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Chief Master Sergeant

Willard L. Hill, Sr.

CMSgt Chevron (1994–present)

Chief Master Sergeant (CMSgt) is the ninth, and highest, enlisted rank in the U.S. Air Force, just above Senior Master Sergeant, and is a senior non-commissioned officer. The official term of address is "Chief Master Sergeant" or "Chief". Attaining the rank of Chief Master Sergeant is the pinnacle of an Air Force enlisted member's career. Some Chief Master Sergeants manage the efforts of all enlisted personnel within their unit or major subsection thereof, while others run major staff functions at higher headquarters levels. All Chief Master Sergeants are expected to serve as mentors for company-grade and field-grade commissioned officers, as well as noncommissioned officers and junior enlisted members, and to serve as advisors to unit commanders and senior officers. By federal law, only one percent of the Air Force enlisted force may hold the rank of Chief Master Sergeant.

Total Active Duty Time:

25 years, 9 months and 10 days.

Awards and Education:

Rifle Expert (1944), Officer Candidate Course (1956) Top Secret Clearance (1956) ROTC

Training, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO., NCO Academy (1958), Administrative Officer Course (1962) SAC Educational Achievement Award (1964), , OJT Supervisor Course (1967)

Duty Stations:

Ryukus Islands, southwest of Japan (1945), Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan (1945), England and

France (1946), SS Sea Devil (1946), Japan (1950) Harmon Air Force Base, Newfoundland (1962) Udorn, Thailand (1967) Lowry Air Force Base, Denver, Colorado, Olathe Naval Air Station, Olathe, Kansas, Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, Maxwell Air Force Base, Montgomery, Alabama, Whiteman Air Force Base, Knob Noster, Missouri, Ellsworth Air Force Base, South Dakota, McConnell Air Force Base, Wichita, KS., Westover Air Force Base, Mass., Phan Rang Air Base, Republic of Vietnam (1969), Beale Air Force Base, Marysville, California.


Bronze Star Medal Ribbon Bronze Star Medal Ribbon Criteria: A U.S. Armed Forces individual military decoration and the fourth-highest award for bravery, heroism or meritorious service. Awarded to a member of the military who, while serving in or with the military of the United States after December 6, 1941, distinguished him or herself by heroic or meritorious achievement or service, not involving participation in aerial flight, while engaged in an action against an enemy of the United States; while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force; or while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party. Awards may be made for acts of heroism, performed under circumstances described above, which are of lesser degree than required for the award of the Silver Star. Awards may also be made to recognize single acts of merit or meritorious service. The required achievement or service while of lesser degree than that required for the award of the Legion of Merit must nevertheless have been meritorious and accomplished with distinction. To be eligible for the Bronze Star Medal, a military member must be getting hostile fire/imminent danger pay, during the event for which the medal is to be awarded. The Bronze Star Medal is typically referred to by its full name (including the word "Medal") to differentiate the decoration from bronze service stars which are worn on campaign medals and service awards. Note: This service ribbon is issued by the military along with an accompanying medal.

Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation with Navy Frame Republic of Korea Presidential Unit Citation with Navy Frame Criteria: A decoration issued by the government of South Korea to both Korean military and foreign units. The last major issuance of the decoration was during the Korean War when the decoration was bestowed to several U.S., United Kingdom and Commonwealth military units. By order of the Korean government, the award was also retroactively authorized to every unit of the United States Army having deployed to Korea between 1950 and 1954. Note: This unit citation ribbon is one of the few awards issued by the military as a ribbon only. There is no accompanying medal.

Republic of Vietnam (RVN) Campaign Medal Ribbon Republic of Vietnam (RVN) Campaign Medal Ribbon Criteria: A military award of South Vietnam established in 1966. Awarded to any member of the United States military who completed at least six months of duty in the Republic of Vietnam between the dates of March 1, 1961 and March 28, 1973. The decoration may also be awarded to any service member who, while serving outside the geographical limits of South Vietnam, provided direct combat support to the Republic of Vietnam Armed Forces for a period exceeding six months. In such cases, a service member must have been awarded either the Vietnam Service Medal or the Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal (for service in a Vietnam campaign) to be eligible. For those U.S. service members who were wounded by an enemy force, captured by the enemy in the line of duty, or killed in action, the Vietnam Campaign Medal is automatically awarded regardless of total time served in Vietnam. The Vietnam Campaign Medal is issued with a device known as the “1960 Bar�. The bar displays the date of 1960 followed by a dash and a blank space. Note: This service ribbon is issued by the military along with an accompanying medal


