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Wave Machines by Keith Ainsworth

Issue 30 February 2013

Wave Machines Bird Oxygen Thieves Deep Hedonia Local Natives


   

       




Bido Lito! February 2013

Editorial

Features

The new year has begun with what some are regarding as another stark challenge, following the announcement of HMV going into administration. At the time of writing, the situation is still particularly unclear, with various rumours circulating around potential purchasers’ identities. Firstly, as is the case with the fall of any business - and given the post-Christmas pressures it seems we’ll be seeing a major high street retailer wilt by the day thoughts go to the people who stand to lose their jobs. The figure on Merseyside alone could be into the many hundreds, depending on how the situation is resolved. In the medium term, we could see an effect - albeit on a much smaller level - similar to that of the Sony/PIAS warehouse fire in 2011, as record labels and distributors see funds and stock tied up in the situation, resulting in pressures on their cash flow. Just before going to press Bido Lito! spoke to one large independent label, who admitted that the situation at HMV had caused them to rethink their marketing budget for a major release set to land at the end of January. But, if you look more widely at the state of physical music retail, the events at HMV become symptomatic of recent changes. We all know that physical record sales have plummeted over the past ten years and this fall has been compounded for a major retailer like HMV by online retailers such as Amazon chipping away at their margins and chomping away at their market share. Desperate to diversify, HMV has over recent years moved further and further away from physical music sales and into tech, hardware, film and even the acquisition, and then selling off, of a live music wing to the business. The growth area in physical music has been in that of the boutique: the limited vinyl, the bespoke CD, hell, even the cassette, and the physical location of choice for the purchase of these objects of lust has been the independent record shop. As the internet has swallowed up the mass market, driving the price point lower and lower and resigning many retailers to being merely Amazon showrooms (Jessops was an acute case in point), the discerning customer who wants something physical, something unique and something purchased from a retailer with an abundance of knowledge, moves to the specialist independent. This is a trend being borne out across disparate sectors with independent record shops, book shops, specialist beer shops and coffee roasters consolidating, growing and carving their niche. The challenge for these retailers is to make sure that their offer remains unique, that the products they sell are specific to them and the retail environment individual. Rough Trade East off Brick Lane, with its unique limited editions, stunning stock selection, in-store gigs and coffee shop, provided the blueprint for this in 2007. If we’re viewing the HMV demise purely from the perspective of its effect on music and its support for the independent music sector we all love, once the short term squeeze on stock and cash flow has been ridden by labels and distributors, I’d argue that the negative effect will be rather negligible. It may even provide an element of support for independent retailers, removing a competitor from the city centre - though I’d preface that with the observation that HMV’s appetite for music at the point of its demise (its vinyl stock dwindled years ago and new CDs were pushed further and further back in store over recent years) had never been lower. I’ll leave the final word with the boss at independent label Bella Union, Simon Raymonde, who, speaking to Music Week, said, “Where do we go from here? Well, the music industry is pretty adept at picking itself up, dusting itself down and then getting on with it again. Is it the death knell of physical distribution? No, not at all, but it will no doubt change things. There are many great success stories within the independent record retail system and while the common view is that we are living in a Spotifyed world, I would say that I see many people turning their backs on mp3s and streaming, and returning to vinyl and, curiously and fascinatingly, even cassettes! And while my Philips Dual Deck Cassette Player is still in daily use, even I couldn’t have predicted that one...” Craig G Pennington Editor

6 WAVE MACHINES

3

Bido Lito!

Issue Thirty / February 2012 bidolito.co.uk 4th Floor, Mello Mello 40-42 Slater St Liverpool L1 4BX Editor Craig G Pennington - info@bidolito.co.uk

8

OXYGEN THIEVES

Assistant Editor Christopher Torpey reviews@bidolito.co.uk Assistant Reviews Editor Naters Philip - live@bidolito.co.uk

10 BIRD

Sub Editor Mo Stewart - subeditor@bidolito.co.uk Online Editor Natalie Williams - online@bidolito.co.uk

12 LOCAL NATIVES

14 DEEP HEDONIA

16 CALM LOVE TRIANGLE

18 CULTURE FORUM

Regulars 4 NEWS 20 PREVIEWS/SHORTS 24 REVIEWS

Designer Luke Avery - info@luke-avery.com Proofreading Debra Williams debra@wordsanddeeds.co.uk Words Craig G Pennington, Christopher Torpey, Mo Stewart, Lisa O’Dea, Jennifer Perkin, Richard Lewis, Mick Chrysalid, Joshua Nevett, Naters P, Rob Dewis, Jordan Doyle, Mike Townsend, Joseph Viney, P. Lee, Clarry M, Pete Charles, Flossie Easthope Photography, Illustration and Layout Luke Avery, Keith Ainsworth, Marie Hazelwood, Alex Wynne, Jennifer Pellegrini, Mike Howard, Jojo Norris, Robin Clewley, Michael Sheerin, Rob Rossington, Matthew Ball Adverts To advertise please ads@bidolito.co.uk

contact

The CALM helpline is now open every evening from 5pm ‘til midnight, plus you can text us too, meaning you can get stuff off your chest, privately. Free, confidential and anonymous, we’ve been helping men on Merseyside sort their heads out since 2000. Get back to enjoying your life, call CALM...

Call: 0800 58 58 58 or text: 07537 404717 Start your first text “CALM2” We don’t charge for texts, but your network might.

www.thecalmzone.net Text & helpline open every day of the year, 5pm – midnight. Calls are free from landlines, pay phones and selected mobile networks and will not show up on your phone bill. CALM is Charity reg. no. 1110621


News

Bido Lito! Dansette

Our pick of this month’s wax wonders…

Bestival Benefit @ Nation On 11th September 2012, a coach containing a group of Bestival-goers veered off the road and crashed into a tree, claiming the lives of three and seriously injuring others. As a tribute to those affected by this terrible disaster, Bestival Organiser ROB DA BANK has announced a special charity event to take place at Nation on Saturday 20th March. The fundraising show will be hosted by THE CUBAN BROTHERS and Rob Da Bank himself, with tickets priced at £16.25 - get the date in your diary, and show your support. Full line-up details to be announced in due course on bestival.net

The City Of Sound And Vision Fancy yourself as the next Fellini, Gondry or Spike Jonze? LIVERPOOL SOUND CITY may well be able to give you a leg up with an open call to budding auteurs to submit storyboard ideas for a music video to accompany OUTFIT’s impending single Performance. The winning entry will then be filmed with help from FACT, and exclusively screened at their upcoming The Art Of Pop Video exhibition. The first slew of acts booked for this year’s Sound City have also just been announced, including THE WALKMEN, TOY, EGYPTIAN HIP HOP and SWIM DEEP. More details of the festival’s music and conference programme can be found on bidolito.co.uk

New Release From Ninetails This group of lads who formed at LIPA had rave reviews from their recent EP Slept And Did Not Sleep and their first Radio 1 play last month. Continuing the good cheer, we’re pleased to announce that NINETAILS have a brand new single out this month. They’ve told Bido Lito! that they’re “very excited about it as it has a lot of commercial value without sacrificing the elements that make us Ninetails.” The title? The rather ambiguous and enigmatic 0 4 2. We await its release with glee. ninetailsband.co.uk

If you’re stuck for somewhere to spend Valentine’s Day, what better way than with an evening of space-age horror core at HiFi on Seel Street? The event, titled In The Mouth Of Madness, offers musical sets from BARBEROS, STIG NOISE SOUNDSYSTEM, ISOCORE, ULTRAZOOK and many more as a celebration of Barberos’ split LP release with DIPSO. A feast for the eyes will also be provided with visuals and installations from COLIN ECCLESTONE, SEBASTIAN BRÜCKNER, SAM WIEHL (HIVE Collective) and VENYA KRUTIKOV. Doors at 8pm. facebook.com/itsbarberos

BBC Introducing Slot Moves The eagle-eared among you will have noticed that the BBC Introducing show on BBC Radio Merseyside has moved its broadcast slot from Sunday to Saturday evening between 8pm and 10pm. Dave Monks’ new music programme is dedicated to promoting local music and giving it exposure on a national level, and is partly responsible for bringing acts such as Dan Croll and The Loud to the wider attention of BBC DJs. “It’s great to see the progress of some of the bands and artists who joined us for early sessions when they started out,” said Monks. bbc.co.uk/radiomerseyside

FACT Serves Up 10th Birthday Celebrations To celebrate its 10th anniversary on 23rd February, FACT is hosting a day of activities, games and arty experiences, all interactive and free of charge. Artist WILL NASH’s Noisy Table, a table tennis table that produces an electronic soundtrack dependent on the bounce of the ball, will be a centrepiece of the birthday festivities as it will host the finale of the Bats And Bleeps inter-band ping pong tournament. ALL WE ARE will be playing a live set, with CLINIC DJs on the decks, and the event will also feature the exclusive airing of Clinic and AFTERNAUT’s Noisy Table-inspired new tracks. fact.co.uk

DAWSONS, the long-standing UK music instrument retailer, have recently opened their huge new Liverpool store. Based on Williamson Street, it’s double the size of the original outlet and is home to one of the biggest collections of guitars in the UK. As a result Dawsons are feeling particularly generous, and have teamed up with us to give away an Orange Jim Root Terror Head (valued at over £400). To enter the draw, fill out the voucher opposite and hand it in at the Williamson Street store before the 23rd February. Good luck!

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk bidolito bidolito.co.uk

SONIC CATHEDRAL We like our psych at Bido Towers, and this compilation EP from Sonic Cathedral is our latest multi-sensual and multi-dimensional indulgence. Featuring six fearsome cuts of modern psychedelia (HOOKWORMS, WHITE MANNA and TTOTALS among others) mastered by SONIC BOOM, the double red and green vinyl release also comes in a mind-bending 3D gatefold sleeve.

Everything Everything Arc RCA

Barberos/Dispo Split LP Launch Event

COMPETITION!

Various Artists Psych For Sore Eyes

"

Dawsons Competition Entry

The ‘difficult’ second album proves not to be so difficult for this Mancunian outfit. Picking up where they left off with 2010’s Man Alive debut, the new record feels like they’ve found the balance between experiment and excess. Highlights include the head-boppingly poppy Cough Cough, the rawly-intimate House Is Dust, Cough and final track Don’t Try, Try which provides a soberingly-climatic end to Arc.

Alien Ballroom Zero PAC A.D. AGITATED RECORDS You might be well aware of Koolaid (Global Tyranny)’s descent down varied sonic rabbit holes, or maybe you’re blissfully ignorant of one of Liverpool’s weirdest psych diviners. Either way, their current incarnation ALIEN BALLROOM’s new LP contains enough swirling layers of droning majesty for listeners new and old: think an unhinged Spacemen 3 in the outer reaches of the Crab Nebula.

Peace Wrath COLUMBIA

To enter, hand this this voucher in at the new Dawsons store on Williamson Street

Name E-mail Tick this box if you w would ould like to receive further information and offers from Dawsons

Cryptic blow-jobs, debauched sexual unions and sleaze-ball antics are all par for the course in B-Town apparently. The jittery, navel-gazing guitars of PEACE’s latest single Wraith are loaded with sexual innuendos more sordid than a Jackie Collins novel, and the song’s lingering seductiveness provides a titillating narrative.


