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Participant Profile

450 visitors Delegations from USA, Korea, Belgium, Germany, Iran, Singapore, Nepal and African countries.

BioAsia 2012 participants attending various sessions

45 sponsored international buyers 6


CEREMONIES CEREMONIES CEREMONIES


Ceremonies Inaugural Ceremony BioAsia 2012 was inaugurated by the Chief Guest, Shri N. Kiran Kumar Reddy, Hon'ble Chief Minister of Andhra Pradesh, on February 9, 2012 at 5:00 pm at the Hyderabad International Convention Centre, Hyderabad. The dignitaries present at the function include: ¬

Dr. (Smt.) J. Geeta Reddy, Hon’ble Minister for Major Industries, Sugar, Commerce and Export Promotion, Govt. of Andhra Pradesh

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Prof. Tissa Vitarana, Hon’ble Minister for

(L to R) Dr. K V Raghavan, Mr. Kevin Ali, Dr. Seth Berkley, Hon’ble Prof. Tissa Vitarana, Hon'ble Shri N. Kiran Kumar Reddy, Hon'ble Dr. (Smt.) J. Geeta Reddy, Dr. Krishna Ella, Shri Raja Sekhar Vundru, Mr. Manni Kantipudi and Shri N R Munjal

Scientific Affairs, Govt. of Sri Lanka ¬

Shri Raja Sekhar Vundru IAS, Joint Secretary, Dept. of Pharmaceuticals, Govt. of India

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Dr. Seth Berkley, CEO, GAVI Alliance

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Mr. Kevin Ali, President (Emerging Markets),

His address was followed by Dr. Krishna Ella’s, where he mentioned that BioAsia over the years has been instrumental in showcasing the Lifesciences and R&D strengths of Hyderabad and Andhra Pradesh to the world particularly the presence of Genome Valley – the largest industrial cluster in the country. He also stated that India is an excellent destination for Biotech/Biopharma industries.

Merck & Co. Inc., USA ¬

Dr. K V Raghavan, Vice President, FABA

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Dr. Krishna Ella, CMD, Bharat Biotech International Ltd.

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Mr. Manni Kantipudi, CEO, GVK Biosciences

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Shri N R Munjal, Chairman, Pharmaceutical Export Promotion Council, Govt. of India

Following this, Hon’ble Prof. Tissa Vitarana, shared his thoughts regarding contributions and challenges to Biotechnology with reference to the society and about India being a dynamic economic hub. His remarks were followed by a brief speech by Hon’ble Dr. (Smt.) J. Geeta Reddy. She emphasized that BioAsia has been successful in significantly contributing towards the development of the Biotechnology industry in India in general and in particular in Andhra Pradesh over the last eight years. She also mentioned that the ninth edition has been successful in assembling the key stakeholders of the sector both globally and from India.

Dr. K V Raghavan welcomed the audience by highlighting BioAsia as an integral part of the Biotech industry’s growth and mentioned that Indian Biotech industry had crossed over US$ 3 Billion in 2010-2011. While speaking, Mr. Manni Kantipudi emphasized that BioAsia provides a platform for companies to exhibit, launch and showcase their products and services. He recalled the association of GVK Biosciences with BioAsia for the past several years and the opportunities and benefits thus provided to the company.

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Ceremonies Inaugural Ceremony The inaugural ceremony also featured the release of BioAsia-Yes Bank Report on ‘Indian Biotechnology Ecosystem Perspective’ and BioAsiaPharmexcil Report on ‘Indian BioPharma Industries and Incentives to Exporters’

Inaugural Ceremony

While speaking at the inauguration, the Hon’ble Chief Minister stated that India is amongst the top 12 biotech destinations in the world and second in Asia, after China. In his address, he also spoke about India being the world’s largest producer of the recombinant Hepatitis B Vaccine and how the state has emerged as the undisputed leader in the country for Biotechnology. Assuring continued support from the Government to the development of the sector, he emphasized that the biotech companies have a crucial role to play in the society and will have to keep quality and affordability of medicines on top of mind. He also mentioned that BioAsia has been a great platform, helping the Government in attracting new investments into the state and showcasing the strengths of Genome Valley to the global community.

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BioAsia 2012 was instrumental in showcasing the R&D strengths of Hyderabad and Andhra Pradesh to the world, particularly the presence of Genome Valley – the largest Lifesciences industrial cluster in country.

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Ceremony Highlights: Release of BioAsia-Yes Bank Report on ‘Indian Biotechnology Ecosystem Perspective’ & BioAsia-Pharmexcil Report on ‘Indian BioPharma I n d u st r i e s a n d I n c e n t i ve s to Exporters’.

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India is amongst the top 12 biotech destinations in the world and second in Asia, after China, stated the Chief Minister.

Mr. T S Appa Rao, IAS, Chairman, Organizing Committee, BioAsia 2012 presented a memento to the guests and the Inaugural Ceremony ended with the Vote of Thanks delivered by Shri N R Munjal.

BioAsia 2012 Converge Sponsored by

¬ The exclusive networking dinner hosted by

European Business Technology Centre (EBTC) th on 9 February, 2012 from 6 pm onwards, started with a presentation by Dr. Geetha M Swamilingiah of EBTC. Delegates at the Networking Reception

¬ About 400 people from different countries

participated in this networking dinner, which was intended towards creating an opportunity to Meet, Discuss, Share and Partner. 10


Ceremonies Valedictory Ceremony The valedictory ceremony was held on 11th February from 17:00 hrs to 18:00 hrs at HICC, Hyderabad.

Key points highlighted during the Valedictory ceremony were: ¬

The Chief Guest at the Valedictory Ceremony was Dr. T. Ramasami, Secretary to the Government of India, Department of Science and Technology The dignitaries present at the function include: ¬

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Shri Raja Sekhar Vundru announcing the initiatives of Department of Pharmaceuticals during the 12th plan period with major focus on Innovation, R&D, Drug discovery which includes: an international pharma cooperation initiative for setting up Joint Testing Lab facilities for certification, 6 n e w c e n t re s fo r fo r m u l a t i o n development and manufacturing training centres, extending infrastructure support for cold chain high-end drugs, 10 new Pharma growth clusters, National Centre of Pharma in northeastern region in Guwahati, R&D centre bulk drugs Napier in Hyderabad, Nano Technology Centre in Kolkata, 4 centres for Biosimilar expertise, including one in Hyderabad, industry focus on Animal House Scheme and creation of a park focused on medical device industry in Ahmedabad International Centre

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Shri Raja Sekhar Vundru, IAS, Joint Secretary, Department of Pharmaceuticals, Government of India

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Dr. K V Raghavan, Vice President, FABA Dr. Sunder Rajan, Director ARCI, Hyderabad Mr. Karun Rishi, President, USA - India Chamber of Commerce Dr. P V Appaji, Executive Director - Pharmexcil Mrs. Mridul Jain, Director, Department of Commerce, Government of India Dr. Ahmed Kamal, Project Director - NIPER, Hyderabad

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The session started with Dr. K.V.Raghavan delivering the welcome address and summarizing the importance of BioAsia. The panel speech started with Shri Raja Sekhar Vundru announcing the initiatives of Department of Pharmaceuticals followed by speeches from the rest of the panelists and finally concluded by the Chief Guest's speech.

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Valedictory Ceremony ¬

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(L to R) Shri Raja Sekhar Vundru, Dr. Ahmed Kamal, Dr. K V Raghavan, Dr. T. Ramasami, Mr. Karun Rishi, Dr. P V Appaji, Mrs. Mridul Jain and Dr. Sunder Rajan 11

R&D is the key to growth, innovation and the path to progress, said thought leaders Ceremony Highlights £ Release of BioAsia – CII Report £ BioAsia Special Award £ FABA Special Award £ NIPER Newsletter Release £ BioAsia Innovation & Young Minds Award


Ceremonies Valedictory Ceremony ¬

The need to initate customization of drugs with respect to geographical areas and to initiate conducting Phase-1 trials in India.

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To assist innovation of young minds and provide mentoring backed by financial aids.

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Need to focus on ways to bring groups together and establish a collaborative platform where the research investments are optimized, the benefits are shared and there is caring for people built into our system. Hence the three important key words are Optimization, Sharing and Caring .

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In future the major challenge in Indian R&D sector is to attract talent to study Science and take Research as a career. Today, talent is tilted more towards managing innovation rather than creating innovation.

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Need for increasing emphasis on promoting public-private partnerships and creating a policy environment which will enhance the engagement of the R&D sector.

The release of BioAsia – CII Report and the NIPER Newsletter followed by the BioAsia Special Award, FABA Special Award, BioAsia Innovation & Young Minds Award were highlights of the Valedictory Ceremony.

Mr. Arvindh Shanmugam presenting memento to Dr. T. Ramasami

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AWARDS AWARDS AWARDS


Awards Genome Valley Excellence Award "Genome Valley Excellence Award" was instituted by the Government of Andhra Pradesh to recognize and honour eminent individuals and organization for their exceptional contribution to the Lifesciences Research & Industry.

Dr. Seth Berkley giving the acceptance speech

He also mentioned that these manufactures also have the capacity to engage in applied vaccine development. Developed by the Andhra Pradesh Regional Government as a hub for over 100 biotech companies and spread across 600 square kilometers, Genome Valley is viewed as the Indian pharmaceutical equivalent of the computer industry’s Silicon Valley in the United States, said Dr. Berkley. A large proportion of GAVI vaccines suppliers in emerging countries are based in the Genome Valley.

Dr. Seth Berkley receiving the award from Hon'ble Shri N. Kiran Kumar Reddy in the presence of Hon'ble Dr.(Smt.) J. Geeta Reddy

The Genome Valley Excellence Award was presented by the Hon’ble Chief Minister of Andhra Pradesh, Shri N Kiran Kumar Reddy and Dr. (Smt.) J. Geeta Reddy, the Hon’ble Minister for Major Industries, Suagar, Commerce & Export Promotion, Govt. of Andhra Pradesh to Dr. Seth Berkley, CEO, GAVI Alliance and Merck & Co. Inc., USA. While the award to Dr. Seth Berkley was bestowed in honour of his extraordinary contribution to the sector and his commitment to the betterment of human health as a physician, epidemiologist and leading advocate in public health, immunization and vaccine. The award to Merck & Co. was bestowed keeping in mind its commitment to patient health & vaccine research, particularly for its initiatives on preventing cancer in women.