United Nations (UN) Korean Service Medal Ribbon United Nations (UN) Korean Service Medal Ribbon Criteria: An international military decoration established by the United Nations on December 12, 1950. Awarded to any military service member, of an Armed Force allied with South Korea, who participated in the defense of Korea from North Korean aggression between the dates of June 27, 1950 and July 27, 1954. In the United States Armed Forces, any service member awarded the Korean Service Medal is automatically granted the United Nations Service Medal. On November 22, 1961, the United Nations officially changed the name of the United Nations Service Medal to the United Nations Korean Medal. The United States Department of Defense continues to refer to the decoration as the United Nations Service Medal in an effort to maintain consistency with older military files referring to the decoration by its original name. The decoration was the first international award ever created and recognized the multinational defense forces which participated in the Korean War. Note: This service ribbon is issued by the military along with an accompanying medal.

Air Force NCO Professional Military Education Graduate Ribbon Air Force NCO Professional Military Education Graduate Criteria: Awarded U.S. Air Force enlisted personnel completing a proscribed non-commissioned officer professional development programs. Such programs include Airman Leadership School (ALS), NonCommissioned Officer Academy (NCOA), and the Senior Non-Commissioned Officer Academy (SNCOA). Additional awards of the NCO Professional Military Education Graduate Ribbon are denoted by oak leaf clusters. Note: This service ribbon is one of the few awards issued by the military as a ribbon only. There is no accompanying medal.

Air Force Longevity Service Award with Oak Leaf Cluster Air Force Longevity Service Award Criteria: Awarded to U.S. Air Force personnel completing four years of Active, Reserve, or Air National Guard service. For those members of the Reserve and National Guard, service must have been in a drilling status with regular attending of weekend drills and annual training. The decoration is awarded to both officers and enlisted personnel, in contrast to service stripes which are only provided to enlisted members of the military. The award was first issued in 1957 by order of General Thomas D. White, Air Force Chief of Staff. It was primarily created as an Air Force equivalent to the service stripes used by other branches of the United States military to denote years of military service. Additional awards of the Air Force Longevity Service Award are denoted by oak leaf clusters. The award is retroactive to the founding of the Air Force in 1947. Attachments: Bronze Oak Leaf One single oak leaf cluster is attached to the designated award and denotes a second award of that particular decoration. Note: This service ribbon is one of the few awards issued by the military as a ribbon only. There is no accompanying medal.


Vietnam Service Medal Ribbon Vietnam Service Medal Ribbon Criteria: Awarded to any service member who served more than thirty consecutive days, or 60 nonconsecutive days, in the Republic of Vietnam between the dates of 1961-11-15 and 1973-03-28, and from 29 April 1975 to 30 April 1975 . For those service members who supported Vietnam operations from another country (such as Thailand), the Vietnam Service Medal may be authorized if such activity was in direct support of Vietnam combat operations and if such combat support exceeded 30–60 days. For the United States Navy, vessels operating in Vietnamese waters qualify for the Vietnam Service Medal provided that the naval vessel was engaged in direct support of Vietnam combat operations. The U.S. Air Force also grants the Vietnam Service Medal for 30–60 days of flight missions in Vietnamese air space, even if the home base of the flight mission was not within the Republic of Vietnam. Attachments: 4 Bronze Stars participation in military campaigns or multiple bestowals of the same award Note: This service ribbon is issued by the military along with an accompanying medal.

Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal Ribbon Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal Ribbon Criteria: Awarded for participation in "any military campaign of the United States for which no other service medal is authorized" including the Cuban Missile Crisis between October 1962 and June 1963, actions in Lebanon, Taiwan, the Congo, Quemoy and Matsu, and for duty in Berlin between 1961 and 1963, initial operations in South Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia, Panama, Grenada, Libya, Operation Earnest Will, peacekeeping and sanction missions against Iraq, Operation Northern Watch, Operation Southern Watch, Operation Vigilant Sentinel, and United Nations actions, including Bosnia and Somalia. Additional awards of the medal are denoted by service stars, with the arrowhead device also authorized for United States Army personnel who are awarded the decoration through participation in an airborne or amphibious assault. The Fleet Marine Force combat operation insignia is also authorized for certain sailors. Attachments: Bronze Star Device, Silver Star Device, Bronze Arrowhead Device - Mounted Note: This service ribbon is issued by the military along with an accompanying medal.

