Issuu on Google+

ITS WHAT WE SHOULD DO.

AYAN BHANDARI

DESIGN IS NOT ABOUT WHAT WE CAN DO,


I have had the privilege of being educated across the world in places such as Africa, India, and now America. This experience has made

me a natural cross pollinator of ideas. With a minor in biology, I get inspiration by asking how nature solves its problems. In design I follow the philosophy “I sketch, therefore I think� and I believe that through sketching we can communicate, contemplate, and alleviate whatever is thrown our way as designers. I want to use my Eastern experiences with my Western education to create meaningful designs that embrace culture and span a lifetime. I have a thriving passion for design and can bring a high level pf work and a positive attitude to any team.


DC METRO

4

BAHIKHATTA

12

INSOULIN

24

JINSEI

30

2


DC METRO


Ayan Bhandari, Zack Filbert, Liz Stokley,

Understanding Car Interiors 1

2

1

Windshield: Provides user with the ability to see his/her surroundings.

2

Guages: Allows user to know the speed of the car and rpms of transmission.

3

Steering Wheel: Allows user to have complete, manual control of the vehicle.

4

Pedals: Allows user to accelerate and reduce the speed of the vehicle.

5

Vents: Allows user to control the weather in the vehicle.

5

6

3

Because public transport should make you feel good.

4

To better understand how to get people out of cars and into the subway we must fir what a driver undergoes when using his/her vehicle everyday and the amenities tha In this diagram, the blue numbers represents areas of comfort and the yellow numb areas of control.

7

8

10

9

6

Navigation: Allows user to see where they are in relation to where they are going, distan

7

Radio: Allows user entertainment, news, or updates on traffic.

8

Shifter: Gives user another form of control of the vehicle, in this case the transmission.

9

E-Brake: Allows user to stop faster in case of an emergency.

10

Leather Seating: Allows full comfort for the user throught his/her travel.

Duration :: 10 weeks Recognition :: SHORTLISTED 300/8000 PROJECTS :: iF Competition and featured on Yankodesign.com Examples of different luxury car interiors. These examples show comfortable seating and ways that passengers can be productive while riding.

4


RESEARCH, ANALYSIS, INTERVIEWS AND FINAL DIRECTION. “I use the metro to and from school, its a great place to hang out with my friends and i dont have to walk with my heavy backpack.” Seats set infront of map

Crowding in the metro

Interior view of cabin

Over 2 million car accidents occured in 2008 resulting in over 37,000 fatalities

5,457 pounds of CO2 are produced per car per year

Understanding Ca Metro

r

Interio

r Interiors

is Analys

Ayan Bhandari, Zack

Filbert, Liz Stokley,

Design a metro that appeals to those who can afford to commute by car by incorporating productivity, and create a comfortable and controllable experience for current users.

Kees Lyundijk

1

w/ uninviting.

Lights: Dim

and yello

Straps: To

high and

en Maps: Hidd

1

mfortable

can be unco

by standing

passengers

.

Fire Alarm

thought that

Adds: After

rated into

isnt integ

difficult to

of the train. 5

n well.

infested with

de the train

outsi nger to see

in locations

read at 2certa

the desig

rial that gets

iting mate

trial/ uninv

Pole: Indus

to grip.

and can be

3

ghout the

germs throu

6

day.

gh natural larger throu the space and make 4 privacy. er passengers

lighting

6

8

7 8

10 9

. By is necessary e the parts analysis of stages we can creat ay cab an al early nt for speci design a subw st the train in the that accou has d how to understan and for and again three different cabs To better s working passengers storgae. On the left are ding what standing understan ht out concepts. To nting for multiple comfort and cab is for a small area. better thoug left, the cab is accou ent. The middle the possible in tainm as On le s. enter peop need g for Examplinestheofceilin to fit as many differen t luxury monitors is designed car interior cab s. the These , comfort examples show right able seating the

riding.

and ways that passeng

ers can be productive ari, Zack

Ayan Bhand

Stokley, Kees

9 10

while

Filbert, Liz

Luyendijk

user with the ability

Guages: Allows user

Steering Wheel: Allows

4

Pedals: Allows user

5

Vents: Allows user

to know the speed of

to see his/her surround

ings.

the car and rpms of

user to have complete

transmission.