Given India's status as an international supplier of state of the art vaccines, Dr. Berkley emphasized the importance of maintaining quality control measures. "GAVI is not a regulatory body but we do expect the Indian Government and its National Regulatory Agency to set a stringent regulatory environment," he said. "The Government should keep quality as its top priority." Dr. Berkley paid tribute to the contribution of India’s biotech sector to the explosion in vaccine research and development, and the number of new vaccines currently in the pipeline for a variety of diseases.

In his acceptance speech, Dr. Seth Berkley said that he was passionate about India & Vaccines. He praised that Indian manufacturers matched quality standards for vaccines appropriate to specific countries and offered them at lower and sustainable prices through a reliable supply stream over time. 15


Awards Genome Valley Excellence Award

FABA Special Award

Mr. Kevin Ali, President of Emerging Markets, Merck & Co., USA accepted the award on behalf of his company MSD. In his acceptance speech he highlighted the importance of developing affordable, effective and sustainable vaccines in the country.

The FABA Special Award was given to Mr. Cyrus Mistry for his relentless efforts in establishing and pioneering the Shapoorji Pallonji Biotech Park (now the Alexandria Knowledge Park) in Hyderabad, which in many ways paved the way for the rise of Genome Valley. The award was presented by Dr. T. Ramasami, Secretary to Government of India, Department of Science & Technology and collected by Mr. Shingorani, the Former Director & Chairman of SP Biotech Park, Hyderabad on behalf of Mr. Cyrus Mistry during the grand valedictory ceremony at BioAsia 2012.

Mr. Kevin Ali receiving the award from Hon'ble Shri N. Kiran Kumar Reddy in the presence of Hon'ble Dr. (Smt.) J. Geeta Reddy

Genome Valley Excellence Award ¬

Dr. Seth Berkley, CEO, GAVI Alliance for contribution to the sector and commitment to the betterment of human health in multi-faced capacities

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Merck & Co. for its commitment to patient health & vaccine research

Mr. Shingorani receiving the award on behalf of Mr. Cyrus Mistry from Dr. T. Ramasami in presence of Dr. K V Raghavan and Dr. P V Appaji

FABA Special Award ¬

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Mr. Cyrus Mistry for his efforts in establishing and pioneering the Shapoorji Pallonji Biotech Park, Hyderabad (now Alexandria Knowledge Park)


Awards FABA Special Award

BioAsia Special Award

The FABA Special Award was also presented to MedTrack Co. in recognition of the company’s efforts to enhance information-sharing and to connect various industry key stakeholders. Dr. Robert Naismith and Ms. Nadia Naismith Dailey, the Co-founders of MedTrack accepted the award presented to them by the Chief Guest, Dr. T. Ramasami during the valedictory ceremony.

For the first time, BioAsia 2012 instituted a special award, “BioAsia Special Award” which was given to Mr. Karun Rishi, President, USA-India Chamber of Commerce for his extraordinary contribution & passion towards the Lifescience sector and for his global vision in taking the sector forward. The award was presented by Dr. T. Ramasami, Secretary to Government of India, Department of Science & Technology.

Mr. Karun Rishi with Dr. T. Ramasami

(L to R) Dr. KV Raghavan, Dr. Robert Naismith, Dr. T. Ramasami, Ms. Nadia Dailey and Dr. PV Appaji

BioAsia Special Award

FABA Special Award ¬ ¬

MedTrack Co. for its efforts to enhance information-sharing

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Mr. Karun Rishi, President - USA - India Chamber of Commerce for extraordinary contribution towards the Lifescience sector and his global vision for it.


Awards BioAsia Innovation & Young Minds Award In order to promote the investigative spirit in young school children and scientists, BioAsia has instituted Innovation and Young Minds Award in areas of Biotechnology/Lifesciences including B i o m e d i c a l / P h a r m a c e u t i c a l t e c h n o l o g y, Bioinformatics, Biomechanics to name a few. This year, 13 proposals were short listed out of 61 received from India and from 7 countries abroad. Dr. T. Ramasami presenting the award to Dr. Nooruddin Khan in presence of Dr. K V Raghavan

BioAsia Innovation Award ¬

BioAsia Innovation Award for 2012 consisting INR 1,00,000 and a memento was presented by Dr. T. Ramasami which was shared between Dr. Shailaja Tiwari from Dr. H. S. Gour Central University, Sagar, MP for her project titled ‘Recombinant Protein based Liposomal Combination Vaccine for Intranasal Immunization against H e p a t i t i s a n d I n f l u e n za ’ a n d Dr. Nooruddin Khan from the Dept. of B i o t e c h n o l o g y, U n i v e r s i t y o f Hyderabad for his project titled ‘ D e ve l o p m e n t o f E L I S A - b a s e d approach to detect Active Tuberculosis including Smear-Negative Pulmonary and Extra-pulmonary TB cases’

Dr. T. Ramasami presenting the award to Ms. N. Koushika in presence of Dr. K V Raghavan

Young Minds Award ¬

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Ms. N. Koushika from the Ashok Leyland School recived the BioAsia young mind award for 2012 for her project titled ‘Comprehensive Health Check-up Kit’


C ONFERENCES & PANEL DISCUSSIONS C ONFERENCES & PANEL DISCUSSIONS C ONFERENCES & PANEL DISCUSSIONS


Conferences & Panel Discussions Coordinated by

Vaccine Policy – Recommendations & Challenges

SERUM INSTITUTE OF INDIA LTD.

This was followed by Dr. Nata Menabde sharing her experiences about the regulatory standards prevalent in India and also on the quality issues of the Indian vaccines. At the end, Dr. Shreemanta K Parida addressed the need of a pipeline that began with discovery and ended at pre-clinical development and the need of companies to work collectively. (L to R) Dr. Nata Menabde, Dr. Seth Berkley, Mr. Utkarsh Palnitkar, Ms. Mahima Datla and Dr. Shreemanta K Parida

Vaccine Policy ¬

‘Vaccines' is an emerging market and India has huge potential but has been stringent about quality

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If companies work collectively and regulatory standards are upgraded, India can be the world's next vaccine hub

Date: February 10, 2012, 09:30 hrs to 11:00 hrs Panelists: Dr. Seth Berkley, CEO, GAVI, Switzerland Dr. Nata Menabde, WHO Representative to India Dr. Shreemanta K Parida, CEO, Vaccines Grand Challenges Program, DBT Ms. Mahima Datla, SVP Biotechnology & Projects, Biological E Ltd

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Moderator: Mr. Utkarsh Palnitkar, Executive Director, Centrum Capital Partners

The need for using appropriate communication tools to spread awareness regarding the importance of vaccines in India.

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The need to deal with alternate-financing patterns so that the vaccines reach the Indian middle-class population on an affordable plane.

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Va c c i n e I m m u n i z a t i o n a m o u n t s t o unfortunately only about 2.1% of the allocated health budget in India. Hence, a large bulk of children are still deprived of the benefits of a full immunization schedule.

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Indian Procurement Systems are geared towards being affordable but do not currently ensure supply security.

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The need for vaccine manufacturers to deal with two important issues - Supply, Security and Affordability in order to deal with the issues of procurement.

Some of the interesting key points of the panel discussion were:

The session started with a brief introduction about the vaccine policy in India by Mr. Karun Rishi, President, USA-India Chamber of Commerce. Thereafter, a video message of Dr. N.K Ganguly (Chairman, Immunology Foundation & Former Director General, ICMR) was screened in which he emphasized the need to go to the communities and explain to them the value of vaccines. The panel discussion started with Ms. Mahima Datla sharing her views regarding the capacity shortage of vaccines of the Universal Immunization Program. Dr. Seth Berkley commented on the role of the government-owned enterprises in the entire vaccine production business. 21


Conferences & Panel Discussions Vaccine Policy: Recommendations & Challenges ¬

The key issues that the Indian Vaccine Policy touches upon are procurement, the role of public sector units, implementation units, financing aspects, surveillance and decision support systems and Research & Development.

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The competitive difference lies in deciding how to execute the number of initiatives that the vaccine policy aims at, such as setting up of grand challenge fund, the mapping of research capacity and its network, the setting up of bio-repositories, a financial sustainable plan and an interagency task-force.

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Investing in Asia: Enabling Vaccine Industry Success

(L to R) Dr. Krishna Ella, Mr. Kewal Handa, Mr. Vikas Dandekar, Mr. Roopesh Bhargava, Dr. Wenyong Wang and Dr. Hasit Joshipura

The panel concluded that it is absolutely essential for the Indian Vaccine manufacturers to imbibe a culture of incredible world-class quality assurance and quality control standards. It was appreciated that while India produces good vaccines, many a time these vaccines are not delivered to the consumer because of storage issues, lack of adequately competent human resource to deal with the vaccines. The panel felt that the world is recognising the fact that Indian companies make very high quality vaccines at an affordable price due to its cost structure, which is a different business model compared to that of western countries and this was an opportunity for both Western and Indian companies to form innovative partnerships with common interests.

Date: February 10, 2012. 11:30 hrs to 13:00 hrs Panelists: Dr. Krishna M Ella, Chairman & MD, Bharat Biotech International Ltd., India. Dr. Hasit Joshipura, VP-South Asia and MD, GSK India. Mr. Kewal Handa, Managing Director, Pfizer India. Dr. Wenyong Wang, MD, Merchant & Investment Banking, Burril & Company. Mr. Roopesh Bhargava, Senior Director – Sales & Marketing, Sanofi. Moderator: Mr. Vikas Dandekar, India Bureau Chief, Elsevier Business Intelligence The session started with the moderator inviting Dr. Krishna M Ella to make the opening remarks in which he emphasized that the market absorption of a vaccine is still complex in government systems. He further quoted that now is the right time for the Indian vaccine industry to make its mark since vaccine is now getting recognized as an important field as compared to earlier times.

