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chão de caça [hunting ground] jochen volz

An inclining floor made of welded grating occupies the interior of the two connected galleries of the Brazilian Pavilion. From the entrance to the first room on the ground level, the floor rises to a height of just over a metre in the second space. Ordinary pebbles, like those found in the surrounding Giardini, are squeezed into the grid. One immediately recognises this kind of flooring, normally used in an industrial setting or in public spaces, for example, between railway tracks or for covering subway venting shafts or sewerage systems. The presence of stones stuck in the grating reminds us of the debris trapped in the gaps and fissures of the urban textures surrounding us. But – obviously – the pebbles did not accidently get stuck, they have been neatly positioned, one by one, as if someone had carefully fitted a stone in each opening. Interlaced with the grating and the pebbles, there are additional sculptural elements, a series of paintings and a video. A number of wooden sticks are inserted in the floor structure, each balancing a painted cloth draped over the top, like a group of ghosts or a small forest of signs, torches or totems. The paintings' canvas is a black-and-white striped cotton fabric, ordinary bed sheets, but each black stripe has been carefully erased with white paint. The folds of the fabric become bodies in space, in contrast to the original sheets' flatness. And, in response, the erased black lines seem to reappear in the endless braided shoelace bound into a series of multi-headed snake-like forms inhabiting both galleries above and below the grating, hibernating in some areas, and thinned down to a single thread in others. Stones of various sizes are wrapped with the lace and thus become part of the larger overall structure, giving it sculptural volume and weight. There is also a video played in loop, a one-angle shot of a tiled roof that is gradually being dismantled from the inside, creating an opening big enough for the men to escape through and climb onto the roof. The video, which is a collaboration with filmmaker Tiago Mata Machado, is one possible key to reading Cinthia Marcelle's installation Chão de caça [Hunting Ground] for the 57th Biennale di Venezia. The bright-coloured uniforms suggest that the men climbing the tiled roof are prisoners, working on their escape or staging a protest. This image of men on the roof of a correction centre is highly charged symbolically, evoking decades of prison uprisings all around the world, from Bangkok, Glasgow, Milan, Sri Lanka and Sydney, to name just a few, all the

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57ª Bienal de Veneza - Catálogo  

Catálogo da 57ª Bienal de Veneza

57ª Bienal de Veneza - Catálogo  

Catálogo da 57ª Bienal de Veneza

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