for right now or for a holiday escape. harborviewnantucket.com FALL

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MISSION ACCOMPLISHED: A LAST MINUTE, AFFORDABLE ROOM IN NANTUCKET

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By Michelle Haynes

Find this friendly miracle team at nantucketaccommodations.com. 62

Photo: Chuck Anzalone

room request with two days’ notice for one night on a July weekend in Nantucket for under $200. With barely a glimmer of hope in my heart I called Nantucket Accommodations, certain I was on a mission impossible. But, with no sign of a “Tsk, Tsk” at what I perceived to be a fool’s errand, Bruce at Nantucket Accommodations went to work and called me back within five minutes with exactly what I needed. A gorgeous inn, full breakfast in the morning, lemonade and cookies in the afternoon, and a small but spotless room with all of the amenities including wifi and satellite TV and yes, all under my $200 budget. “This is what we do” says Bruce, as I thanked him profusely. “We are the only lodging reservation service on the island and work with 85% of the hotels and B&Bs as well as a number of vacation rentals. Our service is free and we are passionate about helping folks find the best lodging options for their visit.”

One of the most photographed spots in Nantucket—a dedicated group of volunteers ensures the “Planter” on Main Street changes with the seasons.

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BERKSHIRE HATHAWAY Home Services

Island Properties

NANTUCKET

35A Old South Road Nantucket, MA 02554

508.228.6999 islandpropertiesre.com

$8,995,000 Cliff – Lincoln Avenue $11,250,000 Harborfront – Polpis Road Gracious 4-bdrm, 4.5-bath home with garage & private dock. Classic family home in desirable neighborhood, 6-bdrms, 4.5-baths.

Cliff – Washing Pond Road $8,350,000 New Construction – Surfside Road $5,650,000 Grand home with sweeping views of the Pond and Nantucket Sound. Modern & fun beach house compound with all the bells and whistles.

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Photo courtesy of the Martha’s Vineyard Food & Wine Festival

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A Fall Foodie Extravaganza

The 10th annual Martha’s Vineyard Food and Wine Festival October 19-22, 2017 Photos courtesy of the Martha’s Vineyard Food & Wine Festival

Fresh Off the Farm—A community gathering combining island farms and chefs with wine tastings and music. Somm Throw Down—A face-off of three wine personalities—Joseph Carr, Sam Decker of Atria, and Heather Lynch of Bar Mezzana battle for the ultimate pairing of wine and food, prepared by Colin Lynch of Bar Mezzana. Sweet Tooth—An indulgence in the richness of Murdick’s Fudge paired with port wines.

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Oh Shucks!—Oysters fresh from the Vineyard’s oyster farms, paired with perfect pours at the Edgartown Yacht Club.

t is wine, oysters, and show-off time for island chefs at a festival where there is something for everyone. Winemakers, sommeliers, and culinary artisans from the island and beyond are poised for the biggest food event of the year. The lineup includes:

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Grand Tasting—Located at the Harbor View Hotel, this is the highlight of the weekend’s celebration of Sea, Farm & Vine, featuring a large array of winemakers, spirits, breweries, gourmet foods, and restaurants. Champy Brunch with fashions by The Great Put-On—Brunch and bubbly with Jenny Johnson—founder of Champy champagne, and TV personality from NESN’s Dining Playbook. B I R D’S

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Photo courtesy of the Martha’s Vineyard Food & Wine Festival

A Martha’s Vineyard favorite, Good Night Louise.


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14TH ANNUAL CHOCOLATE FESTIVAL FEATHERSTONE CENTER FOR THE ARTS, MARTHA’S VINEYARD OCTOBER 6, 7 AND 8

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hocolate fountains, chocolate cakes, pies, truffles, ice cream sundaes—the list is endless at the chocoholic paradise happening this fall in Martha’s Vineyard. A fundraiser for the island’s Featherstone Center for the Arts, the three-day event is a huge attraction with crowds that will number a thousand before the end of the weekend. There are a lot of chocolate lovers out there. “We began the festival as a way of extending the season,” says Featherstone’s director Ann Smith. “Now it is one of our biggest events of the year and is a wonderful way to support culinary arts on the island and the art of chocolate making.”

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uild your dream home with spectacular sunsets and enjoy the active Menemsha Harbor Waterway Views! See the conceptual home drawing along with a full code analysis by a licensed architect to confirm the ability to build a 3,750 sq, ft home, with views from 1st & 2nd floors, 4 bedrooms, garage and space for inground pool. Septic plan has been approved, and water well installed. Included—Deeded Rights to access private, sandy beach on the pond front to kayak and store small boats. No development mystery, it is ready to go!

Exclusively Offered, rarely available Land Lot, $1,995,000. MVYBROKER.COM 508.627.0702 SUZANNE@MVYBROKER.COM Suzanne Lanzone

M VY BROKER HOMES – INVESTMENT – LAND

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Water View 4 Acre Parcel Overlooking Menemsha Pond


Photo: © Drew Kinsman

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RUN FOR THE LIGHT 5TH ANNUAL GAY HEAD 10K SUNDAY, OCTOBER 1, 2017

Photos: Lisa Vanderhoop

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hat does it take to move an historic 400-ton lighthouse back 134 feet from the edge of an eroding cliff? “You are looking at about $3 million,” says Paula Eisenberg of Operation Lighthouse Rescue. And they did it. A beacon of light since 1856 the precarious cliff beneath Gay Head Light forced the community to make a tough decision—move it or lose it. In a plea for help that went way beyond Martha’s Vineyard, the lighthouse was moved in an engineering feat that found its way to a special edition of the TV show NOVA and can now be viewed on Netflix. Proceeds from the race funds the on-going lighthouse restoration. For the ultimate photo op do not leave the island without a trip out to Aquinnah to see this historic and iconic sentry.

