Issuu on Google+

CGLI 2330 Certificate in Electrotechnical Technology Level 3 Installation Technology: Unit 302/3 – Inspection & Testing and Fault Diagnosis & Rectification

Unit 01 - Installation Planning

Installation Planning Unit Aims By the end of the unit participants should be able to: describe the general types of work that need to be included in installation activities a) installing electrical equipment and systems into new sites or locations b) replacement of electrical equipment or extending facilities (Syllabus Reference: 2.1.02) state the factors that need to be considered when planning an installation a) site conditions and locations of components i) structure - component parts, access ii) building fabric iii) external influences b) storage of parts and materials c) tools and equipment d) minimising disruption to adjacent work areas e) how to estimate the length of time needed for the installation (Syllabus Reference: 2.1.03) identify the parties concerned with installations and their relationships a) client b) main-contractor c) sub-contractor d) suppliers e) consultants (Syllabus Reference: 2.1.04) state the role of relevant parties with respect of regulatory requirements a) Building regulations b) Environmental c) health and safety d) electrical regulations (Syllabus Reference: 2.1.05) read and interpret drawings and specifications to prepare requisitions a) site plans b) block diagrams c) location diagrams d) circuit diagrams (Syllabus Reference: 2.1.06)

The College at Clacton

Unit 01 Page 1

August 2011


CGLI 2330 Certificate in Electrotechnical Technology Level 3 Installation Technology: Unit 302/3 – Inspection & Testing and Fault Diagnosis & Rectification

Unit 01 - Installation Planning

Installation Planning It must never be forgotten the extremely wide range of work that is encompassed by the term „electrical installation work‟. One only has to look at the changing titles used from time to time to describe the IET Regulations. The 1st Edition issued in 1882 was entitled, “Rules & Regulations for the Prevention of Fire Risks Arising from Electric Lighting”. At that time electricity was used almost exclusively for electrical lighting with very little use for anything else, i.e. electric motors. Some people still refer to the „electric light company‟ when dealing with contemporary electricity providers!!!! The 3rd Edition issued in 1897 was entitled, “General Rules Recommended for Wiring for the Supply of Electrical Energy”, reflecting an increased use of electricity to equipment in addition to lighting. The name was again changed with the 5 th Edition issued in 1907 to the “Wiring Rules”. In 1924 the 8th Edition was published entitled, “Regulations for the Electrical Equipment of Buildings” which recognised that there were now many different types of equipment that could be installed in buildings in general. This title was maintained through many editions and amendments until 1981 when the 15 th Edition was published with the title, “Regulations for Electrical Installations”. This recognised that electrical installations are not only carried out in buildings but also in other locations including outside; the current 17th Edition also has this title. Because of this wide variation in work it is necessary to roughly classify the activities into the following: installing electrical equipment and systems into new sites or locations replacement of electrical equipment or extending facilities. The classifications are quite self-explanatory but the first one refers to all situations where an electrical installation is to be installed where one is currently not in-situ; this includes where an existing situation once had an electrical installation but it has now been completely removed. The second classification refers to situations where an electrical installation is currently in-situ and all or part of it, including cables and components, are being replaced or the existing installation is being extended. Factors to be Considered When Planning an Installation

Try This: Think of a type of electrical installation that you may have worked on, worked in or lived in. Imagine you have been asked to completely wire this installation. List some of the factors you will have to consider when planning to install the electrical installation.

The College at Clacton

Unit 01 Page 2

August 2011


CGLI 2330 Certificate in Electrotechnical Technology Level 3 Installation Technology: Unit 302/3 – Inspection & Testing and Fault Diagnosis & Rectification

Unit 01 - Installation Planning Factors to be considered should include the following items: a)

b) c) d) e)

site conditions and locations of components i) structure – component parts, access ii) building fabric iii) external influences storage of parts and materials tools and equipment minimising disruption to adjacent work areas estimating the length of time needed for the installation.

Parties Involved in the Installation Process A number of parties are concerned with the installation process and these parties and their relationships to each other are described below. These include: Client Architect Main Contractor Nominated Subcontractors Non-nominated Subcontractors Nominated Supplier Non-nominated Supplier Consulting engineers (Design engineers)

Compliance with Regulatory Requirements Building Regulations The Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) is responsible for building regulations, which exist principally to ensure the health and safety of people in and around buildings. The regulations apply to most new buildings and many alterations of existing buildings in England and Wales, whether domestic, commercial or industrial. Environment Requirements Although the majority of electrical installation has little direct environmental impact, major construction works can include the installation of electronic equipment such as transformers and capacitors that contain cooling oils. Waste disposal If you intend to discard containers, an assessment must be made as to whether they are special waste. Containers may be special waste if they contain residues of hazardous or dangerous substances/ materials. If the residue is „special‟, then the whole container is special waste.