Korean Service Medal Ribbon Korean Service Medal Ribbon Criteria: Awarded to any U.S. service member, performing duty in the Republic of Korea, between June 27, 1950 and June 27, 1954. There were 13 official campaigns in the war - each annotated by service stars on the medal. Service stars are authorized for participation in the following campaigns: North Korean Aggression (Navy): June 27 to November 2, 1950; United Nations Defensive (Army, USAF): June 27 to September 15, 1950; United Nations Offensive Attachments: 1 Silver Star issued “in lieu” of five bronze. Note: This service ribbon is issued by the military along with an accompanying medal.


National Defense Service Medal Ribbon National Defense Service Medal Ribbon Criteria: Awarded to anyone who serves on active duty in the United States military during a designated time period. In the fifty years since the creation of the National Defense Service Medal, it has been authorized for the following time periods; June 27, 1950 to July 27, 1954 for service during the Korean War; January 1, 1961 to August 14, 1974 for service during the Vietnam War; August 2, 1990 to November 30, 1995 for service during the Gulf War; September 11, 2001 to a date yet-to-be-determined for service during the War on Terrorism. For service in the Gulf War and War on Terrorism, it is also authorized for members of the military reserve provided they are a “military reservist in good standing.” The National Defense Service Medal is further authorized to students at the service academies, but is not granted to discharged or retired veterans who did not serve in one of the above time periods. The decoration is also not authorized to members of the inactive reserve. The award was intended to be a “blanket campaign medal” issued to any member of the United States military who served in a designated time period of which a “national emergency” had been declared. As of 2005, it is the oldest service medal which is still issued to the active military. Attachments: 1 Bronze Star participation in military campaigns or multiple bestowals of the same award Note: This service ribbon is issued by the military along with an accompanying medal.

World War II (WWII) Occupation Medal Ribbon World War II (WWII) Occupation Medal Ribbon Criteria: Awarded for 30 days consecutive service while assigned to: Germany (excluding Berlin) between 9 May 1945 and 5 May 1955; Austria between 9 May 1945 and 27 July 1955; Berlin between 9 May 1945 and 2 October 1990. Service between 9 May and 8 November 1945 may be counted only if the EAME Campaign Medal was awarded for service prior to 9 May 1945; Italy between 9 May 1945 and 15 September 1947 in the compartment of Venezia Giulia E. Zara or Province of Udine, or with a unit in Italy designated in DA General Order 4, 1947; Japan between 3 September 1945 and 27 April 1952 in the four main islands of Hokkaido, Honshu, Shikoku and Kyushu; the surrounding smaller islands of the Japanese homeland; the Ryukyu Islands; and the Bonin-Volcano Islands; Korea between 3 September 1945 and 29 June 1949. Other special scenario awards may be applicable. Attachments: Berlin Airplane Device - Mounted, Japan Bar Device, Germany Bar Device. Note: This service ribbon is issued by the military along with an accompanying medal.


World War II (WWII) Victory Medal Ribbon World War II (WWII) Victory Medal Ribbon Criteria: Awarded to any member of the United States military who served on active duty, or as a reservist, between December 7, 1941 and December 31, 1946. The World War II Victory Medal was first issued as a ribbon, and was referred to simply as the “Victory Ribbon.� By 1946, a full medal had been established which was referred to as the World War II Victory Medal. There is no minimum service time limit for the issuance of the World War II Victory Medal, and the National Personnel Records Center has reported some cases of service members receiving the award for simply a few days of service. As the Second World War ended in August 1945, there are also cases of service members, who had enlisted in 1946, receiving the decoration without having been a veteran of World War II. Attachments: 1 Bronze Star participation in military campaigns or multiple bestowals of the same award Note: This service ribbon is issued by the military along with an accompanying medal.

