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My Lady Caprice

"And you are quite - quite sure?" "Quite! I think I have been so all my life." "I'm penniless now, Dick, a beggar, with nothing in the world but the clothes I wear." "Yes," I said, catching her hands in mine, "my beggar-maid; the loveliest, noblest, sweetest that ever stooped to bestow her love on man. "Dick, how glorious everything is this morning - the earth, the sky, and the river!" "It is our wedding morning!" said I. "Our wedding day," she repeated in a whisper. "And there never was just such a morning as this," said I. "But, Dick, all days cannot be as this - there must come clouds and storm sometimes, and - and - O Dick! are you sure that you will never, never regret - " "I love you, Lisbeth, in the shadow as well as the sunshine - love you ever and always." And so, the little foot hesitating no longer, Lisbeth came down to me. Oh, never again could there be such another morning as this! "Ahoy!" I looked round with a start, and there, his cap cocked rakishly over one eye, his "murderous cutlass" at his hip and his arms folded across his chest, stood "Scarlet Sam, the Terror of the South Seas." "Imp!" cried Lisbeth. "Avast!" cried he in lusty tones; "whereaway ?" I glanced helplessly at Lisbeth and she at me. "Whereaway, shipmate?" he bel1owed in nautical fashion, but before I could find a suitable answer Dorothy made her appearance with the fluffy kitten "Louise" cuddled under her arm as usual. "How do you do?" she said demurely; "it's awfully nice to get up so early, isn't it? We heard auntie creeping about on tippity-toes, you know, so we came, too. Reginald said she was pretending to be burglars, but I think she's going 'paddling.' Are you, auntie ?" "No, dear; not this morning," answered Lisbeth, shaking her head. 111

My Lady Caprice  

by Jeffrey Farnol My Lady Caprice 1 I My Lady Caprice 2 My Lady Caprice 3 My Lady Caprice 4 My Lady Caprice 5 My Lady Caprice 6 My Lady Capr...