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Nadine Carina by John Johnson

Issue 31 March 2013

Nadine Carina John Heckle Death Masks Tony Broke The Weave


   

       




Bido Lito! March 2013

Editorial A week before going to press, Bido Lito! learned the news that the December/January issue of The Stool Pigeon was to be the last. We’ve become accustomed to dealing with news of major, unexpected blows to the music sector of late but, in my opinion, this is the heaviest yet. The Stool Pigeon provided a beacon of punk ethos, growing into the major UK new music print voice, flying in the face of the publishing establishment. Its mix of authoritative writing, pithy, witty humour and marvellous tongue in cheek design was utterly infectious, as was its revitalisation of illustration and the cartoon as key ingredients within the music press. The paper provided a vital, independent voice in the national sphere of music print publications; the snotty, somewhat arrogant and vitriolic little brother to the conservative establishment. It truly was a fanzine at its heart, political and gloriously opinionated, the ultimate culmination of the Sniffin’ Glue manifesto. What was as alarming for me as the decision to close the title was the reason for doing so. In his announcement of the decision to close, published at thestoolpigeon.co.uk, Editor Phil Hebblethwaite stated, “I wanted to do much more online, but the newspaper sucked up nearly all our resources and time. It’s proved impossible to do both as well as we’d like and, to be frank, we’re knackered.” He carried on to say that “running out 60,000 copies of a free newspaper six times a year and distributing them to 100 cities/towns across the UK has become untenable, and also increasingly less effective and exciting than publishing journalism online”. It is often the case that at times of loss you question your own mortality. The Stool Pigeon was an enormous influence on Bido Lito! when we were formulating our ideas for the magazine three years ago and its abandoning of the print format is something akin to Barcelona recruiting Joe Kinnear and installing the long ball as their core mantra. Is the print format really “untenable”? Perhaps on a national level it is. Locally, the paper format gives us a physical connection to the streets of our city and to the music community we are part of. That is not necessarily the case with a national. There’s also the ironic reality that we would not be able to provide the function that we can with the physical magazine (and our website), if it were not for the financial model that a physical magazine provides us: it’s physical magazine advertising revenue that actually makes our organisation tenable. This week The Guardian ran a piece (lovingly written by Mike Doherty) praising Liverpool’s booming independent cultural journalism, saying that “blogs and magazines such as SevenStreets and Bido Lito! are catering for a culturally savvy audience that wants independent cultural journalism”. It also highlighted the brilliant Double Negative and Anfield Rap. We are enjoying an independent media renaissance in Liverpool (we could all name a run of ‘zines and blogs in addition to those mentioned and that’s before The Skinny joins the party) and print media is a central part of this. As a publisher, it just depends which format you think best suits the role you want to play going forward - as The Stool Pigeon have done - as well as making it financially viable. All things considered, for us it was a big inky pink magazine. And that is the way it will stay. That just leaves me to say thank you to The Stool Pigeon. Achingly beautiful x Craig G Pennington / @bidolito Editor

Features

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Bido Lito!

Issue Thirty One / March 2013 bidolito.co.uk 4th Floor, Mello Mello 40-42 Slater St Liverpool L1 4BX

6 NADINE CARINA

Editor Craig G Pennington - info@bidolito.co.uk Assistant Editor Christopher Torpey - reviews@bidolito.co.uk

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JOHN HECKLE

Assistant Reviews Editor Naters Philip - live@bidolito.co.uk Online Editor Natalie Williams - online@bidolito.co.uk

10 UPITUP RECORDS

Designer Luke Avery - info@luke-avery.com Proofreading Debra Williams - debra@wordsanddeeds.co.uk

12 TONY BROKE

14 DEATH MASKS

16 THE WEAVE

Regulars 4 NEWS 18 PREVIEWS/SHORTS 20 REVIEWS

Interns Sean Phillips, Jack Graysmark, Amy Minshull Words Craig G Pennington, Christopher Torpey, Naters P., Jennifer Perkin, Mike Townsend, Richard Lewis, Joshua Nevett, Richard Lewis, Bang On, Joseph Viney, Sean Phillips, Jack Graysmark, Jonny Davis, Steven Aston, Joshua Potts, Flossie Easthope, Tom Silverton, Laurie Cheeseman, Mike Lay, Amy Minshull Photography, Illustration and Layout Luke Avery, John Johnson, Mike Brits, Robin Clewley, Michael Sheerin, Alex Wynne, Garreth Gibson, Keith Ainsworth, Gaz Jones, David Howarth, Chris Hindle, Nicola Reven, Allegra Whitehouse Adverts To advertise please contact ads@bidolito.co.uk The views expressed in Bido Lito! are those of the respective contributors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the magazine, its staff or the publishers. All rights reserved.


News

Bido Lito! Dansette

Our pick of this month’s wax wonders…

Lights, Camera, FACTion! From 14th March, FACT will host over 80 years of music video history as part of THE ART OF POP VIDEO exhibition. The display explores the development of the medium from its modest beginnings through to the big budget features we know today, and features over a hundred classic and lesser known promo videos by international artists, along with the expected ‘Liverpool heroes’ including The Beatles, OMD et al. Local band Outfit will also feature throughout the exhibition, with a performance at the opening and the inclusion of a new video created especially for the event by a competition winner. fact.co.uk

Clinic’s Reign Continues Local psych overlords CLINIC are releasing a reworked version of last year’s Free Reign album. Under the guidance of producer Daniel Lopatin, Free Reign II taps into the dark undercurrent of the band’s output and lets it drive the sound. Lopatin, who also worked on parts of the original record, said, “I wanted to give it a burnt 60s/70s stereo dub feel.” Both an enlightened new perspective for those familiar with the original record and a standalone output for newcomers to the band, Free ree Reign II is released on 4th March via Domino Records. clinicvoot.org

Sound City Turns Up The Volume The highlight of Liverpool’s live music calendar has been busy adding more bands its the bill, including electronicore giants ENTER SHIKARI and soul pop legends DEXYS (pictured), whose enticing set at the Anglican Cathedral will be the venue’s debut appearance for Sound City. MOUNT KIMBIE and ALUNAGEORGE are also among the acts joining an exciting line-up, guaranteed to fill Liverpool with music mayhem over the weekend of 2nd-4th May. If this wasn’t enough, speakers at the Sound City Conference include Jon Morter (the brains behind the infamous ‘Rage Against The X Factor’ campaign), Tracey Thorn and The Wombats. liverpoolsoundcity.co.uk

Rad Line-Up For Radstock Like your festivals heavy but don’t fancy a whole weekend? Then RADSTOCK might just be for you. Featuring a headline slot from Welsh post-hardcore outfit THE BLACKOUT (pictured), this year’s line-up has just been expanded to twenty-four bands, with recent additions including DON BROCO and BURY TOMORROW. You’ll need your stamina for the ten-hour event but there’s plenty to experience while you re-charge your batteries, such as a merchandise village, meet ‘n’ greet opportunities and an after-show party hosted by the line-up. Radstock Festival comes to the O2 Academy on Saturday 30th March. radstockfest.tumblr.com

Oyé 2013 Dates & Culture Tour The dates have been set for the annual AFRICA OYÉ event. On 22nd and 23rd June, Sefton Park will again play host to the largest free celebration of African music and culture in the UK. In addition, the organisation’s touring arm, Oyé Touring & Trading, have announced a series of shows across the country by Jamaican roots reggae pioneers CULTURE. The eleven-night tour includes a show at The Picket on 29th March, where the group will be presenting their acclaimed interpretation of a movement they helped to establish. africaoye.com

Glam Exhibition Sure To Be Hunky Dory It’s hard to imagine the 70s without glam, and while hits like Hot Love and Life On Mars? will always be adored, it was the genre’s exuberant style that made it stand out. Tate Liverpool’s GLAM! THE PERFORMANCE OF STYLE is an examination of how artistic developments were influenced by glam. Exploring themes such as identity and eroticism through works by David Hockney, Andy Warhol and more, it also features a new adaptation of Marc Camille Chaimowicz’s spectacular Celebration? Realife (pictured). It’s now on at the Tate, and we really can’t wait, a ha ha. tate.org.uk

COMPETITION!

UPITUP RECORDS have been serving the city with their electronic tastes since their foundation in 2003. To celebrate their 10th birthday, the label have organised a three-day weekender across three of the best venues in the city: MelloMello, Drop The Dumbells and The Kazimier. Starting 21st March, the event will feature some of Upitup’s favourite artists, including Ergo Phizmiz and Ceephax, along with a collection of Upitup All Stars to close the weekend. More details of the birthday and weekender are in this very issue, and at upitup.com. To celebrate 10 years of Upitup, we’ve teamed up with the label to offer a pair of tickets for the whole weekender. To be in with a chance of winning this prize, simply answer the following question: Upitup Records was founded in 2003, but during which month? a) January b) March c) May To enter, email your answer to competition@bidolito.co.uk by Thursday 14th March. All correct answers will be placed in a big pink tombola, the winner drawn at random and notified by email. Good luck!

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk bidolito bidolito.co.uk

Piatcions Heaven’s Sins FUZZ CLUB RECORDS Domodossola in northern Italy is used to being a place of pilgrimage: the locals better brace themselves for a proliferation of new drone pilgrims after this latest release from their favourite sons PIATCIONS. Cranking the reverb up to 11, the menacing shoegaze on Heaven’s Sins is like an unstoppable Alpine storm, a blizzard of psychedelic swirls.

My Bloody Valentine MBV PICKPOCKET Nobody sounds like MY BLOODY VALENTINE. Continuing where Loveless left off, Kevin Shields and co well and truly reclaim shoegaze from the sea of imitators. There isn’t much new here, but why should there be? The 22-year silence is entirely justified by this swamp of perfectly placed noisemaking. Disregard the rest of your record collection and let this take you.

Parquet Courts Light Up Gold DULL TOOLS If this record from adopted Brooklynites PARQUET COURTS doesn’t bore into your brain with the destruction of a worn-out drill bit and the subtlety of a sledgehammer, then you may need to visit A&E. Stand-out track Stoned And Starving tears through neurones that will drag The Fall, Sonic Youth, Sauna Youth and post-punk Devil-may-care attitude brimming to the surface.