European - African - Middle Eastern Campaign Medal Ribbon European - African - Middle Eastern Campaign Medal Ribbon Criteria: Awarded for any service performed between December 7, 1941 and March 2, 1946 provided such service was performed in the geographical theater areas of Europe, North Africa, or the Middle East. For those service members who participated in multiple battle campaigns, service stars are authorized to the decoration with the arrowhead device awarded for any airborne or amphibious operations performed. The Fleet Marine Force combat operation insignia is also authorized for certain sailors. The following campaigns are recognized by service stars to the European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal: Egypt-Libya: 11 Jun 42 - 12 Feb 43; Air Offensive, Europe: 4 Jul 42 - 5 Jun 44; Algeria-French Morocco: 8-11 Nov 42; Tunisia: 12 Nov 42 - 13 May 43; Sicily: 14 May 43 - 17 Aug 43; Naples-Foggia: 18 Aug 43 21 Jan 44; Anzio: 22 Jan 44 - 24 May 44; Rome-Arno: 22 Jan 44 - 9 Sep 44; Normandy: 6 Jun 44 - 24 Jul 44; Northern France: 25 Jul 44 - 14 Sep 44; Southern France: 15 Aug 44 - 14 Sep 44; Northern Apennines: 10 Sep 44 - 4 Apr 45; Rhineland: 15 Sep 44 - 21 Mar 45; Ardennes-Alsace: 16 Dec 44 - 25 Jan 45; Central Europe: 22 Mar 45 - 11 May 45; Po Valley: 5 Apr 45 - 8 May 45. For those service members who did not participate in a designated battle campaign, the following "blanket campaigns" are authorized to the European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal, denoted by service stars: Antisubmarine: 7 Dec 41 - 2 Sep 45; Ground Combat: 7 Dec 41 - 2 Sep 45; Air Combat: 7 Dec 41 - 2 Sep 45. Attachments: Silver Star Device, Bronze Star Device, Bronze Arrowhead Device. Note: This service ribbon is issued by the military along with an accompanying medal.


Asiatic Pacific Campaign Medal - WWII Ribbon Asiatic Pacific Campaign Medal - WWII Ribbon Criteria: Awarded to any member of the United States military who served in the Pacific Theater from 1941 to 1945. There were twenty one official campaigns of the Pacific Theater, denoted on with a service star. The arrowhead device is authorized for those campaigns involving amphibious assaults. Credible campaigns for the Pacific Theater are as follows: Philippine Islands 7 Dec 41 - 10 May 42; Burma, 1942 7 Dec 41 - 26 May 42; Central Pacific 7 Dec 41 - 6 Dec 43; East Indies 1 Jan 42 - 22 Jul 42; India-Burma 2 Apr 42 - 28 Jan 45; Air Offensive, Japan 17 Apr 42 - 2 Sep 45; Aleutian Islands 3 Jun 42 - 24 Aug 43; China Defensive 4 Jul 42 - 4 May 45; Papua 23 Jul 42 - 23 Jan 43; Guadalcanal 7 Aug 42 - 21 Feb 43; New Guinea 24 Jan 43 - 31 Dec 44; Northern Solomons 22 Feb 43 - 21 Nov 44; Eastern Mandates 7 Dec 43 - 14 Jun 44; Bismarck Archipelago 15 Dec 43 - 27 Nov 44; Western Pacific 17 Apr 44 - 2 Sep 45; Leyte 17 Oct 44 - 1 Jul 45; Luzon 15 Dec 44 - 4 Jul 45; Central Burma 29 Jan 45 - 15 Jul 45; Southern Philippines 27 Feb 45 - 4 Jul 45; Ryukyus 26 Mar 45 - 2 Jul 45; China Offensive 5 May 45 - 2 Sep 45. Additionally, the following Pacific Theater “blanket� campaigns qualify - but without service stars: Antisubmarine 7 Dec 41 - 2 Sep 45; Ground Combat: 7 Dec 41 - 2 Sep 45; Air Combat: 7 Dec 41 - 2 Sep 45. Attachments: 1 Bronze Star participation in military campaigns or multiple bestowals of the same award Note: This service ribbon is issued by the military along with an accompanying medal.

American Campaign Medal Ribbon American Campaign Medal - WW II Ribbon Criteria: Awarded to service members performing either one year of consecutive duty between December 7, 1941 to March 2, 1946 within the continental borders of the United States, or performing 30 days consecutive or 60 non-consecutive days of duty outside the borders of the United States but within the American Theater of Operations. The American Theater was defined as the entirety of the United States to include most of the Atlantic Ocean, a portion of Alaska, and a small portion of the Pacific bordering California and Baja California. Service stars were authorized to any service member who was engaged in actual combat with Axis forces within the American theater. This primarily applied to those members of the military which had engaged in anti-U-Boat patrols in the Atlantic. Attachments: Bronze Oak Leaf One single oak leaf cluster is attached to the designated award and denotes a second award of that particular decoration. Note: This service ribbon is issued by the military along with an accompanying medal.


