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Gallery Espresso Brand Identity Process Book

GRDS 715: Print Studio I Professor: Trudy Abadie-Fail Semester: Winter 09 Biljana Kroll, 2009


Table of Contents

Project Instructions 3

Color Digital Roughs 34

Research 5

Final Logo Design 41

Mood Board 9

Design Narrative 42

Color Palettes 10

eBrochure Design 45

Color Combinations 11

Cover Design 46

Imagery 12

Pages Layouts 50

Textures 13

Product Design 52

Shapes 14

T-Shirt Graphics 54

Typography 15

Uniforms 58

Word List 16

Website Design 60

Logo Design 17

Promotional Mailer Design 62

Project Description 18

Design Narrative 63

Thumbnail Sketches 19

Thumbnails 63

Tighter Roughs 26

Digital Layout 65

Digital Roughs 27

Printed Mailer 66


Project Instructions

Mood Board After completing your Market Research Paper, create your Mood Board. This is a visual collection of found images and content that helps the client get a visual sense of the creative direction you see for the new identity. Conduct a thorough search for images and content for the creation of a Mood Board. Look through publications, the Web and other useful sources assemble a cohesive collection for the categories listed below. Use this as a source to refer to throughout the design of your projects in this course. The "board" will be a multi-page PDF collection of scanned examples organized into the following sections: * competitors' logos and examples * color palette * typography/fonts * images (photography and/or illustration styles that help convey the brand essence) * shapes (organic, decorative, geometric, etc.) * textures & materials (surfaces, paper, metallics, etc. that help visualize the look-n-feel of the brand) * word list (words or phrases that help establish the "personality" for your brand).

Identity Guidelines eBrochure Using your Market Research Paper and your Mood Board for reference, explore possible designs for an eBrochure featuring promotional/ brand guidelines to be viewed entirely on-screen. This is a “hybrid” eBrochure that needs to represent the identity guidelines in a design that also successfully captures the essence of your brand image. It will be viewed by everyone from consumers to brand managers within the company. For content, find or create imagery that is appropriate to your brand identity. (Give credit where credit is due.) You can research content from existing companies in your market, but you must write your own final content. The following are font, color and resolution considerations for monitor viewing. Font: For body text on-screen, sans serif fonts are easier to view. Also, large amounts of reversed body text becomes difficult to read. Color: The color reproduction range (RGB) on a monitor is larger than what can be printed in CMYK on a printing press or even on your inkjet printer.When you select your colors for your eBrochure on-screen, print a test on your inkjet printer and compare.This isn’t an exact indicator, but it will help to identify if a chosen screen color is in a gamut that is far too bright or intense for print. Resolution: 72 dpi @ final size is all that you need for a scan that is viewed only on-screen. And JPEG is the preferred file format for on-screen photos.


Grid: A grid is a underlying structure upon which to base your page composition. It is a common tool in publication design such as newspapers and magazine. It is also an important tool in identity design. It establishes a framework which can be used by several designers and production artists to assemble a final project that will have a consistent look. Here are two PDFs that will help you better understand the grid and its role in brand identity. Sections: Your eBrochure must contain detailed production guidelines for your identity. These specifications will be “fused” into a multipage promotional design.The following sections must be represented first in a detailed outline and then in your overall eBrochure design. You should expand on these and add any additional features that are appropriate to your brand strategy. * Mission Statement (Philosophy) * Logo * Corporate Colors * Typography * Stationery (including letterhead and forms such as fax cover sheets and invoices) * Packaging (including bags, tags, and boxes) * Merchandising (including promotional giveaways, gift certificates, etc.) * Environmental (including in-store and storefront signage, windows, and interiors)

* Apparel (uniforms, aprons, etc.) * Vehicles (cars, trucks, vans, etc.) * Credits (include all credits for pre-existing content used in your design). Use your instincts to determine if anything additional should be included in your eBrochure.The goal is to clearly define the use of your logo identity while promoting an “on-strategy” essence for your brand. Create your eBrochure as a multi-page PDF in either QuarkXPress or InDesign. Export it as an eBook or standard version PDF.