Jez Dior Love Me To Death UNSIGNED “Throw me on the bed and Love Me To Death.” One of the best lines in a hip hop song, EVER. And that’s a fact. Sexy and dangerous-sounding - even with a delicate piano intro - this track from blog botherer JEZ DIOR has been on repeat for weeks. In fairness, he’s only got one other song (for now) but this is mint. Glossy, dark, and utterly seductive.


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Bido Lito! March 2013

Words: Jennifer Perkin / @jhperkin Photography: John Johnson / johnjohnson-photography.com

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk bidolito bidolito.co.uk


Bido Lito! March 2013 NADINE CARINA may be from Switzerland, but her music is as much a product of Liverpool as it is of her home country. This exciting experimental musician has come a long way in a short time, but it might have never happened. “It was only when I first came here that I realised it was possible, doing music. In Switzerland… everybody works in a bank. I studied to be a secretary, actually, and started doing music when I was 20. When I worked as a secretary, I was really depressed. It seemed hopeless.” Making the move three years ago to complete a degree in music and composition at LIPA, she says that seeing a performance by Stealing Sheep was a seminal moment for her. Seeing people her age playing gigs, releasing records and making music their job gave her the confidence to throw herself in. “I saw that it was possible, living off music.” Her 2011 album Magic Box showcases a singer-songwriter with a distinctive voice and taste for the quirky. On the infectiously pretty song Some Cigarettes And Chocolate she is at her most conventional, and comparisons could even be made to Feist. It is a great tune, and the accompanying video showing Carina playing guitar and looking gorgeous in a series of vintage outfits and hats is impossibly feel-good - only the heartless could resist it. There are other great moments on the record: The Garden, with its eerie whistling section, is a stand-out, whilst the simple but affecting Tomorrow also displays her vocal range, in an almost Joanna Newsom-like manner. A talented young woman, and a welcome addition to the chunky-knitsand-cupcakes folk club. Right? Wrong. Late last year Carina released the Little Bits EP. A self-described “continuous experimentation of sounds and ambiences”, it is a fascinating release that shows a shift of direction towards soundscapes, particularly on the two moody instrumental pieces that bookend it. Made in her bedroom studio using “a loop station, a MIDI keyboard, a Monotron Synth, noise of pens, wrenches, a folding ruler and my cat,” it is an at times baffling record that rewards repeat listening. When Bido Lito! saw Carina perform just before Christmas last year she had a table set up, with a gingham tablecloth and a whole manner of samplers, glocks, trinkets and various different things that she looped and weaved to amazing effect. It was clear: run of the mill girl with guitar she was not. In person the tiny singer is giggly and shy, apologising for her English, which is in fact very good and most beautifully accented. Indeed it is her distinct accent that is one of her music’s most irresistible qualities, giving words a lovely new sound in much the way Björk’s Icelandic lilt can. Coming from the small mountain town of Ascona in the Italian-speaking part of Switzerland, she also grew up with French and German but has always written her songs in English. “I love English and I always listen to music in English; maybe that’s why. I think it sounds better.” It’s clear that Carina’s time in the UK has allowed her creativity to flourish, and she is bubbling with enthusiasm for many projects that she has in the works. “I feel more free to do what I want here than in Switzerland. Because it’s bigger and there’s more music, I feel like people understand more what I do.” Writing-wise, she says some pieces come to her lyrics-first, which she then fleshes out into a song. Others are born out of experimentation with the thousands of MIDI sounds she has on her computer. She says her obsession with unusual sounds and noises was inspired largely by a group of female Finnish

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musicians making what they called “lovely noise”. “I was really inspired by them; they do noises with loop pedals and machines. It’s called lovely noise because it’s like lovely sounds. It’s not noise that is disturbing – it’s more like you are in a forest, dancing… it’s dreamy.” Dreamy is certainly a word that fits Carina’s sound, and she recalls that she even went through a stage where songs came to her fully formed in dreams. Back in reality, however, it quickly becomes clear that Carina is an enthusiastic music fan who puts a lot of time into seeking out interesting music of all genres. You could call her a music nerd, in the nicest possible way. She enthuses with equal excitement over obscure Icelandic artists Pascal Pinon and Sóley and the new Bowie song (“Omigod! Do you think he’s going to tour? I have to see him once in my life, at least!”), and admits an obsession with buying new musical trinkets. “I love to get new instruments. Well I say new, but really they are vintage toys. But when it’s new to me it makes me inspired to write.” Unsurprisingly, her primary musical influences are varied. In terms of beats she is most influenced by Japanese artists who use organic sounds in their music, “tiny sounds they record at home, compressed really strong.” Vocals-wise, she cites Lisa Germano, an American violinist and songwriter who has released a slew of honest, intelligent and challenging records. The good news is that, as well as listening to a helluva lot of music, Carina has been busy making lots of it too. She has a bewildering array of projects in the works, ranging from the cutting edge to the astonishingly lo-fi. Last year she collaborated with New York composer and producer Kevin Serra on a track for his project called Cloud Seeding, which sees him pairing up with vocalists from around the world. After he had sent Carina about 20 song sketches to choose from, she added vocals to one and they sent it back and forth – an impressive cross-Atlantic effort achieved entirely online. The Light is a gorgeous, dreamy (there it is again) piece of music, and one that has opened doors for future global collaborations. She is currently working with New York musician Kidaudra on an EP to be called Space Toys, Toys which is aimed for a summer release date. But before that, Carina is waiting on the completion of a music video to accompany another EP. Recorded last year, the EP should hopefully see the light of day in the next month or so. She describes the record on which she worked with long-time collaborator and producer Mathieu Bedwani, as “both electronic and acoustic”. The EP is entitled Things That People Like To Remember and consists of four songs that she recorded over four days. “They were really together; I could feel them as one thing.” Perhaps most intriguingly, however, an American label is releasing a collection of her new songs, recorded on a truly retro Tascam Portastudio 414 recorder and in the unlikely format of cassette. Remember those? Turns out Carina is an enthusiast: “I really like cassettes; I buy lots online. It’s just so lo-fi, it’s not really a good quality recording but I just like the format.” The wistful and country-tinged songs are to be released on a limited run and only in the US, but the UK public can be sure that there is plenty of music yet to come from this prolific talent. One thing is clear – the move to Liverpool was a good one. The secretarial workforce of Switzerland’s loss is most certainly our gain. Nadine Carina will play the Threshold Festival on 9th March and The Bido Lito! Social Club @ Bold Street Coffee on 21st March. nadinecarina.webs.com

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk bidolito bidolito.co.uk


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Bido Lito! March 2013

John h heckle ONE-WAY TICKET TO TITAN

“My brother took me to a Bugged Out rave in Liverpool, I think,” ponders the mild-mannered JOHN HECKLE, as he scratches his chin, revelling in nostalgia. “I fell asleep on the stairs leading up to the cloakroom at about five in the morning because I’d never been up that late.” As Liverpool’s untapped connoisseur of techno earnestly recalls his first encounter with electronic music at the tender age of thirteen, it’s unsurprising that the romanticism of rave sub-culture hooked the impressionable Heckle harder than he could have ever predicted. Fast forward to now: Heckle sat in this blank canvas of a room above MelloMello to discuss the origins of his cosmic tapestry of electronics. Influenced by his older brother, John was besotted with electronic music after that aforementioned brush with the heady charm of techno and intrigued by its unconventionality. His idealised perception of rave culture along with his newfound penchant for house and techno soon turned this loose affinity into a resounding obsession. Wide-eyed and bushy-tailed, John extended his interest immediately. “Me and a friend went to this little record shop called X-Fade or Cross-Fade maybe - the week after Bugged Out,” he reflects as he squints in further recollection. “At first, I started buying Dave Clarke and British Murda Boys records, then there was Sergio and Regas; just loads of techno; I guess it just sort of snowballed from that point onwards.” Already an avid record collector of vinyl by the age of sixteen, John’s duality in stockpiling classic house and industrial records laid the groundwork for his unusual tendency to amalgamate these opposing genres within his early outputs. However, his meticulous, rough-around-the-edges electronics is indebted to an external influence he sought to emulate with an almost uncanny precision. “I drew all of my influences through listening to Jamal Moss because, before I’d heard any of his music, I was listening to basically straight-up techno,” John explains. “Then a friend showed me some of his [Jamal Moss’s] records, so then I started buying all of his Mathematics stuff.” He continues to elaborate on his attempts to re-create the music of Mathematics Records label boss Jamal Moss during the production of Life On Titan, his 2011 debut EP on the same imprint. A cosmic affair littered with diced-up electronics, jacking smooth rhythms and heavy overtones of Chicago-tinged house, this homage to one of the Chicago house music scene’s defining producers would have gone unnoticed, if it wasn’t for an impromptu trip to watch his hero perform live for the first time. “I was a massive fan of the label and at the time he never played in the UK at all. I saw he had a gig in Belgium, so me and a friend got a flight over,” John recites, nodding enthusiastically. “I had a Mathematics T-shirt on and I was just bladdered off my face. So I went up and said ‘I’ve come over from Liverpool’; I only spoke about two words to him,” he laughs, pausing for breath. “Then when I got home I sent him a message on MySpace saying ‘I was the guy with the Mathematics T-shirt on’, and he listened to my music from there – and the music I sent him ended up being the first EP, Life On Titan, for Mathematics.” This seminal release unveiled John’s uncharted talent, allowing

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Words: Joshua Nevett / @joshuanevett Photography: Michael Sheerin / michaelsheerin.photoshelter.com him to fulfil a potential he never thought he possessed as he cites the collection of tracks that ended up on Life On Titan as “failed copy records of Jamal Moss”. But his suspense-inducing build of jaunty house hooks and navel gazing analogues turned out to be as powerful as they were profound. Releasing his debut EP on the label he idolised wasn’t something John took for granted. “It was completely unreal; to have the person who I was then obsessed with music-wise offer me a contract was amazing. It was an absolute dream come true.” His sophomore EP Fourth Dimension soon followed the mighty Titan, moving from caustic, unsettling jaunts to palatable jazz wonderings. Then in 2012 his debut full-length album The Second Son saw him depart even further from the dance-floor into previously unmapped territory. Veering towards the dysfunctional, he lets his whims get the better of him and derails from the Chicago-house throwbacks of old. And this is where we touch down in the present, as we draw ever closer to his performance at one of Liverpool’s flagship house and techno club-nights, mUmU. “It’ll be cool, yeah; I haven’t been booked to play in Liverpool for about three years now so I don’t really know what to expect, but I’m looking forward to it.” John remains as uncategorisable and elusive as ever, shying away from the frivolous labelling of genres. Now recording tracks

for his second full-length album, due for release on Tabernacle Records later this year, the wide array of instruments he has at his disposal will no doubt be a consistent feature in his production. “I’m just a bit nerdy about it; I like to collect instruments. I like the idea of getting a piece of 20 or 30-year-old equipment that someone used to make this classic piece of music - and trying to do something totally different with that same equipment; I think that’s quite interesting,” he explains. Currently working part-time, John is poised to launch his music career full-time as he’s due to depart on a tour of Europe following his performance at mUmU. But despite the praise he’s garnered over the past couple of years, the humble technocrat is keeping his feet firmly rooted to the ground. “If I lived anywhere else I don’t know whether I’d get as much music done; I even like my job and the people I work with. I’m quite happy where I am. I’m home.” An endearing sentiment, sure, but John Heckle’s scintillating spacecraft of sonics is only just breaking the stratosphere – and, with co-ordinates set way beyond the vicinity of our solar system, there’s no telling where he’ll make port. John Heckle plays mUmU on 2nd March johnheckle.com


