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Love Your Ride

! e l c y C

Bicycle SA

The Members’ Magazine — No 160 November 2013 – January 2014 Bicycle SA — More South Australians cycling

Gear Up Girl — Brenton Edwards, Monique Bowley, Amanda Blair, Jessica Olle A few of my favourite (bicycling!) things — Jessica Lovett Adelaide City Bike Art Trail —  Des Chabrel Bicycle SA 111 Franklin Street Adelaide 5000 Tel (08) 8168 9999 Fax (08) 8168 9988 www.bikesa.asn.au

www.bikesa.asn.au


Cycle!

Bicycle SA Office

Contents President’s notes

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This Issue…

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Around the office

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Personal Notes

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Poseurs d’Adelaide: An Awesome Riding Group

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111 Franklin Street Phone (08) 8168 9999 Fax (08) 8168 9988 Email office@bikesa.asn.au Web www.bikesa.asn.au The office is open seven days a week, 9:00 am to 5:00 pm 8:00 am to 6:00 pm during Daylight Saving

Annual General Meeting

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Cycle!

Cycle Safe: More South Australians Cycling

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Cycle! is published quarterly

Bikes outsell cars for past ten years

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New Adelaide City Bike node opens

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Velo-city announces key note speakers

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Gear Up Girl

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Cycling to work improves productivity

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Gear Up Girl SA: Amanda Blair and Monique Boley Gear Up!

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Five minutes with Jessica Braithwaite, Ride2Work Day Ambassador

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A few of my favourite (bicycling!) things

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Adelaide City Bike Art Trail

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Cobwebs: Group riding for all

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Disclaimer The views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of Bicycle SA. Bicycle SA does not guarantee the accuracy of information published herein

Gear Up Girl — page 6

© 2013, Bicycle SA Original articles in Cycle! are copyrighted to Bicycle SA unless otherwise specified. Non-profit organisations may reproduce articles copyrighted to Bicycle SA, with only minor modification, without the permission of the authors, provided Bicycle SA is sent, as a courtesy and condition, a copy of the publications containing such reproduction. Articles copyrighted to their authors may not be reproduced without the express authorisation of their authors. Bicycle SA and the original authors reserve the right to take legal action for breach of copyright where these instructions are not complied with.

Noteworthy... 12 Cringe-worthy commute

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Commute by bike and save millions

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Tailwind 14 Support the stores that support us

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New Members

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A few of my favourite ... things — page 9

Bicycle SA Executive President, Maureen Merrick maureen.merrick@bikesa.asn.au Vice President, Terry Ryan Treasurer, Tom Walker Secretary, Anne Lewis (Smith) Members John Bassett Chris Beauchamp Warwick Cooper Michael Killmier Des Murray Nathan Petrus

On the cover Love is better by Bike : Jessica Eccles and Brett Howell riding City Bikes, from Bonython Kiosk, a brand new hire location Adelaide City Bike Art Trail— page 11

Contributing to Cycle! Have you something you would like to contribute to Cycle!? If so we’d love to hear about it. Please contact the Bike SA office

Government of South Australia Office for Recreation and Sport Department for Transport, Energy and Infrastructure

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Contents

www.bikesa.asn.au


Love your ride Club News President’s notes Maureen Merrick

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ongratulations on the City of Salisbury for the successful launch of the ‘Cycle Salisbury’

cycling programme in September. Three new rides, led by accredited ride leaders from the local community, were introduced into our Rides Programme. These rides, both on the bitumen and on bike tracks are already proving to be very

Around the office

popular with the addition of three more rides in

Christian Haag

the December to February 2014 programme. It has

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been very gratifying to be involved in a programme like ‘Cycle Salisbury’ because it is the local community of ride group coordinator, ride leaders

events with the countless tasks involved, including

and rider who are actively engaged and they will, in

all the ride leaders, ride coordinators, bike

turn, encourage their family, friends and the wider

maintenance and office support volunteers, your

community to join them. In a world where most of

tireless support has resulted in a very successful

us believe we are ‘time poor’ this is a great way to

year for the organisation.

spend a some time together and also develop and maintain a healthier lifestyle and level of fitness. Another exceptionally busy year is rapidly drawing to a close. As this edition of Cycle! will

On behalf of the Executive Committee, I would like to wish you all a very happy Festive Season and a fulfilling and rewarding 2014. Maureen Merrick (President), Terry Ryan (Vice

be our final publication for the year, I would like

President), Tom Walker (Treasurer), Anne Smith

the opportunity to thank all our volunteers, CEO

(Secretary), John Bassett, Chris Beauchamp,

and staff for their extraordinary contribution and

Warwick Cooper, Michael Killmier, Des Murray,

commitment during the year, whether at our many

Nathan Petrus.