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They all laughed at Christopher Columbus… Andy Heyward’s Gadgetorium

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By Michelle Haynes Photos: Colleen McDermott

Although the observatory is serious science, owner Andy Heyward is not above having fun at his ‘Gadgetorium’ which also includes an alien landing pad.

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ou can add Copernicus, Galileo and countless others to the, ‘Are they crazy?’ list,” says Andy Heyward, who is not convinced planet Earth is the only inhabited planet. “There are a few thousand planets out there with similar qualities to earth, and whether they are little green men or just algae, I do believe there is something out there.” Heyward is the creator of the popular children’s television show, Inspector Gadget. His state-of-the-art ‘Gadgetorium’ in the backyard of his Martha’s Vineyard home was built by a team that includes NASA, Caltech and Smithsonian staffers, and is the only functioning space observatory on the island. “I have always loved anything to do with outer space,” says Heyward who is also on the board of the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. For the last three years the Center’s Director, Dr. Charles Alcock, has lectured at the observatory about the cutting edge of space exploration. More about the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory at cfa.harvard.edu.

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— Inspector Gadget creator, Andy Heyward

Familiar to most thirty-somethings— “Go Go Gadget Hat!” Inspector Gadget and his top secret sidekicks Penny and Brain starred in one of television’s most popular series. Created by Martha’s Vineyard resident Andy Heyward, the show ran from 1983 through 1986 and shows no sign of going away as it continues in syndication everywhere.

Andy Heyward moved to Martha’s Vineyard after meeting celebrated island resident and news anchor, the late Walter Cronkite, who shared his love of space exploration. Cronkite broadcast to the world Neil Armstrong’s historic moon walk.

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“This is the most exciting time ever in the world of space exploration and space science. As for life on other planets, I think about it a lot and frankly I am simply not sure.”


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Magical Setting on Moshup Trail!

Extremely Private Home with Stunning Views of the Atlantic Ocean, Noman’s Land and Your Own Tranquil Pond. Deeded Beach Rights Included.

$3,500,000.

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PROVINCETOWN

Photo: Christine Walker

WHAT I DID ON MY SUMMER “VACATION” Cape Air founder and CEO Captain Dan Wolf

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A Fall romp with Kallyn, Jadeyn and Jacob

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PROVINCETOWN Minutes from the airport, don’t leave without a meander through the Beech Forest.

Photo: Chuck Anzalone

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PROVINCETOWN Photo courtesy of the Provincetown Tennessee Williams Theater Festival Ten Blocks on the Camino Real by the National Theatre of Ghana staged at this year’s Tennessee Williams Festival in Provincetown.

TENNESSEE WILLIAMS AND WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

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SEPTEMBER 21-24, 2017

Illustration: David Chick

Tennessee Williams (1911–1983). Before winning fame and fortune as one of America’s foremost playwrights, the award-winning writer spent four summers in Provincetown. His classics include A Streetcar Named Desire, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof, Glass Menagerie, Sweet Bird of Youth and Night of the Iguana.

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South African Hamlet performed in a shallow tank of water at Fisherman’s Wharf, a drumfueled, outdoor production of Ten Blocks on the Camino Real imported from Ghana, Pericles staged on board the a 66-foot fishing schooner; these are just a few of the venues at the 12th annual Provincetown Tennessee Williams Theater Festival. This year’s festival presents plays by two of the greatest writers of the English language—Tennessee Williams and William Shakespeare. In addition to theatrical performances, the festival also features classes, parties and musical events. In the scenic, seaside village of P’Town, festival board president Patrick Falco sees a perfect setting for these plays. “Not only do these stories carry us across the centuries,” he says, “they come to us from theater groups all across the globe. Last year’s Tennessee Williams and Eugene O’Neill was our most popular festival ever and we are delighted to see the festival continue to grow in the heart of this historic arts colony, and to host thousands of visitors and artists that are global and also deeply local.” B I R D’S

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TRADITIONAL TOURS

Daily Tour (1 hr) Spectacular Sunset Tour (2 hr) Race Point Lighthouse Tour (1.5 hr)

NEW ADVENTURE EXCURSIONS LAND ‘N LAKE (Includes Lunch~ 3.5-4 hr) LAND ‘N SEA (Includes Dinner) LAND ‘N SAIL (4.5 hr)

ART W/ART’S (6 hr) SUNRISE AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHY TOUR (3 hr)

CELEBRATING OVER 70 YEARS! Family-Owned & Operated Since 1946

508.487.1950 • 1.800.894.1951

VISIT OUR SITE FOR MORE INFORMATION

www.artsdunetours.com Tours based on 4 person minimum/weather permitting

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A M A R I LY N C O U P F O R P R O V I N C E T O W N

1953—These rare and previously unpublished series of photos by Milton Greene were taken at the guest villa of Joseph Schenck’s estate. Photos: Milton Greene

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1954—Marilyn prepping her makeup for a photo shoot entitled “Peasant Sitting.” B I R D’S E Y E

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PROVINCETOWN September, 1953—Fleur Cowles, editor-in-chief of Look magazine, brought Milton to Los Angeles to meet Marilyn. ‘Mandolin’ was the first photographic collaboration between the two. Over the next three days they created memorable work that won her over.