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10

Bido Lito! March 2013

Radio Rebelde: Up & Away With UpItUp Words: Joseph Viney / @jjviney Illustration: Garreth Gibson / @garrethgibson Despite all of her past and present travails in the corridors of power, Italy fondly remembers Guiseppe Garibaldi, the firebrand who sought to unify his people under one banner. On the crest of a wave of similarly unprecedented pro-republican movements across the continent, the man who was later immortalised in biscuits succeeded in bringing together a previously disparate peninsula. Why the history lesson? Just an extra-curricular activity, something to remind you that events have a neat little way of recurring, because it looks like the age of the Italian revolutionary is upon us once more. Jacques and Paolo, childhood friends from Rome and the brains behind UPITUP RECORDS, are retreading the ground of their forebears. They are applying an at once fiery, laconic and laid-back southern European vibe to an almost limitless supply of releases. Running the gamut from genre-spanning albums and singles to mixes that inspire and create envy, Upitup seek to spread their form of aural propaganda across the world. Both men laugh when the suggestion is put to them that Upitup, with its formless anonymity and lightning attacks, is akin to a techsavvy terrorist cell; a very modern form of warfare. Indeed, with HQs in Stuttgart and Rome as well as Liverpool, the organisation, flow of ideas and co-ordinated releases is militaristic in its fashion. Paolo, with his traditional Mediterranean good looks, speaks with fervour and passion when discussion leans towards Upitup’s modus operandi: “What we do can be seen as a political statement against the mob rule of the record labels, who still cannot keep up with the times despite constant warnings. It’s something we’ve thought about and fought against ever since Jacques and I started the label.” Are they agitprop pranksters? Are they taking the piss? It’s much simpler than that. With a cool eye levelled at his interrogator, Paolo intones, “We do it because we can.” Jacques, now a decade long in Liverpool and with a Molbyesque Scouse lilt to his accent, picks up the thread: “Paolo

and I grew up in Rome together. We were lucky enough to meet like-minded people with common interests through school exchange programmes. We communicated constantly by post and emails, sending suggestions, mixes we’d created, albums we were distributing. Very DIY, but even ten years ago, the internet and its capabilities, in terms of music, were yet to be fully realised.” Even with the first flourishes of burgeoning technology available to them, Upitup utilised what they had as quickly as possible. So fast off the mark were they, that an academic paper released not too long ago offered evidence to show that Upitup were one of the first one hundred ‘net-based labels to get started. No mean feat, but it’s their continued success that bears repeating. Combining digital releases with a more than fair price tag (i.e. FREE), it’s a label, nay, movement, that is very much in tune with these strange times. They allow use of the creative commons copyright, meaning that any would-be acolyte can mould and re-shape Upitup’s releases and apply their own touch to them. Their biography proudly states that they remain “completely uninfected” by

commercial interference. The artists they work with are true manifestations of a neglected, distorted and noisy underground; a rabble with a grudge. True revolutionaries. The work of the past decade will culminate with three consecutive nights (21st/22nd/23rd March) of surrealism, noise and fun at a trio of Liverpool’s most prestigious venues. MelloMello plays host first, welcoming the certified oddball ERGO PHIZMIZ and his talked-about production Gargantua, Gargantua a medieval technoopera based on the Cold War and the writings of French scholar and philosopher, Francois Rabelais. The following night at the Kazimier promises, in Upitup’s own words, “the most exciting future electro-acid-techno rave to date”, with the mix-and-match dystopian collages of CEEPHAX, VHS HEAD and DATASSETTE. Last, but by no means least, is the weekend’s closing party at Drop The Dumbells: a veritable smorgasbord of Upitup’s friends, colleagues and idols take to the stage to celebrate what might just be one of the finest underground stories not just in Liverpool, but across Europe. “We’ve had over 30 live events since 2007,” states Jacques, “and we just want this to be a proper celebration of not just what we have achieved, but what everybody else we’ve come into contact with has contributed too.” Paolo continues, “It’s the full spectrum of both our roster of artists and the talents of those we work with. We just want people to see what we see, hear what we hear and feel how we feel about these brilliant sounds and ideas.” The question remains, are we to expect another ten years? Will we in fact be celebrating the big two-oh in 2023? Jacques and Paolo eye each other, slight grins creeping onto their faces. “We have no intention of stopping now,” promises Jacques. “The first ten years have gone so fast, the next ten probably will too. We never thought about getting this far in the beginning, but our future is very bright. Our work is like a marriage: you just have to take it day by day.” Upitup. com


Photography: Mike Brits / mikebrits.com


Bido Lito! March 2013

Bang On: Whereabouts in Liverpool did you grow up? Tony Broke: The north end of the city. BO: How was it then compared to now? In terms of, like, the recession. TB: Erm, it’s probably similar to how it was when I was a kid, like, people struggling. People are finding times hard ‘cause there’s hardly any work and jobs aren’t paying: everyone’s struggling, aren’t they? Wherever you’re from, all over Liverpool there’s a lot of people struggling financially. The whole Tony Broke character is born out of that, you know - I’ve got a full-time job, at the same time I’ve still fuckin’ got bills and bailiffs at me fuckin’ door, I’m struggling to survive. Basically it’s similar to the eighties, there’s a lot of poverty. BO: Alright, when did you first become aware of hip hop? TB: Erm, probably in the late seventies when I heard, like, electro and bits of funk and stuff like that. I’d say really late seventies/ early eighties is when like b-boy and electro and funk took off. BO: So were you almost into the movement before it became… TB: Yeah, I was into it before it became known as hip hop! I mean it was known as hip hop in the States obviously, but when it came to England, there was the movement that happened with it so it was all about young lads from all communities everywhere wanting to breakdance or b-boy. In Liverpool you had a choice, you were either into football or into boxing. And then when hip hop came everyone just got gripped by it. BO: Was there much of a subculture then, or was it just you and a couple of mates heavily into it? TB: There were a few north end individuals and little crews doing it, but the south end b-boys were on it and they were smashing it. But it sort of died out in the north end when the likes of Pink Floyd and Frank Zappa came in, then the next minute everyone was smoking weed. I did a little bit myself, but at the same time I still loved it [hip hop] because it gave me something else to do besides boxing and football, and it became like a passion. I was always involved in some way, either being a fan or going to shows or listening to DJs playing tunes or whatever – I was a fan of it and I’m still a fan. BO: If you were to critique current rap and hip hop, would you maybe say that there’s something lacking or missing from it? TB: I don’t think there’s anything missing. I always say this: you’ve gotta put all the music that’s out right now in a colander, shake it, shake all the shit out, and you’re left with the best shit. A lot of people aren’t aware of what good music is, or what good MCs are, because a lot of people are sheeple. They

just get told the next big thing and they follow like sheep, as a lot of people aren’t opinionated. But again, if you’re into it, you should do your homework and research, and if you do your research on music you’ll start to identify different categories of music. There’s loads of quality stuff, but there’s a lot of shit stuff as well. BO: The colander’s right though, in terms of, like, you’ve got a thousand artists now, and there might have been 100 good artists back then; there might be 200 now, but there’s 800 other shit ones that you’ve gotta go through first. TB: I think what you’ve got now is too many artists and not enough fans. It’s alright to express yourself, and I’ll never say that anyone should not express themselves through rap, ‘cause that’s what I do. But you should acknowledge that if you are not doing it at a certain standard and you’re skilled at something else – do something else and leave the space for the people who live it and love it and breathe it, d’you know what I mean? If you’re gonna step in the rap game, and I learnt this from the past, you’ve got to be good at what you do, you’ve got to be passionate about what you do, you’ve gotta project your personality into it. When I first stepped on the stage, the pressure on me, especially being a white MC and all that, I had to fight against the stereotype of somebody wanting to be like the black rappers, where I was just trying to be myself. I knew I had talent and I stuck with it, and I proved myself to everybody in the city and outside the city that I’m not just somebody who wants to be in it because it’s trendy at that time – it’s something that I live and breathe. BO: But I don’t think half of these fuckin’ Facebook MCs have done any of that shit. TB: You’ve got to be in front of a real audience, a hip hop audience. You’ve got to be in front of your peers. And if you’re not smashing it … basically you’ve got to prove yourself. You step in the ring, don’t come in with your arms tied behind your back expecting not to get hit – you’ve got to stand there and fight for your reputation, you know, to be respected as an MC. BO: So, how do you think that like hip hop has changed the world? Erm, bearing in mind that you’ve probably seen it all first hand. TB: Social interaction. Race relations. People getting on and engaging over love of music, and it’s a powerful tool you know. If I took all the people out of my life that I didn’t know through music, it’d be mad, know what I mean? So hip hop is a powerful tool - it just brings people together, it changes lives, makes people have a better lifestyle, helps them economically. Not here, ‘cause the country’s fuckin’ fucked, and that’s why I’m Tony Broke. BO: It’s been a long time putting together this album: is it just

