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SEMINOLE COUNTY TRIATHLETES!

FEBRUARY 2014!

VOLUME 1 ISSUE 4

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SEMINOLE COUNTY TRIATHLETES!

VOLUME 1 ISSUE 4

SCT TAKES ON THE BIG BOYS IN THE USAT CHALLENGE COMPETITION Winter can be a difficult time to find motivation as a triathlete. It’s too cold outside to ride, water temperatures dip way below water we prefer, and honestly...how much running can we do? The USAT (United States of America Triathlon) group sponsors a friendly competition to spice it up a bit. Athletes are encouraged to enter their mileage and clubs go head to head featuring a portion of our sport each month. In December, we were focused on the swim, and SCT did outstanding! We finished 6th in division 3 with an impressive 3,588.4 miles swam (weighted). Next up, in January, the focus switched to the bike. SCT moved up to 5th, logging 8,113.7 miles. And that moves us to February. Currently, SCT is in 8th place logging an impressive 1982 miles (weighted). Not too bad for our first time participating. GO TEAM SCT!

SCT ADDS ADDAERO TO HELP REACH OUR ATHLETES Questions about Addaero? We hope to have a mini meeting for athletes interested in learning more soon. We are pleased to announce the addition of addaero.com to the growning list of sponsors for our club. Addaero is a suite of web based training tools for coaches, groups, and individuals designed to plan, track and analyze health and fitness. It removes the barriers and excuses that keep people from improving their health and fitness. Solo achieves this by connecting the individual to friends, groups, coaches, and their data. These connections benefit everyone, from the beginner to the elite athlete by

FEBRUARY 2014!

providing motivation, instruction, accountability, goals and analysis. Addaero Solo synchronizes your health and fitness data from providers, such as Garmin, FitBit, and Withings. This information, combined with instruction and planning from a coach or trainer, is displayed in a simple, easy to understand March format allowing for meaningful analysis.

10th 6pm @D2 Cycling

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SEMINOLE COUNTY TRIATHLETES!

DISCOUNT CODES FOR SCT MEMBERS

VOLUME 1 ISSUE 4

To continue to add value to your club membership, we have secured discounts for local races. Check the members section for more information!

In addition to codes, Sommer Sports is offering you a chance to race for FREE! Simply volunteer for one of their races! Every hour you volunteer gets you $10 off a race. What a deal!

SCT GIVES BACK TO THE COMMUNITY We have several ways you can get out and give back to the community: 1.) March 16th Tour de Cure SAG Stop. 2. ) May 10th Sanford Chocolate Sundae Run with Racetime Sports. 3. ) May 11th Tomoka Triathlon, Ormond Beach 4. ) Check Sommer Sports for numerous events. 5. ) Firecracker 5K with Racetime Sports.

COACH DAN AND WEREZOO/SCT CLASSES STARTING SOON Last race season, SCT had the opportunity to train in a pack. Werezoo opened up their den and invited us for our own private workouts. These were a HUGE success and a ton of fun for all who attended.

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SEMINOLE COUNTY TRIATHLETES!

VOLUME 1 ISSUE 4

BRICK WORKOUT PLANNED IN HAINES CITY April 13th will be here before we know it! Our athletes who will be participating in the Ironman 70.3 Florida will be planning a brick workout on Saturday March 29th at 7:00am. We will meet at Lake Eva Park to ride the entire 56 mile course, followed by a 6 mile run. Even if you aren’t planning on doing the event, please come out and ride with us. IRONMAN CO-BRANDED GEAR NOW AVAILABLE Seminole County Triathletes logo and the M dot. CLICK is a member of the Ironman HERE for more information. Triathlon Club. With this membership, we are given a few perks, such as partnership with Ironman to make available Co-Branded Gear. Currently, you can choose a jacket, backpack, or hat with the SCT

SIGN UP TO STAFF THE TRAVELING CLUBHOUSE We are in need of some volunteers to staff the traveling clubhouse for the following events: IMFL 70.3, St. Anthony’s Tri, and Tomoka Triathlon. Email us at seminolecountytriathletes@gmail.com

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SEMINOLE COUNTY TRIATHLETES!