The panel also felt that one of the problems India is facing in spite of its knowledge pool and man power is the absence of a cohesive community that takes collective ownership and responsibility. It was suggested that the government can take a redressal initiative by providing incentives and partnering with companies for a common goal of reducing and eradicating the depravation of vaccines in India.

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Conferences & Panel Discussions Investing in Asia: Enabling Vaccine Industry Success Investing in Asia – Enabling Vaccine Industry Success ¬

Chinese vaccine manufacturers have phenomenal support from their government; can India take a page out of China's book?

The fact that Chinese vaccine manufacturers have phenomenal support from their government whereas in India, most of the vaccine industries are driven by private entrepreneurs.

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Indian regulatory system has changed in the last two years but not up to the US standard.

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Private entrepreneurs should partner with the government and vaccines should be launched in a parallel manner, not sequential

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There is a need for the vaccine manufacturing companies to build a relation of trust with government regarding the credibility of the data provided by them.

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Identify the disease burden in the country, then identify the required vaccines based on that

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The panel felt that the vaccines should be launched in a parallel manner and not in a sequential manner to make things simpler for the Indian government.

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The panel suggested that private entrepreneurs should partner with the government in areas where it is easy to partner and also look at opportunities where the government cannot reach out due to constraints.

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The panel also emphasized on the need to identify the disease burden in the country and then identify the required vaccines based on that.

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There is a missing link between the Contract Manufacturing Organizations (CMO) and the finished product from the Indian perspective.

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The panel felt there should be serious focus to bridge the gap.

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If India aims to become a superpower, then healthcare has to be focussed upon, of which, Vaccine Immunization is a very important part. India spent about Rs.600 crores out of the Rs. 27000 crore budget set by its government on vaccines - just about 2% of the allocaed budget. So the issue of funding needs to be dealt with seriously by the Indian vaccine industry. Some sort of commitment is certainly required from the Government of India in this regard.

The panel discussion started with Mr. Kewal Handa giving some valuable insights regarding the reasons for the present Indian Regulatory System not being very conducive for the growth of vaccine industry. Thereafter, Mr. Roopesh Bhargava shared his experiences about the vaccine industry and about the acquisition of Shantha Biotech by Sanofi. This was followed by Dr. Wenyong Wang commenting on the trends in the Chinese vaccine industry and the quick-moving regulatory mechanism in China. Lastly, Dr. Hasit Joshipura spoke about the hindrances in taking up various projects in developing vaccines. Some of the key points of the panel discussion were: ¬ The fact that because the vaccine industry is a highly capital intensive industry, Risk Capital is a problem in India. ¬

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The reasons for the domestic attractiveness of the Chinese vaccine industry over that of Indian vaccine industry were better price-points, a clear regulatory system and smoother and clearer approval process in China.

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Conferences & Panel Discussions Supply Chain Importance in the Vaccine Market: Impact of Cold Chain Logistics

The panel discussion started with the moderator requesting Mr. Mahesh Kulkarni to give a perspective of Cold Chain Logistics issues and challenges in the wake of supplying vaccines to Universal Immunisation Programme (UIP). Thereafter, Dr. Dodwadkar was invited to share his experiences regarding vaccines logistical challenges while supplying to UNICEF and various other countries

(L to R) Mr. Mahesh Kulkarni, Dr. Harish Iyer, Dr. S M Dodwadkar and Dr. S K Dash

Some key points of the panel discussion were:

Date: February 10, 2012, 15:00 hrs to 16:00 hrs. Panelists: Dr. Harish Iyer, CEO, Shantha Biotech. Mr. Mahesh Kulkarni, SVP-Technical, Biological E Limited. Dr. S M Dodwadkar, Sr. Director-International Business, Serum Institute of India.

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Cold Chain Management in vaccines is an issue not only in hot tropical countries but also in cold temperate zones facing sub-zero temperatures. Therefore, maintaining +2 to +8 degree centigrade require fail-safe backups.

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Compromising on Cold Chain expenses could be at a huge cost, which could go up to 30% to 40% of the consignment value.

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Indian vaccine companies now have the expertise to deliver bulk consignment by air within 72 hours to any major destination in the world.

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One of the major barriers in maintaining the integrity of Cold Chain Management is awareness and education within personnel associated with the distribution channel and healthcare workers. Suggestions were made by the panel to map a course on Cold Chain Maintenance offered by WHO and adopt it to Indian conditions for better outcomes.

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Initiation of R&D efforts at molecular design levels could evolve thermostable vaccines and should be pursued by corporates in association with academia.

Moderator: Dr. S.K. Dash, CEO, Strategm Advisory Services The session started with the moderator inviting Dr. Harish Iyer to make the opening remarks where he emphasized on the need for innovative solutions to address the needs of the Cold Chain Management. He also dwelt briefly on the impact of Cold Chain disruptions on the stability of products.

Supply Chain Importance in the Vaccine Market ¬

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Coordinated by

Awareness and education within the personnel was found lacking; hence even top line Cold Chain Management I nf ra st r u c t u re ca n n o t d e l i ve r performance BioAsia to push the implementation of all government sanctioned initiatives 24


Conferences & Panel Discussions Supply Chain Importance in the Vaccine Market: Impact of Cold Chain Logistics ¬

The panel also concluded that despite availability of top-of-line Cold Chain Management Equipments, the performance is not guaranteed due to lack of seriousness in maintenance and proper education regarding upkeep. An example given was that of data logger which is not useful unless personnel involved in logistics completely understand how to download the data.

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Experiences over a wide set of geographies indicate that Cold Chain Management pertaining to immunization practices in South America can be benchmarked as a role model, more so due to the similarity in socio-economic and income levels.

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Vaccine Exports – Will Highly Regulated Markets be on the Radar?

(L to R) Dr. Kuppuswamy, Mr. K V Balasubramaniam, Shri Raja Sekhar Vundru, Dr. Rajesh Jain and Dr. P V Appaji

Date: February 10, 2012, 16:30 hrs to 17:45 hrs

It was also recognized that government is seriously pursuing the Cold Chain Management and that BioAsia will make all possible efforts to accelerate the implementation of all these initiatives.

Panelists: Shri Raja Sekhar Vundru IAS, Joint Secretary, Department of Pharmaceuticals, Govt. of India Dr. Rajesh Jain, Joint Managing Director, Panacea Biotech Mr. K V Balasubramaniam, MD, Indian Immunologicals Ltd. Dr. P V Appaji, Executive Director, Pharmaceutical Export Promotion Council of India Dr. Kuppuswamy, MD & Chief Executive Officer, Tergene Biotech Pvt. Ltd. The session started with opening remarks from Shri Raja Sekhar Vundru where he emphasized on the evolution and growth of vaccine industry in India over the last decade and also stressed on the projected worldwide growth. He elaborated on the significant acquisitions in the pharmaceutical and the vaccine industry that have taken place in the recent past.

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Conferences & Panel Discussions Vaccine Exports – Will Highly Regulated Markets be on the Radar? The panel discussion started with Dr. Rajesh Jain taking the audience through the global opportunities that lie ahead of India, the market potential both in terms of volume and value, key determining factors in the vaccine world, the advantage that India offers and the challenges and the solutions within. The session progressed with Mr. KV Balasubramaniam and Dr. Kuppuswamy addressing the audience from a business perspective and concentrating on dimensions including market’s attractiveness, complexities and the level of competition. Lastly Dr. P V Appaji wrapped up the panel session by talking about the Indian government’s initiatives, accomplishments and future plans in making India a global leader in Biotechnology and the vaccine industry.

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There is a need for setting up a national nonprofit biological resource centre for acquisition and distribution of biological materials in India. This is mainly due to the existence of huge intellectual property challenges in terms of outlicensing and royalties which are unaffordable by younger companies.

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The world-wide vaccine industry is predicted to grow from USD 27 billion (2007) to USD 97 billion in 2023 at a 50% growth rate and is on the predicted trajectory.

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Existence of huge world-wide demand for children's vaccines amounts to 423 million doses for 2013.

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There is a strong necessity for the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare to join hands with vaccine and pharma industries to align their R&D programs and goals with the vision of the country.

Vaccine Exports: Will highly regulated markets be on the radar? ¬

Huge intellectual property challenges in terms of out-licensing exist in India; the way forward is a national nonprofit biological resource centre for acquisition and distribution of biological materials.

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There is a need for a more decisive NRA system (Regulatory System) for monitoring standards and to avoid conflict of interest which may arise when the same body generates the demand, procures the vaccine, produces and releases the vaccine with licensing.

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Definite need for a more decisive NRA system and a national accredited laboratory for compliance with GMP standards.

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There is a need for a National Accredited Laboratory which will certify cell lines fit for use and oversee that all the players comply with GMP standards.

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There is a need to have more emphasis on developing markets with focus on regionalspecific diseases rather than developed markets with numerous competitors.

Some of the key points of the panel discussion were: ¬

The success level in the vaccine world is dependent on 4 key factors. £

Availability

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Affordability

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Acceptability

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Sustainability

T h e va c c i n e i n d u s t r y w h i c h h a s b e e n predominantly viewed as a Pediatric Healthcare industry so far is predicted to evolve into an industry for all age groups with large emphasis on Immunization vaccines and Traveler vaccines.