Research

Competitor Brand Identities

Starbucks

• logo • store signage • product packaging

Logo Colors: Black and Green Previous Colors: Brown

Store signage examples; daytime and nighttime. Large bold sans serif sign as well as lighted logo displayed during nighttime. Green canopy used as part of their brand identity.


Research

Tim Hortons

• logo • store signage • product packaging

Logo Colors: Two colors - red and gold One color - brown

Competitor Brand Identities


Research

Port City Java

• logo • store signage • product packaging

Colors: red, green and black

Caribou Coffee

• logo • store signage • product packaging

Colors: turquise, black, brown

Competitor Brand Identities


Research

Competitor Brand Identities

It’s a Grind

• logo • store signage • product packaging

Colors: purple, red, gold and orange

It’s a Grind

• logo • store signage • product packaging

Colors: brown and cream


Gallery Espresso Mood Board

GRDS 715: Print Studio I Professor: Trudy Abadie-Fail Semester: Winter 09 Biljana Kroll, 2009


Color Palettes

Color Symbolism Browns, tan, taupe, cream - coffee, chocolate, coffee froth, nature, earthiness, warmth, honesty,, dependability

Yellow, ochre, sand - joyful, happy, beam of light, mood enhancer, warm, cozy

Red, - increases appetite and heart beat, attention grabber

Purple, mauve creativity boost, wine, grapes

Orange - vibrant, happy, fresh, juicy, cheerful, healthy

Sage Green - renewal, growth, nature, fresh, calming Dark blue - intelligent, mysterious, calming, unity


Color Combinations


Imagery

Images that capture Gallery Espresso brand essence


Textures


Shapes

Stripes, Circles, Swirls and Florals


Typography

Gallery Espresso

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Gallery Espresso

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Gallery Espresso Gallery Espresso Gallery Espresso

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Gallery Espresso Gallery Espresso


Word List drink coffee cup flavor spoon drop spill whipped cream roasted hint blend froth tea bag

listen music heartbeat brewing talking laughing

see artwork patterns shapes textures flowers nature seeds beans sunshine cityscape friends coffee stain

do imagine bite eat wake up get up move happy fast pour sip talk laugh relax sit down unwind read admire taste excited

experience smooth rich aroma vibrant sharp bright artistic soulful exotic eclectic cultural exciting cozy delicious sweet chocolate vanilla creamy bold colorful morning night ornamental creative divine historic


Gallery Espresso Logo Design

GRDS 715: Print Studio I Professor: Trudy Abadie-Fail Semester: Winter 09 Biljana Kroll, 2009


Logo Design

project description

Logos should be unique, memorable and on strategy with the company's brand image. Step One: Based on your creative direction that you established in your Market Research Paper and Mood Board assignments, sketch a minimum of 100 thumbnail possibilities for a logo design. At first, don't focus on color, just black and white. Concentrate on form, composition, and associations as well as the meaning of your shapes and font choices. Use online discussions to review and refine your identity logo/mark. Step Two: Analyze your sketches. Explore color combinations. Refer to your Mood Board for the initial colors you chose as a basis. The recommended reading Pantone Guide to Communicating with Color is a great resource for color combinations and the emotive value they can have.

Use online discussions to review and refine your identity logo/mark even more. Even the slightest alteration can make a huge difference in the level of success of your design. Step Three: For your final design, prepare a PDF document that shows both color and black-and-white versions of your final identity logo/mark.


Thumbnail Sketches

I wrote down all the words so I can see which ones work together, or give some unusual combinations. I experimented with combining “heart,” “soul” and “coffee cup”. On this page I also combines “essence” and “coffee bean.” This one combines the word “essence” and “coffee bean” but also could imply “talking” since drinking coffee can inspire great conversations.


Thumbnail Sketches

I wanted to create more playful settings to reflect the fun, entertaining value of the coffeehouse, so I created flowers by using several coffee cups; they represent friends coming together and having great time. Next, I explored the idea of having coffee cups or coffee beans displayed as art in frames. The frames go from basic to modern, to rococo and oriental. Framing coffee bean is symbolical representation for showing what is priority at the coffee shop. At the same time it says “we take pride in our coffee.�


Thumbnail Sketches

On this page I wanted to play with the cappuccino art that’s becoming very popular on internet and in cafÊs.


Thumbnail Sketches

Simplifying some of the ideas from the previous pages.