Sat 26th Jan โ€ข ยฃ12 adv

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4HE/PERATORS #ABLE#ARS  3TATIC6IBE 3TEALING3OLOS

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Fri 8th Feb โ€ข ยฃ15 adv 9pm - 4am โ€ข over 18s only

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4WELVE'AUGE

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รง(OTHAM3TREET ,IVERPOOL,5& $OORSPMUNLESSSTATED 6ENUEBOXOFFICEOPENINGHOURS-ONรง3ATAMรงPM .OBOOKINGFEEONCASHTRANSACTIONS TICKETWEBCOUKpSEETICKETSCOMpGIGANTICCOMpTICKETMASTERCOUK


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Bido Lito! February 2013

Words: Mo Stewart

Photography: Keith Ainsworth

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk bidolito bidolito.co.uk


Bido Lito! February 2013 It’s that time of year when we all become increasingly obsessed with predicting who will be ‘the next big thing’. As the world’s media jostle for the position of musical Nostradamus, no one spares a thought for those handing over the ‘most likely to’ baton. Four years ago WAVE W MACHINES were that band, and now they’re back with a new album to jog a few memories as to why they got everyone so hot under the collar. Singer, wordsmith and multi-instrumentalist James Walsh gives a good old-fashioned firm handshake as he sits down, radiating that healthy mix of excitement and relief easily recognisable in any musician about to release a collection of songs to the world. “We’ve put a lot of work into it, and we’re eager to see what people think,” he states. One of the drawbacks of a successful album is that often there’s a long time before you can think about the next. For Walsh, lead vocalist and guitarist Tim Bruzon, drummer Vidar Norheim and bassist Carl Bown, it wasn’t until August 2010 that the Wave If You’re Really There tour ended, after taking in every thriving metropolis and boutique festival Europe has to offer. A particular highlight was supporting The Flaming Lips at one of the North West’s most famous and inspirational places, the Jodrell Bank Observatory. “It was amazing. We’d often discussed going to Jodrell Bank as a day out, so to get to play there was magical.” When the time to write finally came, they were eager to avoid the pitfall of the fabled ‘difficult second album’. Enough examples that disprove this tired theory have been and gone, but every band experiencing even a modicum of success will have to answer the question. Thankfully, Walsh was more than happy to indulge Bido Lito!: “We didn’t think about it, to be honest. We’ve definitely been guilty of perfectionism in the past, but this time round we were a bit more easygoing.” As far back as 2007 I had the honour of booking the first official Wave Machines show, held in the slightly inauspicious setting of Bar Ca Va. As I remember, there was confusion mingled with the anticipation in the crowd as they fought for elbow-room at the top of the stairs, mainly because previous incarnation Sizer Barker were still very popular locally. However, once they took to the stage it was abundantly clear Wave Machines were an altogether stronger proposition. The bravery it took to make a decision to reinvent themselves was instantly vindicated once the shimmering electro pop of those early singles received a rapturous reception. That same bravery is at play on Pollen, as their puppy-like energy has evolved into a mature, focused sound, reminiscent of Tom Tom Club, Hot Chip’s recent output, and, at times, Depeche Mode. Irrespective of the touring schedule, the songs that would eventually become Pollen took a while to develop: “The actual writing of the album took a couple of years, partly because of the way we work, partly because what we had wasn’t good enough,” admits Walsh. “There’s some great writing on the first album, but in terms of the sound of the songs it’s a bit of a mish-mash. Pollen comes from a more clearly defined place.” Lead single Ill Fit - a slinky slice of bubbling synths layered

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with creamy falsettos - was released back in the autumn as the bridge from one album to the next, although as Pollen unfolds it’s evident that it’s closer to the first than the second. The biggest shift in thinking was opening up the creative process to a more collaborative way of thinking. “We all had a hand in the writing process this time around. I worked on most of the lyrics, but we were all encouraging each other to put in ideas. If you get lots of material together, you find something eventually begins to lead the tracks in a certain direction. It also means you’ve got lots of other ideas from which you can pick the best melodies or lyrics to fit into that direction.” Another brave decision, with the potential for causing more arguments, but Walsh argues that in fact it’s an effective way of keeping everyone happy: “It might have taken us a bit longer, but there’s a strong feeling throughout the band that we’ve made a really good record, that we’re all happy with. Every song became an amalgamation over time, going through a number of guises. Ill Fit had a different chorus right up until a couple of weeks before the album was finished.” Pollen was mostly recorded in East London’s Konk studios, which will now hopefully earn a better legacy than naming a rather shoddy Kooks album. This appears to be a decision based more on the availability of their chosen producer than any stated ambition to tread the well-worn path south. “We went to London because we wanted to work with Lexxxxx [who mixed Wave If You’re Really There and co-produced Pollen] and he was based down there. It was nice to get in a different headspace for a while.” There was still a fair bit of to-ing and fro-ing involved, with sessions recorded both at their own rehearsal space and at Whitewood Studios on Parliament St. When in London, Liverpool was never far from the band’s thoughts, especially those of Norheim who got married during the course of the recordings. Walsh admits to mixed feelings: “I grew up in London, but I’ve spent so much time in Liverpool now I’m torn. There’s a hectic energy about London, and if you’re not there you do start to wonder if you’re missing out on something. But I wouldn’t move back permanently. My next move is much more likely to be to the countryside!” As with any band worth their salt, the discussions have already begun about how to translate these somewhat sedate songs into a live context. “It’s taken a lot of work because the writing was so protracted. Once we’d finally got the songs together, we then had to learn how to pick them apart. I sometimes wish it was a simpler process, but once we get out on the road we see how much the extra effort pays off.” And for their upcoming Kazimier show in February, the band are particularly keen to produce something a little special: “We love the Kazimier. We’ve played there a few times and it’s always a great feeling.” Pollen is out now on Neapolitan Records. Visit bidolito.co.uk now to win an exclusive, signed LP copy of the album. wavemachines.co.uk

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk bidolito bidolito.co.uk


GEN VES

OXY Words: Lisa O’Dea

Photography: Marie Hazlewood

The Urban Dictionary defines an Oxygen Thief as a person so

“This single is gonna be an introduction, a free download.

useless that the mere act of them breathing is a waste of oxygen. Whilst it’s clear that the literal definition does not apply to this band, surely it can be no coincidence that OXYGEN THIEVES’ performances have left unsuspecting crowds breathless of late. The boys possess a covalent bond - clearly demonstrated in their live gigs - that contributes enormously to them being well on their way to creating a successful formula. The Wirral four-piece - consisting of brothers Al and Rob Fewtrell, Cal McMorran and Daniel Tilling - sit down with me in a small café in New Brighton and I question how the name came about. “Just a sayin’, isn’t it?” replies Al. “Me and me mate used to call people oxygen thieves... ‘he’s useless - he’s an oxygen thief ’. We decided to call the band that when we had to come up with a name and people genuinely do remember it.” And it was their early performances in 2012 that were perhaps even more memorable, leaving many excited about their unique blend of turbulent riffs and grungy, heavyweight beats. With a plethora of gigs firmly under their belt from Sound City to FestEVOL, Oxygen Thieves have commanded attention and begun to push their way to the forefront of a wave of promising new talent that has emerged so prominently in recent months. The group have to this point been building up to release their single Maskara, which will eventually land in February. An audible punch of fuzzy riffs intertwined with extravagant post-punk fusions, Maskara is a febrile mass of dominant basslines that veil a vulnerability within the well-crafted lyrics, which are set around a girl who hides beneath a mask of make-up. With the release of their single in February, I ask Al whether an EP will follow.

We’ll probably play London and a few other gigs to coincide with it and then we’ve got a few options. We might do a sixtrack EP soon and get it out early summer and then start looking at making an album, basically. The plan is to get a sixtrack EP out first. We’re ready for it.” The band are witty, hugely likeable and clearly serious when it comes to their music career. They’ll most likely be lumped under a broad ‘rock’ umbrella; however, there are too many influences within their music for them to be cornered specifically into such a genre. “There were times we were getting told we sounded like people and a lot of the stuff we hadn’t heard before,” says Dan, “Like a lot of German bands, krautrock and bands like Television. We’re into it all now.” “When I joined this band in the summer,” interjects Cal, “the amount of music I was exposed to, like krautrock and things like that... once you get into it, it’s really good.” With an abundance of bands emerging from the peninsula, it seems as though the Wirral is fertile ground for the growth of a new breed of talent and musicians. With many following similar sounds and trends, what makes Oxygen Thieves differ from the other bands? “We don’t sound like we’re from the Wirral,” replies Al. “That’s not to say we don’t like bands from the Wirral as there’s some really good bands. We like most of them, like The Red Suns and By The Sea.” “Ours is a heavier, rougher sort of sound,” continues Rob. “It’s more American, Seattle scene, West Coast sounding. We don’t

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk bidolito bidolito.co.uk

think, ‘we don’t wanna sound like the Wirral’. It’s just us really, we love all the stuff from round here but if you wanna be original, you’ve gotta get away from it. When we started playing, we didn’t make a conscious effort towards it, that’s just what came out.” The influences of bands such as The Pixies can be heard at notable points within their music. Intense vocals imbued with frenetic melodies ensure that Oxygen Thieves produce an authentic sound. They have grown in confidence and ability throughout 2012 and perhaps this is due to them holding back on releasing material until they are truly happy with the quality of production. “People say ‘why isn’t anything out?’” responds Al. “But you don’t go out as soon as you’ve got stuff together; it’s got to be right these days. That’s why we’ve been hanging around; now we’ve got like thirty tracks. You’ve got to have everything together; you might have had the tunes but not the live presence. There’s no point in rushing these things.” “You can’t make a first impression twice,” adds Cal. Oxygen Thieves are beginning to advance through the ranks, even garnering interest from NME in November as a band to look out for, and it’s not hard to see why. When their single Maskara is released in February, the band hope to break away from Liverpool, playing in different cities across the UK, and aim to make a splash on many stages this summer, using the festivals to allow their music to appeal to a wider audience. With their refreshing brand of gritty, grunge rock, it doesn’t seem as though this band of thieves’ oxygen will be running out any time soon. soundcloud.com/oxygen-thieves


Noisy Table make music and sounds on our interactive ping pong table! Bido Lito! Inter-Band Ping Pong Challenge Grand Final Saturday 23 February with All We Are (live) and Clinic (DJ set) fact.co.uk / #NoisyTable Image: Bats & Bleeps Inter-band Ping Pong Challenge; All We Are vs Alpha Male Tea Party, photo by Mike Sheerin


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Bido Lito! February 2013

Bird:

Waiting for the Sirens’ Call

Words: Richard Lewis Photography: Jennifer Pellegrini

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“We’ve been up to Yorkshire, where we visited Sylvia Plath’s grave in Heptonstall recently,” BIRD’s Adele Emmas (Vocals/Bass) recalls. “The graveyard’s alongside a church that’s been destroyed and built elsewhere,” Sian Williams (Guitar/Piano/Vocals) explains. “This graveyard was so eerie and when we were walking around Lex [Samata] our drummer was saying ‘this is such a Bird thing to do’ and we said, ‘Well, get used to it!’” An anecdote that reveals plenty about the ethereal shoegaze, dream pop trio that is Bird. Why merely read a biography about those who have influenced you when you can visit the places that inspired them first-hand? Our meeting in a rain-lashed city centre has been called to Ophelia Presaged with discuss the band’s stunning new EP Ophelia. the crashing waves of Intro (Horses in the Waves), the nearchoral singing sets the scene for what follows: a breathtakingly ambitious set of songs, with the sea providing a thematic connection between the tracks. “There’s a book that’s been in the family for years, my great granddad’s, on Mythology and Ghost Stories, that kind of magical world,” Adele explains. “I read that for lyrical inspiration; it’s got stuff about sirens and stories of the sea. I love being near the sea; it gives me a huge sense of clarity and peace; I feel really at home. We’re not very urban, to be honest; we’re more rural. That’s where most of the inspiration comes from. When I’ve been writing a lot of this EP, all I’ve had in my head is the coast and beautiful parts of England.” Inspired by an impressively esoteric source, Pious sees Sian’s instrumental skills strongly at the fore, the slowly uncoiling piano arpeggios a homage to one of England’s most venerated early composers. “It’s our modern take on 16th and 17th century chants. I’m really influenced by Thomas Tallis, a composer in the Tudor era,” the multi-instrumentalist explains. “It’s called Pious but it’s not about religious piety per se. It’s more about being pious towards yourself and your own beliefs. It’s such a strong word, it conjures up images of being so caught up in something that you can’t really see anything else.” Due in part to Adele’s switch from six strings to four, Bird’s new material has a weight to it absent from the band’s previous recordings. “There’s no bass at all on the old records. I love the bass now; I always used to play guitar,” the singer explains. “We’re trying to utilise more power, more volume and crescendos,” Sian notes. Alongside these developments is the newly-arrived presence of Bill Ryder-Jones in the producer’s chair. Following his work on By The Sea’s superb debut LP, the composer approached Bird last autumn with a view to working on their next EP. “He’s been very good at going along with what we wanted but still putting his slight spin on things production-wise. We’re really appreciative and grateful,” Adele says. “He’s added some synth and soundscapes, which is perfect for us because it adds to the atmosphere.”