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or Provincetown’s Gary Marotta, it was a case of right place, right time and a fortuitous connection that brought never before seen photos of Marilyn Monroe to his gary marotta fine art g-1 gallery located in the heart of town. “It is my great fortune to have access to the photographs of Milton Greene through his son Joshua Greene” says Marotta. The chemistry and deep friendship between Milton and Marilyn is evident in these images. “Marilyn’s magic and her irresistible sexiness coupled with Milton’s talent behind the lens elevate these photos to a high level of fine art photography.” Milton Greene’s photographs of Marilyn are available for viewing and for sale in numbered editions in Marotta’s Provincetown gallery.

Gary Marotta showing Milton Green’s collection of Marilyn photographs.

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Photo: Rebecca M. Alvin

Freshly made pasta changes every day but never disappoints at Provincetown’s Mistralino.

Life is a Banquet

Photo: Ann Murphy

Photo courtesy of Food Network A force to be reckoned with in the kitchen of the Central House at the Crown & Anchor—Food Network competitor Chef Michele Ragussis is a wonder. Do not leave without trying her seared scallops—perfection!

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A breakfast feast at the Inn at Cook Street.

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Photo: Susan Biemsderfer Inside or out at Provincetown’s waterfront Red Inn—a great place to enjoy fun and food, including world famousWellfleet oysters Photo courtesy of Victor’s Victor’s in Provincetown offers award winning tapas. Dine inside or out as both are warmed by a cozy fire.

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Photo courtesy of the Provincetown Tourism Board


PROVINCETOWN

Photo: Chuck Anzalone

Like Nowhere Else!

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You dress up in costumes and run around the streets of Provincetown after dark— Halloween is just another usual night in the cape tip town of Provincetown. 2017

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C APE COD, M A SSACHUSE T T S Photo courtesy of Dr. Tom LoPresti

More than Grapes Happening at Truro Vineyards. Photo courtesy of Truro Vineyards

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Fresh mojitos at Truro Vineyards & South Hollow Spirits The traditional Cuban highball—white rum, sugar, lime juice, soda water and mint.

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es, they do grow grapes, and come fall, the harvest is celebrated with the Grape Stomp & Music Fest on Sunday September 24th featuring music, dancing, food and of course wine. There is enough for kids to do, including first in the vat for their own grape stomp. A food truck is nearby so no one goes hungry. This free event is minutes away from your Cape Air arrival in the Cape tip town of Provincetown. The music continues on Sunday, October 1st with the Vinegrass Music Festival, an homage to what is billed as “Rhythm & Roots.” Live music, wine by the glass, and Twenty Boat Rum and Dry Line Gin cocktails, all produced right on the property. Bring a beach chair, settle in, kick back, and enjoy. B I R D’S

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C HATHA M , C APE CO D

Pumpkins for a Cause in Chatham

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rom New Mexico to Chatham—the hundreds of pumpkins lining the front lawn of The First Congregational Chuch in the Cape Cod town of Chatham have gone the distance. Home grown by a the Navajo Nation in New Mexico, the pumpkins arrive in a huge truck where volunteers set up a brigade for the grand unloading. The field of pumpkins is spread across the front of the church located at the entrance to town. The funds raised are shared by the church and the tribe. There are many reasons to make Chatham a destination this fall and picking out a pumpkin for a great cause is just one of them.

Photos: Alan Pollock, The Cape Cod Chronicle

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Photo: Janice Rogers, Chatham Merchants Association

Duxbury I Rare Offering Village Estate I $4,300,000

Homage to the Chatham Municipal Airport at the annual Chatham Merchants’ Association’s Oktoberfest & Pumpkin People in the Park. Come get your photo op with the “people” on the Chatham Village Green where local businesses and others create unique displays with Pumpkins. The Pumpkin People are in place until Halloween. FALL

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Plymouth I Great Herring Pond with Dock I $2,695,000 _______________ LIZ BONE _______________ 459 Washington Street I 781.325.8079 I Duxbury, MA 02332 Each Office Is Independently Owned and Operated

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From a mighty fighting machine

On D-Day they carried troops ashore to five different landing spots along the coast of Normandy, setting in motion the final course of World War II. Amphibious vehicles—built by General Motors—the Ducks carried 25 soldiers and tons of equipment. Photo courtesy of the Boston Duck Tours

TO BOSTON’S HISTORIC DUCK BOATS

The only original Duck still in service is now used by Boston Duck Tours for special events like parading Boston’s sports champions, the Boston Red Sox and the New England Patriots.

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By Michelle Haynes

he once-mighty war machines are now quacking their way (literally) through the city of Boston earning bragging rights as one of the most popular visitor pastimes and for good reason— it is fun. “History can be fun,” says the Duck Tour’s historian Jim Healy, responsible for most of the historical patter on board the tour. The “did you know?” factoids that may be heard on your Duck Tour includes nuggets like: • Massachusetts, in 1780, was the first state in the Union to abolish slavery. • Something to think about when you munch into your next chocolate bar—Dr. James Baker financed the nation’s first chocolate factory in 1765. Now a housing development, it is said the scent of chocolate still lingers in the air. But don’t confuse it with the scent of molasses in Boston’s North End, remnants of the Great Molasses flood in 1919, when a storage tank burst and two million tons of molasses flowed onto the streets of Boston.

Other factoids: • The Boston Americans, now the World Series champion Boston Red Sox, won the first World Series, defeating the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1903. Anything but dry, the Duck guides are funny and friendly with just enough irreverence to make for a memorable a day of sightseeing. Time needed for touring the city including the splashdown into the Charles River is about 90 minutes and average around $39 per person.

Photos courtesy of the Boston Duck Tours

Every Duck Tour ends with a splash and cruise in Boston’s Charles River.

