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My Lady Caprice

Dorothy, an' Louise - " "What do you mean, my Imp?" "Oh, you know, Uncle Dick! "My roof henceforth shall be the broad expanse.' I'm going to fight giants an' - an' all sorts of cads, you know. An' then, if ever I get to Persia an' do find the wonderful lamp, I can wish everything all right again, an' we should all be 'happy ever after' - you an' Auntie Lisbeth an' Dorothy an' me; an' we could live in a palace with slaves. Oh, it would be fine!" "Yes, it's an excellent idea, Imp, but on the whole slightly risky, because it's just possible that you might never find the lamp; besides, you'll have to stop here, after all, because, you see, I'm going away myself." "Then let's go away together, Uncle Dick, do!" "Impossible, my Imp; who will look after your Auntie Lisbeth and Dorothy and Louise?" "I forgot that," he answered ruefully. "And they need a deal of taking care of," I added. "'Fraid they do," he nodded; "but there's Peter," he suggested, brightening. "Peter certainly knows how to look after horses, but that is not quite the same. Lend me your trusty sword." He rose, and drawing it from his belt handed it to me with a flourish. "You remember in the old times, Imp, when knights rode out to battle, it was customary for them when they made a solemn promise to kiss the cross-hilt of their swords, just to show they meant to keep it. So now I ask you to go back to your Auntie Lisbeth, to take care of her, to shield and guard her from all things evil, and never to forget that you are her loyal and true knight; and now kiss your sword in token, will you?" and I passed back the weapon. "Yes," he answered, with glistening eyes, "I will, on my honour, so help me Sam!" and he kissed the sword. "Good!" I exclaimed; "thank you, Imp." "But are you really going away?" he inquired, looking at me with a 101

My Lady Caprice  

by Jeffrey Farnol My Lady Caprice 1 I My Lady Caprice 2 My Lady Caprice 3 My Lady Caprice 4 My Lady Caprice 5 My Lady Caprice 6 My Lady Capr...

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