The College at Clacton

Unit 01 Page 3

August 2011


CGLI 2330 Certificate in Electrotechnical Technology Level 3 Installation Technology: Unit 302/3 – Inspection & Testing and Fault Diagnosis & Rectification

Unit 01 - Installation Planning Hired plant or equipment Where hired plant and equipment cause an environmental incident while on hire, the responsibility for that incident rests with the person or business that has control of that plant or equipment. Check that the hire company supplying you with plant and equipment operates a system of Preventive Plant Maintenance – well-maintained plant and equipment is less likely to break down, will emit fewer pollutants to the air and can help prevent spillage of oil and fuel to the environment. Pollution prevention and control Within the UK, the new Pollution Prevention and Control (PPC) regime implements the EU‟s Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control (IPPC) Directive. The UK implementing legislation for IPPC (collectively referred to as the PPC Regulations) is the Pollution Prevention and Control (England and Wales) Regulations 2000. Health & Safety If the client is a domestic customer who engages appropriate professionals to carry out the installation work then the responsibility falls on the architect and contractors. If the client is part of a business or work related environment then they, along with the other parties, have legal obligations under the health & Safety at Work Act and its associated regulations. Electrical Regulations All parties related to work activities must comply with the Electricity at Work Regulations in the design and installation of electricity and related equipment. Additionally, for domestic premises, the installer/tester, as well as the installation itself, must meet the requirements of Part P of the Building Regulations. In all case, although BS7671 (the Wiring Regulations) are not legally binding, they are taken as the minimum standard for good workmanship by the legislative bodies and thus breaching BS7671 is likely to result in a breach of the Electricity at Work Regulations or Part P of the Building Regulations. Working with Documentation, Drawings and Specifications It should be clear by now that documents, especially drawings and specifications, are very important for the success of a project. Without them, everyone would have a different idea about how things should be done, and the result would be chaotic. Documents provide the technical information that everyone needs to do their job properly. However, they are only useful if the information they provide is clear and the users can understand them. Unfortunately, this doesn‟t always happen. In our own industry the estimator uses the drawings and specification provided by the consulting engineer during the tendering stage. The electrician will also need the drawings during the installation stage. In the project specifications (which usually come in two parts: General and Particular) there might be hundreds of different drawings, particularly if it is a large project like a school or hospital. There are several types of drawing that will be used in a project; each one has a specific purpose, and no single document will contain all the information needed, except possibly on the simplest level. Different people will need different documents, depending on their task. You will often have to use several documents, reading them alongside each other to get all the information you need.

The College at Clacton

Unit 01 Page 4

August 2011


CGLI 2330 Certificate in Electrotechnical Technology Level 3 Installation Technology: Unit 302/3 – Inspection & Testing and Fault Diagnosis & Rectification

Unit 01 - Installation Planning Scaled drawings Layout and assembly drawings give information about physical objects, such as the floor layout in a building, or a mechanical object. If we were to make the drawing the same size as the object, the drawings would often be far too big to handle. Preparing a Materials List

Take a good look at the drawing above: it shows the layout of the building, the location of specific services and how some items are to be installed and connected. As it is to scale (1:50), you can measure it to find the actual dimensions of the building and prepare a materials list for the job. You can also scale up positions shown on the drawing and mark them for real inside the building itself. However, what the drawing doesn‟t tell us is anything about the fitments or how they should be installed. This information will be in the specification, so you‟ll need a copy of that too. Below is an extract from the specification, which tells us what we need to know. the warehouse lighting and sub-main installation will be completed in PVC single core cable contained within galvanised steel conduit and galvanised steel trunking where required. All fluorescent lighting fittings will be 1700mm x 58W of type Tamlite TM58 and suspended on chain from back boxes. All light switches will be of MK type Metalclad plus with aluminium front plate. The installation to be fed from the new lighting distribution board (MEM) which shall be fed from the existing CB DB located in the warehouse.

The College at Clacton

Unit 01 Page 5

August 2011


CGLI 2330 Certificate in Electrotechnical Technology Level 3 Installation Technology: Unit 302/3 – Inspection & Testing and Fault Diagnosis & Rectification

Unit 01 - Installation Planning Step 1: Count up all the major pieces of equipment needed Looking at the plan and referring to the specification, we can see that we need: 12 off Tamlite TM58 fittings, plus tubes 1 off MK Metalclad Plus 4-Gang 1-way surface switch with aluminium front plate 1 off MEM 3-way SPN surface mounted DB (distribution board). Step 2: Decide the best runs of conduit and trunking A logical way would be to install the 50 x 50mm trunking as shown on the drawing and then install separate conduits from the trunking up to each row of lights and then along each row of lights, fixing the conduit to the roof structure. Step 3: Calculate lengths of trunking, conduit and cable required We measure these from the drawing and calculate the actual distance using the scale provided (1:50). You will also need to know the height of the building, which is not shown on the layout diagram. Step 4: Include accessories, fixings etc. We will need to allow back boxes and hook and chain arrangements at each luminaire and order sufficient fixings (screws, bolts, saddles for conduit etc.) of various types for the installation. Step 5: Consider special access equipment Do you need special ladders, scaffolding etc? It‟s no use having the materials if you can‟t get to the right places! As well as compiling a materials list, you will need to work out what wiring is required to control the installation and feed the lighting distribution board. Preparing a materials list At some stage, you are going to have to put together a materials list for a project or part of a project. The estimator and contracts engineer will usually have ordered most of the systems and equipment, but there will always be smaller projects, or parts of a big project, where you will be asked to do it for yourself. Using the example opposite, this is how you go about preparing a materials list. The drawing is of a warehouse that is part of a large hospital project. It‟s going to be used for storing information and leaflets for medical staff. You‟ll probably be able to order the materials you need from a central store or, if not, directly from a local wholesaler. Either way, the process of working out what you need is just the same. The first thing to do is to get a copy of the layout drawing, like the one on the previous page. It must be a scaled drawing. For more information on this unit see of „Electrical Installations Level 3 2330 Technical Certificate‟ – th revised for the 17 Edition IET Wiring Regulations (ISBN 978 0 435401 10 8).

The College at Clacton

Unit 01 Page 6

August 2011


IT3 U01 - Installation Planning - Complete