Thumbnail Sketches

Creating vignettes by putting the coffee bean on a pedestal.

Experimenting with coffee stains and circles.

The letters “G” and “E” as cappuccino art.


Thumbnail Sketches

Coffee and cream coming together, the spiral as a symbol of life, friendships, and love. It also represents unity of art and music. The cat “crawled out” on the page at this point. I thought of those old neighbourhood cats that hang around cafés and restaurants. They get to know the guests and some of them make the cafés their homes.


Thumbnail Sketches

At this point I wanted to explore the connection between morning time and coffee. The bird is representation of the morning, the chit-chat going on at the coffeeshop, as people are rushing to get their coffee and go to work. The coffee cup is represented as a bird bath - a morning ritual of drinking coffee.


Tighter Roughs

I wanted to see how some of my earlier ideas look when I focus on the negative or positeve space.


Digital Roughs

At this point I wasn’t set on any particular style for my logo so I wanted to create different looks as seen on the the following two pages; modern, hippy, elegant, etc.

Gallery Espresso

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Digital Roughs

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Gallery Gallery Espresso

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Digital Roughs

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Digital Roughs

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Digital Roughs

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Digital Roughs

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Digital Roughs

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Color Digital Roughs

I started with 6 color palettes at the beginning of the process, and at this point I have narrowed it down to three. I tested them with some of the logo designs to see how the shapes interact with different colors.

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Color Digital Roughs

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Color Digital Roughs


Color Digital Roughs


Color Digital Roughs

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Color Digital Roughs

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Color Digital Roughs Once I finalized the pictoral mark, I went back and explored some more font options for the name.

Gallery Espresso Gallery Espresso Gallery Espresso

Font: Century Gothic

Font: Gill Sans Regular

Font: Walkway Bold


Final Logo


Design Narrative

Creating the logo for Gallery Espresso was a complex assignment. I started with the idea that Gallery Espresso will serve an eclectic mix of people, that love coffee, art and music. The logo had to be generic enough to include large target audience, and it had to be inclusive enough that will reflect the well-read, trend-aware people that visit it. When I star ted working on the logo for Gallery Espresso I relied on my mood board to give me some ideas to start up exploring. Those first ideas came out of the shapes I have chosen such as swirls, florals, drips, coffee stains, coffee cups etc. I also drew some inspiration from the font selection I chose as well as the word list. I re-wrote each word in my sketchbook to really get the essence of it and try explore it’s meaning and symbolism. For example the word “artistic” became a flowing swirl, and the word “talking” became a coffee cup that looked like a talk bubble. I really let myself explore any idea that came to my mind at this point. So, some swirls turned into cappuccino art, others turned into birds, cats and leaves. I deconstructed some ideas and constructed others. For example the sketch of a picture frame went from very elaborate to a simple geometric

square. In other sketches I used a simple swirl to create an outline of a cat. In some I focused on the time of the day coffee is being consumed the most – morning time. This led me to sketching birds, sun, open windows etc. Overall, this stage was the most creative, because I wanted to make sure everything is being explored before I started narrowing down the search for the right idea for the logo. Next, I narrowed down my choice to a few ideas, such as using the heart and the cup, the swirl in the cup, the cat silhouette and the steam rising out of the cup. These ideas represented the core of what I thought Gallery Espresso should represent in public. Each of them represented a different aspect so I knew that I had to decide to which one is the most important aspect and feature it. I also took those ideas and experimented with the positive and negative space of the logo. I wanted to make sure the logo works as black and white and work on what it is to be seen primary or as a secondary information. At this point I also added the name, Gallery Espresso written in one of the fonts I had in my mood board. The font matched the style of the logo, but that was also the problem