, manual control of

the vehicle.

to accelerate and reduce the speed of the vehicle. to control the weather in the vehicle.

To better understand how to get people out of cars and into the what a driver undergo subway we must first es when using his/her understand vehicle everyday and In this diagram, the the amenities that go blue numbers represen with it. ts areas of comfort areas of control. and the yellow number s represent

7

Allows passe ive of anoth Window: can be invas support but Handle: Extra time. fade with dirt and can test of time. rial attracts ot stand the Carpet: Mate use and cann table with me uncomfor beco : Can Upholstery

Windshield: Provides

2 3

Navigation: Allows Radio: Allows user Shifter: Gives user

user to see where they

entertainment, news,

E-Brake: Allows user

to stop faster in case

Leather Seating: Allows

are in relation to where

they are going, distance,

or updates on traffic.

another form of control

of the vehicle, in this

case the transmission.

of an emergency.

full comfort for the

user throught his/her

travel.

and time left.

“I live 30 minutes away from work and i love to drive my Audi A4. I worked very hard to earn this status and i dont need to take the metro.”


PRODUCTIVITY THROUGH COMFORT AND TECHNOLOGY.

6 6


PRODUCTIVITY THROUGH COMFORT AND TECHNOLOGY.

Proximity to people while retains privacy

Dynamic movement.

Open space allows mass movement Social Atmosphere

To better understand the interior layout, we prototyped the cabin at half the length. This allowed us to maneuver around the cabin and role play the different scenarios that a user might experience. The final design would allow more seats and a higher occupancy.


FINAL CHAIR DESIGNS AND INTERIOR LAYOUT. Faux leather cushioning: water proof and long lasting.

Injection molded ABS plastic: Cheap tooling cost and durability.

Single seating

Inset screen: Touchscreen allowing users to interact with technology.

Bench Seating

card slot: Insert metro smart card to recieve screen

Dual Seating

8


BENEFITS OF THE METRO CHAIR. The angled leg allots more floor space when seated and allows people to have their feet under them when they get up.

move back and forth through the space without interfering with others.

13in

Room between the edge of the seat and the edge of the chair allow users to take up just as much space as the chair does on its own.

4in


10


BAHIKHATA


Because design can have the highest impact on the other 90%. Duration :: 10 weeks Recognition :: FINALIST :: ICSID World Impact Prize

12


THE PROBLEM

Families in India are living on $2 a day, less than the cost of a Venti coffee at Starbucks. Our goal was to Design a financial literacy tool for illiterate women in India to teach them the benefits of loans and micro financing. These tools can be taught through a local NGO and executed by the women by starting a Self Help Group (SHG) in their community, giving them the opportunity for economic growth and a chance for a better life.


UNDERSTANDING THE USER

We visited India and sat with our users. We asked them about their values, why some groups work and why some groups fail. We asked them why their groups were important to them and what they were using the money for. We found out that most groups were saving the money from each meeting instead of laoning it out and allowing it to accumulate interest. This meant that they were not making substantial amounts of money and sometimes led to the dissemination of a group. the next step was to create a financial literacy tool that NGO’s could use to teach the women the benefits of loaning

14


THE PROCESS

We began our process by studying cultural artifacts from India. We used these as a basis for our form exploration. The main form we chose to follow was a cross shaped piece, similar to that of parcheesi, a popular game in India. From there we started prototyping and role playing to gain empathy and understanding of how our user would use the product. Through this we were able to develop a prototype out of fabric to help organize the tasks of an SHG meeting and send it to India to be tested with the potential user group.