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Conferences & Panel Discussions Rising Importance of Contract Research Organizations Rising Importance of Contract Research Organizations

(L to R) Dr. Ajaykumar Sharma, Mr. Manni Kantipudi, Mr. C S N Murthy and Mr. Swapan Bhattacharya

Date: February 11, 2012, 9:30 hrs to 11:00 hrs. Panelists: Mr. Manni Kantipudi, CEO, GVK Biosciences, Hyderabad, India. Mr. CSN Murthy, CEO, Aurigene Discovery Technologies, India. Mr. Swapan Bhattacharya, Managing Director, TCG Lifesciences Ltd, India. Moderator: Dr. Ajaykumar Sharma, Practice Head – Pharma, Healthcare, South Asia & Middle East, Frost & Sullivan The moderator started the session with a few opening remarks following which he and the panelists spoke about the organizations they represent and their line of work. Thereafter, the panelists suggested the session be more of a discussion between the panel and the audience. Some of the key points of the panel discussion were: ¬

China has a huge competitive advantage over India due to its large scale, infrastructure, scientists with western training who are returning to China due to its significant growth in the Pharma and the Research sectors. 27

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Innovation and integration being the path to progress, more and more Biopharma companies are looking at associations with India CROs

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Innovation in product is not sufficient; it should also reflect in financing possibilities

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Focus areas need to be well defined, regulatory processes made faster if India wishes to play a bigger role in this segment

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The pharmaceutical market of India is worth US$ 20 billion whereas China’s market is worth US$ 36 billion. China’s market growth is estimated to be almost USD 100 billion by 2015 where as India's is predicted to grow to about 40 billion dollars only.

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Big pharma companies are moving towards academic research and are looking at Indian CROs to work directly with academic institutions in the field of molecular discovery.

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One of the major barriers the Indian Pharma industry faces is the lack of support from the government, whereas the Chinese competitors enjoy its government’s active encouragement and investments in the R&D sector.

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Another benefit for China lies in its animal testing and animal model, an area where India is a little challenged because of ethical issues.

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India is stronger than Brazil in terms of CMOs.

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Today the business watchwords are innovation and integration, so there are great opportunities for the CRO business in India.


Conferences & Panel Discussions Rising Importance of

Innovative Partnership Models in

Contract Research Organizations

Outsourcing: CROs, CRAMs, CMOs

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Strategy for India is going to evolve as: £

Innovation in Drug Discovery

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Integration of CRO with CMOs & CRAMs business.

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Currently, the Indian research industry does not have a country specific strategy. It is currently focusing on chemistry based approach in which India fares really well.

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Historically, India has been a much stronger player in chemistry, chemical engineering, number of plants with pre-approval for generics as well as Active Pharma Ingredients (APIs).

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Date: February 11, 2012, 11:30 hrs to 13:00 hrs.

The basic domain is so vast that there is a need to focus on specialized areas like Oncology and Pediatrics.

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Innovation is essential not only in science but also in financing activities.

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The Indian regulatory process is slow. A special example is the DCGI for clinical trials.

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Indian companies should make an attempt to upgrade biological capabilities and combine that with risk capital approach.

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India needs to move from FT studies to in-licensing deal.

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(L to R) Dr. Prabuddha K. Kundu, Dr. Sanjay Mittal, Mr. Anuj Kapoor and Dr. Goutam Das

Panelists: Dr. Goutam Das, Chairman, Goutam Das Consultancy, India. Dr. Sanjay Mittal, Director, Research and Clinical Cardiology, Medanta, India. Mr. Prabuddha Kundu, Executive Director, Premas Biotech, India. Moderator: Mr. Anuj Kapoor, Associate Director, Alexandria Equities Management India Private Limited. The session started with the moderator inviting Mr. Karun Rishi, President of USA India Chamber of Commerce, to make the opening remarks. In his speech, Mr. Rishi, emphasized on the need for proper strategy planning which is presently lacking in the Indian Drug Discovery & Development industry.

India can play a big role in Biosimilars where clinical trials are required.

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Conferences & Panel Discussions Innovative Partnership Models in Outsourcing: CROs, CRAMs, CMOs The panel discussion started with Dr. Goutam Das sharing his views on the sustainability of service based business model from an Indian context and also his experiences with reference to the changes in this industry in the last two decades taking all the macroeconomic factors into account. Thereafter, Mr. Prabuddha Kundu gave some valuable insights on how India’s predominance as a generic player is restricting R&D from locating itself more firmly in India and the risks that are perceived by global players in the context of partnerships with Indian companies. Lastly, Dr. Sanjay Mittal talked about the importance of the institutional partnership model and its chances of success in the current scenario when the research is turning more and more collaborative in nature.

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If large CROs come together and induce foreign partnerships in India, it would help the small players to a great extent. These partnerships have to be built on a common goal.

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Not a single Indian CRO has gone public as yet; this could be a major focus point.

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The biggest issue for the Indian pharma companies while shifting from a chemistrybased approach to a biology-based approach is how to adhere to the specifications of delivery and the means to align themselves in a manner so as to be within the specifications as required by the customer.

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It is very difficult in India to introduce an M&A concept because most of the companies are almost family-run with deep pockets, high on ego and pre-conceptions. There is a need to transform the business culture itself.

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There is a dire need for Indian pharma companies to take inspiration from countries like China who is investing huge amounts of money in drug discovery in UK and other areas thus benefiting from global advantage.

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Macroeconomic factors impact partnerships which is evident from the fact that the shrinkage in the profitability of pharma companies affects the R&D sector to a great extent. So there is a need to focus on the wide opportunities available in the areas of nutrition, cosmetics, and non-pharma agro business.

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There is a need to de-risk or mitigate the risk in partnerships through the present legal framework in India. This should not be a long drawn process. Moreover, the process has to have recourse through proper arbitration.

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The three essential factors necessary to make an efficient and effective partnership are Regulatory System, Legal System and Ecosystem.

Innovative Partnership Models in Outsourcing ¬

India needs to stop being a generic player; only then can it build upon its strength in R&D and move up the economic ladder.

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R&D is the foundation of the future of Biotechnology. Unfortunately, unlike China we do not invest much in it.

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From family-run businesses to M&A, structures is the need of the hour. Are we up to it?

Some of the key points of the panel discussion were: ¬

Cash & carry model is now changing and the Indian pharma Industry is moving more towards risk sharing.

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Indian CROs have to build trust and transparency into their in-house systems while they deal with big global biotechs and pharma companies.

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Conferences & Panel Discussions Attracting Risk Capital for SME & Start-up Lifesciences Firms in India Coordinated by

Attracting Risk Capital for SME & Start-up Lifesciences Firms in India Mr. Vishal Gandhi moderating the session

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The Biotechnology industry in India has grown threefold in the last five years; the benefits are coming from cost effectiveness, R&D expertise and personnel skills

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Indian investors lack the sectorial depth of their US and European counterparts. They study new businesses primarily from a financial viewpoint and dismiss the complex scientific aspects that are the real value generators

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The changing mindsets of VCs are a reason to be optimistic. They are not as opposed to niche segments as they were a decade ago

Date: February 11, 2012, 13:00 hrs to 15:00 hrs Panelists: Dr. Sanuj K. Ravindran, MD, Asian Healthcare Fund Dr. Sunny Sharma, Senior MD Asia, OrbiMed Advisors India Pvt. Ltd. Mr. Rajesh Rai, CEO, India Innovation Fund Dr. Atul Aslekar, Co-Founder & Director, VLife Sciences & Technology Pvt. Ltd. Mr. Shrishendu Mukherjee, Strategic Advisor – India, Wellcome Trust Anand Govindaluri, Senior Vice President Investments, Exploit Technologies Pte Singapore Mr. Sai D. Prasad, VP-Business Development, Bharat Biotech International Ltd.

The panel also opined that the global investing environment for Biotech companies hit a roadblock between 2008 and 2010. This was primarily due to recession that severely impacted funding for the sector owing to its high-risk profile. The panel agreed that the situation was improving, with most domestic innovator companies and MNCs focusing on high-growth areas like Biosimilars to gain entry into the Indian Biotech sector.

Moderator: Mr. Vishal Gandhi, SVP and Head Life Sciences, Yes Bank Ltd. The panel first and foremost emphasized the robust growth of the global Life Sciences Industry with India emerging as a key player. It detailed out the significant improvements in India’s basic health indicators since independence and reaffirmed the contribution of various government departments, agencies and industry segments which are working towards improvement of Indian healthcare standards. 30


Conferences & Panel Discussions Attracting Risk Capital for SME & Start-up Lifesciences Firms in India In the course of the session, it was noted that the Biotechnology industry in India, comprising of around 380 companies, has grown threefold in the last five years, to reach USD 4 billion in FY2011. India’s biotechnology sector is benefitting from several advantages like cost effectiveness, R&D expertise and personnel skills. India is now widely recognized as an ideal location for manufacturing biotech products and for conducting high-level research programmes in the field.

(L to R) Dr. Atul Aslekar, Dr. Sunny Sharma, Dr. Shirshendu Mukherjee, Mr. Rajesh Rai, Dr. Anand Govindaluri, Mr. Vishal Gandhi and Dr. Sai D. Prasad

Increasing investments, outsourcing activities and exports are key drivers for growth in the biotech sector, the panel agreed. With regards to risk capital, the panel appreciated the contribution of the Department of Biotechnology and Department of Science & Technology. Schemes like Small Business I n n o va t i o n Re s e a rc h I n i t i a t i v e ( S B I R I ) , Biotechnology Industry Partnership Program (BIPP), Technology Development Board Schemes have been radical in promoting indigenous highrisk research programs. As an example, the panel mentioned DBT has schemes which cover the entire R&D value chain from 'Idea Funding' to 'Proof-ofc o n c e p t ' t o Va l i d a t i o n a n d f i n a l l y, Commercialization.

With respect to Private Equity Investments in LifeSciences, the panellists echoed the enormous potential of the LifeScience industry in India that has seen a steady increase in risk capital investments. In the past decade, most of the equity investments have been in the established segments of pharmaceutical manufacturers, Contract Research Organizations (CRO) and hospitals. However, the panel believes that going forward the PE investments will be more diversified and will increase in the upcoming industry segments like Biosimilars, Vaccines, Medical Devices and Diagnostics.