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S T. L O U I S

Glass and Candy Inspire 7th Annual Airport Art Gala

S Glass blowers and boogie-woogie happening at the St. Louis Airport this Fall. October 5th, Terminal 1 Concourse B, 6–9 pm FALL

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Lambert International Airport

t. Louis Lambert International Airport (STL) is partnering with the Third Degree Glass Factory in commissioning a custom collection of glass works offered for sale at the Airport’s 7th annual Art of Travel gala on October 5, 2017. The glass collection features more than 100 creations including sculptures, vases, bowls, pitchers, ornamental candies and holiday ornaments. Shaping soft, fluid, hot glass into beautiful, translucent shapes is similar to pulling crystalline sugar and taffy into whimsical and delicious candies, thus the show features a sweet-inspired menu accompanied by Sweetie & The Toothaches, a local boogie-woogie group. The annual fundraiser benefits the Lambert Art & Culture Program, which supports the airport’s exhibitions of local and regional artists. artoftravelstl.com. 95


MONTANA

The Ballad of Lefty Brown: Western Spirit with the Sidekick’s Soul

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By Brian D’Ambrosio

ured by big sky, huge land, and large minerals, people come from just about everywhere to see Montana—and just about everybody wants a piece of it. That includes filmmakers. Director Jared Moshe rose early one morning in 2015 to scout possible filming locations in southwestern Montana. After a night in a hotel in Ennis, driving out of town, the director stopped to watch the sun climb over a rim of buttes. Each blade of winter-tattered grass seemed to blink on, as if lit by a tiny filament. He looked around—as a New York-born, L.A. resident would—for someone with whom to share this exhibit of small pyrotechnics. He saw no person, no ranch, nothing that intimated habitation except a fence and the powdery asphalt that rolled across the grass. Strings

Photos: David McFarland

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A scene from the film “The Ballad of Lefty Brown” with Jim Caviezel and Kathy Baker

of snow hung over the rounded summits. Then the sun appeared in a split in the clouds. At once, he knew that he had found one of the locations fit to exemplify The Ballad of Lefty Brown. “I’d always wanted to shoot in the northwest U.S. and especially Montana,” said Jared Moshe, who wrote, directed and produced The Ballad of Lefty Brown. “I feel that the northwest U.S. is alive in a way and manner that the southwest just doesn’t have. Montana seemed like a land rife with possibilities.” Moshe said that while scouting he was immediately enamored of Bannack, about a four-hour drive from Billings, and founded in 1862 when a prospector named John White discovered gold in nearby Grasshopper Creek. From the late 1860s to the 1930s, Bannack operated as a boom-and-bust cycle mining town with a fluctuating population. Approximately half of the film production’s time was spent there. B I R D’S

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Photo: David McFarland A scene from the film “The Ballad of Lefty Brown” with Tommy Flanagan and Bill Pullman

“Bannack is a beautiful piece of history never used for filming a western like this before,” said Moshe. “Most westerns are set on about one of five ranch locations in California and New Mexico. But, Bannack is literally in the middle of nowhere, it is gorgeous, and it’s incredibly well-preserved. The Meade Hotel (the original Beaverhead County Courthouse) makes you feel like you are living in history and living in the woods, in the land, and the scenes filmed there brought out all of the Montana aspects of the story. We benefited from the fact that in Bannack everything there is as-is. We added some furniture and carpeting and chandeliers and we worked the locations, but overall we were working in the actual spaces.”

throughout the valley, and you can imagine it teeming with life and energy.” Roger Kasak, assistant manager at Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks, who supervised the filming at Bannack State Park, said that the cast and crew “were super respectful of the town and the buildings,” and that he supports the concept of future film productions making use of the state park as a resource. “They dressed the sets fantastically, yet respected the integrity of the buildings,” said Kasak.

PART PREPARED FOR PULLMAN

The Ballad of Lefty Brown was written with actor Bill Pullman in mind to fulfill the obligation of Lefty Brown. A veteran of approximately 60 movies, Pullman has had a decades-long relationship with Montana as a resident and a rancher. He rattled off his own array of accolades for Bannack. “To know that those buildings in Bannack have been in place since the 1800s is something that you felt vividly,” said Pullman. “You felt it most vividly around the back sides of the buildings and while doing a shootout scene along the back side. When you get shot and dive into the dirt in Bannack, you wonder just who else has also dove into the dirt there, or who else took cover in that dirt, or who else had died there throughout the years. With Bannack, you know that no scene designer put it in there, and it’s natural to wonder about the human beings who were dedicated to settle the place. You think of a tent city and the thousands of people who lived there at one time and how they were spread

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MONTANA: COWG I RL C A MP

By Lisa Ballard

“A cowgirl is a spirit, a special brand of courage. The cowgirl faces life head

on, lives by her own lights and makes no excuses… A cowgirl might be a rancher, but she’s just as likely to be a checker at the local grocery store, a full-time mother, a banker, an attorney or an astronaut.” —Dale Evans, Actress/Singer, wife of Roy Rogers

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Photos: Lisa Ballard

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n easy hundred miles northwest from Cape Air’s hub in Billings, Montana lies Horses N Courage, a guest ranch, owned and managed by Kent and Sarah Hereim, offering girlfriend getaways. This safari-style horse camp is nestled in an aspen grove amidst a couple thousand acres of grassy fields, rolling ridgelines and sun-speckled timber. I’m not an equestrian, but saddling up for a few days seemed like a must-do Montanan experience. Female and traveling alone, a women’s retreat sounded more inviting than a conventional dude ranch. The other guests included two mothers and their grown daughters from Oklahoma and North Carolina, a housewife from eastern Montana and an engineer from Louisiana for a total of seven. I was glad for the small group, given my limited horse-womanship. “I’m excited to do a little glamping,” giggled one of the daughters, as she fitted her cowgirl hat with a tie to keep it from blowing off. One of the criteria for glamor-camping or glamping is sleeping in a wall tent. These white canvas cabins have rugs on their wood floors, comfortable beds and other creature comforts. At Horses N Courage, we slept on cots in over-sized, flannel-lined sleeping bags. A wash bowl and battery-powered lamp sat on a table in a corner of the tent. We were completely off the grid. My tent mate, the engineer, was returning for her second visit despite getting thrown from horses, twice, earlier in her life. “Sarah understood my horse anxieties,” she said, as we