13

good to have a complete and utter compiled album now? TB: Do you know what, it is. I was messing around [for years] doing freestyles anytime there was like a hip hop or open mic night on, doing a couple of battles here and there. And then I started realising I had nothing to sell, I had no product, nothing to show. I was just a memory in people’s brains who were in that club at that time. And I thought, “Well that’s not good enough”, ‘cause people wanna have something in their hands and say, “that’s him”. So I thought, well I’ve got to go in the studio now and start recording. BO: Does the album have a sort of message? Because obviously Tony Broke is you, but it’s almost an extension of you. TB: It’s me, but a mixture of other people that I’ve seen around me. There’s circles I move with, people who fuckin’ get off their heads on beer, weed, drink, everything. People who just live that lifestyle. As I said earlier on about people just trying to get ahead, make money how they can, and people are just assuming music’s gonna pay your bills and stuff like that, when it’s not. You’ve gotta have a job, you’ve gotta do this and that, you’ve gotta just survive, basically. It’s a bit negative, it’s a bit dark, but you can only reflect your environment to a point, and sometimes that negative environment brings a depression. And that happens from the lifestyle, and it’s purely economic because, you know, only so many people can be rich, and there’s more poor people than there are rich people. And I represent the working class, the poor, the fuckin’ downtrodden. People who are just trying to make a living. BO: Tony Broke does, innit? TB: Tony Broke is me, but it’s also my alter ego at the same time, you know what I mean? BO: Everyone must be able to understand that, like. TB: You’ll relate to having to ask your mate for a fiver so you can get some fuckin’ ‘leccy in, or see if there’s any work going. You know, anyone who’s in that position where you’re struggling will get it. So I’m just talking from that perspective, and if you’re broke you’ll relate to what I’m saying. BO: And everybody’s broke at the minute, so Broke’s never sounded so good, as they say. Tony Broke’s album Broke As F$£k is out now on Blah Records. To read an extended version of this interview go to bidolito.co.uk tonybroke.bandcamp.com

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D e at h M a s k s Words: Mike Townsend /@townsendyesmate Photography: Robin Clewley / @robinscamera As I sit alone in The Shipping Forecast awaiting the arrival of mysterious post-punk revivalists DEATH MASKS, I prepare myself for what might be a challenging interview. Pretending to make notes, images of glum faces quickly escalate into full black suits and eyeliner as indie stereotypes and a warm beery glow start to get the better of me. Death Masks began as a solo project for talented multiinstrumentalist Thom Tyrer, as the stress and tribulations of his former collaborative projects drove him to become a solo artist. Several raw and unpolished demos emerged from a homemade studio in his basement, demonstrating a songwriting prowess that was yet to find its voice, as Thom struggled to translate his sonic vision for the songs into actual recordings. Eight months later and this drive, accompanied by the urge to perform his songs live, led him into recruiting two more guitarists, a drummer and a keyboard player until they became the fivepiece that we see today. Even at just three tracks, Death Masks’s first eponymous EP on EDiLS Recordings is a varied affair. Opener Times Six is a brooding, stodgy slow burner, with menacing vocals as Thom sneers “someone’s watching you” repeatedly to a wonderfully chilling effect. Final track Gather Your Thoughts is a startling contrast, as the pounding accompaniment is replaced by a light, sparse guitar line that wouldn’t have been out of place on the last Drums album. Having been together for less than two years, it is understandable that the band might still be searching for their ‘Death Masks sound’. Thom concedes that they will need to nail it down somewhat, suggesting that the new EP will have a “much harder edge than the old” as it brings elements of their fierce live act into the studio. Despite the fact that they have only performed a “handful of shows” together, this live sound is clearly deeply important to them; and the desire to translate it onto record is something that has driven guitar bands for decades. Before your eyes start to roll, consider the fact that, until now, all their recorded output has been written, recorded and produced by Thom alone in a homemade basement studio. To jump from a solo artist to a five-piece is a testament to the vast sound that

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Thom thought his recordings could achieve and he gratefully admits that his new band mates made the new EP “the easiest recording experience of his career”. As we arrive at the subject of influences, Mat Wilcock is quick to cite Glaswegian noise pioneers Mogwai and of course My Bloody Valentine, whilst Thom reflects on the more delicate, melodic tendencies of Norwegian producer Lindstrøm and The Cure. This paints an interesting picture of how the band function in their songwriting and recording process, with the instrumentalists adding the muscle behind Thom’s carefully crafted compositions. Thom vehemently corrects me when I ask if songwriting duties are still maintained solely by him, instead suggesting that “everyone chips in”. Whilst I suspect his humility might be getting the better of him, it’s not difficult to notice a tangible element of relief that he is no longer doing this on his own. The three tracks on their new EP, a split release with fellow EDiLS label mates Tear Talk, certainly succeed in refining their sound, and are evidence of a band who are starting to recognise their strengths. Their Fleetwood Mac melodies come drenched in such a dense, unnerving context that it makes them so exciting and engaging, playing dark and light against each other so effortlessly yet deliberately, with an astonishing confidence for a band who have been together for such a short period of time. Conversation inevitably turns to the name, as Death Masks already find themselves fighting off the misery and gloom tags that their name might suggest. It’s true that even at this early stage gloom seems to be following them around. When Thisisfakediy featured them in their Neu Bulletin last year they felt the need to apologise for “creeping their readers out”, and the photo shoot for this feature is hardly going to make you feel warm and cuddly inside. Whilst this image certainly isn’t something that the band is actively trying to perpetuate, Thom recognises that “it’s important to keep some mystery whilst maintaining some sort of image when it comes to public perception”. It is their music though more than anything that has lead to this dark, sinister persona. Thom’s menacing, almost baritone, vocals will draw inevitable Ian Curtis comparisons, but it’s contemporary bands like London’s O. Children and Indiana’s brilliant Stagnant Pools that they sit most

comfortably alongside. Resisting the urge to describe it as ‘postInterpol’, mainstream indie’s affection for a post-punk revival that saw the likes of Interpol and Editors headlining festivals a few years back certainly seems to have dwindled, something Joe Oxley is quick to dismiss: “I think there will always be room for bands trying to create new and exciting music, and I think it’s important for us to stick to what we know and love”. You have to agree; Liverpool is becoming one of the finest hubs for new music in the North, with independent promoters dedicating an increasingly frequent set of shows to the most challenging and forward-thinking new artists about. As one of the most self-contained local scenes in the country, Liverpool does seem almost impervious to national shifts in taste and fashion. I’m not trying to suggest that Liverpool is out of touch; it’s just that, with such a brilliant infrastructure in place, with its world class venues, huge network of culture press, internationally renowned festivals and global publishers and distributors, everything is in place for Liverpool to produce and cultivate its own indigenous cultural movements without the need to rely on London. This selfsustainability allows bands like Death Masks to “stick to what they know and love”, because they will ultimately be judged and celebrated on the basis that they have produced a piece of art that justifies their stubborn integrity. One thing that stays with me after meeting the band is their unrelenting passion for what they do. Conversation regularly turns to their past experiences in other projects: Thom talks warmly about his and Michael Stephens’ shared basement studio and Joe about his experience as a studio engineer. Even as I leave for five minutes to go to the bar, I return to find them in an animated discussion about their vinyl collections. The love they have for their craft is infectious, and as they develop and attention starts to grow it will translate into a dedication and persistence that will surely see them step up into the Liverpool elite. Death Masks play MelloMello on 22nd March, alongside Tear Talk, to launch their new EP. deathmasks.bandcamp.com


Words: Richard Lewis Illustration: Alex Wynne / alexpaulwynne.tumblr.com Even a casual observer of the drinking establishments around Liverpool’s University Quarter will have noticed the burgeoning presence of the city’s jazz scene in several public houses over the past few years. The storied likes of Peter Kavanagh’s, The Caledonia and The Grapes, watering holes all in close proximity to each other, draw sizeable audiences on a weekly basis to soak up the music created by an increasing number of jazz players in the city. With its popularity slowly snowballing and the first LIVERPOOL INTERNATIONAL JAZZ FESTIVAL set to commence this month, the jazz scene in Liverpool is about to take another leap forwards due to THE WEAVE. Led by trumpeter Martin Smith, the band are the first ensemble playing original jazz music to come out of the city in decades. While the jazz scene in Liverpool is in rude health at present and growing in popularity, Martin recalls this wasn’t always the case. “When I first started playing in the city, jazz was sort of a bad word really,” he remembers. “It had a bad reputation for being exclusive; it wasn’t inclusive of an audience whatsoever,” he recalls. “I’ve been playing jazz in the city for the last twenty years or so, the last ten of which have just become better and better. Not just in terms of the jazz community but in terms of how healthy it is. There are gigs now where people are playing pretty far-out, demanding music but the place is bouncing because of the energy that’s there,” Martin enthuses of kindred spirits such as Marley Chingus and The Blind Monk Trio. A fixture on records by local luminaries Stealing Sheep, Emily & the Faves, The Coral and Steve Pilgrim over the past two decades (this list of Liverpoolbased bands stretches into double figures), Martin describes his work with Shack as “some of the most powerful musical experiences in my life.” “What a lot of Liverpool bands love is that Ennio Morricone, Mariachi sound,” Martin explains. “The parts on Love’s Forever Changes - a lot of people refer to that. There’s definite influences that pervade the city and live here, like Captain Beefheart and Zappa.” The Zappa connection is particularly apt as Martin spent seven years working with Zappa tribute group The Muffin Men, which included The Mothers of Invention’s original drummer Jimmy Carl Black. Elsewhere, via his connection with prog rockers The Wizards

of Twiddly and their two-year tenure as backing band to former Soft Machine guitarist Kevin Ayers, Martin went on to work with Super Furry Animals and Gorky’s Zygotic Mynki, huge fans of the Canterbury Scene alumnus. Due in part to the impact The Kazimier has had on Liverpool’s music scene (“I could sit and wax lyrical about that place for hours; it’s extraordinary what they’ve brought,” Martin says), jazz now has a greater presence within the city’s musical identity. A member of the ‘high energy, full-power’ Kazimier Krunk Band, Martin is also part of Stealing Sheep’s Lucy Mercer’s side-project Sing for Your Supper. Alongside The Kazimier, the arrival of The Capstone in March 2010, and their support for gigs showcasing jazz, progressive and avant-garde forms, ensures that high-profile touring bands visit the city, including Jazz Festival headliner Courtney Pine. “It’s been a long, long time since this kind of level of national acts came to Liverpool,” Martin nods. All of which brings us to The Weave, the ensemble band formed by Martin. “Last year I decided that I wanted to do something not for myself, but something where we could take something out of this pond of Liverpool and put it on a national stage,” Martin explains of The Weave’s formation. “I’ve never thought of myself as a writer, a prolific writer by any means; some of the songs on the album are fifteen years old; they just bubble out of my subconscious,” Martin explains of the writing process. “Some of the songs I wrote last year, some I’ve had the chord sequence to for about ten years, then added a melody two years ago. They’re fragments that I’ve pulled together.” Imbued with a fair degree of Liverpudlian humour, as titles including Cold, Wet And Sockless and Apart From That Mrs. Lincoln attest, the self-titled LP evokes the smoke-filled rooms of John Barry soundtracks and exudes the languid cool of Federico Fellini films 81/2 and La Dolce Vita. As if further proof were needed about how tight the band’s playing is, the entire LP was laid down in a mere two days at Parr Street Studios last August. With the exception of a spoken word overdub by Simon James on The Ballad of Bernard Swimmins, the disc’s nine tracks were all recorded live. “There are charts with the harmonic structure of the songs, but everything else is improvised,” Martins explains of the recording sessions. Following the LP launch at Parr Street and the band’s headline slot at Liverpool International Jazz Festival, the band head out on tour across the UK in the autumn. As part of Jazz North’s Northern Line Ambassadors project to bring the genre to a wider audience, Martin and The Weave will hopefully continue what they have started in Liverpool, spreading the word about the form and bringing together what might have been thought of as disparate music scenes. The Weave play the Liverpool International Jazz Festival on 28th February The Weave’s debut LP is out now, available through Burning Shed Records. theweavemusic. com