VOLUME 1 ISSUE 4

Officials Tri- Angle As we train for triathlons, we practice swimming, we practice biking, we practice running, and we practice our transition routines. How many athletes pull out their handy-dandy USAT Competitive Rules Rule book and review all of the rules and regulations? I’d venture a guess that not many do. Unless you are competing at the Elite level, you probably don’t care about the hundreds of types of violations that can result in penalties or even disqualification. Frankly, only a handful of the violations are called by referees on a regular basis. By far, the majority of these are incurred on the bike course. To help you avoid the common penalties, I’ve listed the top 3 here with a basic overview of each. Drafting – Intersecting your draft zone (7 meters x 2 meters around the bike) with the draft zone of another athlete. You may legally enter the draft zone to pass, but the pass MUST be completed within 15 seconds of entering the draft zone. A pass is completed when the leading edge of the front wheel of the passing athlete overtakes the leading edge of the front wheel of the athlete being passed. If you enter into a draft zone and are unable to successfully pass within the 15 seconds, even if you drop back out of the draft zone, you have illegally drafted and can be assessed a penalty. (And yes, those of us riding on the backs of the motorcycles know that you know that we are there and we know what you are doing – chances are we’ve done that same move at some time during a race ) Overtaken – If you are passed on the bike course, it is your responsibility to drop back out of the draft zone immediately. If you do not, an “Overtaken” penalty will be assessed. If you want to pass that other athlete, you may do so but only after exiting and re-entering the draft zone. Position – Unless there is a safety issue or an athlete is in the process of passing another, all athletes must ride on the right of the course. Even if you are not within the draft zone of another athlete, you may not just cruise along down the left side of the course. Doing so may result in a “Position”violation and a variable time penalty.

Jill Bowers

USAT Official and SCT Member Jill Bowers gives us a look into the rules and regulations of our great sport each month.

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Debbie Rosa Debbie Rosa

SEMINOLE COUNTY TRIATHLETES!

VOLUME 1 ISSUE 4

Each Month, T3 will welcome a guest writer to share their experiences in triathlon. First up, Becky Quinn. Becky is one of the coaches in our C25K program, as well as one of our newest 140.6 finishers.

The start of the SCT Couch to 5K program in January has me reminiscing about my start as a runner (and a triathlete).  Some of you may be wondering why a triathlon club is offering a beginner runner program, but the truth is we all started in this sport somewhere, and for some of us it was through running.   I grew up as an athlete, with softball as my main sport, but including stints with basketball (until I realized I was too short and too slow), and cross country (just to have something to do after school before basketball season).  I grew up in Manchester, CT, home to the famous Thanksgiving morning Manchester Road Race.  And though I participated in that a few times growing up, I had no idea what a big Becky Quinn deal that organized road race structure was.  In college I thought about trying out for softball, but needed to work a part-time job and never would have been able to fit it all in.  So to battle the “freshman 15,” my roommate and I would run.  Yet I never considered myself a “runner” until a few years later when a coworker convinced me to do a 5K with her.  I had no idea what I was getting myself into…but when I showed up for a 7:30 a.m. race on a Saturday morning, I was amazed to find an entire subculture, previously unknown to me, of people who chose to pay money to get up early and run 3.1 miles in hot and humid Florida, and they liked it!    After that first race, I was hooked.  I did some more 5K races, then slowly increased the distances.  I don’t think I did that strategically at the time, but I vividly remember one weekend morning with friends on the Cady Way Trail when I ran 6 miles for the very first time.  Six miles!  I was amazed that I could do such a thing!  Next was a 15K in Orlando, after which I vowed NEVER to run that far again…and two weeks later was planning my first marathon.  In the middle of all this, another coworker convinced me to try triathlons…but more on that next time.  

SCT’s C25K workout.

Rain or Shine the C25k folks are ready Sharon Dannel

FEBRUARY 2014!

Today, countless races and 10 marathons later, I am proud to call myself a runner.  But to those who are just starting out, I have the following to share: being a “runner” takes work, it takes commitment, and you will only get out of it what you put into it.  But if you do the work, take the time to commit to it, and see it for its awesome possibilities, the benefits are endless!  And I’m not just talking the physical health benefits.  How many of us have Carol Haile developed amazing friendships, found romance, found strength within ourselves that we had no idea existed, “just” through running? continued page 7

Judi Robison

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SEMINOLE COUNTY TRIATHLETES!

VOLUME 1 ISSUE 4

For what it’s worth, here are the top 5 things I try to remember as I continue on my running journey: " 1."

Practice positive self talk in your head.  Some people use a mantra or phrase (when I’m tired but have a ways to go, I sing “Just Keep Running” to the tune of Dory singing “Just Keep Swimming” in Finding Nemo).  Other times when I find myself doubting whether I can make my running goal that day (whether it’s in a race or just a training run), I remember back to times when I felt bad but made it anyway.  As soon as that negative thought enters your head, recognize it, acknowledge it, then force it out with something positive.