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unpacked, “When I got here, I immediately relaxed. This place is heaven. The pearly gates are wood and barbwire.” A verbal, “knock, knock” interrupted our conversation. A ranch hand, poked her head through the tent flap. “Want a tour?” she asked. She started with the hot tub, a round, metal stock tank (water trough) outfitted with a propane water heater. Then she pointed out the shower head in the shower shack, a metal bucket with holes in the bottom. The outhouses had normal toilet seats and solar-powered lights. We were roughing it, but not really. We saddled up after dinner to get used to our horses. We rode up a nearby slope to a view of the next valley, paused for photos then headed back to camp. The next morning, we rode much longer, several miles. The breeze cooled us. The sun warmed us, and I felt more at home on my horse. That afternoon, Kent, the only man in camp, gave roping lessons while several of us napped. I awoke as our sisterhood gathered for dinner. After savoring barbeque ribs off the grill, I asked the others why they had come to cowgirl camp. “I feel safe here in a way that lets me push myself to the edge of my comfort zone,” replied the mother from Oklahoma. “There no cattiness like at work, only empathetic ears,” added her daughter. “I like my rut, but sometimes it’s good to get out of it,” concluded my tent mate. Horsesncourage.com 99


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ST. CROIX

BUCK ISLAND

“One of the world’s most beautiful beaches.” —National Geographic magazine

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Time-out in St. Croix’s sumptuous Buccaneer Resort.

he largest of the United States Virgin Islands, St. Croix tops the list when it comes to vacation options. From the arts, to historic landmarks, to watersports, to the number one reason anyone visits the Caribbean—the beaches—St. Croix has it all. Buck Island, a boat ride away from St. Croix’s shopping center in Christiansted, is a designated National Monument and part of the Park Service. Pristine and untouched, this is exactly the tropical beach folks write and sing about. Only a few licensed boats are allowed access to the perfect ribbon of sand. Bring your own everything, from beach chairs to lunch and be sure to take along your snorkel equipment to take advantage of the underwater trail, home to a coral reef teeming with colorful fish. Your only way to get there is with an approved boat captain who can arrange full and half-day excursions. Lots more at nps.gov. Photos: © Steve Simonsen

No shortage of local art in Frederiksted, St. Croix

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S T. C RO IX

“The circular path of the labyrinth is

Photos: © Steve Simonsen

Labyrinth at Estate Mount Washington

a metaphor for walking the path of life, as well as representing wholeness and unity.” —Wendy Solomon, gotostcroix.com

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By Wendy Solomon, gotostcroix.com Many people drive by the unsuspecting turn that leads you to Estate Mount Washington. But as you head north from Creque Dam Road, watch closely and you will see a small yellow sign on the right hand side of the road at the base of a telephone pole which simply states: “Estate Mt. Washington, Circa 1750.” I would call this worn dirt road ‘the road less traveled’, but take it anyway! After what feels like a mile drive along the dirt road, on the left hand side you will see some quaint yellow and white buildings and a sign that says: “Park Here”…easy enough! Estate Mount Washington IS private property; however, the owners kindly allow the public to enjoy the ruins of this centuries-old sugar plantation. The lush foliage covered sitting areas, and the labyrinth they have constructed is open to the public during daylight hours. B I R D’S E Y E V I E W


U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS

Photo: © Steve Simonsen Shopping in the U.S. Virgin Islands is always duty-free.

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ST. JOHN Trunk Bay

Honeymoon Honors for St. John

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Photo: © Steve Simonsen

ften referred to as Love City, St. John, in the United States Virgin Islands, (U.S.V.I.), earned the title—one of the “15 Best Honeymoon Destinations in the United States” by the all powerful TripAdvisor Rentals. “World-class beaches, unspoiled forest and blissful solitude” are just a few of the descriptive phrases used to describe the U.S.V.I.’s smallest island. With two-thirds of St. John under the protection of the Virgin Islands National Park, the island’s acres of hiking trails and tucked away beaches are postcard perfect and you will have no trouble finding your private piece of paradise. Still, if you choose to be get out and sightsee, you have the National Park Service at your disposal with an unending list of activities and guided hikes. “You’ll be lounging on Honeymoon Beach, hiking the Reef Bay Trail, or snorkeling at Trunk Bay in no time. Later, you might find yourself shopping in Coral Bay or enjoying the nightlife in Cruz Bay before returning to your tropical retreat or cliff top villa rental,” says TripAdvisor. “It’s great to see the U.S. Virgin Islands positioned among the top honeymoon destinations across the nation,” Commissioner of Tourism Beverly Nicholson-Doty said. “We would like to thank all our visitors who wrote and continue to write reviews online and share their experiences with this online community of global travelers.” An added incentive, no passport needed for U.S. citizens to any of the United States Virgin Islands and for those with a shopping gene you have a $1,600 duty-free allowance. As for getting there, take advantage of Cape Air’s nonstop flights into neighboring St. Thomas from the Caribbean hub of San Juan, Puerto Rico. From there it is a cab ride to the ferry stop in nearby Charlotte Amalie or across the island to Red Hook; the latter offers almost hourly service between St. Thomas and St. John. B I R D’S E Y E V I E W