“He enhanced the magic without squashing our signature sound,” Sian adds with a nod. An incidental pleasure of recording with the former Coral axeman was access to his armoury of vintage guitars. “Fleetwood Mac are my favourite band,” Sian explains. “I was recording part of Ophelia on a really nice Gibson and he said ‘that used to belong to Peter Green you know’.” “Sian nearly had a heart attack,” Adele laughs. The EP’s title cut and standout moment, Ophelia marks the band’s first full collaboration. A twin tribute to the Prince of Denmark’s doomed girlfriend and John Everett Millais’ PreRaphaelite painting, the track glides into view on Sian’s simple yet vast-sounding delay pedal riff, held in place by Lex’s tribal drumbeats. “The music was the first thing we wrote together as a band,” Sian explains. “Adele has been messing round with the bass and she came up with the riff; I put the guitar part instantly over it, then Lex brought the drums in and it just developed.” String-laden mini-symphony The Waltz - “About two loved ones being separated during the war” - has its origins in a trip down to Brighton and BBC classic Truly, Madly, Deeply. “I found this big box of old photos that didn’t belong to anyone and I bought a few,” Adele recalls. “There was this photo of this one guy who was in his military uniform and I thought ‘Someone’s probably clutched onto this and cried their heart out over it.’ That sparked it off.” Alongside the rhythm section’s greater impact, another development on the EP is the distant, siren-like quality of Adele’s vocals, highly redolent of Cocteau Twins’ Liz Frazier. Swathed in generous helpings of reverb, the lyrics become all the more compelling - this certainly isn’t something that you can sling on as white noise. “You need to invest in it and really listen to it; you can’t really have it on in the background.” Adele nods. “Lyrically, the theme throughout is about the loss of people, but finding something through that, learning lessons and finding new people,” Adele states. “It’s very much about the light and dark of life: without darkness you can’t have light. The subject matter is quite gloomy, but if you think the music’s beautiful then you’ll start to think of them both together.” “We pride ourselves on being quite left-field,” laughs Sian. “In a way, the more weird we can be, the better, to be honest; we want to be different. We’re not gonna be making any pop tunes anytime soon.” A welcome relief surely as Bird’s voyage becomes ever more fascinating with each new startling leap their collective imagination takes. Ophelia is released through Jack to Phono Records on 14th February, with a launch show at Leaf on 15th February. Visit bidolito.co.uk for an exclusive live session with Bird as part of our ‘Afternoon Tea With...’ series. facebook.com/birdmusicofficial


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Bido Lito! February 2013

Words: Joshua Nevett Illustration: Jojo Norris The myth-ready back-story to LOCAL NATIVES’ rags to riches meteoric rise is by now a well-worn tale upon the lips of the blabbering fabulist. Wide-eyed and wanderlust, the DIY ethos that permeated Local Natives’ debut LP Gorilla Manor and that subsequent performance at SXSW in 2009 soon fostered their reputation as LA’s newest self-made success story. Propelled wholly by their tenacity, staunchness and talent, word of their exploits soon spread like a remorseless insect infiltrating people’s inner ears. For a while, their under-tapped euphoria and barbershop harmonies melted anyone who dared cross their path into bubbling pools of admiration. Then, they started hittin’ the ole dusty trail. They continued to relentlessly tour Gorilla Manor to great acclaim until their tired fingers were naught but powdered bone beneath their swollen feet. And now they again reside on the precipice of cementing themselves into the limelight as one of the bands to keep a firm eye on in 2013. On 28th January, the Silverlake troupe release their forthcoming LP Hummingbird, Hummingbird which comes as a welcome return to the fray for the quartet after a lengthy gestation period. Although Local Natives may have slightly wandered off the radar since 2011, a couple of things remain clear during a transatlantic phone-call with their affable multi-instrumentalist, Ryan Hahn (Guitar/Vocals). The excitement in Ryan’s warm, genial voice is almost palpable and demonstrates that Local Natives are clearly ready to retake the bull by the horns in 2013: “It feels great to be back, man. I mean, we took quite a bit of time off to focus on writing and recording this new record, but we’re one of those few bands that really enjoy touring so we’ve been kind of missing it. It’s been really good just to get back out there and learn how to play these new songs live.” Alas, their fortunes fell on difficult times in 2011. With their lives consumed by touring commitments, their spirits were tormented by the departure of long-term bassist and friend, Andy Hamm, who left for undisclosed reasons, assumed amicable. And yup, amicable or not, the glistening sheen of their stratospheric emergence was slightly scuffed… but not for too long. Ryan explains how, just as soon as five became four, they quickly stumbled upon the acquisition of The National’s Aaron Dessner, to fill that gaping void and co-produce their latest LP no less: “We’d kind of written most of the tracks for the new album and then we got the call that we were going to tour with them [The National] in 2011.” So, why Aaron then - was it an unconscious decision considering the circumstances? “Yes,” Ryan asserts. “We wanted to work with someone who we got along with on a personal level but also respected as a songwriter.” Ryan recounts that touring with The National gave them plenty of opportunities to smash their foreheads together with frontman Aaron: “He was just as interested in working together as we were and it just felt like a really natural musical relationship we had together. He really helped push us in the studio

even though most of the songs were already written.” You get the impression that Ryan’s suspended in a glowing state of nirvana when he talks about his new record, in an almost zen-like state of bliss. However, there’s still an underlying honesty when it comes to taking a step back and reflecting on his experiences over the past 12 months: “We went through a lot of heavy times last year; I think this record was us working through a lot of that stuff. With a band that’s as tight as we are, we’re just such close friends, ya know; when one thing happens to one of the guys, it really affects all of us.” His comments are twisted through with anguish, cryptic and vague; and the group’s lyrics refer to breaking down emotional barriers, documenting personal tribulations and affliction. The first single off their new LP Breakers exemplifies this: “Breathing out hoping to breathe in,” they sing. “I know nothing’s wrong but I’m not convinced,” they continue, full of dismay about their lack of confidence in their convictions. Ryan reinforces the listener’s feeling that the songs on this record are coming from “a personal and honest place”. Aside from the more obvious comparisons drawn between Local Natives and the delicate fleeting harmonies of Fleet Foxes, the orchestral, theatrical

dramatisations of Arcade Fire and the feather-light, rhythmic canter of Vampire Weekend, Ryan muses over their influences during the writing of Hummingbird Hummingbird. He cites Leonard Cohen as a “huge influence” and reels off a list of British bands from the 80s, including The Smiths and New Order, as references for introducing “different guitar tones”. These are bewildering influences considering Local Natives’ particular live, organic and ramshackle approach to production. Maybe there’s a secret collaboration in the pipeline, who knows? All (of this writer’s) pipe dreams aside, Ryan talks of how the band took a giant leap towards increasing their production values during the recording of Hummingbird: Hummingbird “On the first record we focused on making sure that everything was live, if you know what I mean; there wasn’t a whole lot of production, but there’s a lot more electronic elements to this record; we used a lot more instruments like different synths and drum samples. For us, this was a massive step more towards production, just to make sure it sounded relevant even in five years’ time, ya know.” It seems that Local Natives’ decision to migrate to Brooklyn to record their long-gestating second album has paid dividends. And Aaron Dessner has evidently proved to be an invaluable addition as well, as the band are reaping the benefits of his impending wisdom and technical nous. But what of their performance in Liverpool though, is Ryan looking forward it as much as we are? “Ahh, yeeeaahh, totally man! We haven’t been able to spend much time there, so we’re really looking forward to going out afterwards, and seeing the town.” And with that last burst of enthusiasm, Ryan’s voice evaporates into nothingness, to be replaced by the droning sound of a disconnected tone. See you at Garlands Ryan - you’re in for a belter. thelocalnatives.com


Bido Lito! February 2013

Edwy Edwyn w n wy Collins

Sam Lee & Friends Thursday 21 March The Epstein Theatre 7.30pm

Saturday 20 April A ril Ap 8pm £17.50, £23.50

Richard Thompson Ginger Baker’s Jazz Confu Confusion f sion fu

EXTRA DA AT AT TE E DUE

WOW TO DEMAND

Robert Vincent & Peter Bruntnell

A Celebration of the music and artistry r of Kate Bush ry Saturday 2 February r ry 8.30pm £12

Wednesday 13 February r ry 8.30pm £12

Gretchen Peters Saturday 9 March The Epstein Theatre 7.30pm £19.50

Friday 12 Ap April A ril 8.30pm £12

Friday 1 March 7.30pm £20-£30

Sunday 24 February r ry 7.30pm £17.50-£25.50

Lau Ludovico Einaudi

Nasher

13

A ril Ap Saturday 20 April St George’s Hall Concert Room 7.30pm £16.50

Monday 15 Ap A April ril 7.30pm £24.50-£34.50

Box Office Off Of ffi fice 0151 709 3789 liverpoolphil.com

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14

Bido Lito! February 2013

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Bido Lito! February 2013

15

LIVERPOOL ELECTRONICA: A State Of Deep Hedonia Words: Mick Chrysalid Illustration: Mike Howard There is a tangible vitality running through the veins of Liverpool’s electronic music community right now. It could be argued that the region has not witnessed such a boom since the electronic-infused pop heydays of the 80s. OMD, Flock Of Seagulls, China Crisis, Dead Or Alive all cracked the charts, not to mention Frankie who conquered the world, albeit briefly. This was before house music’s revolution swept across UK clubland. In the 1990s, Cream in Wolstenholme Square became a mecca for many weekenders getting their fix of 4/4 beats, amongst other things. Ladytron emerged in the late nineties and had success with a fresh lilt on synth-heavy electro pop with a nod to new wave. For a city prepossessed with guitar music, there have always been significant pockets of electronic music that have peppered Liverpool’s history. However, all of this considered, it is the sheer concentration of numbers right now that is enabling another chapter to be written for electronic music in Liverpool, and just possibly its most important one. Evian Christ, Faded Gold, Afternaut, Forest Swords, Bantam Lions, Kepla, Sun Drums, Capac, Mitternacht, Tomasu, Isocore, Lunar Modular … not to mention other bands who have been fermented in electronic music such as Outfit and Wave Machines. There are more acts popping up as we speak that will help transcribe this rich period. DEEP HEDONIA’s idea was to begin cultivating this unrivalled scene of underground musicians by using live performances as a forum for exchanging ideas. This night would be named ARK. The men behind the moniker are Jon Davies, Thom Isom and Sam Twidale. Jon and Sam aren’t just fans and promoters, they are at the forefront of this wave with acts Kepla and Sun Drums. Thom is of a design background and focuses on visual and art direction. “We have to put a bit of thought as to what will work and where it is best suited. ARK at Dumbells feels right. It’s a place where people can feel understood. Sometimes in more traditional gigs there just isn’t the time,” says Thom. The first ARK was a success, with various different artists showcasing everything from the more ambient side of the spectrum, from False Lights’ nod to 80s imagined mysterious TV soundtracks, to the deep core of Lunar Modular’s undulating rhythms. Jon Davies: “It’s great to see people going out and setting themselves up with loop pedals, sequencers and the like in a reaction to knowing what can be achieved here.” Indeed, modern electronic music in all its forms is born out of an optimism that arrived hand in glove with the cheaper technological advancements that welcomed the turn of the century. eBay has a steady stream of affordable grooveboxes and sequencers, and, considering that laptops are able to run software such as Ableton and Reason with ease, the world is now your bedroom; your bedroom is now ARK. Factor in Deep Hedonia’s wider ambition

when it comes to their bookings and you get a feel for the kind of impact they can have this year. Local acts who have cut their teeth at ARK will get to rub shoulders with internationally-renowned acts that the Hedonia crew invite to the city. Last year alone, Laurel Halo and ITAL played Liverpool and it is with this ambition in combining the international with the regional that a picture starts to build around where electronic music can go in this city. Jon points out, “We may have started a bit on the giant side when baby steps may have been needed, but they were shows that we really loved and felt needed to come to Liverpool. Burial next in Sound Food and Drink?” It’s quite infectious to see such a DIY spirit embodied in the three of them. They do take it seriously but there’s still a cheeky laugh to be had. “We really want to put the acts on that we want to see and hear. We don’t want to end up putting big shit acts on just to make money. This goes hand in hand with building a respectable name,” Sam states. Put this in tandem with the fact that they’ve enrolled on the LJMU Enterprise Fellowship Programme (which focuses on help and support in getting such ventures off the ground) and you can see what the green shoots of their ideas can grow into. We’ve established that there are many strings to the Deep Hedonia bow but the cynosure that really presents the collective’s bull’s-eye is ARK. The emergence of acts in Liverpool who have gone out and cobbled bits of gear together to then throw their synths into the electronic dance music ring with ever-mutating genres may be the truest testament of Deep Hedonia’s commitment to both Merseyside itself and the development of its music. ARK is where, for me, they will cut their teeth and possibly have the most influence. The night provides a floor for many like-minded people to bring their synths, laptops, sequencers, mixers, etc and have a dance and a grin. I was there, I concur. The next instalment takes place on 9th February, with Lunar Modular, Afternaut and Bantam Lions joined by a host of exceptional talent. Fashions and fads come and go in waves but electronic music whether it’s called intelligent dance music or straight-up electronic dance music, whether it’s in the direction of house music, or whether you’re mining the depths of the more experimental sub-genres - is alive and kicking here. Deep Hedonia are putting a collective stamp on something that Liverpool is crying out for. Along with the best of acts that they will bring into the city from far and wide, ARK’s local emphasis is attestation that there is a blossoming here and now for all to enjoy. Liverpool could just be at the forefront of the next wave of European electronica. Real Deep Hedonia. deephedonia.com