Prior to the arrival of a certain bunch of Merseybeat upstarts in the early 1960s bringing about a sea change in Liverpool music, jazz was hugely popular in the city. As The Weave’s Martin Smith notes, “Liverpool was very much on the map for touring musicians: Miles Davis, Duke Ellington and Louis Armstrong all played here.” The Capstone Theatre retools this for the 21st Century and steps up a gear in bringing high-profile jazz acts to its intimate surroundings, hosting the first-ever LIVERPOOL INTERNATIONAL JAZZ FESTIVAL between Thursday 28th February and Sunday 3rd March. Headlining the opening day, ROLLER TRIO, hailed by BBC 6Music’s Gilles Peterson as ‘the new sound of UK Jazz’, added a Mercury Prize nomination to a wave of critical acclaim they received for their eponymous debut LP last year. Asked what the audience can expect at the group’s show, guitarist Luke Wynter told Bido Lito!, “I think we’re a lot louder and more energetic than people might expect a jazz band to be. We get a lot of people at gigs telling us they loved the show even though they thought they didn’t like jazz. I think people can relate to the energy and emotion of a performance even if the music is unfamiliar.” In addition to the ticketed shows, free performances are also scheduled every day at the festival with THE WEAVE supplying the first of these, showcasing tracks from their recently released debut album. The second day sees critically acclaimed quintet LED BIB head the bill; while pushing into progressive rock territory, local jazz/prog rock ensemble GORP play a free show. Come the weekend the bill increases, with four acts scheduled for Saturday 2nd March. Mercury Prize nominees for 2010 LP Golden, THE KIT DOWNES TRIO provide headlining duties while WHITE CANVAS, who include former Stands bassist Dean Ravera, play a free show in the afternoon. Sunday 3rd March sees Liverpool jazz scene stalwarts BLIND MONK TRIO play a free show. The event culminates with a stand-out headliner in the shape of highly revered UK saxophonist and clarinettist COURTNEY PINE HOUSE OF LEGENDS, who provides a rousing finale to the festival’s inaugural year. A veteran of Later...with Jools Holland and showcasing music from his recently issued 15th album, the booking marks the return of the jazz maestro to The Capstone after his sell-out 2010 performance launched the venue’s jazz programme. thecapstonetheatre.com


18

Bido Lito! March 2013 Previews/Shorts Edited by Richard Lewis

Idlewild mainman RODDY WOOMBLE has carved himself out an impressive niche as a roots/folk performer away from his Edinburgh RODDY WOOMBLE band, who are currently on hiatus. Retaining the melodicism of the Scot’s band while toning down the raucousness, Woomble is on the road in support of his upcoming fourth LP Listen To Keep, Keep due out on Reveal Records this month. Leaf / 21st March

A scintillating double header sees Chi-town indie rockers MAPS & ATLASES share a stage with UK MAPS & ATLASES / TALL SHIPS math rock trio TALL SHIPS. The former are currently traversing the globe in support of their second LP, last year’s acclaimed Beware And Be Grateful. Brightonians Tall Ships band boast an excellent reputation live, captured on last year’s highly venerated debut album Everything Touching. Touching The Kazimier / 5th March

Duke Special

Take a Northern Irish man, a battered piano, some red wine and a shock of dreadlocks and what have you got? DUKE SPECIAL, that’s what. Playing music and making it into theatre (not musical theatre though, don’t panic), Duke is back on tour with his album Oh Pioneer, Pioneer released last year through Universal Music. Although this LP marks his second flurry into the major label market since 2008, Duke Special remains one of those artists who’s accidentally underground. Bringing his hefty discography (7 LPs, 5 EPs, and performances on children’s TV show Sesame Tree) with him he’s set to make a beautiful night in New Brighton’s Floral Pavillion. For longstanding fans of Duke you’ll be looking out for the classics like Sweet Sweet Kisses and Freewheel; but keep yourself open to new tunes Nothing Shall Come Between Us and Snakes In The Grass too, as bracingly eccentric as we’ve come to expect from this consummate innovator. Throw in his penchant for getting Victorian pub singalongs on the go and you’re sure to get your night’s fill. To hear more from the man himself, head over to bidolito.co.uk now to read N. Philip’s full interview with the man beneath the dreads. Blue Lounge, Floral Pavilion / 7th March

A man whose CV places him in the category marked ‘underground legend’, MIKE WATT MIKE WATT visits the city in early March. Cofounder of groundbreaking US hardcore trio Minutemen, in addition to his work with fIREHOSE and contributing his basslines to the reformed Stooges, Watt is on tour to promote La Busta Gialla, the first Europe-wide release by his new trio IL SONGO DEL MARINAIO (with guitarist Stefano Pilia and drummer Andrea Belfi). Eric’s / 5th March

Continuing the Italian theme, Rome-based post-hardcore quintet HOPES DIE LAST pay a visit HOPES DIE LAST to these shores in March. Touring the record Trust No One, released on Valentine’s Day last year through Standby Records, the band have begun to build up a buzz across the pond, with the LP breaking into the US Heatseekers Chart. Before they begin to break big over here, catch them at Elevator Bar. Elevator Bar / 22nd March

The Epstein continues a run of superb gigs with folk singer SAM LEE taking to the stage on 21st SAM LEE AND FRIENDS March. Lee’s 2012 debut release Ground Of Its Own was nominated for the Mercury Prize and received a wealth of four-star reviews, earning the coveted stamp of approval from Nick Drake/R.E.M. producer Joe Boyd. The Epstein / 21st March

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk bidolito bidolito.co.uk

Threshold Festival

Photo by Allegra Whitehouse / @arewphotos

Something of a cult hero, German-based musician and producer ULRICH SCHNAUSS ULRICH SCHNAUSS visits The Kazimier to showcase his ambient electronic wares next month. Hailed as “an institution in shoegaze circles” by Drowned in Sound, the Berliner plays live with excellent support from MARCONI UNION and DJ JAMES HOLROYD. Suitably tripped-out visuals are supplied by regular Ulrich collaborator Nat Urazmetova. The Kazimier / 23rd March

Gearing up for its biggest year yet, THRESHOLD FESTIVAL returns to its regular haunts around the Baltic Triangle for another weekend of grassroots music, art, comedy and discussion. Taking place across several venues - Camp & Furnace, The Picket, Elevator Bar, Baltic Creative and The Albert Dock - the festival enters its third year with its most extensive line-up to date. Acts confirmed include critically acclaimed Americana singer-songwriter ROB VINCENT, folk singer NATALIE MCCOOL, roots ensemble RUMJIG, bluesman DAVE O’GRADY, and Liverpool funk soul saviours MANUKAH (pictured). Also set to feature are THE THESPIANS, BROKEN MEN, KUSANAGI, PADDY STEER, CHELCEE GRIMES, FONETIKS and many more besides. Little Panther will be hosting a night of metal and rock on the Sunday, headed up by GUARDIANS, and MelloMello are planning a musical, culinary and comedy-based takeover of The Picket. In visual arts Threshold will welcome back the Liverpool Art Prize Winner 2012, Robyn Woolston, who has created site-specific installations for the last two events, while her proposed installation for 2013 will be exhibited in Camp & Furnace’s Blade Factory. In addition to the music, the accompanying attractions include gaming, comedy, crafts industry workshops, films, guerilla knitting and plenty of surprise pop-up performances besides. All of the above costs the wallet-saving sum of £20 for a weekend ticket. Various venues / 8th-10th March


Sat 16th March, 7:30pm.

DAVE SPIKEY WORDS DON’T COME EASY TOUR Wed 20th March, 7:30pm.

BLACK BOX THEATRE COMPANYOTHELLO COMPANY OTHELLO Fri 22nd March, 7:30pm.

McCARTNEY:: YESTERDAY & TODAY A MUSICAL CELEBRATION Sat 23rd March, 7:30pm.

LIVERPOOL MOZART ORCHESTRA Sun 24th March, 8:00pm.

F:RATED COMEDY CLUB Fri 5th April, 8:00pm. Thu 21st February, 7:30pm.

LIVE/WIRE THE AC/DC SHOW

STARRING PHOENIX NIGHTS’ JANICE CONNOLLY

Mon 15th April, 8:00pm.

BARBARA NICE IS MRS. NICE

ENTER SHIKARI SOLD OUT

Sat 23rd February, 8:00pm.

ZOE LYONS: POP-UP COMIC

Sun 21st April, 7:30pm.

MARTIN STEPHENSON

Sun 24th February, 8:00pm.

F:RATED COMEDY CLUB Thu 28th February, 7:30pm.

Wed 24th April, 12:30pm.

ROYAL LIVERPOOL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA LUNCHTIME CONCERT SERIES

FLORAL JAZZ NIGHT

MARLENE VER PLANCK Wed 6th March, 7:30pm.

MEGA STARS:

A GRAND CHARITY VARIETY SHOW Thursday 7th March, 8:00pm.

DUKE SPECIAL Fri 8th & Sat 9th March.

HAND IN HAND THEATRE

THE CRUCIBLE

Sat 16th March, 11:00am to 3:00pm.

