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My Lady Caprice

"You will then forgive him for the 'ambushes' and cherish him with much tea?" I stipulated, winking away a tress of hair that tickled most provokingly. "Yes," said Lisbeth. "And no bed until the usual hour?" "No," she answered, quite subdued; "and now please do put me down." So I sighed and perforce obeyed. She stood for a moment patting her rebellious hair into order with deft, white fingers, looking up at me meanwhile with a laugh in her eyes that seemed almost a challenge. I took a hasty step toward her, but as I did so the Imp hove into view, and the opportunity was lost. "Hallo, Auntie Lisbeth!" he exclaimed, eyeing her wonderingly; then his glance wandered round as if in quest of something. "How did she do it, Uncle Dick?" he inquired. "Do what, my Imp?" "Why, get out of the tree?" I smiled and looked at Lisbeth. "Did she climb down?" "No," said I, shaking my head. "Did she-jump down?" "No, she didn't jump down, my Imp." "Well, did she - did she fly down?" "No, nor fly down - she just came down." "Yes, but how did she - " "Reginald," said Lisbeth, "run and tell the maids to bring tea out here for three." "Three?" echoed the Imp. "But Dorothy has gone out to tea, you know - is Uncle Dick going to - " "To be sure, Imp," I nodded. "Oh, that is fine - hurrah, Little-John!" he cried, and darted off to ward the house. "And you, Lisbeth?" I said, imprisoning her hands, "are you glad also?" Lisbeth did not speak, yet I was satisfied nevertheless. 30

My Lady Caprice  

by Jeffrey Farnol My Lady Caprice 1 I My Lady Caprice 2 My Lady Caprice 3 My Lady Caprice 4 My Lady Caprice 5 My Lady Caprice 6 My Lady Capr...

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