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Bido Lito! February 2013

ESCO WILLIAMS, STEPHEN LANGSTAFF and ANTON POWERS come together for a unique musical collaboration

Words: Jennifer Perkin Illustration: Alex Wynne Valentine’s Day can be a drag. However, as couples struggle under the pressure to find the perfect gift, and singles fight off the relentless barrage of amour, this year will see a welcome musical respite for all. This 14th February will mark a unique event – the release of a new piece of music from an exciting project called the CALM Love Triangle, involving three of Liverpool’s strongest talents from the far corners of the musical spectrum. Those three home-bred talents are DJ Anton Powers, singer-songwriter Stephen Langstaff and self-confessed ‘soul powered nerd’ Esco Williams – a trio that Stephen describes as “like the weirdest boy band ever!” The project comes under the umbrella of CALM - or Campaign Against Living Miserably - the charity that exists to prevent male suicide in the UK. For those who aren’t familiar, a quick visit to theCALMzone.net website provides a staggering insight into how far-reaching the issue of male suicide is. The jaw-dropping statistics speak for themselves: about 75% of all suicides are male. It is the largest cause of deaths for males aged 15-35 in England and Wales. We lose more young men to suicide than to road accidents, murder and AIDS combined. The Love Triangle idea is this: get these three musicians into the studio to write a piece of music on the spot, to be released on the CALMzone website on Valentine’s Day. And not just any studio: the track will be recorded at the Motor Museum Studio in Liverpool (where the likes of Jake Bugg and Two Door Cinema Club have been committed to tape), with in-house producer Al Groves at the helm. And as if there weren’t enough people of Liverpool pedigree involved, established filmmaker Lee Isserow will be documenting the whole process for a making-of style video. As the Merseyside coordinator of CALM, Simon Howes points out that the charity has a long history of linking into the music scene, a logical way of connecting with a demographic that is at risk of suicide. He mentions the fact that in our culture musicians are allowed to open up about their emotions in a way that often isn’t as socially acceptable for ordinary blokes – hence the

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popular concepts of the ‘tortured soul’ or the ‘twisted genius’. A major part of the charity’s aim is to challenge the stereotypes that prevent ordinary men talking about the issues they face. According to Simon, as individual ambassadors for the charity, the three musicians involved “capture the essence of music in Merseyside” and appeal to men from all different scenes, highlighting that there is no ‘one size fits all’ model for what men should be. Bido Lito! caught up with soulful folk singer Stephen Langstaff, one of the city’s brightest young voices, in a café on Bold Street ahead of the recording date to chat about the project. Stephen admits that he wasn’t aware of the statistics around male suicide until meeting members of the organisation, whom he describes as being “very passionate” and “on a mission”. From there it was an easy decision to get involved as an ambassador. “It’s crazy because there must be people who have committed suicide who literally would only needed to have spoken to some mates about it. Whatever’s on their mind, get it off their chest. And it helps. It’s such a simple thing. CALM is offering a hand to people who either feel that they can’t initially talk to a friend – or maybe even don’t have someone.” While the three artists who make up the Love Triangle have met briefly, Stephen admits he has no idea what the musical output might sound like. “It’s like a food experiment: let’s see if chorizo works with peanut butter!’ he laughs. “I’m excited about it. Esco’s got a great energy about him, and I like that. He’s got a soulful voice which I can relate to, but he’s also got the hip hop thing going and it will be interesting to see if he pushes that. It will be good to get out of my comfort zone!” For artists, music can be the obvious outlet for the kind of emotion that many others might struggle to express. Stephen agrees: “Absolutely, it gets everything off your chest. Sometimes you write something that just has to be written, because if you don’t write it you’ll go nuts. You just have to let it out.” However, he says he’s careful not to get bogged down in the negativity.

“I try not to be too confessional. If you come to a gig I don’t want to be just ‘woe is me’ onstage. You have to bare your soul and I believe in that big time. But I want to have some fun as well.” As Simon Howe of CALM explains, now can be a confusing time to be a male: “bombarded with conflicting messages telling you simultaneously to man up, be more in touch with your feminine side, to be a better partner, to moisturise regularly.” He says there are urban myths that perpetuate certain stereotypes – such as the idea that when a relationship ends blokes will just go to the pub and say ‘oh well, plenty more fish in the sea’. Part of the idea of having a project focusing on Valentine’s Day is about highlighting the reality that relationships hit men hard too, and talking about the rarely focused-on frustration and loneliness that can accompany the day. The project is all about turning potential problems into something positive. As Stephen says: “Everyone gets low. The truth is things are so much bigger in your head than what they are outside. So when you tell someone you’re actually able to reduce the size of it, just through talking to someone. So that’s the first step. To just draw a line and say ‘I’m moving on now’. You can work through any problem; I do believe that, definitely.” For the listener and fan, music can often function as a kind of catharsis and source of inspiration, as well as a constant companion. Stephen says: “That’s one of the functions I think of a real artist, to say things that other people can’t, which enables them to go on the same journey with you. Obviously if you’re able to write music, or poetry or whatever, and you’ve been given that gift, there should be a reason for it. And I think it is to write things that say something that other people can relate to, that will release something in them.” To keep up-to-date with the CALM Love Triangle project, to see the making-of video, and to stream the finished track on 14th February visit thecalmzone.net


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Bido Lito! February 2013

In November 2012, Liverpool Vision launched its new Strategic affordable studio space for a vibrant mix of artists. Yet here is a council rates’ disputes, noise abatement orders, funding cuts and Investment Framework (SIF), a document that outlines a fifteen-year cruel, uncomfortable irony: the SIF plan was published almost a economic pressures, is the SIF a plan that can help facilitate the vision for the city centre. The plan has been deliberately designed year to the day after the Creative Review article ran and, barely as flourishing of our grassroots cultural sector? to ‘promote strategically identified economic priorities’ and follows the ink had dried, Wolstenholme Creative Space was boarded up. Because, on the face of it, it should be. If the motivations really on from the City Centre Strategic Regeneration Framework (SRF), There are various reasons for Wolstenholme Creative Space’s are for the growth of the creative industries in the city, a prioritising launched in 2001, which resulted in the 2008 Capital of Culture and end (it would be simplistic to try and park blame at a specific of the culture and visitor economy and support for the development the Liverpool ONE development. individual’s or organisation’s door) but its closure, despite a of Liverpool’s individual sense of place, then we should be moving Encouragingly, the plan outlines support for the growth of widely-held regard of its importance to the local creative scene, into a new period of support for Liverpool’s grassroots creatives. the creative industries in the city, a prioritising of the culture and endorsed on an international level by Creative Review, is to be By its very nature, the grassroots creative culture of our city is visitor economy and also ongoing support for the development of lamented. The case also demonstrates a worrying trend. The particularly disparate, with lots of small collectives and individuals. Liverpool’s ‘individual sense of place’ (an idea brought into focus availability of cheap rental space is a key factor for the flourishing The artists, independent retailers, photographers, designers, as cities become evermore competitive for investment, profile and of grassroots creative communities (a point identified in the publishers, promoters, performance spaces, theatre groups, dance visitor numbers while often, and somewhat ironically, become Creative Review article and noted above) in cities across the world troupes, musicians, galleries, recording and rehearsal studios, evermore homogenised). - Berlin has enjoyed the benefits of this for decades - yet the SIF tech start-ups, production companies, festivals, independent cafes On the face of it, this seems like good news for grassroots notes that “Ropewalks still has gaps to fill with derelict buildings and bars, printers, and the myriad of creative thinkers, doers and culture in the city. After all many would support the idea that and development sites throughout the area. It needs to attract makers are what make our city truly marvellous, that make this the city’s ever developing and morphing home-grown grassroots more investment and development activity to accommodate place what it is. creative culture, and its people, play a hugely important role in its more creative and digital businesses, apartments and cultural This is a sector of vital economic and cultural worth. If it unique sense of place. attractions”. It is vitally important that the creative and cultural is to be understood, valued and supported, it needs strong The SIF aims to promote Liverpool as a capital of major cultural organisations currently calling these ‘development sites’ home representation within the city level decision-making process, and events and will look to support ongoing programmes that have a stake and a say in their future. a real understanding of its intrinsic worth to the city. It needs serve to enhance As well as bringing into focus the collective representation equal to the individual representation a positive image challenges on an organic level, the of Liverpool’s large arts organisations, a position into which (with of the city, attract aforementioned Creative Review support) today’s grassroots organisations can blossom in the visitors and share years to come. economic benefit. And seeking (Encouragingly representation Liverpool Biennial, is not through Liverpool Sound some desire to City and The Arabic provide obstacles Arts Festival are all and halt cited as successful development. examples of As much as such events.) But anybody else, does this support we want to see spread to our city’s Liverpool continue to grassroots cultural progress and flourish organisations? beyond the current In their December challenges. We want 2011 issue, the to understand our internationally role in, and be part regarded Creative of, a plan for the Review ran an future that has every extended feature celebrating Liverpool’s individual and community within our city As Liverpool launches its vision for city centre growth and at its heart. In order to achieve this, our thriving independent creative scene and investment over the next fifteen years Bido Lito! Editor making the assertion that “a stone’s grassroots g ass oo s ccreative ea ve sec sector o needs a sea seat a at Craig G Pennington makes the case for our city’s grassroots the throw from the multibillion pound he table. ab e creative organisations having a seat at the table To beg begin n such conve conversations, sa ons B Bido do LLito! o developments of Liverpool ONE and Magazine Magaz ne w will be hos hosting ng CULTURE FORUM FORUM, an open pub publicc the Albert Dock a vibrant independent creative scene is thriving in article also profiled the now-demised Contemporary Urban meeting mee ng presented p esen ed at a Fall Fa Out Ou Factory, Fac o y Dale Da e Street, S ee on 7th 7 h February Feb ua y Liverpool”. The whistle-stop-tour article included artist Framedink, Centre, demonstrating the pressures at both a grassroots and 2013. 2013 The meeting’s mee ng s full u title e is: s photographer Adam Murray-Brown, Lost Art Skateshop, illustrator high budget, flagship project level. This emphasises the need for Kev Grey, Bold Street Coffee, The Well, Gary ‘Horse’ McGarvey aka a balance to be struck between protecting our grassroots scene CULTURE FORUM: FORUM Establishing Es ab sh ng City C y Level Leve Representation Rep esen a on Screenadelica, The Kazimier and clothing line CadeandTodd. with support and encouraging engagement and – where needed The piece remarked on a stark sense of people “committed For Fo The Liverpool L ve poo Grassroots G ass oo s Creative C ea ve Sector Sec o – investment and infrastructure. to doing it for themselves or not at all, partly out of recognition Another related point brought into focus within the SIF is the that independence is always better and partly from seeing other desire to increase the city centre population to over 42,000, “the The event even will w feature ea u e a panel pane of o representatives ep esen a ves from om Liverpool’s L ve poo s projects wither when funding was withdrawn”. It also identified largest of any UK city in the core of the city centre”. After the grassroots g ass oo s creative c ea ve sector, sec o the he city’s c y s large a ge arts a s organisations, o gan sa ons the availability of cheap, affordable space, particularly around banning of live music at Static Gallery in 2012 due to noise issues, Liverpool L ve poo Vision V s on (the he city’s c y s economic econom c development deve opmen company the Ropewalks, as a key factor for supporting the burgeoning a case that brought into focus the ongoing friction between the who commissioned comm ss oned the he SIF), S F and Culture Cu u e Liverpool L ve poo (Liverpool L ve poo City C y creative community and hoped that “creative types up and down city centre as a place for both sleep and play, such a population rise Council). Counc It will w also a so include nc ude an audience aud ence of o you, you our ou grassroots g ass oo s the country will be able to take advantage of this situation in the will bring with it further challenges. creative c ea ve community. commun y coming years”. So, does the SIF have the ongoing support of Liverpool’s If you want wan to o make ke su sure e that ha LLiverpool’s ve poo s g grassroots ass oo s ccreative ea ve The article was based largely on the collective community around grassroots culture at its heart? The issues outlined above highlight sec sector o iss cen central a to o the he future u u e vvision s on o of ou our ccity, y p please ease aattend. end The Wolstenholme Creative Space, celebrating its role in providing some initial challenges and, after twelve months of ongoing even event iss free ee and you can register eg s e aat b bidolito.co.uk do o co uk