MDI FAMILY DANCE DAY

Fri 26th April, 7:30pm.

INDIAN TAKEAWAY WITH HARDEEP SINGH KOHLI Sat 27th April, 8:00pm.

FLORAL FOLK NIGHT SARA GREY & KIERON MEANS

Sun 28th April, 2:15pm.

WIRRAL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA ROMANTIC INTERLUDE

Sun 28th April, 8:00pm.

F:RATED COMEDY CLUB


20

Bido Lito! March 2013

Reviews

Ian Skelly (John Johnson / johnjohnson-photography.com)

IAN SKELLY The Sundowners The Zanzibar We are constantly reminded that our planet’s coral reefs are in grave danger. Depletion, breakoffs and nefarious deeds like theft are rapidly destroying one of the Earth’s most beautiful and vital resources. Deciding to buck the trend, the Zanzibar saw fit to exhibit a Coral break-off that endangers no-one, only enriches. IAN SKELLY, drummer with Wirral chameleons The Coral and brother of vocalist James, has received wave after wave of glowing reviews, promising profiles and fan adulation for his solo project and subsequent album, Cut From A Star. Much like his parent band, Skelly projects a tasty blend of Arthur Lee-inspired soul, 60s psych, poppy hooks that attack the brain, and a dash of traditional folk. In essence, he’s very much a music fan’s musician, and a true son of Merseyside’s artistic and cultural heritage. Far from allowing that to pigeon-hole him, Skelly lets loose with an enviable amount of reckless abandon. An inevitably cramped and humid venue remains very much in awe throughout. Yet, far from resting on his laurels and basking in the success The Coral has afforded him, Skelly has made the sometimes arduous journey out on his lonesome. The results are, at times, terrifyingly good. With Ian on vocals and James on drums, a grand amount of the Skelly family talent is on display, and yet there’s still room for one more. Fiona Skelly, along with her bandmate in support act THE SUNDOWNERS Niamh Rowe, offers sultry backing voices to the lovingly

crafted and equally well received DNA and It’s Only Love. Love As the night’s set winds to a close, a problem rears its head. “We’ve… erm… run out of songs,” a sheepish Skelly announces. Foregoing an excuse to call it a night and hit the relative safety of the backstage area, Skelly and his band instead launch into The Byrds’ Mr. Spaceman. Spaceman Be it improvised or a slice of coy, sly stage technique, it’s a move that exemplifies just what makes this boy so special. Skelly, his family, and his colleagues in The Coral have the holy trinity sewn up: past, present and future. Really, what’s not to love? Drummers making the transition from the back to the front of the stage are not particularly well documented. Less so are any success stories. Dave Grohl, Phil Collins and…well, no more spring to mind immediately, but we can safely pencil Ian Skelly’s name onto that list from here on in. Joseph Viney / @jjviney

His mawkish a cappella and karaoke renditions are reminiscent of a washed-up seaside crooner, lamenting his lost loves from the top of a mist-shrouded lighthouse. However, Lung still manages to reduce the capacity crowd of the Kazimier to a resounding hush. Accompanied by nothing more than his iPhone connected to a tiny Fender practice amp, Lung’s limbs flail about frenetically for Selfish Man, while shimmering, carefully plucked guitar is applied sparingly on the introspective ballad Brooklyn Girls. Girls Forget the rasping, confrontation of WU LYF, for when Lung’s debut solo output is released later this year it’ll be sure to bleed the heart dry of emotional poignancy – that’s if this collection of disaffected dramatics is anything to go by. Manchester’s DUTCH UNCLES are no dummies

when it comes to high-octane, cathartic smart pop. They’ve arrived just in time to give tonight what it’s sorely been missing, a unified congress of funk. They write exhilarating electronicaindebted parcels of pop with enough xylophone bongs to compete with the Royal Philharmonic. “I’d like you to meet our newest addition, the electric xylophone. Tonight’s going to be a lot of fun,” remarks impish frontman Duncan Wallis, who looks beside himself with joy at the prospect of having more instruments at his disposal to clatter, smash and jab at. They’re out of the blocks with an eerie jitter, as Pondage sets a tone of tension that’s present throughout their latest album Out Of Touch In The Wild. Haunting keyboard stabs build and unnerve in a gruelling, rhythmic canter that you can almost properly dance to. Wallis spares no time in jerking around the perimeter of the stage; he unshackles his limbs with fevered intent like a malfunctioning jack-in-the-box. Dutch Uncles may paddle in the same puddles as Hot Chip (Wallis’ falsetto) or Peter Gabriel (cerebral synths), but they swim in an entirely different pool altogether – and lead single Fester proves this with disco handclaps and an onslaught of staid guitar lines. “This has gone at the speed of light, let’s have a last hoedown,” proclaims Wallis, and it’s a hoedown we receive as they bounce into the punchy percussiveness of The Ink. One thing’s for sure: they’ll have the punters speaking double Dutch for weeks. Joshua Nevett / @joshuanevett

PATRICK WOLF Abi Wade

everisland & Hope St. Agency @ The Epstein Theatre Perched behind her cello, ABI WADE appears as though she could have performed at any point in this theatre’s century-long history. Her offkilter fashion sense sits her out of step with the present, the grand proscenium arch framing her like a lost oil painting. Her instrumental set-up

DUTCH UNCLES Francis Lung

Evol @ The Kazimier “Hmm, I have to say, one of my top five moments in music has to be finding out that my band has split up via YouTube – and playing The Kazimier tonight, of course,” divulges the angular FRANCIS LUNG, the ever-enigmatic cajoler. My, my, he sure does know how to turn on the charm. But for those more observant than most, you’re probably already wise to the fact that tonight’s wiry, slick-mannered support act is none other than estranged WU LYF bassist, Tom McClung.

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk bidolito bidolito.co.uk

Dutch Uncles (Gaz Jones / @GTMPhoto)


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22

Bido Lito! March 2013

Reviews

consists of a cello and a box cajon, yet her sound belies this meagre selection of equipment. Simultaneously carving multi-textual drumbeats tapped on the cello whilst plucking groovy notes, she gives strong and interesting vocal performances. With hints of Joanna Newsom and the wonderfully ambidextrous Merrill Garbus, Wade confidently strides through a set of otherworldly, quintessentially English folk. For a decade now PATRICK WOLF has been developing his own unique bittersweet world. He is now at a stage where you know what to expect from him, like a Tim Burton film, or perhaps more relevantly, a David Lynch feature. Wolf’s latest album Sundark And Riverlight is not so much a new album but a reinterpretation of old songs. At times stripped bare and at others re-imagined, the record is an attempt to distil his sound to its essence. In keeping with his new album’s desire to be understated, Wolf enters the stage to little fanfare, accompanied by his long-term violinist Victoria Sutherland and new addition Willemwiebe on accordion. The thing that always hits hardest at his shows is the organic flexibility of Wolf ’s voice. The depth, tone and ease with which he navigates melodies is truly remarkable. This is something that doesn’t simply come from a natural-born gift nor training, but rather an awareness of one’s capabilities and a total absorption of a self-created world. Most songs tonight come with a verbal introduction, explanations of their

Patrick Wolf (Keith Ainsworth / arkimages.co.uk)

beginnings, metaphors, and what they now mean to him with the passage of time. He openly talks of his own depression and friend’s suicide, making it clear that his music is the ultimate catharsis for him. Through his musical abilities as a composer and his acute mindfulness, he totally transcends the heart-on-sleeve clichés of many singer-songwriters to become something unique. Songs such as House, The City, City and of course Magic Position, Position shine brightest in these new formats, losing none of their charm when stripped to their bare essence. Although still a young man, Patrick Wolf has been performing for a decade now and is fast approaching the realm of national treasure.

Here’s hoping he has many more years of enchanting music in him. Jonny Davis / restrelaxrecords.co.uk

THE CITY WALLS

Clang Boom Steam – Memory Men – Lee Clark MelloMello THE CITY WALLS make a return to live action at MelloMello at arguably the worst time of the year. Just a few weeks after Christmas when bank balances are still recovering and January no-drinking ‘health kicks’ are stringently being enforced, the last thing you need when trying

to pull a crowd is the weatherman dishing out last minute red alert warnings. The lashing snow doesn’t put off tonight’s local gig goers though as they come in their droves to see a stellar line-up. Because of the weather MelloMello is unsurprisingly sparse when first act LEE CLARK takes the stage armed with just an acoustic guitar and a beer. He certainly plays his part in warming-up the punters up though with his heartfelt soulful compositions such as Since You Told Me It Was Over. Next up are MEMORY MEN, who entice the drinkers down to the front and turn things up a notch. Their combination of shoegaze and punk with distinct vocals from front man Martin Stillwell (Guitar, Vocals) result in some hefty pop tones. Any attempted cigarette breaks in-between bands are off the cards after failed attempts to keep the ciggies snow-free, so it’s a case of remaining down the front in time for Irish spawned and Liverpool based four-piece CLANG BOOM STEAM, who turn out to be the highlight of the night. By the time they come on the venue is jam-packed and they respond with an electric performance. Their name may be taken from a Tom Waits song but their sound is less reminiscent. They take the storytelling style of traditional Irish songs and give them a kick up the arse with a dark, psychedelic, fuzzed-up wall of sound. They are love child of The Pogues and Queens Of The Stone Age, and frontman Garvan Cosgrove is mesmerising, especially on

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To book tickets Call: 0844 8000 410 Visit: www.thecapstonetheatre.com


24

Bido Lito! March 2013

Reviews

Clan, whilst recent single Worms gets a great reception. Their forthcoming album is definitely something to keep an eye open for. The City Walls then take to the stage to finish the night off. Somewhere between Young and Dylan, they still manage to encompass a trademark sound and style you’d associate with the crème of the Scouse bands. Paul Crowe (Guitar, Vocals) has been entertaining Liverpool gig attendees for many years, and is still showing he has the knack to knock out a tune with some spot-on harmonies and arrangements which are brilliantly complimented by a cello. Begging You and More Ways Than One are melodic folk rock at its best and they bring a feeling of unity into the room for those who have skidded, slid and skied their way out. As Crowe brings the set to a close he thanks the crowd for coming out and braving the weather. No problem, the pleasure is ours. Steven Aston / gigslutz.co.uk