" 2."

Remember that everyone struggles with running when we’re pushing our limits.  We just do it at different paces.  Quite a few years ago I would run with some people out of Track Shack on Wednesday nights.  It was an informal tempo run, but occasionally we would go to the track at Lake Highland Prep and do speed work.  I had no idea what speed work was—I would just follow along and do what the others told me.  What I remember is that the group included runners with a wide range of abilities, and often times I was the last one crossing the line for the laps we would do.  I was huffing and puffing as I pushed myself to run 400s or 800s or whatever it was.  But the “fast” people, when they finished their laps, were also huffing and puffing as they pushed themselves to get better and faster.  We all struggled to get better, we just did it at different speeds.

" 3."

Which leads to my next point, which is you CAN go faster.  You CAN push your body further than you did last year, last month, last week.  Why would you want to?  Well, why not?  We are all capable of more than we give ourselves credit for, and the feeling of confidence, strength and pride (a good pride, not an arrogant pride) we feel after running farther or faster or better than we have before can transfer into positive things throughout the other aspects of our lives. 

" 4."

Supporting others in their running goals can reinvigorate your own running.  I fully believe in doing what you need to do for you, to run the best you can.  Sometimes that means running on your own or with people who are faster than you, which might mean leaving other running friends behind.  There’s nothing wrong with that.  But there is also time to support others who might need it, share your experience, provide a distraction for someone struggling through a training session.  There have been many times when I’ve been running with a friend or group of friends when I was not having a “good” run, and their encouraging words, conversations, or even silent cadence next to me gave me the strength to continue and finish what I set out to do.  I have tried to pay that forward and will never take those moments for granted.

" 5."

Finally, this is FUN! Never forget that running is a fun thing.  Look around your neighborhood, or on a playground, or simply remember back to when you were a kid, and we would just run because we could.  Because we couldn’t wait to get from the school door to the playground at recess.  Because we were playing hide and seek and ran to find the best hiding spot.  Because it was raining and running through puddles made an amazing splash and mess.  Be happy that you can do this, that your body functions in a Anne Spencer and Debbie way to make it possible to move forward, get stronger, feel the wind, sun or rain on your face, your feet hitting the pavement, the little reminders from your lungs and heart and muscles and joints that they’re there, working hard for you.

Coach David Houle

Rosa

  Enjoy it, smile randomly about it, and just keep running, just keep running, just keep running, running, running…

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FREE for SCT club members ($35 annual membership fee) $20 program fee for non-members Race Fees additional to the cost of training program Group training and special seminars will be held in the Lake Mary/Sanford area

Sprint Triathlon March 31st - June 14th

Train To Race the Lake Sylvan Triathlon on June 14th

11 week plan with Swim, Bike & Run Training Transition & Nutrition Clinics

Interested  in  Triathlon…  but  are  unsure  about  the  swim? Join us for a Beginners Adult Swim trial on Sunday, March 23rd Come to our information session on March 10th to learn more! 7:30 pm at Riverwalk Pizza in Sanford. To RSVP or for more information: Visit Seminole County Triathletes on Facebook Email us at seminolecountytriathletes@gmail.com You have to take the first step, but the Seminole County Triathletes can help you keep moving forward!