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Photos: © Eliza Magro

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Sugar Mill ruins provide the perfect backdrop

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Photo: © Steve Simonsen

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ST. THOMAS

Ziplining through the Tree Limin’ Extreme in St. Thomas. Photos courtesy of the USVI Department of Tourism

Enjoying the St. Thomas nightlife

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VIEQUES

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Photos: Kelly Thompson

Navio Beach, Vieques—a popular spot for body surfing

ften referred to as the Spanish Virgin Islands, Vieques is your fastest escape to the Caribbean with a flight time of less than fifteen minutes from Cape Air’s Puerto Rico hub city of San Juan. But oh, what a world apart is Vieques. Horses meandering down the winding roads, a wildlife refuge, an abundance of restaurants and lively night spots, and then there are the beaches—take your pick. Laid back may be too strong for the pace of a Vieques vacation. Meander the Malecón in the waterside village of Esperanza, poke around the shops and little stands featuring locally made gifts, pick a moonless night and take a night time jaunt to the brightest Bioluminescent Bay in the world, or do what most folks come to Vieques for, the beach. Tucked away in jungles, or along the main drag, Vieques’ beaches are some of the most beautiful and untouched ribbons of sand in all of the Caribbean. A must is viequesinsider.com for the ‘skinny’ on everything and anything in Vieques. It is pretty much the only comprehensive guide to the island. Fall is a perfect time. Not too hot, the crowds have yet to arrive, and think off-season, the best time for deals on accommodations. 110

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Photo: Sara Lee A natural attraction in Vieques—one of the brightest bioluminescent bays in the world. This is how a hand actually looks dipped in the water surrounded by a bazillion dinoflagellates. This is a must-trip on a moonless night during your Vieques vacation. Photo: Kelly Thompson

Not sure how to open a coconut to get to the nutritious liquid inside? No problem. Have Ramache or one of the many other roadside coconut vendors on the Malecón in Esperanza do it for you. — Kelly Thompson, viequesinsider.com

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BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS

The Baths of Virgin Gorda

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Photo courtesy of BVI Tourism


BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS

Photo: © Steve Simonsen

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House-sized boulders and crystal water frame one of the most popular natural attractions in the British Virgin Islands.

nown worldwide as “The Baths” this watery labyrinth of ropes and ladders, nooks and crevasses, winds around for about a half hour, or more if you take your time. At the end of the trail you are rewarded with one of the most beautiful beaches in all of the Caribbean. Pack a lunch and give yourself a full day to enjoy what I guarantee will be the highlight of your vacation. An important tip: get here first thing in the morning or at the end of the day. The Baths are popular and the best way to enjoy is to have this wonder to yourself. Okay for kids over six as long as they can swim.

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Bring an appetite to the British Virgin Islands This Fall Photos courtesy of BVI Tourism

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e’re thrilled to announce the lineup of exciting events for the fourth annual BVI Food Fete,” Director of Tourism Sharon Flax-Brutus said. “This will be a month full of gourmet adventures. It’s the perfect way to learn about and experience the bold flavors of the islands, alongside a talented group of visiting chefs and a fantastic list of participating restaurants, bars and properties throughout the BVI.”

THE LINE-UP INCLUDES:

Taste of Tortola—Friday, November 3rd—An opportunity to enjoy food, wine and amazing entertainment featuring a number of BVI restaurants. Jost Pork Festival—Saturday, November 4th & Sunday, November 5th—This two-day event happens on the tiny island of Jost Van Dyke, home to famous watering holes, Foxy’s and the Soggy Dollar; the latter birthed the infamous libation, the Painkiller. Barefoot Gourmet Soiree—Friday, November 10th at Peter Island Resort & Spa. This culinary event highlights renowned local chefs and showcases a variety of Caribbean cuisine. Taste of Virgin Gorda—Saturday, November 18th at the historic Nail Bay Ruins. Culinary creations from Virgin Gorda chefs and live entertainment followed by dancing under the stars. Anegada Lobster Festival—November 25th & 26th—The Anegada crustaceans are said to be the finest in all of the Caribbean BVI Food Fete Bar Crawls—Games, music, food, and fun and no need to think about driving as transportation is provided. bvifoodfete.com 116

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BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS

Photo: © Steve Simonsen

VOTED # 1 IN ‘BEST PLACES TO VISIT IN THE CARIBBEAN’ “‘Posh’ is the best word to describe the British Virgin Islands. The shoreline at Cane Garden Bay is particularly picturesque and The Baths are mystifying. Infused with refined British culture, this archipelago is the epitome of Caribbean luxury travel.” —U.S. News and World Reports 118

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CAPE AIR EVERYWHERE

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Everyone loves a bargain, especially when it comes to airfares. Do not miss the latest and greatest when it come to Cape The best way to hear about special airfares andAir/Nantucket promotions isAirlines to join fare Capesales. Air’sLog on to capeair.com and click on ...check out details at capeair.com FALL

