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William Joseph Baptiste Selected Works


PERFORATED TOWER.

Professor: Nick Bruscia Fall 2017

Utilizing natural and biological precedents, The overall aim was to investigate bio-organisims allowing for the development of a theoretical position on the relationships between geometry, form and the environment. Starting off with a drawn analysis of the geometric system allowed for the establishment of the internal architectural variables of the system and the potential external parameters that it responds to. Studying the predefined limits of the geometric system and its ability to change state through gradients and topological transformations. The bio-organism chosen was the sponge due to its perforation and movement in water. Its skeletal structural allowed for mobility and flexibility. Its elongated form allowed for deep canals and crevice. Its structural system results in a gradient of modular member which was the basis of said proposal. Allowing this design to adapt to external forces and essential move like a sponge resulted in parametric principles. Allowing the structure to converge on itself and allow for a secondary external casing and or thatched design results in a tower like form which has gradient in its structure as well as its “skin�.


Aggregate System.


Field Model.


Perforated Model.


VERTICAL VILLAGE.

Professor: Coryn Kempster Fall 2016

“Vertical Village” was initially aimed at the demographics of “Gardeners”. The realization that anyone can garden and refining to the key demographic was essential. Families of mixed use requiring different needs but essentially being the same at their core was what designed the layout of the building. With markets on the lower levels, living above allows residents to grow their own goods above and then sell them below. Essentially having a second program of day care ties with the mixed families and foster kids which provides them with homes and other living opportunities. The 12 story building consists of a Podium like form where the commercial floors, such as “Daycares, Farmers Markets and Foster Agencies predominantly acquire the lower portion of the building, while the residential consists of mixed families ranging from, single parent, Extended and Foster families. “Sharing” on the upper levels between families is essentially creating a community in a village setting.


Two Couples or Individuals -Share central core space which includes Entrance and indoor Courtyard

Two Nuclear Families Upper -The Central Light space belongs to family on upper level

Two Nuclear Families Lower - Both families share the entrance. Lower family obtains central core space.

Two Single Parent Family Upper -Both families share a Library

Two Single parent Family Lower -Bother families share Central core space and Dinning Room.

Foster Family Families share Everything due to open space

Multi-Gen Family -Share everything while keeping privacy


CULTURAL HINGE. Leimart Park Competition Fall 2016

After Carefully studying the site and surrounding urban context, the design team came to the realization that there was a need for a large open public space where citizens could come together to celebrate their heritage and culture. At the moment, Leimert Park is the main public space the community relies on to gather and fulfills different kinds of cultural activities. However, this existing space was designed as the main formal green space for the community as a part of the master plan of the 1920’s. Programmatic, the building is zoned according to its relationship to the street; in order to create a spatial sequence that constantly moves the user between interior and exterior. Thus, circulation becomes a major part of the architectural performance, which more that connecting one space to another promotes high levels of interaction between users as they move through space. It places people at the center of the design to activate the building through the day.


Weaving In.

Sunny Side Competition Fall 2017

After Carefully studying the site and surrounding urban context, the design team came to the realization that there was a need for a large open public space where citizens could come together to celebrate their heritage and culture. At the moment, Leimert Park is the main public space the community relies on to gather and fulfills different kinds of cultural activities. However, this existing space was designed as the main formal green space for the community as a part of the master plan of the 1920’s. Programmatic, the building is zoned according to its relationship to the street; in order to create a spatial sequence that constantly moves the user between interior and exterior. Thus, circulation becomes a major part of the architectural performance, which more that connecting one space to another promotes high levels of interaction between users as they move through space. It places people at the center of the design to activate the building through the day.


Extending the grid forms stands through the site.

Nodes on the strands for nature studies, story telling, art, installations & field centers.

Ecological strands of water retention fields & planting that reclaim the site & offer public programs.

Education strand woven into the urban fabric and linking existing civic buildings.

Work strand of community gardens, green houses & startups along the street elevations.


Applying the site proposal to one section and or parcel allows for the reaming site to be later on developed and utilized. Allowing for community involvement to later “grow� the site themselves is what we as a design team felt most important. The Fact that the community of Sunny-side can essentially design for themselves was the overall goal of the project.


SLS STREET LEAGUE

Skateboarding Course Personal Work Spring 2018

The Proposed design for a SLS Street league competition Course allows for all skateboarders to experience two big sections instead of the traditional one sectioned course. This competition has the best and greatest skaters from around the world competing, so creating a course that challenges them but allows them to have fun at the same time was the main goal. Splitting the longitudinal site into thirds allowed for two big sections and an inner section connecting both. Having constant circulation allows for the skaters to go back and forth perfecting lines and building points. Essentially this course allows for skaters to build upon their points quickly for their overall ratings. The main design focus was to have all vert elements on the edges of the course while all the street obstacles and elements are located in the middle allowing for utilization of the whole course and not specifically adhering to one type of skater. Its supposed to be well rounded and balanced course for all types of skaters. One big section contains a 20 foot down ramp which allows for skaters to shoot out and hit the central pyramid going full speed.


Course split into Thirds for two big sections and one small center section.

Two Circulation paths are introduced within all three sections.

Circulation patths are refinded and Tertiary spaces are introduced.


Big Section 1.

Street Section.

Big Section 2.


SNAPPING FACADE. Student Assistant Work Spring 2018

Snapping Facade suggests an alternative approach for the design of dynamic facade systems that use a “snapping-induced motion” to open and close apertures, providing shading for the building. The prototype explores using weakening-induced bands tied within the elastic threshold which, produce “snap” deformation with minimal stimulus. Traditionally, unstable movement within the building construction is considered as an undesirable occurrence but, the Snapping Facade aims to harness the characteristics of elastic instability by applying it as an opening and closing mechanism using the embedded energy within the materials. Without complicated maintenance, users can participate in the dynamic movement of the building envelope for play, fun, and energy saving. My role as a research and student assistant was to aid in the physical model and its construction. the snapping facade system essentially was designed by the professor and other student assistants. Utilizing tools such as a 3D printers and Laser cutters, the mass production of modular pieces and paper like materials were essential in the whole process. The finished result allows for shading of natural sunlight with the easy motion of a “twist”.

Image Credit: Post-Process Jing Yong Song.


ORGANIC SUNSHADE. Professor: Jin Yong Song Spring 2018

A continuation from the “Snapping Facade” proposal, The design for the interstitial fabric and or paper like fabric that not just only bends or “snaps” with the structural system but allows plays a role to a perforated shader as well. The Ideal of creating a pattern on this secondary element came the idea of bio-organism and green life. With the collaboration with a Local artist who strictly indulgences in mimicking wild life patterns with perforations as her medium, taking these design principles and creating a pattern for one modular piece only showed the potential of endless pattern possibilities. With doing a lot of research in kinetic art and Kinetic movement, choosing a pattern that would reduce the materials strength resulting for maximum flexibility was crucial. The idea of a “leaf” came into fruition due to it mimicking the organic context of being outside in the woods or wilderness. This Organic facade is just another alternative to elements such as a blind and curtains. Again this is simply activated by the simple motion of a twist.


59 Tyler ST Buffalo, NY 14214 wjbaptis@buffalo.edu T.631.780.2366

William Joseph Baptiste Portfolio  

Selected Works.

William Joseph Baptiste Portfolio  

Selected Works.

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