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BRYCE ANDERSON Member since: USAT 2009, SCT 2013 Age Group: 30-34 Status: Married to Keely Anderson with a one year old son (Maximus) Occupation: Analyst - Wells Fargo Favorite Local Restaurant: Amura and Hillstone When not training, I enjoy: Family, Reading, Music, Cycling, Movies Before I became a triathlete I was: Falling in love with my wife Keely. We found a flyer for a tiger shark triathlon on the door to Stonewood during a weekend jaunt up to Ormond Beach FL. That night at dinner we both talked about how Triathlon sounded like a fun sport to get into. I had no idea where it would take us. Who or what inspired you to start triathlons? In my late twenties I managed to pack on a few extra pounds. I came from a background as a Fitness Management major in college and worked a couple of years as a personal trainer but had let things fall apart with my health. I still remember the day I quit “being out of shape” cold turkey. I was standing looking at myself in the mirror. I did not even recognize the 5’9” 235 lb person staring back at me. I now race at a healthy 148 lbs. The key to my success was never a diet or special training program or even triathlon. All of those things helped, but in the end it came down to a choice. I choose on a daily basis to be a healthy person. It plays a part in my decision to work out, what to eat and even in the choices I make regarding what I waste my time watching on TV. I strive for a healthy mind body and soul. That is my goal. Triathlon was an obvious choice; both to bolster this healthy lifestyle and as medium to further strengthen the bond with my wife and fellow triathlete. My first triathlon: 2009 Race #3 of the Clermont Central Florida Triathlon Series. People literally swam right over the top of me. I biked at something like a 19 mph and ran the hilly 5K at around an 8:50 mile. I remember looking at my age group result (18th of 36) and thinking I would never be on the podium at one of these things. Pre and/or Post event ritual: The night before every race I split a Papa Murphy’s home bake family size pizza with my wife. I get ground beef on my half and she likes “gourmet veggie” on hers. After the races I like to chill with our SCT club, joke around and sneak over for a massage if possible. When my wife and I leave the venue we try to find a Dairy Queen and get a Butterfinger Blizzard to split. DQ is the kryptonite to our triathlon; but we typically only indulge after races. Favorite event/tri: Miami Man (Olympic Distance) Favorite segment (swim, bike or run): The bike of course. PR/Best race (or any split time): Miami Man 2013 at 2:05:43 (Olympic Distance). I shaved 4 minutes off of my previous best, PR’d the swim with a 1:28 per yard average, and PR’d the 22 mile bike at 23.7 MPH. This year's athletic goal: Go under 2 hours at Miami Man 2014 Can’t race without: My Family Most embarrassing or disastrous moment: At Tomoka 2013. I always clip my tri shoes onto my bike to speed through transition faster but at the first race of the season I forgot to open the Velcro on the shoes. This meant that I had to fumble with them to insert my feet, all while riding up and over the intracoastal bridge. I won’t make that mistake again… My equipment: Felt B16 TT bike, Williams 85 Carbon Clincher Wheels, Giro Advantage 2 Helmet, XLAB Torpedo water system, Louis Garneau Carbon HRS Cycling Shoes, Merrell Bare Access 2 Running Shoes, 53X11 Headsweats Visor, SCT Tri Kit and Speedo Socket Goggles. Equipment wish list: FLO Disc Wheel, Felt Bayonet Carbon Aerobars Best advice: It is never too late to dream big, set goals that seem a little crazy and strive to be a better you. Favorite Thing(s) About SCT: Sharing in a passion with equally passionate family and friends. There is nothing like receiving encouragement and support at an event you have trained for all year. My wife and I have always shared this experience but the enjoyment is multiplied by the caring hearts of our SCT family.

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KEELY ANDERSON Member since: 2012 Age Group: F 35-39 Status: Married to Bryce Anderson and 1 son, Max Occupation: Fitness Professional (trainer/ fitness instructor) Favorite local restaurant: Amura/The Vineyard When not training, I enjoy: Training and teaching others, spending time with my family, going to dinner & movies, watching sports Before I became a triathlete I was: A state/ regional gymnastic competitor for 6 years, a National/collegiate springboard Platform diver for 6 years, a Fitness/figure competitor for 2 years. Who or what inspired you to start triathlons? My husband and I were on one of our first dates at Stonewood and we found a triathlon flyer for an upcoming race. We decided that it would be something fun and challenging to do, and we could train together. I was also recovering from my 3 rd and 4th knee surgeries, so it was good motivation to get me training. My first triathlon: : #3 of clermont sprint triathlon series 2009 Pre and/or Post event ritual: Pre event: tapering the week before & we get a Papa Murphy's pizza the night before the event Post: Dairy Queen treat Favorite event/tri: Miami Man International Distance because its a well run event, good training challenge, and a little vacation. Favorite segment (swim, bike or run): Bike, followed by the swim. PR/Best race (or any split time): 2013 Miami Man- improved total time by 7 minutes from previous 2 years This year's athletic goal: My goal for the beginning of the year was to just compete in my first triathlon post baby. My goal was accomplished and I was 1st in my age group. My end of the year goal was to Finish 5th in Miami Man. I finished 8th. I learned what I need to adjust in my training for next time to make 5th happen. Can’t race without: My magic Merrell shoes and extra gum in my pockets:) Most embarrassing or disastrous moment: Getting a flat tire on the first mile of my first race in 2011 and missing the Miami Man finish line ( running 5 minutes further). My equipment: Speedo goggles, Trek 1.2, Merrell bare access, garmin 910 xt Equipment wish list: New goggles, swim parka, Time Trial bike, the perfect pair of zoot tri shorts Oakley thump sunglasses Best advice: Set goals, train smart, have fun. Favorite Thing(s) About SCT: Being able to share my interests with those who have the same interest. I enjoy the Camaraderie at events whether it be racing, cheering or volunteering