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WE HAVE CONNECTIONS • Book any Cape Air flight

capeair.com 800.CAPE.AIR

• Book any Cape Air flight connecting with United Airlines

united.com

• Book any Cape Air flight connecting with JetBlue

jetblue.com

• Book any Cape Air flight connecting with American Airlines (note — select “advanced options” then “all carriers”)

aa.com

• Book any Cape Air flight connecting with Delta

expedia.com

• Book any Cape Air flight connecting with Seaborne Airlines

expedia.com

• Book any Cape Air flight connecting with Alaska Airlines

expedia.com

G E T TI NG F ROM H E RE TO TH E RE AN D B E YO N D

I

By Peter Kokoszka f you are traveling beyond a Cape Air destination, one of our partner airlines can get you onward and beyond to almost anywhere in the world. Visit one of Cape Air’s travel partner websites, shown above, or call a professional travel agent to book convenient connections. Booking your entire trip together on a single ticket is the best way to ensure a seamless journey from start to finish. When you book all of your flights together on one of our partner airline websites, you are automatically booked with the appropriate connecting time between your flights, eliminating the need for a mad dash across the airport. With a single itinerary and ticket, you can generally receive connecting boarding passes and check your bags through to your final destination. Also, in the event of a flight delay, Cape Air has access to your entire itinerary to assist you with rebooking your connecting flight as well as your Cape Air flight. If you choose to book separate tickets for different portions of your trip, be sure to allow enough time between your flights to claim and recheck your baggage and to meet each airline’s check-in time requirements. Most airlines no longer provide through check-in of baggage and boarding passes when you are booked on separate tickets, and you may also be charged separate baggage fees. Another downside to booking your flight on separate tickets is, in the event of a flight delay, Cape Air may not have the ability to access your other airline ticket, and it may be necessary to pay rebooking fees to make a flight change. Save yourself time, effort, and money by booking your complete itinerary together on one ticket. You’ll be glad that you did. Questions? There is never a charge to talk to a Cape Air agent at 1.800.Cape.Air. 122

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jetBlue

SERVICE BETWEEN NEW YORK’S JFK AIRPORT AND CAPE COD

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ape Air’s travel partner JetBlue offers nonstop flights from New York arriving in Hyannis at 12:17 pm and departing Hyannis for New York at 12:54 pm. The service operates from June 15th through September 24th 2017. Information for Cape Air & Nantucket Airlines at capeair.com and for JetBlue at jetblue.com.

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WHERE TO STAY, EAT, SHOP OR PLAY?

Look no further than our loyal family of advertisers. We thank them for their many years of support and as you travel to one of Cape Air’s far-flung destinations please call on them. If you feel compelled to let your fingers do the walking, find them with a click on their ad at birdseyeviewmagazine.com. On behalf of the entire Bird’s Eye View family, thank you. —Michelle Haynes

BOSTON

Window Panes Home & Garden ... 23

Island Properties Real Estate ........ 63

Boston Harbor Hotel ....................... 94

WoodenBoat ................................. 27

Magnum Moving & Storage ........ 49

Macdonald & Wood Sotheby’s ....... 91

MARTHA’S VINEYARD

Maury People Sotheby’s Realty...... 2

CAPE COD

The Back Porch Larder ................. 64

Michael Kane Lightship Baskets ........................................ 52

Chatham Sign Shop......................... 91

Breakwater Real Estate ................ 75

Nantucket Bake Shop ...................... 49

JFK Museum .................................... 89

Clarion Inn Martha’s Vineyard ..... 64

Nantucket Beach Chair.................... 53

Sandwich Glass Museum ................ 89

The Collection ............................. 75

Yellow Umbrella Books .................... 91

Conroy & Company..................... 71

Nantucket Chamber of Commerce .............................. 60

MAINE

Eisenhauer Gallery ......................... 3

Nantucket Lightship Basket Museum .......................... 61

16 Bay View Hotel .......................... 29

Featherstone Center for the Arts.............................. 75

Camden Harbor Cruises ............... 32

Harbor View Hotel....................... 71

Nantucket Stock .............................. 60

The Country Inn .......................... 32

Hob Knob .................................... 67

Nantucket Tents .............................. 53

The East Wind Inn ....................... 38

Isola Restaurant ........................... 69

FIORE Olive Oils & Vinegars........ 33

Karen Overtoom Real Estate ........ 74

Nantucket Windmill Auto Rental.......................................... 48

Galyn’s Dining ............................. 22

Kelley House................................ 71

Grand Harbor Inn ........................ 29

Martha’s Vineyard Chamber of Commerce ........... 71

House Wine................................. 23 The Island Inn Monhegan ............ 38 The Kimball Shop & Boutique ...... 34 The Lindenwood Inn.................... 34 Lisa Hall Jewelry .......................... 34 The Manor Inn ............................ 28 Lord Camden Inn......................... 29 Monhegan Brewing Company ..... 38

Martha’s Vineyard Buyer Agents........................... 67 Martha’s Vineyard Museum ......... 69 Martha’s Vineyard Real Estate...... 64 MVY Broker................................. 69 Polly HIll Aboretum ..................... 74 Wallace & Co. Sotheby’s .............. 74

Nantucket Pearl Co. ........................ 63

Nobby Clothes Shop .................... 49 SeaGrille Restaurant..................... 52 Thai House .................................. 63 trACK Nantucket ......................... 49

NEW HAMPSHIRE Century 21 Highview Realty ........ 19 Fireside Inn & Suites .................... 19 Martha Diebold Real Estate ........... 8 The Lyme Inn............................... 19