BEAR’S DEN

Clean Cut Kid – Joe Banfi Live Fast @ The Shipping Forecast First up for the challenge of playing to a room already sweating with punters is a band of supreme invention. CLEAN CUT KID are a delight; you’d think their brand of Mumford-

Bear’s Den (Chris Hindle)

aping folk delves too far into pastiche, but initial impressions belie a mercurial command of populist song-writing. Runaway has a muscular, shifting momentum that contrasts nicely with Mike Hall and Greta Svabo Bech’s vocal interplay. The latter is a charming stage presence, crooning against her violin, losing herself to the music’s dynamism. “We’re gonna take it up and rock out,” grins Hall, before adding, “I mean folk rock out.” Thunder a truly memorable Cue Silence And Thunder, blend of soaring chords and Celtic imagery that leaves the crowd in pieces. Dig beneath the charisma and it’s apparent that flourishing synth

lines are the heart of this band, a pointer that others in the same mould should follow if they want to keep their eyes on the future. Innovation is key, and who else could offer such a worthy flip-side of the coin as JOE BANFI? He walks on, slightly bookish, outfitted in minimalist black, and delivers a set that is by turns haunting, challenging and starkly beautiful. With a voice that seems intent on finding its way around melancholia and stronger, stranger bursts of passion, every track is coloured like an Expressionist painting, pulling sentiments such as “my blindness is a burden” into ambiguous

territory. His playing is accomplished and fearless. Intensity surrounds each note, backing a literate knowledge of pastoral revivalism, perhaps expressed best in a stunning cover of Where Did You Sleep Last Night? Banfi has chosen to leave his collaborators on record at home, cutting to the heart of his troubled id, ripe for listeners’ explorations. By the impression he leaves after a mere half hour, this guy can’t be kept a secret for long. The BEAR’S DEN holding court tonight is a different creature from the one slipping beneath big names on bills and gathering fans here and there. This is their first solo tour and, after supporting the likes of Matt Corby and Smoke Fairies, they look ready to earn the respect achieved by their contemporaries. Possessing an easy-going vibe despite frontman Andrew Davie admitting to a case of nerves, they bring understated pathos to songs dealing largely with very personal narratives. It’s impossible to hear Pompeii, Pompeii about a trip with Davie’s wounded father, without finding something to treasure in its lyrics, naked as they are, about trials of the soul. Characters are so predominant in Bear’s Den’s output that the occasional same-y chorus or stutter into MOR folk can be forgotten; try Isaac on for size in an Academy, let’s say, with a larger audience, and the effect might be astonishing. These tunes are literally and figuratively begging for wider release. Kev Jones’ careful strumming evokes Neil Young at his most romantic, laying


solid ground for Joey Haynes to hammer away on percussion, alternately switching between kit and bass to the delight of the others. Don’t Let The Sun Steal You Away weaves a spell, swaying and peaking at the right moments. Agape proves the perfect closer, lingering for its heartfelt honesty. Beards held high, they can move onto making more EP stamps knowing that greater opportunities could soon be calling. Joshua Potts

VINNIE CARUANA

Robbie Cavanagh - Spirit Bear - Peter Harrison Kong Live Events @ The Shipping Forecast Formerly of bands The Movielife and I Am The Avalanche, Long Island’s VINNIE CARUANA comes preaching the virtues of his own brand of pop punk to us Brits. On a tour of his upcoming EP City By The Sea, Sea he has chosen to stray away from his hardcore origins by performing acoustically and without the backing of his musical brethren. Tonight is a chance to see what this punk troubadour has been up to since riding the wave of the so-called ‘Kerrang era’ of the 2000s. Support from fledgling acoustic songwriters PETER HARRISON and SPIRIT BEAR demonstrate sentimental acoustic folk sounds. Admittedly though, both acts sound somewhat softcore next to their headliner, but they’re nevertheless endearing introductions to the unpolished yet uncontrived feel of the night. The final support act is Wigan’s ROBBIE CAVANAGH. A throwback to the late 90s, Cavanagh’s lyrics are poetic, with a dash of nihilism and an American accent, evocative of the likes of Counting Crows and The Goo Goo Dolls. A trip down memory lane for many of the audience. Caruana commences his set with I Am The Avalanche track Symphony to a crowd that knows every word and guitar-strung nuance. The power and snarl behind the voice emanating from Caruana’s heavily tattooed chest is like the sound of fifty men fist-pumping the air, which incidentally is close to what is actually happening around him. With cans of Red Stripe raised in salute, the crowd is enraptured as he roars The Movielife classic Green Eyes. His musicianship is far from what any stickler would call flawless as he makes several cack-handed mistakes on his guitar. But, like any true partisan of the genre, what he lacks in perfection he makes up for in attitude. The raw power of The Drinking Song and I Took A Beating presents two testosteronefuelled anthems and highlights of the set, almost pushing the tiny cellar of the Shipping Forecast into moshpit territory. Somehow The World Keeps Turning, Turning one of his solo efforts, is a more personal reflection of Vinnie Caruana as a songwriter, woven with references to his family and his musings on life and death. It is perhaps a little disappointing that we do not see more of this through his set, as the crowd again laps up his performance with zeal. He then reverts

to covering old ground in Sailor Tattoos and The Gravedigger’s Argument, Argument before finishing on Saves The Day track Three Miles Down. The crowd is again endlessly appreciative of each song. Here is a man who very obviously lives and breathes the spirit of his music: a punk puritan with a power over his audience. That choice to go it alone to perform such guitar-led anthems is a controversial one, but nevertheless one which has produced satisfying results, proving that even a genre such as punk has its conventions to be broken. Flossie Easthope / @feasthope

MODESTEP

Document One - Koven 02 Academy As dubstep becomes more and more popular outside of the underground scene, one particular band who seem to be riding on the crest of this wave are MODESTEP. Since starting out in 2010, they’ve gone from strength to strength with their live dubstep and rock fusion, with their first album Evolution Theory debuting in February to widespread recognition. Opening tonight though are KOVEN: similarly to Modestep, they feature a live vocalist, and the combination of Kate Ashton’s engaging voice with the skilled mixing of Max Rowat results in a trance-like atmosphere, feeling like someone has put chill wave in a blender. The incorporation of acoustic guitar in More Than You gives it a slower feel, sometimes sounding like 2step reminding us of the roots of dubstep. Following this enticing warm-up are DOCUMENT ONE. The two-piece production unit of Matt King and Joe Froud also choose to use live vocals tonight, hinting at a trend that appears to be on the rise in the world of dubstep. Mixing in a wide variety of songs, from the obvious (Skrillex) to the not so obvious (Outhere Brothers and Black Eyed Peas), the sampling of other artists does seem a little extensive when you note how Document One have a catalogue of their own brilliant tracks (Stay Stay and Under The Sun) at their disposal, to the extent that integrating mainstream music feels like a bit of a crowd pleaser. Nevertheless, their strong performance stirs up multiple moshpits, which is always a good sign at any gig. Opening with J. Rabbit’s remix of Satisfaction, Modestep instantly get the crowd going when they hit the stage. Without pausing, they then smash out single To The Stars with an extended guitar solo from Nick Tsang, showing off their versatility in combining elements from multiple genres. With sweat raining from the ceiling, and dislodged shoes scattered about the floor, it’s evident why Modestep generate such a fervent following on the road. That in spite of the noise generated, making it feel like cleaning your ears with a pneumatic drill. Take It All, their collaboration with Koven (featuring some unbelievable drumming from Matthew Curtis),


28

Bido Lito! March 2013

Reviews

precedes set closer and renowned single Sunlight, and another shattering guitar solo to Sunlight top it off. With both themselves and the crowd hungry for more, they encore with Save The World, a slower number that brings the night to a natural end. Modestep are far beyond anything else that is going on; with a unique combination of live drumming, electric guitar, on-stage mixing and beautiful vocals from lead singer Josh Friend, big things are expected of them, and at this rate, they’re sure to live up to these expectations. Tom Silverton / @ThomasSilverton

THE JOY FORMIDABLE Glasswerk @ The Kazimier

Four years ago, Welsh trio THE JOY FORMIDABLE signed to Atlantic Records ahead of their debut full-length album The Big Roar. Roar Having toured relentlessly for years, supporting the likes of The Temper Trap, Passion Pit and even The Manics, that old phrase ‘stadium band’ was thrown around as they became synonymous with big guitars and even bigger choruses, and the British media clung on desperately to their latest hope for a British, cross-Atlantic invasion. The backdrop tonight is impressive, as projections of city skylines and a bright flashing fox silhouette move gracefully through each song, reminding us that their ambitions still

The Joy Formidable (David Howarth / @DayHowarth)

extend beyond the intimate settings of The Kazimier. Lead singer Ritzy Bryan almost skips onto stage and launches straight into promising new track Cholla, as the band waste no time in pushing the sound system to its limits. That familiar bassline introduces debut single and crowd favourite Austere, as Bryan bravely attempts to induce a sing-along to a crowd who look as if they wished they’d taken the tinnitus warnings a bit more seriously. The brilliance of Austere signifies The Joy Formidable’s greatest strength, as the soft vocals contrast with the

dense, hard accompaniment, finding subtlety and grace in even the loudest places. Cradle quickly follows alongside Tendons, and it becomes clear that each song will be followed by an onslaught of instrumental breakdowns, which, although sonically impressive, do threaten to overshadow Bryan’s vocals by dehumanising the songs and reducing them to an exercise in just playing fucking loudly. Wolf ’s Law opener This Ladder Is Ours passes by unassumingly, before the stunning The Greatest Light Is The Greatest Shade provides the backdrop for that

piercing, monster of a riff, showcasing exactly the kind of life-affirming bombast that we need from The Joy Formidable. Tonight is very much a set of two halves. Their early material is a demonstration in loud, shoegazey soundscapes that you would not feel uncomfortable mentioning in the same breath as You Made Me Realise-era My Bloody Valentine. Songs like Cradle, I Don’t Want To See You Like This, and Austere are effortless, as the vocals, band and audience all become part of the same loud, abrasive, but most importantly, fun, sound. Newer tracks like This Ladder is Ours and Little Blimp can at times feel like aggression for the sake of aggression, as if by turning up those vocals and honing in on those choruses, this wonderful energy turns into something quite vulgar, seeing them land on the wrong side of (heaven forbid) Paramore. I’m not suggesting that bands shouldn’t aim for a wider, more inclusive audience, but it seems a shame to see The Joy Formidable abandon the aesthetic that made them one of the most exciting new bands in the country five years ago. All their shortcomings though (and there are a few) can be forgiven as we come to their finale Whirring Whirring. Make no mistake, this is an unbelievable, career-defining song, up there with the best that UK guitar music has produced in the last ten years. Those brash opening chords signal the start of a tenminute bombardment, balancing restraint with