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Conferences & Panel Discussions Attracting Risk Capital for SME & Start-up Lifesciences Firms in India The panellists also acknowledged the challenges in PE/VC investments in LifeSciences. It observed most investors are unwilling to invest in LifeScience companies’ R&D activities as they prefer funding companies whose product and market are clearly identified. This leads to LifeScience entrepreneurs being unable to raise sufficient funds for basic R&D through equity investments. The current conservative investor mindset is leading to Indian investors looking to fund matured companies. The panel emphasized that most of the deals sealed over the last few years have been for manufacturers of generic drugs or contract manufacturers, as these are perceived as fairly low-risk businesses. The challenge now, the panel said, is to identify worthy companies from the next outperforming segment. Indian investors lack the sectorial depth of their US and European counterparts. They are more likely to study new businesses primarily from a financial viewpoint and hence dismiss the complex scientific aspects of a company which are the real value generators in this industry. However, as the panel was happy to underline the fact that such a mind set is changing now, with PE and VC investors increasingly looking out for companies in a niche segment or with a competitive technological advantage. Similar challenges are seen in the IPOs for Lifesciences companies. However, the panel believed that the number of IPOs from the Lifesciences industry is likely to go up in the next few years as the industry matures.

Panel discussion in progression

On the M&A front, the panel felt that the last three years has seen significant traction in the Lifesciences arena. The early indicators suggest that the M&A activity is bound to head north with a lot of big pharmaceutical and biotech giants looking at emerging markets to consolidate their global footprint.

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Conferences & Panel Discussions Research Cost Effectiveness - Long Term Solution for the Industry Coordinated by

Some of the key points of the panel discussion were: ¬

(L to R) Dr. Harry S. Rathore, Dr. Cyrus Karkaria, Dr. K V Raghavan, Dr. Sumit Ghoshal, Dr. Richard Connell, Dr. Venkat Jasti and Dr. Sandeep Gupta

Some of the important parameters for assessing R&D cost effectiveness are reduction of R&D time, minimal administrative tasks, use of process automation to speed up the process and increasing the productivity of research personnel.

Research Cost Effectiveness Long Term Solution for the Industry

Date: February 11, 2012.15:00 hrs to 16:00 hrs. Panelists: Dr. Harry S. Rathore, MD & Head of Lonza India. Dr. K V Raghavan, Vice President, FABA. Dr. Richard Connell, VP & Head of Asia Research, Pfzier, Shanghai. Dr. Sandeep Gupta, Sr. Vice President, Discovery & Early Development, Endo Pharmaceuticals, USA. Dr. Cyrus Karkaria, President – Biotech, Lupin Ltd. Dr. Venkat Jasti, Chaiman & CEO, Suven Lifesciences, Hyderabad, India. Moderator: Dr. Sumit Ghoshal, Deputy Editor, Business India Ltd., Mumbai. The session started with the opening remarks of Dr. K V Raghavan where he briefly explained two important terminologies - Cost Effective Analysis and Cost Benefit Analysis, while mentioning the important parameters for assessing R&D cost effectiveness.

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Lack of support from the government reflects strongly on research cost effectiveness considering the high complexity involved in generics is highly capital - intensive.

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India should reap the benefits of a collaborative R&D setting: flexibility, scalability and an ability to share risks that decreases cycle time and increases productivity.

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Some of the major reasons for less development in biotechnology are high complexity involved in generics and biotechnology being a highly capital - intensive industry.

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One of the major barriers the Indian industry is facing is lack of support from the government, an example of which is the 600 million dollar budget provided by the government for drug discovery as compared to China whose allocated budget is 120 billion dollars.


Conferences & Panel Discussions Research Cost Effectiveness - Long Term Solution for the Industry ¬

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The panel felt that the demand outweighs supply at present, brain-drain being one of the factors. At the same time, the panel also felt the gap is being bridged by the emerging educational facilities and development of the pharma industry in India. So the focus now should be on grooming future talent. One of the ways to reduce R&D costs is to get assistance from Public Funded Research Institutions. The Indian government has several programs running with the Department of Science and Technology where it will not be a partner in patent; the patent rights are given fully to institutions that are doing research work. The panel suggested that innovative partnerships should be achieved by relying more on CROs, external partners, Biotechs, non-pharma partners in order to achieve R&D cost effectiveness. The benefits of working in a collaborative R&D setting are flexibility, scalability and an ability to share risks which decreases cycle time and increases productivity. The panel also emphasized the importance of time reduction in cost effectiveness of R&D. A pharma company also needs to scale value to the next level while collaborating and growing with the knowledge gained through such collaboration. The panel emphasized the growing importance of CROs and recommended to upgrade the value chain by providing a differentiating service. It felt CROs should be looked upon to bring pure capacity.

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Power 20 Breakfast Meeting Power 20 Breakfast Meeting


Power 20 Breakfast Meeting Closed Door meeting with the global thought leaders of the Vaccine Industry

Sponsored by

Delegates at the Power 20 Breakfast Meeting which was headed by Dr. Seth Berkley

Date: February 10, 2012.08:00 hrs to 09:00 hrs. The Power 20 Breakfast Meeting brought together prominent members from various industries and was headed by Dr. Seth Berkley, CEO, GAVI Alliance.

The meeting was attended by: Dr. Seth Berkley, CEO, GAVI Alliance Ms. Aurélia Nguyen, Director, Policy & Market Shaping, GAVI Alliance Prof. Tissa Vitarana, Hon’ble Senior Minister of Scientific Affairs, Govt. of Sri Lanka Dr. Nata Menabde, WHO Representative to India Dr. Rajesh Jain, Joint MD, Panacea Biotec Dr. Harish Iyer, CEO, Shantha Biotech Ms. Mahima Datla, SVP – Biotechnology & Projects, Biological E Ltd. Dr. Surendra Madhukarrao Dodwadkar, Senior Director – International Business, Serum Institute of India Ltd. Dr. Shreemanta K. Parida, CEO, Vaccines Grand Challenges Programme, DBT Mr. K V Balasubramaniam, MD, Indian Immunologicals Ltd.. Mr. Kewal Handa, MD, Pfizer India Dr. Wenyong Wang, MD, Merchant & Investment Banking, Burill & Co. Dr. Ray S. Prasad, Chief Operating Officer. Global (Biologics), Biological E Ltd. Ms. Catherene Jucker, Dty. MD, Shantha Biotech Mr. Anuj Kapoor, Associate Director, Alexandria Equities India Management Ltd. Mr. Karnvir Mundrey, Director, Atharva Lifesciences Consulting

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Power 20 Breakfast Meeting Closed Door meeting with the global thought leaders of the Vaccine Industry The members of the meeting with Dr. Seth Berkley consisted of top industry key stakeholders. They discussed various issues faced by the current vaccine market in India and deliberated possible solutions by exploring and seeking support of international bodies like GAVI and WHO and summing up with an overall outlook of the biotech industry focused on India and its capabilities. The meeting received overwhelming response from the industry.

Delegates attending the Power 20 Breakfast Meeting

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CEO CONCLAVE CEO CONCLAVE CEO CONCLAVE


CEO Conclave Megatrends which will shape your coming decade. Have you identified them yet?

Partner

Sponsored by

CEO Conclave in procession

CEO Conclave

Date: February 10, 2012, 18:00 hrs onwards. To set the ball rolling, Mr. Sandeep Sinha, Director, Healthcare Practice, Frost & Sullivan, South Asia & Middle East delivered a presentation on the Global Mega Trends and shared the top 10 trends identified for India: ¬

Urbanization: Mega Cities, Mega Regions, Mega Corridors

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Working Age Population

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The Middle Bulge

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Next Gen Politics Scenario

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Social Media Impact

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Connected India

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Economic Growth

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Infrastructure

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Value for Many

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Healthcare

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Urbanization can be countered; Gujarat is an excellent example. Also, by 2020, it is estimated the working population will be large enough to benefit India over China.

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Healthcare insurance in India is still at a nascent stage. However, substantial growth is expected through government and private insurer participations.

Key takeaways from the workshop on mega trends:

Post the presentation, Dr. Ajay Kumar Sharma commenced a workshop to discuss the impact of the mega trends on the Biotechnology industry. The audience consisting of about 40 CEOs from the industry were divided into 10 groups for the discussion. 41

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Urbanization: It was concluded that urbanization could be countered. For example Gujarat had overcome the exodus of rural to urban areas by creating adequate infrastructure in terms of ring roads and 24 hours electricity supply. China had also foreseen this problem and had developed cycle tracks in its cities that also ensured a green environment for its citizens.

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Working Age Population: By 2020, a higher working age population will benefit India over China and will help sustain frequent recessions.


CEO Conclave ¬

Middle Bulge: Affluence has moved from high class to middle class Indian families which in turn will give rise to a demand-oriented economy which will drive better healthcare infrastructure, better services round the clock and access to quality medicines.

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Next Gen Politics Scenario: The new generation of politicians will bring in effective and better measures of governance that will help the growth of industries.

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Social Media Impact: It is seen that a growing number of consumers are moving on to the internet, making themselves aware of healthcare and wellness issues.

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Connected India: Growing adoption of smartphones, developed connectivity gives consumers access to information anywhere and anytime.

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Economic Growth: India’s contribution to the world’s GDP is growing. Currently India is the elite trillion dollar club and it is expected to be the third largest economy by 2050. With the growing economic clout, India is poised to become a more dominant player in the world.

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Infrastructure: Pace of infrastructure growth and government investments in this sector need to be increased; this will help companies to save time and cost.

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Value for Many: This is a model which will excel the satisfaction ratings over and above the value for money. Consumers see value for money if there is a range of services provided in the same amount and from a reputed brand.

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Healthcare: India’s healthcare insurance industry is still in the nascent stage. Entry of private insurers is expected to boost this segment. The government plans to increase spending in healthcare and at the same time, is also pursuing private players Public Private Partnership (PPP) opportunities. Health economics predicts a shift in spending; it is seen to be moving from treating towards predicting, diagnosing and monitoring.

CEO Conclave activity in progress 42


WORKSHOPS WORKSHOPS WORKSHOPS


Workshop Labs of the future Workshop on the latest trends in Research Facility Design

Labs of the future

Labs of the future workshop in procession

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Way forward: A 360 degree a p p ro a c h to ca p i ta l p ro j e c t execution, employment of the latest project management tools, procedures and approaches and a serious look at the latest trends in Contained Environments.

