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As a pioneering techno producer and DJ with an over two-decades-long career, more than 100 releases spread throughout numerous record labels and aliases, and an extensive map of worldwide touring, Inigo Kennedy (yes, it is his real name) can teach us a thing or two about time management. Even his new album Vaudeville, released on the Token imprint, was written in the period of just two months, yet he considers it the most cohesive and proper album he's ever done. Be it a studio session or performing live on three decks, Inigo works quickly happening only after the fact. Getting in the mind of such music wizard is no easy task, but we tried... interview by Katya Guseva

Hi Inigo, I'm calling from Brooklyn. I have to admit I'm nervous talking to a techno master like yourself, especially after listening to your new album. You're pretty much a living legend. Thank you. I'm just nervous that my one-year-old boy might wake up. He's in the other room.

we've got quite a connection with that city. That's where my wife and I got engaged. Nice! And now with a baby it's like a whole new life... It really is. It's a miracle I did an album at all, with everything else involved... I'm sure it must have been time consuming. How long did it take you to produce the album? whole music-making life when I've had a bit of pressure. I've been quite a long time, but we got serious about it towards the end of last year, just after the Phase album was out on Token. I think it like: "So, do you think we can have the album ready by the end of January?"

say yes, because I'd be delaying it later. But in the end I got it done. By January?! We had eight tracks done by the end of January, and a couple more came along two weeks after that. I just had to force myself to make music every evening. Get home, have dinner, put the But thankfully it turned out pretty good. 34

Wait, so you only did it for an hour every night? then I had a few other nights, when I was home alone, and turned these ideas into tracks. Then I sent them to Kris, and he was so relieved, because he was getting pretty nervous. I was too, to be honest, but suddenly we had like 75% of the project done. That was really nice. Ha! Seems like you work much better under pressure. I don't have anything to compare to really. It wasn't like I was forcing the music, I was just trying to make more time for it than I would normally. Luckily I can work quick. I am quite designing tracks for days, I'm more performing the ideas and recording them, catching the accidents, and then make a track afterwards out of all the bits. It's probably because I come from the hardware background which is a diplomatic way of saying that I'm quite old - that teaches you to be more hands on. Especially when you're performing you can react to the sound right there, in the moment. I think for people who started out a lot later than me, only doing it in software, it's much easier to fall into the process of designing your tracks a lot: drawing everything out and making it perfect every time you press start. For me it doesn't really work, because I'm not really catching any energy this way, if you know what I mean. But it does annoy other people, because it's really hard to get bits of my tracks for remixes, or for me to change something that's not quite right after the fact... There are pros and cons for everything. So let me understand... If I compare it to designing a piece in Photoshop, you basically work with layers and then save it as a JPEG, so you can't change it anymore? Yes, in your analogy I would be manipulating all those layers in real time, because I would have them all on the desk, and I would be able to change the sounds then. But at the end of that process I click "Merge Layers", and it's baked.

Seventeen: Elusive Issue  

Featuring interviews with the elusive Beneath, Gantz, Lucy, Inigo Kennedy, Rrose, C L N K, and ghostly artwork by Hernan Marin, Silvia Grav...

Seventeen: Elusive Issue  

Featuring interviews with the elusive Beneath, Gantz, Lucy, Inigo Kennedy, Rrose, C L N K, and ghostly artwork by Hernan Marin, Silvia Grav...

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