Design Narrative

as they were both competing for attention. I made black and white digital roughs of all the logos to see which ones stood out and which ones faded away. Some ideas were too detailed and turned out to be hard to reproduce in a logo, while the simpler ideas stood out. At this point I also noticed I had several styles of logos – some were elegant, others were modern, while others were minimalistic. Next I started simplifying the overall look of the logos by either working on the pictorial mark or by using a cleaner sansserif font for the name. I also experimented with the position of the pictoral mark in relation to the name, such as placing it above the name, left of it, right of it or between the two words. I noticed that it felt more natural if the logo was placed left of the name, since people recognize shapes faster than content. In the next step of the process I focused on finding the right font treatment for the name as well as introduced color to see how the top choices for logo stand out when color is introduced. I also used this time to decide on the color palette. I started with 6 possible color palettes, and at this stage I narrowed it down to three. I made many different combinations, and also focused on choosing the right shade and tint of the

colors. I liked how the rich reddish brown provided a dark background for the warm orange and gold colors. I also liked how rich the purple looked as an accent. At this point I had three logos – the first one featured a cup with a heart, the second one had a silhouette of a cat and the third one featured a simplified version of a cup and rising steam. Although the cat logo had potential I decided that it doesn’t have as strong presence as the other two, when scaled down in size. I also decided it would have limited the target audience of Gallery Espresso. The logo featuring the cup and the heart was a good choice but it felt too literal having the cup silhouette. I also worried that it may not be unique enough. The third logo featuring the simplified birds view of a cup with the steam rising. This one did not have the problem of being literal or limiting. I found this logo to have many of the qualities that I wanted their logo to have. For example the circle provided a bold shape that made the logo stand out. It also symbolized the allencompassing qualities of a ying-yang sign. It symbolized the eclectic mix of people with different backgrounds, cultures and interests. The swirl had motion to it, like a music wave


Design Narrative

or a brushstroke moving across the canvas, in this case the canvas was the brown circle. Once I decided on the logo, I went back on creating more cohesive unity between the logo and the name. I did alteration on the symbol, such as changing the size and the appearance of the circle, and changing the position of the swirl. I also separated the swirl from the circle and used it alone with the name. That created some interesting combinations but I felt like the logo lost the strength and the deeper meaning that it had. One combination that really stood out to me was the one logo where I also introduced another smaller circle inside the large brown circle. I liked how that new circle interacted with the larger one.The off center positioning created a focus point at the swirl.The brown circle started looking more like the saucer while the white circle became the cup. It also added visual depth and framed the swirl without overpowering it. What I liked about this new design was that it was very abstract and simple, without being literal.The swirl led the eye from the logo to the name.The

final font that I chose for the logo didn’t compete with the logo but it created a cohesive whole of the logomark. Adding the city name under the logo was the final piece of the puzzle. The orange and brown color combination was chosen as final because of the warm, optimistic feel they evoke when placed together. At the same they are not just trendy colors but have qualities that are timeless – brown: natural, warmth, honesty, dependability, orange: vibrant, happy, fresh, juicy, cheerful, healthy. In conclusion, I think the final logo was the best choice for a company such as Gallery Espresso; a gathering place of people who love good company and a great cup of coffee. At the same time the stylistic treatment of the logo would appeal to the artistic, trend aware customers who appreciate art and design. The contemporary style of the logo will also work for any of the large cities, such as Atlanta or New York, but at the same time it will always carry the warmth of a Southern city, representing the inviting and friendly culture of Savannah.


eBrochure Design


eBrochure Cover For the cover design I wanted to have different stripes running across the page, so that they lead to the logo, or away from the logo. Their purpose was to lead the eye across to the next page, and at the same time I think stripes would complement the logo nicely without competing with it.


eBrochure Cover Thumbnails


eBrochure Cover Thumbnails


eBrochure Cover Digital Roughs and Final

Final Cover


eBrochure Inside Pages Thumbnails For the inside pages I wanted to continue the stripes to create a smoother transition. Also I think they allow for some interesting page layouts where they connect the artwork with the title of the page and the copy on each page.


eBrochure Page Designs


Gallery Espresso Product Designs “Artistea� packaging for the specialty tea sold at Gallery Espresso

Inspiration


Gallery Espresso Product Designs Final Digital Solutions Gallery Espresso Coffee, light roast, Artistea, premium blend tea Chocolate Bites, complimentary chocolates


Gallery Espresso Ephemera Men’s T-Shirt Designs


Final Gallery Espresso T-Shirt Designs for Men


Women’s T-Shirt Designs

Inspiration


Final Gallery Espresso T-Shirt Designs for Women


Gallery Espresso Uniforms

Women’s and men’s aprons


Final Uniform and Apron Designs


Website Design of galleryespresso.com Featuring store specials, section about the concerts and shows held at the coffeehouse as well as info about the gallery. Separate link to the gift shop.