Final protoype sent to India for user testing


PROOF OF CONCEPT

We sent the prototype to an NGO in Rajasthan and had them try it with different self help groups. With their insight we were able to make the correct alterations that allowed the product to be more intuitive and easily accepted into the process of micro-financing in India.

16


FINAL DESIGN 16”

The final design is a cross shaped gameboard, similar to the game of parcheesi, made of fabric that has pockets and slots for money and pictures. The dimensions of each piece are simple and easy to understand. This form is not only culturally relevant but is intuitive and easy for any community to manufacture and use.

2 1.⁄2 “

16”

Meeting

Person

Essential Savings

Expenses

Repayment

Loan amt

Outer panels catalog the number of meetings, the money transfered for each meetings and who has taken out a loan and when it should be paid back.

5 1⁄3”

6 5 4 3 2 2⁄3”

2 Loan amt

1 Essential Savings

6 8

Expenses

Repayment

Amount Due

Amount Paid

Expenses

Essential Savings

Essential Savings

Loan Period

Person

Person

1 1

16”

Interactive are in the center determines who recieves the loan and for how long.

6

3 5

11

4

5

3

Repayment

9

Loan amt

Expenses

7

Loan Amount

Expenses

2

2

4

Meeting

Person

12

10

Repayment

1

2

3

4

5

6

Meeting

1

2 3 4 5

Meeting

Loan amt

2.5”

6

4"

2"

4" 16"

4"

2"


STORYBOARD 1

10

4

2

12

6

7

8

9

5

11

3

1

10

4

2

12

6

7

8

9

5

11

3

25,000 Cow for milk

1

NGO representative takes a photo of each of the participants using his cellphone.

2 Print and place the picture inside one of the pockets on the outer rim of the center square.

The women gather around the board 5 and play the game while the NGO representative dictates each scenario; One where no loans are taken out and one where the money is loaned during every meeting.

3

Place the card deck in the middle of the center square. The amount of rupee symbols indicates the expense of each cards item.

4 Each card has a visual and textual representation of a user need and the amount a user has to save to reach that need. Most women understand currency values which is why they are used here.

18


6 8 3

1

9

2

11

7

8

The loan amount is placed

1 in the 10repayment 4 slot 2 of the

meeting in which it would be due.

12

6

7

8

9

5

11

3

Person

Essential Savings

Expenses

Repayment

Loan amt

5

12

2

When the recipient is chosen, their picture is removed from the center and placed in one of the outer panels until their loan period is over. With their picture removed they cannot recieve any more loans. This ensures fair distribution.

Repayment

4

3

Expenses

10

4

Essential Savings

1

5

Person

7

6

Meeting

STORYBOARD CONTINUED

1 2 3 4 5

6

Instead of dice, two bottle caps or sea shells can be used. The inner rim has the amont of months a loan is given. Loan recipient and duration is chosen by where each cap lands.

6 Meeting

Loan amt

9

Once they take a loan out they choose a card within that price range that they can use the loan for. This item helps them accumulate money to generate income and payback the loan.


When a user’s loan period is over they are removed from the outer panels and placed back on the outer rim of the center square. This represents that they have paid back their loan with interest and qualifies them to get another. Repayment

Expenses

Essential Savings

12

1

10

4

Person

As the session continues, everyone takes out a loan. As the loans accumulate interest the user’s are exposed to an exponential growth in income.

Meeting

Loan amt

6 5 Essential Saving

Loan Amount

Repayment Expenses with Interest

WHO

ESSENTIAL SAVINGS

REPAYMENT/ INTEREST

3

Who

4 2 Loan amt Person

Essential Savings

Expenses

Repayment

Repayment Expenses

Loan amt

3

Essential Savings

Repayment

11

Person

Expenses

8 5

6

Essential Savings

9

Meeting

Person

7

5

80

2 6

4

1 month

Woman 3

12

3

10

2

60

1

80

1

2 months

2

Woman 2

3

10 4

80

5

80

6

3 months

Meeting

Woman 1

1

10

1 2 3 4 5

11

The NGO representative keeps a record of what is loaned out as well as each meeting’s figures and uses that as a teaching tool and record.