NEW YORK

Monhegan Boat Line ................... 38

MONTANA

Oli’s Trolley .................................. 23

Lifestyles Montana .......................... 97

Owls Head Transportation Museum .......... 33

Ampersand Bay Resort & Boat Club ............................ 42

NANTUCKET

Beglin’s Lake Placid Jewelers ........ 45

Pentagöet Inn & Restaurant......... 27

Barrett’s Nantucket Tours ............. 52

Guide Boat Realty ........................ 41

Point Lookout .............................. 32

Brass Lantern Inn ......................... 53

Hotel Saranac .............................. 43

Red Sky Restaurant...................... 34

Clay Twombly .............................. 60

Paul Smith’s College .................... 42

Rheal Day Spa ............................. 33

Compass Rose Real Estate ........... 48

Rockport Market Place ................ 32

Dreamland................................... 60

Sandra Hildreth Adirondack Paintings ............... 41

Rooster Brother Store for Cooks .... 27

Fareground & Pudley’s Pub .......... 61

Saltmeadow Properties ................ 27

Johnstons of Elgin ........................ 61

Trenton Bridge Lobster Pound ..... 22

Harborview Nantucket................. 52

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ST. THOMAS

Art’s Dune Tours .............................. 79

Birch Ridge Inn ................................ 19

Best Western Emerald Beach ...... 109

Bubala’s Restaurant ......................... 87

Sugar & Spice .................................. 17

Calypso Realty ........................... 109

Cape Cod Wood Carving ................ 76

Vermont Horse Country............... 17

VIEQUES

Christina’s Jewelry............................ 85 Crown & Anchor ............................. 76

CARIBBEAN:

The Inn at Cook Street .................... 84 Jobi Pottery...................................... 84

THE U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS ST. CROIX

Mistralino Ristorante ....................... 84

The Buccaneer ........................... 103

Provincetown Chamber of Commerce .............................. 83

Remax Real Estate ......................... 103

Provincetown Tourism Board........... 85 Ptown Massage + Bodywork .......... 85 The Red Inn ................................. 79 The Schoolhouse Gallery.............. 79 Snip Salon.................................... 87 Victor’s Restaurant ....................... 84

Black Beard Sports ..................... 111

THE BRITISH VIRGIN ISLANDS BVI Tourism Board ..................... 128 Dolphin Discovery ..................... 115 Dream Yacht Charters ................ 117

ST. JOHN

Fort Burt Hotel & Marina ........... 117

340 Real Estate Co. ................... 106

Inter Island Boat Sevices ............ 117

Islandia Real Estate .................... 106

Mahogany Car Rentals .............. 115

Ocean three six two dining ........ 107

Smiths Gore Limited .................. 119

Seaview Vacation Homes ........... 106

Sol Y Sombra Villa ..................... 115 Speedy’s Ferry ........................... 119 Surfsong Resort ......................... 119

FROM PAPER TO SMARTPHONE

By Trish Lorino

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elcome fall and Cape Air’s newest passenger program. Say goodbye to paper and hello to Cape Air’s brand new TravelPass. The ten-ticket books formerly known the Commuter Book has a new name, a new look, and perhaps most importantly, offers an easier than ever before way to book your flight with Cape Air/Nantucket Airlines. No more waiting for the paper book to be delivered via mail. You can manage all of your flights with a simple electronic transaction, easily managed on a desktop, smartphone or tablet. No more paper tickets to keep track of— customers can log in to their TravelPass account and see the number of passes left. For frequent fliers TravelPass 10-packs are priced to offer a substantial savings over standard fares. As for advance bookings, the new TravelPass makes it easy to book your flight in advance and there is also a corporate TravelPass for companies who have multiple travelers who need to fly frequently. Look for the new TravelPass this fall at capeair.com.

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INDEX

PROVINCETOWN/TRURO


NEWS AND VIEWS

CURBSIDE TO PLANE SIDE—

DEPARTING NEW YORK FOR THE MOUNTAINS and the SEA

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Photo: Lisa Ballard

By Lisa Ballard

Cape Air’s “ride” to White Plains, New York.

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n 2011 I took my first flight on Cape Air from Lebanon, New Hampshire to New York City. After deplaning in White Plains, a sleek black limo whisked me and the other passengers into Manhattan. I knew my Cape Air ticket included ground transportation into the city, but the limo was an enchanting surprise! As we rolled past Central Park, our driver offered to drop us off wherever we wished enroute to Cape Air’s “official” location at the corner of West 35th Street and 8th Avenue. I slid out at Columbus Circle. Returning to Lebanon two days later, I went to the pick-up address, expecting to find a check-in desk, but nothing in the neighborhood of 35th Street and 8th Avenue resembled an airline office. I phoned Cape Air, worried I would miss the ride back to White Plains. “Do you see a Starbucks across from a Staples?” asked the friendly customer service representative. “Yes,” I replied. “Have a cup of coffee and watch for a car with ‘Cape Air’ on the door.” At precisely the time on my ticket, the limo pulled up. A half-dozen customers scattered around Starbucks picked up their lattes and got in the car with me. We all chuckled at the incongruity of it. Six years later, that Starbucks is still there, and Cape Air still picks up passengers by that same curb, although an even roomier luxury van has replaced the limo. The Big Apple sure offers many unique experiences, including how Cape Air gets you there and takes off. Editor’s Note: Cape Air’s curb-to-plane service also includes seasonal flights to Provincetown, Nantucket, and Martha’s Vineyard, and your entire itinerary can be booked at capeair.com or 800.Cape.Air. B I R D’S

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NANTUCKET

Nantucket’s Easy Street Basin

JOIN US FOR THE HOLIDAYS

Showcase your business to thousands of Cape Air passengers in the holiday issue of the Bird’s Eye View. Our reach extends from St. John to Nantucket to Billings to Saranac Lake and beyond. The Holiday issue is in all of our planes November 1st thru January 1st with a live link to your business at birdseyeviewmagazine.com. Questions–Kimberly.corkran@capeair.com Need an ad created–reach out to Chuck at graphicsgroup@comcast.net Photos: © Cary Hazlegrove/NantucketStock.com


Fall 2017  
Fall 2017  

September | October