Website Design of galleryespresso.com Digital Rough


Promotional Mailer


Design Narrative After visiting the website of ShipShapes I was impressed at the variety of options they had for die-cut direct mail. After reading their marketing report and customer testimonials I decided that a custom die-cut mailer would reach the audience I was targeting. Reading from other case scenarios, thier mailers seemed to have a great response rate so I decided to create my own version of a die-cut mailer that would promote Gallery Espresso. The idea behind my mailer was that it will be very realistic and visually appealing. I wanted to also advertise the two things that Gallery Espresso is famous for: coffee and complimentary chocolate. The coffee cup and chocolate photograph would be taken from bird’s eye perspective, which is the most likely perspective that the recipient would have when they pick it up from the mailbox or find it on the ground next to their door. The mouth-watering chocolate and frothy coffee will draw their attention in finding out more and turning the other side of the mailer. The copy on the back was created to target people in the morning, while they are picking up their morning papers. Another more specific target was mothers, who “deserve a break” on weekend mornings by having a good cup of coffee, while everyone in the house is still asleep. The mailer has a detachable coupon that offers a large espresso drink for the price of a small one, if redeemed by 10am.

CMM Guidelines • Dimensions between 3 1/2 and 12 inches in height, between 5 and 15 inches in length, and between .007 and 3/4 inch thick. (It does not have to be of uniform thickness and can be folded as long as it’s sealed.) • It can’t weigh more than 3.3 ounces. • Choice of materials (paper, plastic, cardboard, rubber, foam), but your piece has to be sturdy enough to go through the mail and not get destroyed--yet flexible enough that it can slip into mailboxes. Notes from ShipShapes Marketing Report Krispy Kreme - The campaign fetched an 8.5 percent response rate from consumers, far greater than the 0.5% to 1% response that the company was struggling to get from regular direct mail. Toyota Camry Dealership - The ShipShapes ClearCard™ piece generated almost 1,200 test drive requests and 27.75% of the test drivers wound up purchasing a new vehicle. The ShipShapes phase of the integrated marketing campaign cost the dealer group about $100,000, and led to $16.5 million in car sales. Considered ShipShapes Options ClearCard™ - Send your prospects or repeat customers a loyalty card, redemption coupon, sweepstakes entry, or business card without an envelope. ClearCard mailers are processed as automated flats, ideal for national and local reach. They are die-cut, can have glued on piece or a magnet added. GreenVue™ - A unique, sustainable media alternative, made with post-consumer recycled plastic material from soft drink bottles (rPET). No envelope required.


Thumbnail Sketches


Digital Layout Dimensions: 8" wide x 4" high x .25" deep CMYK, 300 DPI Printed as GreenVue™ ShipShape. Price: Most ShipShapes CMM mailers will sell for less than two dollars, including the 0.461 cent postage charge. Minimum run 1,000 pieces. Cost depends on the zip code saturation of the mail list. Mail campaigns in excess of 10,000 pieces are less than $1.00 to print and mail. Shipping Directions: Customized MarketMail must be transported to a Destination Delivery Unit (DDU)-the facility where the mail will be sorted for delivery by the mail carrier. They can be shipped there via Priority Mail or Express Mail services or they can be personally transported directly to the DDU. Upon arrival, Customized MarketMail pieces are sorted and prepared for delivery by the letter carrier. Each time at least 200 pieces per mailing must be mailed at once.

CUT OUT &

bring in any day before 10 a.m. and get a large espresso drink for the cost of a small.

To Mr. & Mrs. Williams 112 Wilson Street New York, NY 21094

Gallery Espresso NEW YORK

Lexington Ave., New York, NY Limit one coupon per guest, one item or offer per coupon. Void if copied, transferred, purchased, sold or prohibited by law. No cash value. Offer good while quantities last.


Promotional Mailer front side


Promotional Mailer back side


Gallery Espresso Brand Identity Process Book GRDS 715: Print Studio I Professor: Trudy Abadie-Fail Semester: Winter 09 Š Biljana Kroll, 2009


Process Book