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JUST PRESS ENTER 2013 DONE! Looking back in order to look forward is an essential element for triathletes. When you look back at 2013 what stands out for you? Was it the most fun you had, the most challenging race, the easiest race, or simply celebrating with friends? What do you want for 2014? My challenge for you in 2014 is to try something new in your training, do something different, and get out of your comfort zone. Triathletes love routines with a passion. Weeks are planned out well in advance. If weather, work or life requires us to modify our carefully developed training schedules, we often become exasperated with frustration. Sometimes we question if we will be as fast or as strong on race day because one training day was altered. Basically we freak out! We get caught up in the same routine and are afraid to try something new, do something different, or do anything that takes us out of our comfort zone. But, I can assure you it can be a positive experience and enhance your overall skills. So how have I gotten out of my comfort zone? I love to travel and I love triathlons. So, I decided to combine the two. I searched for triathlons which coincided with my dates of travel. During my search the pin dropped on the map of the world and landed on Bali. Beautiful Bali. I was in. I found my flights and found myself staring at the “pay now” button. My heart pounded with excitement and fear. Press enter, press enter, but my finger was trembling. I kept telling myself, “What an adventure it would be. I’m going to be swimming in the Indian Ocean, biking on an island with crazy drivers in cars and on scooters, and running I have no idea where.” What if by traveling that far my body doesn’t work? What if I embarrass myself racing against Australians, New Zealanders and people from all over Southeast Asia? Am I going to let getting out of the comfort of the pool I swim in, the roads I bike on, the routes I run stop me? Press enter! What if I don’t like Bali? What if I get home sick? I was going to be twelve hours ahead of Florida time. What if I get

injured? What if, What if… Am I going to let fear of the unknown stop me. NO! Press enter! Press enter! With one quick move of my hand, I clicked and it was done. I pressed enter on getting out of my comfort zone. My trip to Bali was life changing and I can’t believe I entertained hesitating for one second. I placed 2nd in my age group and met some of the nicest people from all over the world. Swimming in the Indian Ocean was amazing, biking on a 1980’s style bike dodging crazy drivers was adventurous, and running through the streets of Bali with chickens everywhere and the local people cheering put a smile on my face. How I felt after this trip is indescribable and one of the best decisions I ever made. Yes, I felt out of my comfort zone, but only for a few fleeting moments. I realized anticipated discomfort is just something we make up in our heads when we are fearful about placing ourselves in new situations and that’s what keeps us from pressing enter. As you are planning your 2014 season you don’t need to travel half way around the word to get out of your comfort zone. Just challenge yourself. Try a new adventure. Swim, bike, run somewhere new and with people you don’t know. Do a race you have never done before. Travel somewhere. Anywhere. Just put on your goggles, helmet and running shoes and get out of your comfort zone. All you have to do is press enter!

COACH CAMERON EDWARDS Cameron Edwards is a certified USAT Triathlon Coach and USMS Swim Coach. She is mostly proud of the training required than the results of her events. Her favorite races to train for were the Ironman Florida, the USA Triathlons Nationals, and the USMS Short Course National Championships.Coach Cameron has earned many podium finishes,  USAT All American Honorable Mention Honors and was chosen to be on the cover of USAT Triathlon Magazine 2011 Winter Edition. As a proud coach, she enjoys every session and enjoys seeing her athletes go through the process to accomplish their goals. Cameron says, “Do not take things so seriously, this is supposed to be fun…enjoy the hard work and smile because if you are not having any fun why do it.”

Contact Coach Cameron: Cell (386) 290-5470 or email camerone52@hotmail.com

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Exclusive Membership has privileges...

15% off

10% off

See Member’s Section of details

10% off

10% off

10% off

Planning your 2014 Calendar? Let SCT help you reach your goals! We are in the process of selecting special team events for next year. Drop us an email to make sure your voice is heard. Seminolecountytriathletes@gmail.com

Sue

Micaela Renee Sharon

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SCT PHOTO GALLERY

Shannon and David Houle Steven Spencer

Erik Hart

Angela Wise

Joe Briatico

Justin Sanders

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February 2014 SCT Newsletter  
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