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Conducted by experts, ‘Labs of the Future’ was a realistic workshop featuring several leaders who spoke about work processes and shared experiences regarding multi-product facilities and single use technology w i t h i n t h e a re a o f Va c c i n e Manufacturing, Containment and SU technology.

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The workshop believed that one of the ways of minimizing risk and maximizing the value of an asset is by running a Pilot Plant, to be converted later for future GMP operations.

Date: February 9, 2012, 9:00 hrs -16:00 hrs, Hotel ITC Kakatiya, Hyderabad An informative workshop for the Lifesciences Industry, this workshop was aimed at top & middle level management professionals involved in Laboratory Operations, Planning and Architecture, Engineering & Projects, Capital Projects, Finance & Capital Planning and Energy Management. It covered all the critical multi and interdisciplinary aspects in research facility and witnessed 90 attendees from all spheres of the Lifescience industry and typically from the companies involved in high-end Research & Development activities. Not just that, the Who’s Who of the industry and the major companies involved in laboratory planning, designing and engineering also made their presence felt at the event.

At the workshop a galaxy of eminent speakers from the industry shared their expertise, insights and techniques to enable professionals to benchmark their plans and programs and build state-of-the-art research facilities based on the latest successes and innovations

Research laboratories are workplaces for scientific breakthroughs; there are several key architectural, engineering, operational, and safety techniques involved in the design of research facilities in order to create a successful collaborative and a crossdiscipline research environment.

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Workshop Labs of the future One of the prerequisites in research facility design is the need for flexible lab space facility planning. One of the ways of minimizing risk is by running a Pilot Plant that can be converted for future GMP operations, thus maximizing the value of the asset. When it comes to facility delivery, it is best that preengineered, modular clean room systems are used.

‘Labs of the future’ was conducted by experts who have directed many large-scale projects from conceptual design to construction administration including several labs and R&D projects utilizing international standards to ensure maximum flexibility for client’s ever changing business models.

Speaking on the occasion, Dr. Robert K Haugen of Kewunee Scientific asserted that companies should look at a 360 degree approach to capital project execution right from initial planning and employ the most up-to-date project management tools, procedures and approaches to counter the challenges.

During the course of the workshop several leaders engaged in Biotech projects regarding MultiProduct facilities and single use technology and leading experts within the area of Vaccine Manufacturing, Containment and SU technology shared their experiences. The workshop also included: ¬ People with experience in synchronizing scientific methodologies with the optimum physical facilities to create enterprise transformation and operational success in the Private, Public and Academic sectors in the United States and overseas.

Latest trends in Contained Environments is another aspect that needs to be addressed in the Lifesciences industry. The professionals need to have an understanding of the work processes so that they can plan for increase in usable bench space, control hazardous chemicals and improve lab safety. it is imperative that for the labs of the future some of the latest techniques in work process exploration and analysis be given to the designer. Along with this, he or she has to be well versed with the Choice of Safety Enclosures & Laboratory Exposure Risk Analysis - ASHRAE TEST and be aware of the advances in the arts and sciences of heating, ventilating, air-conditioning and refrigerating to not only serve humanity but to promote sustainability as well. The workshop touched upon a quantitative field investigation tool used to determine leakage and flow rates of contaminants from fume hoods, ducts or equipment and threw light on the recommended lab practices.

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Specialists in delivery methodologies who ensure projects always achieve client goals cost effectively and with the minimum risk.

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Professionals with global experience in the development and management of Engineering, Manufacturing and Quality Compliance projects.

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Professionals with field experience in the development and implementation of Validation and Qualification Systems and training programs for sterile and non-sterile drug manufacturing sites.

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Officials from ASHRAE 110 re-write committee.

In all, the workshops became the resource pool for creating labs that were future- ready and equipped to handle the dynamism of modern R&D.

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Workshop Partner

Bioinformatics Date: February 9, 2012, 9:00 hrs to 16:00 hrs at NIPER, Hyderabad

Supported by: Department of Pharmaceuticals, Ministry of Chemicals and Fertilizers, Govt of India & the Schrödinger team. The goal of this workshop was to train selected personnel from all over India and highlight the role of Bioinformatics in current scenario. This would enable the participants to return to their labs with new ideas, software experiences and best practices to maximize productivity in their own research activities. Workshop groups studied problems with hands-on examples using Bioinformatics software and discussed complex issues highlighted by examples and case studies presented by the faculty.

Bioinformatics ¬

BioInformatics Workshop: Trained participants in current trends in Bioinformatics to maximize productivity in research

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Workshop groups dealt with hands-on projects using Bioinformatics software & discussed complex issues

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Talks by high profile speakers dealing with current scenario and advancements in BioInformatics

He also spoke about NIPER’s new courses which are going to commence in the new academic year. The Guest of Honor, Dr. K. V. Raghavan emphasized the crucial role played by Bioinformatics in the development of various areas of Biosciences. He said that the structure activity design of drugs in Bioinformatics plays a major role. Depending upon structure activity design, we can classify the different Bioinformatics as Biopharma co informatics, toxico informatics and health informatics. He also said that potential drug targeting has used bioinformatics as an HTS tool for the screening of the new molecule entities.

Bioinformatics Workshop for research scholars & students

The workshop was inaugurated by the Chief Guest Shri Raja Sekhar Vundru, IAS, Joint Secretary, Dept. Of Pharmaceuticals, Ministry of Chemicals & Fertilizers, Govt. of India, Dr. K. V. Raghavan, VicePresident, FABA, Dr. Ahmed Kamal, Project Director, NIPER and Dr. Kolupula Srinivas, the Convener, by lightening the lamp. Dr. Ahmed Kamal welcomed the gathering and in his welcome address, he highlighted the objective of the workshop and demonstrated the recent developments in Bioinformatics. He went on to touch upon its role in current scenario and briefed about NIPERHyderabad and various conferences and seminars conducted at the campus.

The Chief Guest Shri Raja Sekhar Vundru said that such workshops and conferences help students to update themselves in this field of interest.

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Workshop Bioinformatics He gave a statistical analysis on the amount of expenditure spent on research and said that it has increased from 80 crore to 234 crore over the past 15 years in India. But in the foreign R&D sectors, he drew a parallel by stating that the expenditure has grown from 64 crores to 934 crores. He emphasized that IT and biologics is a new era and that will bring new medicines for the disease for which we have currently no new medicines. Finally, he concluded that “The Future is in Biopharma”. He also launched redesigned NIPER-Hyderabad website.

The use of protein crystallography in modern biology and drug discovery was discussed. Parameters that will enable non-crystallographers such as bioinformaticians, molecular modelers, protein chemists, medicinal chemists, cell biologists etc. to choose a correct structure for their research were emphasized upon. Dr. Ravindranath S Rathore, School of Life Sciences, University of Hyderabad, delivered a talk on “Emerging Scenarios in Structure Determinations and Predictions”. He spoke about homology modeling, threading (fold recognition) and ab initio methods as emerging alternative ways of elucidating three-dimensional structures of enzymes and the employment of these predictive methods in rational drug discovery process. He also gave a brief outline of the structure prediction methods, their scope of applications, and held up a case study.

In the inaugural function, Prof. N Satyanarayana, Registrar, NIPER Hyderabad; Dr S.S Varaprada Rao, Former BDMA President; Dr PV Appaji, Executive Director, Pharmexcil; Prof. E Muralidarshan, IIFT; Eminent Speakers, Scientists from IICT and other academic institutes and industry, officials from IDPL, Schrodinger Team, Course Coordinators, Faculty, Staff and Students of NIPER-Hyderabad were present.

Dr. Kunchur Guruprasad, CCMB, Hyderabad enlightened the students by delivering a talk on “Construction of 3-D model of the Plasmodium falciparum 20S proteasome - exploring the biological and chemical space in the catalytic subunits compared with yeast 20S proteasome inhibitor complexes for rational drug design”. He discussed the proteasome molecular machinery and its involvement in the degradation of misfolded proteins and short-lived regulatory proteins, besides having a role in cell-cycle control, cell differentiation and metabolic adaptation, and cellular immune response. He also discussed the construction of the three-dimensional model of the Pf 20S proteasome and mutations associated with the catalytic subunits likely to confer specificity and which may be exploited for the design of suitable inhibitors.

Prof. B. Jayaram, Department of Chemistry, IIT, Delhi delivered a talk on “Genomes to Hit Molecules In Silico: A country path today, a highway tomorrow”. He spoke about the importance of database, aspects of DNA sequence and the way in which drug design software fall short of expectations even if the structures of drug targets are known. He explained the development of all atom energy based methodologies for whole genome analysis (ChemGenome), tertiary structure prediction of proteins (Bhageerath) and protein/DNA targeted lead molecule design (Sanjeevini). He also discussed how these methodologies can be configured to an assembly line to deliver hit molecules from genomic information. After the tea break, the session started with a lecture by Dr. Anthony Addlagatta, Senior Scientist, IICT on “Protein crystallography: implications in drug discovery and modern biology”.

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Workshop Bioinformatics Dr. G. Madhavi Sastry, Project Manager, Schrodinger Team, & D. E. Shaw India Software Ltd., Hyderabad delivered a talk on “Visiting Molecular Docking Algorithms and the Challenges in Predictive Abilities�. She discussed conformational search algorithm, scoring function and the chief objectives of a good docking algorithm. She focused on different methodologies and latest trends that have been used to address a few aspects of a docking algorithm. She also touched upon different scoring functions based on implicit and explicit solvation methods to account for interaction forces. The post lunch session was followed by a hands-on session where the delegates worked on molecular docking, homology modeling and various other tools used in molecular modeling and drug design studies. The participants expressed their pleasure at this rare opportunity where they could interact with people from different parts of the country and they were delighted with the session which helped them to understand the software. During the scientific session and hands-on training, the delegates interacted with the speakers about career opportunities in this filed. In the Valedictory Session, Prof. N Satyanarayana, Registrar NIPER-Hyderabad, chaired the session and thanked the all the organizers including eminent speakers and delegates. He presented momentoes to the Schrodinger team in appreciation of their participation. The success of this workshop is definitely a collective effort of NIPER-Hyderabad, Indian Institute of Chemical Technology (IICT), BioAsia 2012 and Schrodinger India

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Workshop Partners

Tech Transfer 2012 Date: February 9, 2012, 9:00 hrs - 16:00 hrs Hotel Katriya, Hyderabad

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India's biggest platform for Technology Accessing, Sourcing, and Licensing for Indian Lifescience industry, especially MSMEs - Tech Transfer 2012- was held by the Foundation for MSMe Clusters and IKP Knowledge Park in conjunction with BioAsia 2012. It showcased about 300+ cutting-edge, cost-effective, innovative technologies to be acquired by Indian Lifescience organizations and entrepreneurs in this space.