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Bido Lito! February 2013

Previews/Shorts

Edited by Richard Lewis - middle8@bidolito.co.uk

In what is likely to be a packed-out affair at MelloMello, punk quintet EAGULLS bring their EAGULLS furious live show to town. Fresh from supporting punk legends Buzzcocks on tour, sterling support comes in the shape of The Futureheads’ punk side project RIVALS. RIVER CAVES, which feature former members of local thrash merchants SSS, complete an excellent bill. MelloMello – 23rd February

Danish punks ICEAGE bring the noise to the imminently suited environs of The Hold. Recently ICEAGE signed to indie label par excellence Matador (Sonic Youth, Cat Power, Kurt Vile) the Copenhagen quartet are set to release their highly anticipated second album in February. Prior to that catch them here before they inevitably move into bigger live spaces. The Shipping Forecast - 26th February

Described as the ‘new sound of UK Jazz’ by BBC Radio 1 DJ Gilles Peterson, Leeds outfit ROLLER TRIO ROLLER TRIO are a visceral stew of conventional and experimental sounds, their tracks taking in thrashy noise, stonking riffs and electronic soundscapes. The show forms part of the first ever Liverpool International Jazz Festival, running between 28th February and 3rd March at The Capstone. The Capstone Theatre – 28th February

Mazes

After the huge success of the inaugural Liverpool International Festival Of Psychedelia last year, the event returns in late September as a two-day extravaganza. Prior to that, and to whet the appetite of all interested psychonauts, the first of several sonic appetisers comes strongly recommended. Pitching up in Blow-Up-esque Blade Factory, rising alt rock trio MAZES headline the first taster for the 2013 event. Drawing from the fertile 1990s era of US alt rock (Pavement, Guided By Voices, Go-Betweens), the Mancunians supplement this with a smattering of pop hooks. Building a sizeable reputation live, the three-piece are fresh from supporting The Cribs on a nationwide tour. On the road to coincide with their imminent second album Ores And Minerals, due for release on Fat Cat Records on 18th February, the new record marks a strident step forward from critically-acclaimed debut LP A Thousand Heys. Heys Support on the night comes from local diviners of psychedelic noise ALIEN BALLROOM (previously known as Koolaid Global Tyranny). Making one of their first live appearances, the ensemble’s new long player Zero PAC A.D., released on Agitated Records, features seven swooning cuts of vintage psych sounds for the discerning space traveller. The line-up is completed by MIND MOUNTAIN’s heavy jams, and Liverpool Psych Fest DJ ONLY RECORDS WILL SAVE US ALL will be on hand to spin the discs. The Blade Factory – 22nd February

The ornate surroundings of the Epstein Theatre will host a special performance by PATRICK PATRICK WOLF WOLF, marking a decade since his debut LP Lycanthropy Lycanthropy. Wolf ’s world tour is a tenth anniversary celebration, with recent LP Sundark And Riverlight featuring re-recorded, acoustic versions of earlier works that saw the genre-defying singer return to his roots as a folk singer. The Epstein Theatre - 7th February

The spirit of New Orleans will be in evidence at this boozy, brassy party. A Cajun feast and MELLOMELLO BIG FAT MARDI GRAS traditional Mardi Gras tipples will accompany the ever-marvellous EDGAR JONES, SPEAKEASY BOOTLEG BAND and HARLEQUIN DYNAMITE BRASS BAND. There will also be a coronation for the Carnival King and Queen, chosen the traditional way by the ceremonial sharing of King Cake and some Golden Beans. Proceeds will go towards The New Orleans Musicians Relief Fund. MelloMello - 9th February

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Freeze Present... The Bedrock Warehouse Party

Photo by Carlos Armando

The Godfather of Dub and the high priest of reggae, LEE ‘SCRATCH’ PERRY is a bona fide living legend. LEE ‘SCRATCH’ PERRY Via his mixing board experiments in the early 1970s, Perry was one of the first exponents of dub, while his own self-built studio The Black Ark saw him become producer to scores of acts. A must see. Eric’s - 17th February

Founded by DJs JJOHN OHN DIGWEED DIGWEED and John Muir, BEDROCK bring some of dance music’s stalwarts and hottest new talent to Camp And Furnace. Best known as one half of Ministry of Sound residents Sasha and Digweed, and radio show Transitions which boasts 14 million listeners worldwide, Digweed continues to maintain a schedule few DJs can match. In command for a full five-hour slot, Digweed will be supported by Freeze resident and 3B Records kingpin JEMMY, fresh from recent Bedrock release Quarry Bank. Bank Room Two, meanwhile, is hosted by locals Waxxx who will provide an eclectic mix of everything from bass music, off-kilter funk, disco and house. The headlining slot comes courtesy of NEIL BARNES, best known as part of dance music pioneers Leftfield, one of the most influential acts ever to hit the genre. Currently in the studio honing new material, a very rare DJ set will see him road-testing several of these new tracks. A DJ set from FRIENDLY FIRES comprises the accompanying headline performance. Liverpool legend GREG WILSON also features, along with Merc Music boss MARK E. Strong local support comes in the form of mUmU resident ADELE MOSS (whose recent gigs include Fabric and the Warehouse Project), THOMAS TUFT of Juice FM, and Waxxx and Disctoeca Poca stalwart MR PAUL. Camp And Furnace – 9th February


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To book tickets Call: 0844 8000 410 Visit: www.thecapstonetheatre.com


Liverpool’s International Arts Venue

What’s On - Spring Season For full listings visit www.thecapstonetheatre.com

Joe Stilgoe

Ethan Johns

Friday 8th February 7.30pm £12.50

Wednesday 13th February 7.30pm £10

June Tabor

Manu Delago Handmade

Friday 22nd March 7.30pm £17.50

Friday 19th April 7.30pm £12.50

To book tickets: Call: 0844 8000 410 Visit: www.thecapstonetheatre.com

Juan Martin Flamenco Dance Ensemble Sunday 17th February 7.30pm £17.50

Sonar Friday 3rd May 7.30pm £12.50


24

Bido Lito! February 2013 Reviews

ALLAH-LAS

heads bobbing loosely along in time with tunes that offer a warm embrace, before casting out with a characteristic coldness that has you returning for more and more. Come the end of the show, with the band doing an informal meet and greet session, they seem both genuinely surprised and equally as happy with the plaudits and congratulations tumbling towards them. Not so much a Viking invasion as almost total assimilation. Much like the nation that bore them, The Raveonettes are ice-cool, distant and expansive, with multiple layers hiding the truth from the surface. Joseph Viney

Temples – Mohebbi Harvest Sun @ Leaf First up in our psychedelic triple are Liverpool’s very own MOHEBBI. Although all of the bands performing tonight describe themselves, in one way or another, as psychedelic, it’s Mohebbi who delve into the darker side of the genre. Their songs - especially Portmanteau, with its appropriately melancholic use of a harmonica, and Breaking You Down, Down with its pounding, thunderous drumming – are a perfect mix of swagger and bluesy heartbreak. It’s a great start to the evening and they’ve set the bar high. TEMPLES shuffle on stage soon after with, one could argue, a bigger buzz around them than the headliners. The place is packed as the Kettering four-piece dive head first into their well-tuned British psychedelia. These lads are fans of the years ’65 through to ’68 and they don’t mind letting you know about it. The spooky Golden Thrones is all blissful and chiming before a quick burst of fuzzy, dirty guitars crashes in. It also contains a subtly catchy chorus that will ride around in your head for days. The rest of the set is good, though there’s work to be done - however, they’ve only been together about six months so we can cut them some slack. Inevitably, they finish with single Shelter Song and remind us all why they’re on just about everybody’s list for 2013. Think Tame Impala, doing an impression of The Pretty Things, covering something between Rubber Soul and Revolver. By the time headliners ALLAH-LAS step onstage the place is rammed. Singer and guitarist Miles Michaud says his hellos and the band kick off with the hypnotic Don’t You Forget and Tell Me (What’s On Your Mind). Both songs perfectly demonstrate the band’s love for gentle mid-60s garage rock, with the latter showing off Michaud’s impressive Jagger-esque delivery. A short, and rather intense, instrumental leads straight into Sandy Sandy: a gem of a song – or, more aptly, a dark crystal. It’s one of the standouts in the band’s impressive collection of songs and tonight it shimmers like a flame that’s been painted black. The band are on a roll now as they give us the destined-to-be-a-single Busman’s Holiday, before throwing out a rather ordinary Holiday unreleased tune. It’s strategically placed on the setlist to give single Catamaran that extra knockout blow. And it works. The song’s smooth RnB puts your mind on a one-way surfboard to a baking hot Californian beach, and leaves you there grinning with an ice cold beer in hand. There’s half a second of silence before any applause, as the audience shake themselves out of the spell they’ve just been put under. Returning promptly for an unexpected encore, Michaud steps aside to let drummer Matt Correia have his Ringo moment on a slightly heavier than normal Long Journey. Journey They needn’t have bothered: their voices sound almost identical.

PEACE Virals

Evol @ The Kazimier

The Raveonettes (Marie Hazelwood)

And with that the California daze dissipates: when can they come back? Jordan Doyle

THE RAVEONETTES Eric’s

As soon as great Danes THE RAVEONETTES take the stage, all eyes turn towards the elfin beauty of Sharin Foo (Vocals/Guitar/Bass). It’s easy for fans, writers and photographers to be drawn towards a pretty face and ultimately distracted, but the Scandinavian duo have more than enough in the tank musically to pull even the most priapismic person in attendance from such easy aesthetic qualities. Ably assisted by bandmate Sune Wagner, The Raveonettes are at once loud, enigmatic and addictive. The more attentive of attendees here might be able to spot a slew of different influences: the melodic feedback of the Jesus & Mary Chain, the peaceful vocal melodies of the Everly Brothers, and the dark, mysterious and sad reality-imbued lyrics of the Velvet Underground. Bands like Glasvegas, whose fans would probably cite very similar influences, have done nothing but utterly stink out the joint since day one so thank your stars that The Raveonettes are able to digest

Gig Guide and Ticket Shop live at www.bidolito.co.uk bidolito bidolito.co.uk

their inspiration and whittle it into something palatable and serious, lacking any of the mawkish and unintentionally hilarious qualities of their contemporaries. On the road in support of their latest LP Observator, the pair, supplemented by a touring Observator drummer, make the most of Eric’s low ceilings and, at times, shattering acoustics to deliver a very memorable set, one that traverses jangly pop, moody swing, Spector-esque wall of sound techniques and, towards the end, the macabre and foreboding hand-on-the-shoulder of drawnout metal chords. It’s all about the atmosphere tonight, with bright lights and even a smoke machine lending the proceedings a feeling akin to the last disco on Earth. Cuts like their newest album’s opening track Young And Cold, Cold as well as certified corkers Love In A Trashcan, Attack Of The Ghost Riders and Cops On Our Tail, are more than enough ammo to keep a swollen audience both enthralled and baying for more. Each of the band’s members is cast in long shadows across the audience, feeding like vampires on their enthusiasm. Switching instruments regularly, Wagner and Foo don’t miss a beat, the fug of noise and smoke providing enough cover for the technicalities before they delve deep into the heart of another song. Some in the audience stand open-mouthed,