Air Force Good Conduct Medal Ribbon Air Force Good Conduct Medal Ribbon Criteria: Awarded to any enlisted member of the United States military (except U.S. Air Force personnel after 2006) who completes three consecutive years of "honorable and faithful service." Such service implies that a standard enlistment was completed without any non-judicial punishments, disciplinary infractions, or court martial offenses. If a service member commits an offense, the three-year mark "resets" and a service member must perform an additional three years of discipline free service before the Good Conduct may be authorized. The Air Force Good Conduct Medal which was authorized by Congress on July 6, 1960, but not created until June 1, 1963. Between 1947 and 1963, Air Force personnel were issued the Army Good Conduct Medal. For those serving both before and after 1963, both the Army and Air Force Good Conduct Medals could be worn simultaneously on an Air Force uniform. The 97th Air Force Uniform Board met in October 2005 and made the decision to discontinue the medal with the rationale that good conduct of Airmen is the expected standard, not an exceptional occurrence worthy of recognition. On 8 February 2006, the Board announced that effective immediately new medals will no longer be issued, but previously awarded medals that are a matter of record may still be worn. Additional decorations of the Air Force Good Conduct Medal are denoted by oak leaf clusters. Attachments: 1 Bronze Oak Leaf One single oak leaf cluster is attached to the designated award and denotes a second award of that particular decoration. Note: This service ribbon is issued by the military along with an accompanying medal.

Air Force Outstanding Unit Award Air Force Outstanding Unit Award Criteria: Awarded to any U.S. Air Force command (including Reserve and Air National Guard units) performing exceptionally meritorious service, accomplishing specific acts of outstanding achievement, excelling in combat operations against an armed enemy of the United States, or exhibiting conduct with distinction in military operations involving conflict with – or exposure to – a hostile action by any opposing foreign force. The award was created in 1954. Multiple awards of the Air Force Outstanding Unit Award are denoted by oak leaf clusters on the ribbon. Until 2001, the Outstanding Unit Award ranked directly below the Presidential Unit Citation on the precedence of Air Force awards. Attachments: 2 Bronze Oak Leafs award of that particular decoration.

One single oak leaf cluster is attached to the designated award and denotes a second

Note: This unit citation ribbon is one of the few awards issued by the military as a ribbon only. There is no accompanying medal.


Army Good Conduct Medal Ribbon (Willard was in the Army Air Corp. before the Air Force) Army Good Conduct Medal Ribbon Criteria: Awarded to any enlisted member of the United States Army who completes three consecutive years of "honorable and faithful service.” Such service implies that a standard enlistment was completed without any non-judicial punishments, disciplinary infractions, or court martial offenses. If a service member commits an offense, the three-year mark "resets" and a service member must perform an additional three years of discipline free service before the Good Conduct may be authorized. During times of war, the Army Good Conduct Medal may be awarded for one year of faithful service. The medal may also be awarded posthumously, to any soldier killed in the line of duty. To denote additional decorations of the award, a series of Good Conduct Knots are provided as attachments to the decoration. Service for the Army Good Conduct Medal must be performed on active duty and the medal is not awarded to members of the Army reserve or National Guard who are not federalized to active service. For those Reserve and Guard members who satisfactorily perform annual training and drill duty, however, the Army Reserve Components Achievement Medal may be awarded in lieu. Attachments: Good Conduct Knots are issued to United States Army personnel as an attachment to the Army Good Conduct Medal – and the accompanying service ribbon – denoting additional decorations of the award. Note: This service ribbon is issued by the military along with an accompanying medal.

Air Force Commendation Medal Ribbon

Air Force Commendation Medal Ribbon Criteria: A mid-level award presented for sustained acts of heroism or meritorious service. Awarded by local commanders, allowing for a broad interpretation of the criteria for which the medal may be awarded. For actions where such performance was in direct contact with an enemy force, the Valor device ("V" device) is authorized as an attachment to the decoration. The U.S. Air Force began issuing its own Commendation Medal in 1958 with additional awards denoted by oak leaf clusters. Note: This service ribbon is issued by the military along with an accompanying medal.

Dad's Ribbons and Medals  

I'm very proud of my dad's (Willard L. Hill, Sr) military career and have posted this file for those who want to view his accomplishments.

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