Tech transfer 2012 ¬

India suffers from inadequate techtransfer because of a wide gap between industry requirements and knowledge creators, inaccessibility of information, lack of communication and mutual trust, paucity of suitable p l at fo r m fo r i nte ra c t i o n a n d misalignment between ‘technologypush’ and ‘market-pull’.

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Showcasing about 300+ cutting-edge, cost-effective, innovative technologies waiting to be acquired by Indian Lifescience organizations, this event was conducted on a track basis with technology presentations in Biotechnology, Pharmaceuticals, Diagnostics and Medical Devices.

Delegates at Tech Transfer 2012

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Workshop Tech Transfer 2012 Key Highlights of Tech Transfer 2012: ¬

About 75 LifeScience companies accessed 300+ cutting-edge, cost-effective technologies suitable for them.

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Techno-commercial presentations were made on 125+ screened technologies by experts.

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Technologies showcased were from reputed international agencies, companies, institutes, universities with authenticated data, information, and proven trials.

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A “LifeScience Technology Compendium” in CDROM with preliminary information and data on each of the 300+ technologies were provided to all participants.

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One-to-one meeting were held at the end of “Tech Transfer 2012” between technology seekers and technology owners/licensing facilitators.

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Expressions of interest were generated for 60 technologies, which are in the further phase of discussion and negotiation.

It is a known fact that many technologies stand stagnated in the hands of ‘haves’, waiting to be licensed-out and/or commercialized. Classical technology transfer has not been as successful in India as it has been in developed economies because of the perceived wide gap between industry requirements and knowledge creators, i n a c c e s s i b i l i t y o f i n fo r m a t i o n , l a c k o f communication and mutual trust, paucity of suitable platform for interaction, and misalignment between ‘technology-push’ and ‘market-pull’, to name a few. It is therefore necessary to address the above gaps by creating a wider platform for technology transfer, as one of the prominent features/offerings of the innovation ecosystem in India. In order to fill the above gap, Foundation for MSME Clusters (FMC) and IKP Knowledge Park (IKP) have been exercising an international technology transfer facilitation project for the benefit of Indian Lifescience industry. This year-long exercise has been undertaken in 6 phases, viz. Market Survey; Technology Scouting; Partnership with National and International Agencies, Institutions and Organizations; Technology Screening; two Technology Transfer shows, and Follow-up and Transfer of Technologies. In order to bring pragmatism and globalism on to the platform, FMC and IKP have partnered with the Steinbeis Centre for Technology Transfer India, Institute of Intellectual Property, Research and Development (IIPRD), New Delhi, and other international technology transfer facilitators based at various countries at the world.

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Workshop Tech Transfer 2012 Key decision makers and industry representatives participated in Tech Transfer 2012 from across India. Tech Transfer 2012 was conducted on a track basis with technology presentations in the areas of Biotechnology, Pharmaceuticals (APIs + Intermediates + Formulations), Diagnostics and Medical Devices.

Tech Transfer 2012 has been initiated as a part of the umbrella project titled “Promoting Innovative Clusters in India�, which is funded and supported by t h e N a t i o n a l S c i e n c e & Te c h n o l o g y Entrepreneurship Development Board (NSTDB), a part of the Department of Science and Technology, Government of India. The project has been undertaking a host of other such activities across four select clusters of India to bolster an ecosystem of innovation. Tech Transfer Summit 2012 in progress

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BUSINESS PARTNERING BUSINESS PARTNERING BUSINESS PARTNERING


Business Partnering BioAsia 2012 successfully conducted B2B (one to one business meetings) during the event within a dedicated partnering area. It offered individual meeting spaces for the private one-to-one meetings and over 300 private B2B meetings were realized during the three days with a listing of over 400 requests from the Biopartnering community.

B2B Business Partnering meetings

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Business Partnering The BioAsia partnering community comprised of global thought-leaders, scientific experts, decision makers from the industry, top notch CEOs and regulatory experts from the industry, research organizations and institutional authorities. BioAsia also offered a free online partnering system which proactively supported the partnering delegates, exhibitors and sponsors of the event for networking and scheduling meetings during the three days of the event.

Dr. Cyrus Karkaria in a Business Partnering meeting with the Korean Delegates

Mr. Manni Kantipudi in the middle of a Business Partnering Meeting

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BIOBAZAAR BIOBAZAAR BIOBAZAAR


BioBazaar Partner

BioAsia 2012: International Buyer-Seller Meet With the pharmaceutical industry slowly but certainly shifting towards Bio-pharmaceuticals, this constitutes a major part of the total Biotech market. As of today, Bio-pharmaceuticals account for 25% of all pharmaceuticals in the development pipeline. There are currently about 125 Bio-pharmaceuticals marketed worldwide and appropriately 633 new products are in the pipeline, totaling to over 19% of all new drug development programmes. What's more, 20% of the currently marketed drugs are biotechnologically derived. Keeping this dramatically expanding market in focus and with a view to promoting the Indian Biopharma and Medical device sector, Pharmexcil with the support of Ministry of Commerce and Industry, Govt. of India, organized the International Buyer Seller Meet during BioAsia 2012.

BioBazaar ¬

The International Buyer - Seller Meet attracted 28 international delegates from 13 countries and over 100 Indian registered delegates interacted to forge progressive business links.

¬ One of the major highlights of the

meet was the two USFDA approved factory/site visits for all the International delegates. ¬

Focusing on the rise of Biopharmaceuticals, the meet not only covered the exhaustive spectrum of Biopharma products, but also promoted the Indian Biopharma and Medical device sector with great vigour.

The meet was scheduled in different sessions between 9th and 11th of February 2012, and covered various Biopharma products such as vaccines, monoclonal antibodies, bio-generics, blood products and medical devices. It saw the participation of about 28 International Delegates from 13 countries including Colombia, Mexico, Peru, Nigeria, Kenya, Ivory Coast, Egypt, Uzbekistan, Nepal, UAE, Syria, USA and China. Together with this, more than 100 Indian registered delegates also participated to establish their business relationship with global counterparts.

Delegates during the International Buyer-Seller Meet

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BioBazaar It was noted that the meet successfully helped a lot of registered Indian companies to forge new business partnerships. During the meet, it was also established that in the pharma sector, companies are required to obtain product registrations in the importing countries and that due to formal protocol, it will take some time to start the export of products as well. As a part of the International Buyer Seller Meet, two USFDA approved factory/site visits for all the International delegates were also arranged. The delegates were overwhelmed with the visits and expressed their keenness to do more business with Indian companies.

Delegates during the International Buyer-Seller Meet

Delegates during the International Buyer-Seller Meet

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International Trade Show International Trade Show International Trade Show


International Trade Show The International Trade Show was successfully hosted by BioAsia 2012. The show comprised of over 65 stalls and 13 BioAsia Innovation andYoung Minds short-listed candidates.

Delegates at International Trade Show

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International Trade Show The exhibitors’ participation included booths from the Republic of Korea, Sri Lanka, Iranian Biotech; government bodies such as ICMR and NRDC, MNCs; domestic companies like Bharat Biotech, GVK Bio, Biological E, USP, Sristek, research and educational institutions. Around 1100 delegates/visitors participated in the Trade Show during the event. Pavilions that showcased the Genome Valley, Pharmexcil and IKP Knowledge Park were the highlights of the exhibition.

Delegates at International Trade Show

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WHITE PAPER RELEASES WHITE PAPER RELEASES WHITE PAPER RELEASES


White paper releases BioAsia–Yes Bank Report on “Financing Ecosystem”

BioAsia–Pharmexcil Report on “Indian Biopharma Industries and Incentives to Exporters of Pharmaceuticals, Biologicals, Biopharma and Bioservice Sectors”

Historically, there has been a large gap between the funding available for the Biotechnology sector and the funding required by the players to achieve their full potential. Biotechnology sector by its nature is high risk/high reward and requires long term risk funding, especially for start-up companies. The most suitable financing model for these companies is through Venture Capital (VC) and Private Equity (PE) investments.

(L to R) Dr. Seth Berkley, Prof. Tissa Vitarana, Hon'ble Shri N. Kiran Kumar Reddy, Hon'ble Dr.(Smt.) Geeta Reddy, Dr. Krishna M. Ella and Shri Raja Sekhar Vundru

The report covers various export schemes across the globe and is intended to help exporters from India by providing useful information with regard to:

(L to R) Dr. K V Raghavan, Mr. Kevin Ali, Dr. Seth Berkley, Prof. Tissa Vitarana, Hon'ble Shri N. Kiran Kumar Reddy, Hon'ble Dr.(Smt.) Geeta Reddy and Mr. Vishal Gandhi

¬ India's strengths in Biotechnology product

manufacturing.

The highly knowledge-intensive industry has evolved to a stage where it needs financial partners who have the requisite understanding and risk appetite to support its growth through structured financial and advisory solutions. With this as the theme, this report highlights the current investment scenarios for the Indian Biotech Industry and covers various funding opportunities for LifeScience start-ups in this prevailing investment environment.