Birmingham youngsters PEACE are on the cusp of massivedom. Now that they’re selling out London shows and their singles are getting played all over the place, plus the fact they’ve bagged a coveted slot on the upcoming NME tour, one can’t help wondering what heights the future holds for these boys. VIRALS, who are on before, don’t help much in the way of raising excitement. Pink-mopped former Lovvers frontman Shaun Hencher pulls 90s rock moves not at all befitting the lightweight, sunny LA pop that his band play. One gets the sense he’s playing more for his bedroom mirror than for us - there’s even a knee slide towards the end. Which would be great if the music stood out, but it doesn’t – it sounds a lot like Ty Segall with all semblance of edginess removed. After some technical fiddler, Peace are on and launch straight into 1998, a cover of an 80s trance classic, which surprises for its early Pink Floyd-style noodling. It’s instantly apparent that we are not watching the latest indie upstarts off the production line – these guys can really, really play. Though several radio-friendly singles attest that Peace are capable of a very polished sound, this performance instantly demonstrates that they aren’t afraid to the break the mould, not to mention the three-minute radio slot. Technically brilliant though it is, it falls flat on an audience who want the hits – it’s not until jaunty single Wraith that there are movements in the ranks. And unfortunately this sets the tone for the night – though the band put in a solid set there is little effort to engage the crowd, and little love coming back. Five songs in, vocalist Harrison Koisser (whose twin brother Sam is on bass) quips, “This is our last song. Just kidding!” ahead of their luminous ballad California Daze. The song proves that it’s impossible to nail down this band’s sound, but who needs to – they’ve a knack for writing tracks that are catchy but in no way throwaway. Though there are moments that evoke Foals and Vampire Weekend, above all it is their own sound that shines through – as well as the secret


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26

Bido Lito! February 2013 Reviews

weapons that they have in Harrison Koisser and powerhouse drummer Dominic Boyce. Bloodshake gets a positive response, but just 45 minutes in and the set’s all over. It’s difficult to pinpoint what’s missing tonight. Are the band lazy, used to an adoring and rabid crowd? Or is it just an off night? Time will tell. Either way there’s bucketloads of potential here, and as they get swept into the star-making machine we can only hope they manage to build upon their strengths without completely sanding off their edges. Jennifer Perkin

JAMES BLAKE Melé

Abandon Silence @ The Shipping Forecast Since his last appearance in Liverpool, local producer MELÉ has been championed by Annie Mac, appeared in The Boiler Room and produced official remixes for the likes of Wretch-32 and EMI upstarts Bastille. So it is with intrigue and excitement that we await his 12 o’clock return to the intimate setting of The Hold. Animated as ever, Melé brings the party right from the off, almost bouncing off the walls as he takes us through a highlights reel of the last twelve months in electronic music. Flanked by Radio 1’s newest resident Monki, he treats us to an astonishingly energetic set, dropping tracks like Meek Mill’s House Party, Party his own Beamer Beamer, and - most

James Blake (Matthew Ball)

explosively - Joy Orbison and Boddika’s Mercy (Boddika’s VIP) with a confidence only acquired when you’ve enjoyed the type of year he has. As the final song fades and rapturous applause ensues, the mutual love between the young DJ and his local scene radiates from all corners. The evening’s headliner JAMES BLAKE cuts an imposing figure as he towers over the booth, easing us into his set with some previously unheard new material. The twitchy, stop-start beats move quickly and suddenly, ducking and weaving their way tantalisingly close to the payoff where your ears might expect them. Technically brilliant as it is, it’s difficult to ignore the somewhat subdued atmosphere, as the challenging early moments of his set present

a bit of a comedown from the exuberance of Melé just moments earlier. The introduction of Digital Mystikz’s seminal Earth A Run Red injects some much-needed energy though, as reverent nodding heads are dispelled by ecstatic pumping fists and the scene becomes much more familiar. We are soon taken even closer to Croydon’s Big Apple as Skream’s 2006 classic Glamma reminds us why we were all so excited by dubstep before it collapsed in on itself, the audience clearly appreciating these tunes that are becoming more and more of an enigma in today’s shows. 90s RnB makes an appearance (as it did with his 2012 CMYK EP), as his own Harmonimix remix of Bills Bills Bills teases you with that sample before crushing it almost beyond recognition,

integrating pop and experimental flourishes much like his career has to-date. As 3am approaches and departure beckons, Blake abruptly halts proceedings and demands everyone’s attention with a moment of silence, before delivering a final masterstroke in what has been a riveting two-hour set: a full, unedited version of Purple Rain. Rain Now forgive me if hyperbole gets the better of me on this occasion, but as all 250 audience members sing in unison, arm in arm, until the very last refrain, you are forced to remind yourself that you’re not in a John Hughes movie and these moments are actually unfolding in front of you. 2012 has been a year of immeasurable improvements for electronic music in Liverpool, with new promoters bringing in the country’s finest and most challenging artists week in week out. Tonight, the best local talent and one of the country’s biggest names stand shoulder to shoulder: Melé and James Blake have produced a night that will be retold and reminisced over for weeks to come, encapsulating this exciting, ambitious and thriving scene in which we find ourselves. Mike Townsend

RODRIGUEZ

Harvest Sun @ Philharmonic Hall Cult hero SIXTO RODRIGUEZ has landed at The Phil; the man whose real-life fairytale reads like a


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Bido Lito! February 2013

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Bido Lito! February 2013 Reviews

film script: Detroit folk singer releases two wellreceived but non-selling albums in the early 70s then disappears. Subsequently, his work proves extremely successful and influential in South Africa, becoming the soundtrack to apartheid, with him being held in the same regard as Elvis and The Beatles. Two fans in the 1990s decide to look into the widely accepted rumours about the manner of his apparent suicide, and record the whole adventure. SPOLIER ALERT – a certain folk singer discovers that his artistic dreams came true after all, even if he wasn’t aware of it. And so we find ourselves in Liverpool, 2012. A city with a penchant for the cult hero rather than the commercial, one which holds these heroes in the same regard as their more famous peers - Arthur Lee and Don Van Vliet anyone? Both adopted sons, Lee’s gigs with Shack meant a lot more than those who don’t know can realise, as did Vliet’s first-ever art exhibition, which took place at The Bluecoat in 1972. Tonight really feels like something in the same vein. Huge credit must go to the promoter for bringing us this landmark show. Rodriguez emerges, top to toe in leather and a cowboy hat, prompting someone in the audience to shout, “You look cool, la!” Bizarrely, he does, instantly boosting his cowboy credentials with a searing, poignant solo rendition of the Don Gibson classic Sea Of Heartbreak. Next comes the first of tonight’s three covers, All My Loving. Loving Though not a perfect performance

Stealing Sheep (Mike Sheerin)

by any stretch of the imagination it’s a great choice to which the crowd responds fittingly. Yet, there are rumblings from people who bemoan that it’s not a note-perfect rendition, maybe even viewing the performance as a mistake. But then they’re probably of the same persuasion as the folk who complained that the sound at Spike Island was shit. Overall, the set veers between the graceful and the sublime: Sugar Man feels like a homecoming, Blue Suede Shoes is a wig out, and I feel lucky to have a face left after the eruption that greets Only Good For Conversation. Conversation The ferocity in this, and indeed some of the set’s heavier moments, is surprising.

Tonight feels like nothing short of a triumph, regardless of the odd musical glitch: a triumph in the planning, delivery, impact and importance. “It’s been an honour, a pleasure and a privilege,” to quote the great man. Indeed. P. Lee

STEALING SHEEP

The Left Hand - Ex-Easter Island Head The Kazimier Early doors and a bustling Kazimier sees a mesmerising opening slot from EX-EASTER ISLAND

HEAD sate the early arrivals. With their tablemounted guitars set up immediately in front of the stage, the orchestra pit performance allows onlookers to witness the group at close quarters. After a brief introduction, Mallet Guitars 3 is played in its entirety; the three players, heads bowed and concentrating intently, weave the track’s dense textures. Opening with a phase that chimes like the distant pealing of church bells, the piece grows in volume and intensity, gradually changing shape until the final section resembles the score from the closing scenes of 2001: A Space Odyssey. On the subject of exploring far-flung galaxies, self-described ‘Resident Band of the International Space Station’ THE LEFT HAND follow. Piloting their craft through the same billowing cloud of stoner rock smoke exhaled by Dinosaur Jr. in the early 90s, the trio supplement their XL axe riffs with helpings of HMHB surrealism and swelling Hammond organ crescendos. Hidden behind a J. Masics-style curtain of hair, Joe McLaughlin leads proceedings, the threepiece alternately tight and lackadaisical, their long spaced-out grooves loping along with Dead Skeletons-style fervour. With the venue at near capacity, STEALING SHEEP descend from the dressing room and launch straight into opening salvo The Garden, prompting thoughts of whether the open space to the rear of the venue might have served as inspiration. After ironing-out some sonic creases


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in the sound early on, with Emily Lansley’s wondrous guitar-work slightly submerged in the mix, the trio turn in a dazzling display. The final tranche of gigs following the warm reception for Into the Diamond Sun, the constant metronomic swaying of those gathered stagefront and the rapport between the three players all add to an effortlessly confident performance. A superb rendition of Re-Arrange sees the balcony behind the stage pressed into service, as escapees from the diamond mine featured in the single’s video appear in silhouette before rhythmically working their way down the steps on to join the band. A clangourous I Am the Rain, meanwhile, improves on even the studio version, the enveloping harmonies ringing out across the crowd, anchored by Lucy Mercer’s percussive thuds on drums. Led by Lansley’s bewildering guitar lines, frequently achieving the effect of sounding like the work of more than one player, Genevieve, the zenith of their songwriting thus far, supplies the set’s highpoint, the track compacting the essence of the band’s gleaming psych pop into three exacting minutes. Unsurprisingly dropped into the set late on, signature tune Shut Eye provides a suitably rousing finale, building from its nursery rhyme beginnings to something almost approaching a carnival procession. A fitting end to an extraordinary year all told. Richard Lewis

GALLON DRUNK

Girlsweat - Sidney Bailey’s No Good Punchin’ Clowns Howl At The Moon @ The Kazimier Ex-Bad Seeds guitarist James Johnston captains the good ship GALLON DRUNK through a performance at the Kazimier tonight which is as thrilling as it is macabre. The ‘swamp rock’ foursome, now in their umpteenth incarnation since the band’s inception way back in 1988, are on tour promoting their seventh long player, The Road Gets Darker From Here, and we’re in attendance to confirm that their blues-tinged, bass-heavy rumblings were, well, always pretty damn dark to begin with. Before we’re treated to a glimpse of the darkness however, the reverend SIDNEY BAILEY and his NO-GOOD PUNCHIN’ CLOWNS invite us to see the light. Their ragtime ditties, which include the tale of an alcoholic preacher whose affliction ends up getting him ex-communicated, are delivered with light-hearted authority by Sidney, who intersperses his “sermons” with solos on his trademark ceramic jug. It gives the term ‘blowhard’ a whole new meaning. Sidney Bailey’s have gone from quiet novelty act to one which has resurrected (no pun intended) and done justice to a lost genre. Leeds noise act GIRLSWEAT are up next with a trashy, lo-fi concoction of bass, drums, keyboards


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Bido Lito! February 2013 Reviews

and pedal steel guitar. Leaning slightly towards the avant-garde end of punk rock, and recalling local noise stalwarts Dirtblonde, they set to work assaulting the senses with a fury and nihilism which fails to make any real impression on the crowd. The cavernous, Cramps-esque vocals are delivered with plenty of chaotic energy but, perhaps sensing the polite bewilderment of their audience, Girlsweat end not with an anarchic bang, but with a moody whimper of digital silence. Gallon Drunk are touring their first album in five years and make a welcome return to the fray. They take the bold step of playing a clutch of new songs consecutively, clearly intent on massaging their material into the crowd. The snake-hipped Johnston is a strong presence and consummate musician, effortlessly juggling vocals, guitar, Hammond and harmonica. The multi-instrumentalism extends throughout the band - the set seems to be held together by a relentless maraca part, which is employed to maximum effect by saxophonist Terry Edwards, who plays both instruments simultaneously. Johnston leads us imperiously through a rollicking set, withering any indifference in the crowd with highlights Hangin’ On and A Thousand Years, before bringing us back down to earth with the marauding Doors-ian creep of Push The Boat Out, which has the punters in thrall. Ever the showman, Johnston finishes in the way every rock and roll band worth its

Gallon Drunk (Rob Rossington)

salt should: by playing a riff on the face of a submissive audience member and hurling his axe into the arms of another, who joins in for a scintillating finale. Pete Charles

CHILLY GONZALES Evol @ The Capstone Theatre

Away from the city centre’s usual haunts,

an audience waits patiently in the purple-lit tranquillity of The Capstone Theatre. The lights dim, and CHILLY GONZALES appears, dashingly adorned in a satin smoking jacket, green socks and slippers. Illuminated by a solitary spotlight, he begins to play pieces from his latest album, Solo Piano II. Revealing his adventurous mastery of the piano, Gonzales plays with boundless range and ability. Songs meander into polyrhythmic outbursts as he entices percussive elements out

of the piano, embracing the Steinway’s reach, unafraid of any note. White Keys - employing only the piano’s white notes - is emotive, considered and dynamically delicious, whilst other pieces are evocative of a horror movie soundtrack, dark and vengeful. His fourth piece is slow and sinister, with echoes of jazz, the left hand emitting bursts of despair. After this mesmeric introduction, Gonzales unveils his mysterious persona, and starts to engage with his audience. He describes the record Solo Piano II as a “platonic version of his music”, demanding the listeners to “fill in their own space”. The album is essentially a source from which to flourish, as Gonzales himself brings his album to life through each live performance. He declares that all music is “tension, followed by resolution”, providing insights into the methodology of songwriting, like a magician revealing his tricks. This breaks down the barrier between musician and audience letting us comprehend the most simplistic and vital codes of composition. Keen for a more hands-on approach to teaching, Gonzales invites lapsed ex-piano players from the audience onstage for a piano lesson. His first pupil is guided into composing a three-note song, in the style of Never Stop, Stop made famous by an iPad advert. “People often make the mistake of trying to make songs too complicated,” explains our teacher, as he accompanies this three-note masterpiece,


Thu 21st February, 7:30pm.