.......................................................... .......................................................... .......................................................... .......................................................... .......................................................... .......................................................... .......................................................... .......................................................... . . . . . . . . those . . . . . . . . moments when you are . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .attack . . . . . . . .final ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .until . . . . .up. . in. . the . . . sea . . . of. noise and left drained, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .swept . . . . . . . . .but . . absolutely . . . . . ecstatic. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .bewildered, . . . .Townsend ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mike . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . / @townsendyesmate .......................................................... ............................................... . . . . . . . . . . . 2/3 .......................................................... .......................................................... – Soho Riots . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Catfish . . . . . &. .The . . .Bottlemen .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .The . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . I.Love . . . .Live . . .Events ....@ . . The Shipping Forecast . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Kazimier .......................................................... .......................................................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .The . . .past . . . .few . . . years . . . . have not been kind to . . . . . . . . . . . 5/3 . . . . . . . . . . inclined, . . . . . . guitar-based indie rock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .commercially .......................................................... . . . . . . . .the . . .landfill . . . . . indie-fuelled implosion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .following . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .circa . . . .2008. . . . . However, . . . . . . . .that is set to change as . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Erics . . . . . . .been . . . . . . . . .tipped by the press (well, . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2013 . . . . . . .widely ..... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .has . . .BBC . . .anyway) . . . . . . as . . a. .year to witness a number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .the

Tickets currently on sale at bidolito.co.uk sale Moonlight Gathering

THE 1975

Il Songo Del Marinaio

5/3 7/3

Maps & Atlases The Kazimier

Deap Vally and Drenge

The Shipping Forecast 11/3

Stornoway

16/3

Faintest Idea

18/3

Wild Nothing

The Kazimier MelloMello

The Kazimier

Ulrich Schnauss

of groups end that fallow patch. Hot young things, Manchester’s THE 1975 are one of the bands tipped for glory. Tonight’s sell-out gig (and the estimable Peter Crouch’s stamp of approval) is darned strong evidence that they are probably right. And they’ve got the tunes to prove it. Local lads THE SOHO RIOTS open to an already bustling crowd. Their dynamic set alternates between a melodic blend of early 90s dreamy slowcore, à la Red House Painters, a little bit of Veronica Falls, and a little bit of Best Coast’s jangly indie pop (before they discovered Fleetwood Mac and went boring). I Only Want To Talk displays their keen songwriting ability and ear for a tune with its distorted, reverb-drenched guitars and simple yet captivating refrain. Set closer Who’s Your Man has more than a hint of The Cribs and draws the biggest reaction from the crowd. Just as the set gets better and better, so The Soho Riots show an improvement with each gig. . . Carrying . . . . . . . . . . . . .tonight’s . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .theme ..... . . . . . . . . .on. .with . . . . . . . . . . guitar-heavy .............. .are . . CATFISH . . . . . .&.THE . . .BOTTLEMEN. . . . . . . . .Relying . . . . . on . . grungier, ....... .power . . . . .pop . . . .and . . . Libertines-esque . . . . . . . . . . . . hooks, . . . . . .these .... .dudes . . . . play . . . .a.very . . . tight . . . .and . . .energetic . . . . . . .set, . . .replete ..... ................................... .with . . . .scorching . . . . . . .solos. . . . . .The . . .Arctic . . . . Monkeys-aping ........... .A.S.A. . . . . ebbs . . . . and . . . .flows . . . . beautifully, . . . . . . . . .and . . .is. .most .... .certainly . . . . . . none . . . . the . . . worse . . . . . for . . .Alex . . . Turner’s . . . . . . clear .... ................................... .influence. . . . . . . .Their . . . boundless . . . . . . . .energy . . . . .carries . . . . a. .set . . full ... .of. technically . . . . . . . .well-written, . . . . . . . . .if.a.little . . . unimaginative, ...........

songs which over the course of half an hour or so do tend to get a bit familiar and samey. And now for something completely different... well, maybe not. The lad rock show culminates with a very slick and polished The 1975, who definitely prove to be one of those bands who are miles better live than on record. Chocolate’s edgier Two Door Cinema Club sounds really get the indie section of the crowd grooving, and The City mines the 80s revivalism of The Psychedelic Furs et al that has been so prevalent over recent years, and the world is most certainly no worse place for it. But (there’s always a but, isn’t there?) the best is definitely reserved for the mid-00s stylings of Sex: the breakdown at the end is one of the best I’ve heard in years. Despite all this, The 1975 can’t maintain their energy throughout, so that many people leave tonight in the belief that Soho Riots have provided the definitive highlight of the evening’s proceedings. Laurie Cheeseman / last.fmlecheesemaster

FIESTA BOMBARDA Williamson Tunnels

Fiesta co-founder Leon Pearce told me their events were “an abandonment of inhibitions, leaving your sense of cool at home and replacing it with pure fun”. They have already progressed through some of the city’s more unconventional venues: a Brazilian carnival with a lot less flesh and a few more feathers, from St Luke’s Bombed Out Church to Camp and Furnace and, tonight, the Williamson Tunnels. Though on paper a subterranean setting might .not . . .seem . . . . . . .obvious . . . . . . . . . . .for . . . . . Bombarda ........ . . . . . . . . an . . . . . . . . .match . . . . . . . the ........... .experience, . . . . . . . . the . . .punters . . . . . .aren’t . . . . put . . . off. . . .The . . .stage .... .is. set . . .at. the . . .entrance . . . . . . to . .the . . .labyrinth . . . . . . and, . . . under . . . . .a. .thick . . . . . . . .of. red . . . . . . .the . . . . . . stand ............ . . . . dome . . . . . . . . .brick, . . . . . .crowd . . . . . . . . .nervously, ....... .as. .a. crowd . . . . .might . . . . stand . . . . .in. an . . apocalyptic . . . . . . . . .bunker ..... .having . . . . .been . . . .invited . . . . . to. . humanity’s . . . . . . . . last . . . big . . .bash. .... .As. . KALIKA . . . . . .begin . . . . .their . . . .set . . .they . . . edge . . . . .forward, ...... ................................... .drawn . . . . .in. by . . acoustic . . . . . . .happiness, . . . . . . . face-paint . . . . . . . .and . . .a. .warming . . . . . . of . . the . . .tunnel . . . . .air. ..................

WONDERLUST then step things up a notch with a fast-paced set of indie pop, crafted in Liverpool but with vocalist and writer Graham McKee’s Belfast accent dancing over the top, no more so than on their last song Love At First Sight which ends the set on a crowd-pleasing note and ushers in the next with the air of excitement he deserves. ADY SULEIMAN’s blend of rich British soul fills the tunnel with swaying faces, no doubt won over by his recent outings on Radio 1 and 1Xtra. Suleiman’s honest lyrics and engaging performance make for a sound bigger than the sum of just him and supporting guitarist ED BLACK (whose own set follows later on). JOHNNY PANIC & THE FEVER’s set feels like it’s built from a Fiesta of more earthly origin, Daniel Brian Taylor (Vocals) growling melodically over the top of some solid indie instrumentals. Next on the marathon list of acts is Ed Black, of Ninetails fame, this time performing under his own name and bringing a more pop feel to the stage. He’s lyrically witty and possessing more than enough energy to bop to; the crowd like what they’re hearing and duly oblige. The last three acts are a colourful blur of the word that buzzes around the tunnels all night, and the mantra of the Fiesta Bombarda Collective is fun. The unashamed eccentricity of THE LONG FINGER BANDITS infects the crowd as they dance like there is no tomorrow. Limbs are loose and feet are stomping, straight on into JERAMIAH FERRARI’s set, whose energy reverberates through the tunnels in a way Joseph Williamson could never have anticipated when he plotted their construction over a century ago. After being whipped into a frenzy by the .multiple . . . . . . .encores . of the excellent Ferrari, the ......... Fiesta crowd are in for one last treat in the form of ......... .KING . . . .TWIT. . . . .Fronted by brass and with a stomping .set, . . . . . . round .. . . . .they . . . . . off the night with a hair-swinging, .fist-pumping . . . . . . . . thirty minutes of non-stop dancing; .if. .the . . .venue . . . is some apocalyptic hideout, and .this . . . night . . . . humanity’s . last chance to party, then ......... .all . . will . . .go . . to . sleep smiling. ......... Mike Lay

............................... . . .23/3 .............................. . . . . ............................... . . . . . . The . . . .Kazimier ..................... . . . . ............................... . . ............................... ............................... . . 27/3 . . ............................... . . . . . . The . . . .Shipping . . . . . . . .Forecast ............. . . . . ............................... . . ............................... ............................... . . ................................................................................................................ 29/3 . . . . . . The . . . .Picket ...................................................................................................... ................................................................................................................ ................................................................................................................ ................................................................................................................ .4/4 ............................................................................................................... . . . . . . Blade .......................................................................................................... . . . . . . . . . . . .Factory .................................................................................................... ................................................................................................................ ................................................................................................................ ................................................................................................................ 22/4 . . . . . . Anglican .......................................................................................................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cathedral .................................................................................................. ................................................................................................................ ................................................................................................................ ................................................................................................................ 2-4/5 ................................................................................................................ ................................................................................................................ ................................................................................................................ . . . . . . 3-Day . . . . . .Wristbands .................................................................................................... ................................................................................................................ ................................................................................................................ .27/9 ............................................................................................................... .28/9 ............................................................................................................... ................................................................................................................ ................................................................................................................ . . . . . . The .......................................................................................................... . . . . . . . . . .Kazimier ...................................................................................................... ................................................................................................................ ................................................................................................................ ................................................................................................................ ................................................................................................................ ................................................................................................................ ................................................................................................................

Fiction

Culture

Hookworms Daughter

Liverpool Sound City 2013 Liverpool Live rpool Psych Fest 2013

Fiesta Bombada (Nicola Reven)


The Art of Pop Video The first exhibition of its kind in the UK 14 March - 26 May fact.co.uk / #artofpopvideo Image: Björk / Enclyclopedia Pictura, Wanderlust, 2008, image courtesy of One Little Indian, London



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