¬ List of Biopharma/Bioservice companies

registered with Pharmexcil and their product lines. ¬ Global status of Biopharma sector. ¬ Indian Biopharma sector's potential for exports ¬ Forthcoming important Biotech exposition in

India and overseas Biotech global expositions. ¬ Various schemes and financial incentives of

Department of Biotechnology, Ministry of Science & Technology, GOI. ¬ Financial incentives provided to Indian

Pharmaceutical/Biopharma industry by the government through Pharmexcil as product approvals (MAI Scheme), product promotions (MDA Scheme) and more. 67


White paper releases BioAsia-CII Report on “India: The R&D hub for Global Lifescience Organizations” The Indian Lifesciences sector offers critical drivers to enable the growth of Global R&D Organizations. In 2010, the Indian Lifescience market was worth US$ 27.5 billion and is expected to reach US$ 59.7 billion by 2015, growing at a CAGR of approx. 17%. The speed with which the industry has developed in the past decade highlights the country’s reserves of well-educated, relatively inexpensive workforce as well as the power of cultural change. With the Indian most of the opportunity.

The objective of the project “India: The R&D hub for global Lifescience organizations” is to create an ecosystem for potential collaborative R&D strategies for global players with Indian organizations, illustrate market dynamics of the Indian Lifescience sector by analyzing the past, ongoing and future trends and drivers highlighting key challenges that could be faced by global Lifescience companies with India in purview.

The report intends to build access for Global LifeSciences Organizations to enter India. It presents top level opportunities prevailing in the Indian LifeScience market for global companies and allows them to best benefit from the existing set-up and positively evolving ecosystem for R&D in India. The report highlights the opportunities in the Indian LifeScience R&D sector by presenting the key concerns faced by the industry and detailing to implement solutions to enable India to become the R&D hub for global LifeScience companies.

(L to R) Mr. Ketan Diwan, Dr. Ahmed Kamal, Dr. K V Raghavan, Shri Raja Sekhar Vundru, Dr. T. Ramasami, Mr. Karun Rishi, Dr. P V Appaji, Mrs. Mridul Jain, Dr. Sunder Rajan and Dr. Vibhav Garg

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GALLERY GALLERY GALLERY


Gallery A walk-through of the happenings, moments and highlights of the successfully concluded ninth chapter of BioAsia that optimized opportunities for Lifesciences.

Mr. T S Appa Rao, IAS presenting the memento to Hon'ble Shri N. Kiran Kumar Reddy and Hon'ble Dr. (Smt.) J. Geeta Reddy

Hon'ble Shri N. Kiran Kumar Reddy, Chief Minister of Andhra Pradesh during his Inaugural speech

Inaugural Ceremony in procession 71


Gallery

BioAsia 2012 Participants

Dr. Seth Berkley and GAVI team in conversation with Dr. Krishna Ella and Dr. Harshvardhan

Indo-German Breakfast Meeting in procession

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Gallery

Delegates in interaction with the panelists

Prof. Tissa Vitarana in conversation with Dr. Harish Iyer and Ms. Catherine Jucker of Shantha Biotech

Ms. Mahima Datla in conversation with Dr. Seth Berkley and Dr. Rajesh Jain

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Gallery

Practical Training at Bioinformatics Workshop at NIPER

BioAsia Young Minds & Innovation Award Poster-Model presentation

Delegates at the AWEX Belgium stall

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Gallery

Dr. Seth Berkley in interaction with Media

Delegates at the International Buyer-Seller Meet

Mr. Manni Kantipudi in conversation with Mr. Anand Govindaluri 75


Gallery

BioAsia Young Minds Award Ceremony

Prof. Vitarana at Srilankan Pavilion at BioAsia Tradeshow

Poster display of International & Young Minds Awards

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Gallery

BioAsia Young Minds & Innovation Awards candidates showcasing their projects

Guests at BioAsia 2012

Delegates in discussion

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Gallery

Hon'ble Prof. Tissa Vitarana interacting with Dr. Nata Menabde

Power 20 Breakfast Meeting in progression

Shri Raja Sekhar Vundru interacting with ISB Hyderabad delegates 78


MEDIA COVERAGE MEDIA COVERAGE MEDIA COVERAGE


Media Coverage The power and reach of the media was amply demonstrated in BioAsia 2012 which successfully showcased the purpose, business mandate and its goal of bringing together key industry stakeholders with the intent of chartering a dynamic road map ahead for the future of Lifesciences.

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Media Coverage

82


FEEDBACK & COMMENTS FEEDBACK & COMMENTS


Feedback and Comments “Biotech companies have a crucial role in the society and will have to keep the quality and affordability of medicines in mind. India is amongst the top 12 biotech destinations in the world and second in Asia, after China. I am glad that the state of Andhra Pradesh has emerged as the undisputed leader in the country for Biotechnology and BioAsia has been a great platform helping the Government in attracting new investments into the state and showcasing the strengths of Genome Valley to the global community. I take this opportunity to assure continued support from the Government to the development of sector” - Shri N Kiran Kumar Reddy, Hon'ble Chief Minister of Andhra Pradesh “BioAsia has been successful in significantly contributing towards development of biotechnology industry in India in general and in particular in Andhra Pradesh over the least eight years. Focusing on vaccines, the ninth edition of BioAsia has been successful in assembling the key stakeholders of the sector both globally and from India. Prominent participation of the Indian vaccine manufacturers like Bharat Biotech International, Shantha Biotech, Serum Institute of India, Panacea Biotech, Biological E, Indian Immunologicals Ltd, in the event highlights of the importance of the event.” -Dr. (Smt.) J. Geeta Reddy, Hon’ble Minister for Major Industries, Sugar, Commerce & Export Promotion, Govt. of AP “India is a prime example of how the vaccine landscape has changed over the past 20 years. Indian manufacturers can produce vaccines that meet high quality standards, are appropriate to specific country settings, and are offered at lower and sustainable prices through a reliable supply over time. They also have the capacity to engage in applied vaccine development. I am excited at the prospect of seeing Indian manufacturers develop new combination vaccines as well as tackling new diseases that are especially relevant to those living in developing countries.” -Dr. Seth Berkley, CEO, GAVI Alliance “Indian Biotech industry had crossed over $3 billion in 2010-2011 and BioAsia is an integral part of the Biotech industry’s growth.” -Dr. K V Raghavan, VP, FABA 85


Feedback and Comments “BioAsia over the years has been instrumental in showcasing the Lifesciences and R&D strengths of Hyderabad and Andhra Pradesh to the world particularly the presence of Genome Valley – the largest industrial cluster in country. India is an excellent destination for Biotech/Biopharma industries. Hyderabad is the biggest manufacturer of biotech products and vaccines in the country and this explains the focus of BioAsia on elements like policy, strategy and markets” Dr. Krishna M. Ella, CMD, Bharat Biotech International Ltd., Hyderabad “It was a truly a vibrant platform and discussions were very stimulating clearly suggesting a road map to take the Indian biotech industry to next level of growth.”

-Vishal Gandhi, SVP and Head- Life Sciences, Yes Bank “It was indeed a pleasure attending the BioAsia 2012 at Hyderabad. It was a very well thought off coordinated effort to put such a conference. My personal compliments to the team. The Agenda and the subject was very well chosen” -Roopesh Bhargava, Director - Sales & Marketing, Sanofi Pasteur India (Pvt) Ltd., Mumbai “I commend BioAsia2012 organisers for making an effort to bring various stakeholders around the table in a breakfast meeting with Seth Berkley, GAVI Chair as the top of the table. It was gratifying to see the vibrance, enthusiasm and commitments across all sectors to take the vaccine agenda forward cohesively. The most touching part of that meeting is the bold openness of many who raised pertinent issues about our shortfalls and weaknesses. This reflects the turning point and the paradigm shift at "looking at the half empty" glass to dream to fill it up. If we can dream it, we can make it. Yes, we can! This is the beginning and we need to create a cohesive community and ecosystem for everyone to echo their voice as well as to put their one cent keeping the bigger picture as the ultimate objective knocking down all the barriers on the way. On the concluding point, we need to aim Vaccines - not as "A Shot in the Arm!" in 2012, but as "Lollipop in the mouth!" -Dr. Shreemanta K Parida, CEO, Vaccine Grand Challenge Program, Dept of Biotechnology, Ministry of Science & Technology, Govt. of India 86


Feedback and Comments “This was an excellent meeting with topics discussed being clearly relevant to vaccines and expanding use for improvement of public health”

-Dr. Harish Iyer, CEO, Shantha Biotech, Hyderabad “The BioAsia 2012 was well organized, had good speakers and was well attended. The focus on CROs was important for HYDERABAD to project”. -Mr. Manni Kantipudi, CEO, GVK Biosciences “More professionally conducted this time with better industry participation” -Dr. K V Balasubramaniam, Managing Director, Indian Immunologicals Ltd. “The precise number of registered delegates for the event was 598; in addition over 450 visitors also thronged the three-day global bio-business event. Sri Lanka participated as the Country Partner for the event and more than 40 countries took part in BioAsia 2012 with major delegations from USA, Korea, Belgium, Pennsylvania, Germany, Iran, Singapore, Nepal and Africa. The international tradeshow at BioAsia 2012 attracted about 75 Companies from across the globe wherein the Biobazaar (International Buyer Seller Meet) had over 45 sponsored international buyers from 17 Countries. We are extremely grateful for the support received from the Government of India through Department of Biotechnology, Department of Pharmaceuticals, Department of Commerce, Department of Science & Technology etc.” -Mr. Karikal Valaven, IAS, Convener, BioAsia 2012 “There were some interesting discussions and it was good to meet business partners at the location. The logistics (layout of rooms, food, location) were all very comfortable.” -Dr. Richard Connell, Vice President and Head of Asia Research, Pfizer, Shanghai “BioAsia 2012 was well organized.” -Mr. Sai D. Prasad, VP - Business Development, Bharat Biotech International Ltd. 87


Supporting Organisations

biocat BioRegio de Catalunya

Media Partners

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www.bioasia.in

BioAsia Secretariat 204, Imperial Apartments, Greenlands Circle, Ameerpet Hyderabad-500 016 Andhra Pradesh, India +91 40 6644 6477 / 6577 info@bioasia.in

Š Federation of Asian Biotech Associations (FABA)

BioAsia 2012 Report Book  

BioAsia 2012 report

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