BARBARA NICE IS MRS. NICE

STARRING PHOENIX NIGHTS’ JANICE CONNOLLY Sat 23rd February, 8:00pm.

ZOE LYONS:: POP-UP COMIC Sun 24th February, 8:00pm.

F:RATED COMEDY CLUB Thu 28th February, 7:30pm.

FLORAL JAZZ NIGHT

MARLENE VER PLANCK Wed 6th March, 7:30pm.

MEGA STARS:

A GRAND CHARITY VARIETY SHOW Thursday 7th March, 8:00pm.

DUKE SPECIAL Sat 2nd February, 8:00pm.

FAIRPORT CONVENTION Fri 8th February, 8:00pm.

Fri 8th & Sat 9th March.

HAND IN HAND THEATRE

THE CRUCIBLE

KELLY JOE PHELPS

Sat 16th March, 11:00am to 3:00pm.

Sat 9th February, 7:30pm.

Sat 16th March, 7:30pm.

Fri 15th February, 7:30pm.

Wed 20th March, 7:30pm.

BROTHER SINNER & THE WHALE TOUR

LIVERPOOL MOZART ORCHESTRA RICHARD DIGANCE Sat 16th February, 8:00pm.

MIDGE URE

Sun 17th February, 2:30pm.

THE ELEPHANT BRIDESMAID Wed 20th February, 12:30pm.

ROYAL LIVERPOOL PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA LUNCHTIME CONCERT SERIES

MDI FAMILY DANCE DAY DAVE SPIKEY WORDS DON’T COME EASY TOUR BLACK BOX THEATRE COMPANY

OTHELLO

Fri 22nd March, 7:30pm.

McCARTNEY:: YESTERDAY & TODAY McCARTNEY A MUSICAL CELEBRATION Sat 23rd March, 7:30pm.

LIVERPOOL MOZART ORCHESTRA Sun 24th March, 8:00pm.

F:RATED COMEDY CLUB


steering it into different dynamics and moods, featuring demonic, crushing sounds as he slaps the low notes of the piano with his palms. Another audience member plays simple bass notes, whilst Gonzales whips out a pair of bongos and raps along in his Canadian drawl. Gonzales’ appreciation of rap music becomes clear with Rap Race, Race a homage to the genre, rife with comedic flair: “I took my inner Larry David and exaggerated it.” He relates to his struggle with the false optimism of major keys, explaining his love of the more protesting minor keys. Happy Birthday and Chariots Of Fire are then played in a minor key, with hilarious effect. For the final song, he commands the audience to hum a bassline, and the preceding standing ovation leads to an encore. Sweat drips from this great, lurching man as he slaps at each end of the piano, leaping up and down from his piano stool, using the pedals to vigorous effect. For the finale, Gonzales announces he will play his favourite song to emerge from Liverpool. Reluctantly expecting The Beatles, there is a sigh of elation when he plays Frankie Goes To Hollywood’s The Power Of Love. His mournful rendition creates a touching, sublime and sincerely festive end to the concert, and inspires more than a few promises to relearn the piano. Clarry M

MISS STYLIE MelloMello

The small and intimate venue of MelloMello seems to be an excellent fit for the dubstep wordsmith that is Jade MISS STYLIE Jackson. Friendly and with a slightly heady atmosphere, the casual stylings provide a relaxed backdrop for the gig. Stylie launches into her first track - a dominant bassline sluiced with grimy electro - and the crowd are instantly drawn closer to the stage. The Toxteth freestyler is on top form, dizzying the audience with spells of dirty street beats cast beneath lyrics that spit like bullets from a hyperspeed machine gun. Captivating and energetic, Stylie possesses a frenetic, wild energy that engages the crowd and draws them into sharing her performance. Throughout the set, Stylie is able to fuse a multitude of genres until you’re

not quite sure where grime ends and hip hop begins. This is testament to her versatility and she exemplifies this on the night, oscillating effortlessly between hip hop, electro and house. The highlights scattered throughout her set are notably the tracks plucked from debut EP Heavy Salad, Salad which was released at the end of October and features a collaboration with The Tea Street Band’s Timo Tierney and Lee Smith. Stylie manages to achieve the paradoxical effect of producing a polished, slick sound that has clearly seen a lot of hard work whilst still managing to retain a sense of unpredictability. There is the feeling that she may not follow the plan, but whatever she does bring, it’s guaranteed to be enjoyable. It is perhaps this dynamic that makes Miss Stylie so enjoyable to watch at every gig, and this performance is no exception. Lisa O’Dea

CHAIN AND THE GANG Lovecraft – Ticks – Owls*

Evol @ The Shipping Forecast We are gathered here tonight to witness the rock royalty that is USA’s Ian Svenonius. Through the medium of various bands, including Nation Of Ulysses and The Make-Up, as well as various solo projects, books and journalism, Svenonius has been sharing his anti-establishment world view with us since 1988. Tonight he fronts his latest incarnation CHAIN AND THE GANG, they of a distinctly sleazy 70s rock aesthetic. But first up we have a trio of home-grown talent from the fringes, starting with a moody set from the recently reemerged OWLS*. Following are über-geeks TICKS who, when they hit, pull off angular awkwardness in a darker Young Knives kind of way, but when they miss are just a bit… awkward. Affected quirkiness turns to genuine cringe when the singer says, “Sorry we’ve played for so long, we’ve almost finished.” No apology needed Ticks, you’re worth it. Things go from slightly strange to completely off tap when the ensemble known as LOVECRAFT, led by singer and multi-instrumentalist Craig Sinclair, take the stage. Lovecraft are intense, quirky, and unclassifiable: they’re a little bit


36

Bido Lito! February 2013 Reviews

scary and utterly brilliant. It sometimes appears that the band are perhaps trying a little too hard, but by the end of the set it’s evident that you cannot fake this kind of weird. Go and see them, we implore you. And onto Svenonius, who has been spotted in the crowd watching the support acts, and his gang. The band are essentially a two-hander, with combustible crooner Katie Alice Greer matching Svenonious’ laid-back, cabaret-singermeets-talk-show-host persona (and the man does host his own talk show, check it out). The pair strut and exchange lines as the band kick out their simple, garage rock jams. Greer is a joy to watch, her short mop flailing asunder as she gives it her all. The themes are political, but are presented in a playful way – no Refused or Rage Against the Machine-style bombardment from them. Songs like ‘Nuff Said and For Practical Purposes are the most memorable, but tonight it’s not really about the songs, and more about the style. It’s all a bit too cool for school, but in an entirely self-conscious way. Get it? Yes it’s sexy, laid-back, fun and intelligent, but ultimately there’s an energy missing. Everyone in the room is on their side, but no one’s really losing themselves in the moment – it’s more a question of watching with interest. As much as we admire Svenonious (who graciously thanks all support acts by name), all of those knowing winks can get a tad exhausting. Jennifer Perkin

Shearwater (Mike Sheerin)

SHEARWATER Eric’s

One of the more annoying things about watching bands is picking one with talkative members. Instead of just tuning up, berating the drummer for yet another missed beat and getting down to business, some have a wellhoned and annoying penchant for gassing on and on. Of course, like most other things in existence, there are myriad variables involved. In the case of Texan boys and Sub Pop signings SHEARWATER, running their mouths off is a

symptom of a wicked combination of fatigue, enthusiasm and genuine awe. As their vocalist, Jonathan Meiburg, tells the odd rambling story about their current tour, which seems to have taken them everywhere bar North Korea, you can’t help but feel a sense of warmth towards them. Both their songs and stories convey the notion of a band very much in each other’s pockets, for better or worse. If you want an idea of just how lengthy this latest jaunt has been, consider this: their most recent album, Animal Joy Joy, came out all the way back in February (not only that, but it was somewhat lacking from the myriad and

tiresome ‘Best Of 2012’ lists to which we’re annually subjected). Only now have they been able to see us lucky buggers in Blighty. Luckily for Shearwater, time has done little to dilute a devoted crowd’s desire to see them, with the older men at the front gazing up adoringly, as only star-struck middle-aged music lovers can. Frankly, there’s a lot to adore about them: songs like Breaking The Yearlings are meditative, soulful and fresh. Immaculate cuts to the chase with its rounded bassline and tidy, fast drums before giving way to an expansive finish. Will Sheff (Vocals/Guitar) is blessed with one of those memorable and deeply affecting baritone voices that can lend a certain gravitas to their lyrics. Their excellent musicianship and tiring tours do little to assuage the problem of the relatively little attention they receive from the music press. After tonight’s showing and with a little more application, they might finally get what they deserve. Their set is festooned with intricate music, and has a relentless pace and real devotion to the craft that a lot of their contemporaries seem to miss on their way to the mirror. As they smoothly slide their way through the sprightly Pushing The River River, you can’t help but think that we might not be blessed in this part of the world with the cleanest river in history, but whatever they put in the streams of Texas must contain sheer magic. Joseph Viney


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.......................................................... .......................................................... .......................................................... .......................................................... .......................................................... .......................................................... .......................................................... .......................................................... .......................................................... .......................................................... .......................................................... . . . . . . Swimmers . . . . . . - Secret Garden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Olympic . . . . . . .-.Non Monsieur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Gathering .......................................................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Harvest . . . . . .Sun . . .@ The Kazimier . . . . . . . . . . . 1/2 .......................................................... . . . Kazimier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .doors . . . . . . . . . . Kazimier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .The are open for a . . . . . . . .of. . the .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .The . . . . . . meeting . . . . . . . of . . .the two great cities of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .musical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Liverpool . . . . . . .and . . . Glasgow, . . . . . . enough to warm even . . . . . . . . . . . 6/2 . . . coldest . . . . . . .of. . cockles. .... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .the . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Headliners ADMIRAL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Leaf . . . . . .seem . . . . to. . be . . .on. a quietly awesome roll . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .FALLOW . . .moment: . . . . . . .the . . .same . week of this show . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .at. .the .......................................................... their debut in Liverpool 7/2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - their charity Christmas . . . Epstein . . . . . . .Theatre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .track . . . .Torrent . . . . .Rain . . . sits . . . in. pride of place as Lauren . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .The . . . . . . .BBC . . .6Music . . . . . Headphones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Laverne’s Moment. .......................................................... First on the bill though are cute folksters NON ..........................................................

Tickets currently on sale at bidolito.co.uk sale

ADMIRAL FALLOW

Wave Machines JP Cooper

Patrick Wolf

8/2

The Wave Pictures

8/2

Dutch Uncles

The Shipping Forecast The Kazimier

11/2

The 1975

12/2

Local Natives

15/2

Bird EP Launch

The Shipping Forecast The Kazimier Leaf

Mazes 22/2 ...............................