6 Meeting

13

Loan amt

One whole rotation around the board reperesents a year. The NGO has the flexibility to make this a point to educate the women by comapring and contrasting scenarios or continue to the next year and show the benefits of continuing the Self Help Group over long periods of time.

20


“If Design is about creative problem-solving, then we must address some of the biggest issues facing the other 90% in our society.� - Akshay Sherma


22


INSOULIN


Because your insulin pump should be as unique as you are. Duration :: 2 weeks Purpose :: sketching and prototyping project to enhance conceptual thinking and prototype usage within the design process

24


TREND STUDIES.

Waterproof

Dynamic Styling Material change informs use

Customizable

INTERVIEWS with College students about the objects and activites that represent them revealed the trend study above. analyzing this study developed MATERIAL AND FORM CHOICES.


THE CURRENT “SOLUTION”

To much function not enough form Utilitarian Primitive Interface One color

BRIEF :: Design an insulin pump that can connect to the user on an EMOTIONAL level and give users a chance to feel unique.

26


CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT.


Controls for navigating through the interface.

Window to view insulin reservoir.

Wrap around screen for easy viewing data while clipped on.

One piece clip for easy attachment to body.

Front plate is removable/ customizable.

28


JINSEI


Because sometimes, waiting 24 hours for blood is too long. Duration :: 4 weeks Awards :: MOST POPULAR DESIGN :: Deisgn 21 Social Design Competition

30


UNDERSTANDING WHERE THE TRUE PROBLEMS ARE.

HIV, and Hepatitis 1 & 2 to 4 Tests : Syphillis, be approved for donation.

$

of labor, test materials, and computer and quality assurance systems X2 : Cost needed to manage the data generated.

23,000 :

Injured from wounds requiring blood transfusions in Sri Lanka tsunami during initial impact.

test blood to be 24 hours : Toapproved for transfusion

300,000 :

Units discarded during the Pakistan Earthquake in 2005.


THE CURRENT PROCESS OF DONATING YOUR BLOOD

UPCOMING MASS MARKET TECHNOLGOGY

1 Take kit out of box. Includes a pipette, test, and lancet.

2

Use lancet to prick finger.

3 Draw blood form the prick and place in well designated for blood. leave flat and wait 20 minutes.

4

Use second well to read results. indicated by color or lines. 32


CONCEPT PHASE 1 AND 2


34


THIS IS JINSEI Extract

4 Chambers :: 4 Tests

Pull for Pressure

Grip and Seal


MATERIALS FOR MANUFACTURING 1

Silicone coated rubber top

2

ABS plastic (grey)

3

Thermoplastic PVC

4

ABS plastic (grey)

5

Rubber (black)

6

ABS plastic (white)

7

ABS plastic (red)

7

6

5 4

3

2

1 36


PREPARING JINSEI FOR USE.

1

Place bar code on top of cap that corresponds with bag.

2

Untwist the top part of the cap in order to apply reagents.

3

Place reagents into each tube and place back top.

4

Place finger inside plunger handle and pull back to create pressure.


USING JINSEI TO EXTRACT AND TEST BLOOD

5

One way valves open when pushed inwards, allowing plunger to enter.

6

After removal of plunger the valves shut, creating pressure inside the tube. This creates a vacuum.

7

Plug tube into tubeshield and allow blood to be drawn in four chambers.

8

Set down for twenty minutes and allow color change. Each test has its own color that a technician can read and give positive or negative.

38


“Blood is that fragile scarlet tree we carry within us.”

- Osbert Sitwell


42


SKETCHBLOG ON CORE77.COM


CHEERS

42


Industrial Design Portfolio