MONSIEUR, who have as much charm as a chintzy tea set. They’re a great little band who produce an all-round charming set, with the delivery of single I Wish We Were Young in particular like a heart-shaped hand warmer. Next we get serious for SECRET GARDEN GATHERING who treat us to a set of their brooding and intriguing indie-folk. Lead singer Toots LaBelle is vocally reminiscent of Tracey Thorn, but with even more of a Gothic edge. A dash of synth contributes to said edge, providing psychedelic brushstrokes to their music. Pals of Admiral Fallow and all-round cheeky chappies OLYMPIC SWIMMERS follow on from Secret Garden Gathering with a rousing set, which includes meaty organ solos and Arcade Fire-style collective bellows. The band’s music is rough and atmospheric, a neat juxtaposition to their jocular and self-effacing banter, which is a hit with the audience, proving funnier than Joey Barton’s French accent. Evidently Olympic .Swimmers . . . . . . . . . . . . .as. .roadies . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Fallow, ..... . . . . . . . . .double . . . . . . . . . . . . .for. .Admiral ........... .as. .they . . . .finish . . . . their . . . . set . . . and . . . prepare . . . . . . the . . . stage ..... .prior . . . to . . the . . . headliners’ . . . . . . . . nonchalant . . . . . . . . .appearance. ......... .A. wistful . . . . . . . . . . . . of . . . . . .Bursts . . . . . . . . . opener ...... . . . . . . . rendition . . . . . . . . . Tree . . . . . . . . .is. the ......... .for. . the . . . .now . . . .bustling . . . . . . arena . . . . . and . . . .is. .met . . . with .... .joyous . . . . .claps . . . .and . . .whistles. . . . . . . Judging . . . . . .by. .one . . .super..... .fan’s . . . . . . . . .dancing . . . . . . . . . . .front, . . . . . . . . . . .that ... . . . . fervent . . . . . . . . . . . .at. .the . . . . . . .it. is. .clear ....... .the . . .band . . . .have . . . .a.core . . . .set. . of. . admirers. . . . . . . . And . . . why .... .wouldn’t . . . . . . they? . . . . .Lead . . . singer . . . . . Louis . . . . Abbot . . . . .has . . .the ... ................................... rugged good looks and stage presence to rival ................................... .those . . . .of. .Marcus . . . . .Mumford, . . . . . . . and . . .the . . .band’s . . . . .overall ..... .grandiose . . . . . . .orchestral . . . . . . . folk . . . sound . . . . . makes . . . . .it. easy . . . .to. . ................................... .see . . .why . . .their . . . music . . . . .translates . . . . . . . so . . well . . . .on. .record ..... .as. . it. .does . . . . live. . . . .As. . Beetle . . . . . .In. .The . . . Box . . . .begins ..... .with . . . .a. .Weezer-esque . . . . . . . . . . .guitar . . . . .riff, . . . the . . . perfect ...... ................................... .union . . . . .of. .Abbot’s . . . . . .and . . . Sarah . . . . .Hayes’ . . . . . male . . . . .and ... .female . . . . . voices . . . . .is. .a.golden . . . . . moment, . . . . . . . meaningful ......... .and . . . . . . . . . . . The . . . . . . . .moves . . . . . . . .to. . crowd ..... . . . . endearing. . . . . . . . . . . . .band . . . . . . . . . on .......... Enough? .favourite . . . . . . Isn’t . . . .This . . .World . . . . Enough?, . . . . . . .with . . . pangs . . . . .of. . .old . . country . . . . . .folk . . .and . . .an. .accordion . . . . . . .hook . . . .so. .catchy ..... .you’ll . . . .be. .humming . . . . . . . it. .three . . . .weeks . . . . .later. . . . Guest . . . . .Of. . ................................... .The . . .Government, . . . . . . . . .an. .ode . . . to. .the . . .group’s . . . . . favourite ....... .bar . . in . . native . . . . .Glasgow, . . . . . . .is. a. .bona . . . .fide . . .toe-tapper, ........ ................................... .and . . . another . . . . . . .highlight, . . . . . . . .Four . . . .Bulbs, . . . . .sees . . . .the ... .group . . . . assemble . . . . . . . .to. .sing . . . like . . . .an. .awkward . . . . . . .indie .... .choir . . . . . . . . . . .acoustic-guitar-clad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .The ... . . . . . around . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Abbot. ......... .song . . . .is. .partially . . . . . .a. capella . . . . . . and . . . .stunning . . . . . . up . . .to. . .the . . final . . . .note. . . . .Sing-along . . . . . . . .classic . . . . .Squealing . . . . . . . Pigs .... .rounds . . . . . things . . . . .off . . nicely . . . . .before . . . . .an. . encore . . . . . of . . Oh ...

Multi Puropse Chemical (Mike Sheerin)

Oscar and Old Balloons ends proceedings on a major goose bumps moment. Long live their indomitable Glaswegian spirit. Flossie Easthope

MULTI PURPOSE CHEMICAL Metro Manila Aide - Oceanis - Scare Tactics The Zanzibar 2013 might just be the Year of Metal in Liverpool. Last year saw noteworthy input from local turks Conan (who supported overlords of sludge-metal .Sleep) . . . . . . . .progressive . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .OCEANIS, .......... . . . . . .and . . . . . . . . . . . .riff-fiends . . . . . . . . . . . . . who .... .appear . . . . . on . . .a. mouth-watering . . . . . . . . . . . .bill . . .tonight . . . . . which ..... .also . . . sees . . . .gone-but-not-forgotten . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . fun-time . . . . . . metal ..... .act . . MULTI . . . . .PURPOSE . . . . . . . CHEMICAL . . . . . . . make . . . . .a. welcome ....... ................................... .return . . . . for . . .a.one-off . . . . . reunion . . . . . . show. ............... . . .The . . .Zanzibar . . . . . . is. .fit. .to. .busting . . . . . .for. .opening . . . . . . act ... .SCARE . . . . .TACTICS, . . . . . .whose . . . . . infectious . . . . . . . .brand . . . . .of. .old... ................................... .skool . . . . Americana . . . . . . . .metal . . . . is. .delivered . . . . . . .with . . . finesse, ...... .good . . . .humour . . . . . .and . . .minimal . . . . . .posturing. . . . . . . . They . . . .wear .... ................................... their early-Metallica influence on their sleeves ................................... .with . . . .the . . . thunderous . . . . . . . . . Ludicrous . . . . . . . .Speed, . . . . . .while .... Speed .popular . . . . . . set . . . closer . . . . . Drunk . . . . . Fuck . . . . inspires . . . . . . .some .... ................................... .fervent . . . . . call-and-response . . . . . . . . . . . . .lyrics. ................ . . .Oceanis’ . . . . . . . frontman . . . . . . . . .Joe . . . .Maryanji’s . . . . . . . . .very ... .presence . . . . . . . has . . . .created . . . . . . a. . sizeable . . . . . . . horseshoe ........ ................................... .down . . . . the . . . front. . . . . .That, . . . .and . . .the . . .fact . . . that . . . .he. .has ... .declared . . . . . . .his . . .mission . . . . . . tonight . . . . . . to . . .be. . .to. .“hurt .... .people.” . . . . . . . . . . . . . spends . . . . . . . . . . . . deal ......... . . . . . . . Maryanji . . . . . . . . . . . . . a. .good . . . . . . . . of. . his ... .time . . . .stalking . . . . . . ambulatory . . . . . . . . . audience . . . . . . . .members, ....... .and . . .bellowing . . . . . . . lyrics . . . . while . . . . .his . . bandmates . . . . . . . . .stand .... .behind . . . . . .him, . . . .motionless . . . . . . . . apart . . . . .from . . . .a. .furious ..... ................................... .shredding . . . . . . . .action. . . . . .Fusing . . . . . punishing . . . . . . . . metal-core ........ .breakdowns . . . . . . . . .and . . .the . . convoluted . . . . . . . . .arrangement . . . . . . . . . of. . ................................... .progressive . . . . . . . . rock, . . . . Oceanis . . . . . . are . . .perhaps . . . . . . the . . .most .... .forward-thinking . . . . . . . . . . . . of. . Liverpool’s . . . . . . . . .current . . . . . crop . . . . of. . .metal . . . . . . . . . Rise . . . . . . . .Ruin . . . . . . . . . Maryanji’s ........ . . . . . artists. . . . . . . . . .From . . . . . . . displays .............. .impressive . . . . . . . . vocal . . . . . range . . . . . and . . . . Herculean . . . . . . . . lung .... .power, . . . . . and . . . Brotherhood . . . . . . . . . .is. .a. terrifying . . . . . . . journey ...... .through . . . . . .sonic . . . .Hades. ........................

Whether it’s a sermon or a kung fu kick to your solar plexus, you never quite know what you’re going to get with METRO MANILA AIDE. Older and wiser, but having lost none of his shock factor, the band’s erstwhile troubadour Saul Godman appears on stage in full drag, save for a pair of combat shorts. The potential for farce immediately goes through the roof as he prances around, batting away the mock advances of male audience members. Godman’s hirsute compadres break the confused sexual tension with heavy-rocking new tracks, served up alongside old favourites Help To Change, Change .People . . . . . Of . . .Today and Hell Is Paved. It’s unclear ......... .whether . . . . . . the . . new material marks a new direction .for . . the . . . band, . . . but the rambling monologues have .been . . . . . . . . jettisoned as Godman seeks to . . . . . largely .... .reinvent . . . . . .himself . . as a lead vocalist. . . .Multi . . . . .Purpose . Chemical frontman Andres .Lefevre . . . . . is. .back . from the slightly more hospitable ......... .climes . . . . . of. . his . native Miami, and is regaling the .slavering, . . . . . . . .black-shirted mob with a bravura ......... .monologue . . . . . . . . about having missed Greggs’ .pasties. . . . . . . His . . typical American cheekiness lends .itself . . . . well . . . . to the balls-out nu metal of MPC, ......... jagged riffing sits somewhere .whose . . . . .mid-paced, ... .between . . . . . . . Disturbed . and Pantera, and they’re .not . . . so . . .self-important .. as to deny one fan an ......... Break Stuff by Limp Bizkit. impromptu verse of ......... .A. .frantic . . . . .rendition . of Cult, which could have .sat . . . . . . . snugly . on System Of A Down’s first . . . .quite ..... .album, . . . . . .sees . . guitarist Adam Lucas tear about .three . . . . strings . . . . out of his guitar. A shambolic bass, .drums . . . . .and ... . . . . . . . . . vocals encore brings proceedings to .an . . abrupt . . . . . halt. . . . .If. we . . .can . . take anything away from tonight’s ......... .gig, . . . .aside . . . . from tinnitus, it’s that Liverpool’s .metal . . . . .scene . . . is working hard to dispel negative .stereotypes, . . . . . . . . and that you don’t have to take ......... .yourself . . . . . . too . . seriously to garner respect, even if .you’re . . . . .wearing . . . your sister’s best frock. ......... Pete Charles

. . . . . . . . The . . . .Blade . . . . . Factory ................ . . . . ............................... ............................... . . . . .5/3 .............................. . . ............................... ............................... . . . . ............................... . . . . . . Erics ......................... . . . . ............................... . . ............................... ............................... . . . . .5/3 .............................. . . . . . . . . The . . . .Kazimier ..................... . . ............................... . . ............................... ............................... . . . . .18/3 .............................. . . . . . . . . The . . . .Kazimier ..................... . . ............................... . . ............................... . . ............................... . . ............................... 22/4 . . . . . . . . Anglican . . . . . . . . Cathedral ................. . . ............................... . . ............................... . . ............................... . . ............................... 2-4/5 . . ............................... . . ............................... . . ............................... . . . . . . . . 3-Day . . . . . .Wristbands ................... . . ............................... . . ............................... . . ............................... . . .7/5 .............................. . . ............................... . . ............................... . . . . . . . . Liverpool . . . . . . . . .Philharmonic ................ ................................................................................................................ ................................................................................................................ ................................................................................................................ ................................................................................................................ ................................................................................................................ ................................................................................................................ ................................................................................................................

Il Songo Del Marinaio

Maps & Atlases Wild Nothing Daughter

Liverpool Sound City 2013 Loudon Wainwright III


TATE.ORG.UK/LIVERPOOL FREE FOR TATE MEMBERS TATELIVERPOOL @TATELIVERPOOL With the support of the Culture Programme of the European Union

BOOK NOW 8 February – 12 May 2013

With additional funding from Tate Liverpool Members and the Glam! Supporters Group Media partner

Travel partner

Nan Goldin Kenny putting on make-up, Boston 1973 © Nan Goldin

ce n a m r o f r e P The

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