This Issue… Peter Carter

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pring in Adelaide is always windy, and this spring seems to be windier than average, with recent storms causing damage and making the final Grand Slam more of a challenge than desired. A casualty of a different sort has been Girls Day Out, an aquatic version of Gear Up Girl, which has had to be postoponed because of an adverse forecast. Let’s hope Gear Up Girl is not so affected. Two items in this issue promote the event, profiling Monique Bowley and Amanda Blair, and another piece profiles Jessica Braithwaite, Ride2Work Day ambassador. Jessica Lovett has a broad survey of many aspects of cycling: clothing, shops, tour organisation and so on. Des Chabrel introduces us to the Adelaide City Bike Art Trail, something a little different from your usual tour. We’ve all had embarrassing moments, but Ryan Beggs has been brave enough to tell us about his, that revealed itself in peak hour traffic. As always, brief reports of recent happenings and news of future events. One of those, of course, is next year’s Velo-city conference, and we have news of keynote speakers. Another important event is Bicycle SA’s annual general meeting. The notice is on the next page. Make a note in the calendar, attend, and perhaps nominate for the executive or some other role. In the meantime, make the most of the warming weather.

Life’s better on a bike >>>

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he November edition of Cycle! always marks the start of the spring cycling season which, for the BSA Team, is a crazy time of event preparation and delivery. As I write, tomorrow will see us delivering the eighth Ride2Work Day event in partnership with the Adelaide City Council. Events such as this are a terrific way to encourage those not so frequent riders to put the excuses back in the cupboard and get the bike out of the shed. And then it’s off to KI for the Annual Tour, where we will showcase some of the best tourism riding experiences this State has to offer to over 200 mostly interstate visitors, before we tear into the Amy’s Ride and Gear Up Girl rides. We hope you will join us for a ride or two. But there is a new and significant project underway as well. Some weeks ago the Safe Cycle SA campaign was launched in The Advertiser. Our partnership with Adelaide’s ‘daily’ has grown steadily over the years and for Bicycle SA it’s an incredibly important one. As a small not for profit organisation looking to make a big noise, our capacity to make our views heard in the busy marketplace is determined by the strategic partnerships we build and in this regard, to have the support of The Advertiser, is crucial. With a State election six months away, the cycling community has a real opportunity to achieve meaningful change within the political sphere. Over the coming months, the Cycle Safe SA campaign will provide a platform for all of us to have our say and influence candidates across the State to develop more effective long term cycling policy that will ultimately provide the access and opportunity that so many South Australians want: to ride with confidence and safety for fitness, transport, tourism, social engagement or just for the simple desire to do something so wonderfully ‘fun’. To support this print and online media campaign, we have launched our <www. sa.vote4cycling.com.au> website, where you will be able to view Bicycle SA’s policy positions and sign up to our online petition and make your ‘Ride for Change’ count. Candidates will also have Continued next page...

November 2013 – January 2014

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Personal Notes Congratulations to all the Grand/Mini Slam riders who, in spite of the challenging weather conditions on our final ride for 2013 successfully completed their 100 km or 200 km personal challenge rides. A number of riders completed their very first 100 km or 200 km. To you all, again, congratulations and well done. Laura Stephens, at 10 years of age, successfully completed her inaugural Mini Slam series of five rides and her first 100 km. The huge smile on Laura’s face when she arrived back at Talunga Pavilion said it all. In spite of the wind, the rain squalls, intermittent hail and the inevitable hills, a superb effort Laura and a remarkable achievement. James Ashby had a fall at the railway line at Lyndoch. An injured knee did not deter him from getting back on his bike and completing his longest and first 100 km as well. This is a really courageous effort for a 14 year old. Congratulations and a super effort James. Unfortunately Brian Carlson and Rosemary McCormick sustained injuries as a result of the same Lyndoch railway line. We wish them both a speedy recovery and look forward to seeing them at the Grand Slam events in 2014. The riders who successfully completed either the series of Grand or Mini Slam rides will be published shortly. We sincerely hope that Doug Kitchen, one of our founding members and also a life member is recovering well after his recent admission to hospital. Our best wishes also to Heather, Doug’s wife, as she recovers from recent surgery.

Poseurs d’Adelaide: An Awesome Riding Group Poseurs d’Adelaide

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he Poseurs d’Adelaide group of riders have certainly found their niche within the Sunday rides. The following is recent feedback from the group: ‘The good news is that the Poseurs d’Adelaide bunches are thriving. Most new riders have found us via the BSA ride programme or word of mouth. We have had several visitors to Adelaide (working or studying from other countries) who join us regularly and see a lot of the Adelaide Hills before returning home.’ Well done for being great ambassadors for both cycling and promoting our State!

From the office ...continued the opportunity to upload their cycling policy positions on the site for us all to see and compare. We believe this will assist you in making a more informed choice when you cast your vote. So I encourage you to grab a copy of The Advertiser, follow the campaign and get involved. Your support will be vital in helping us achieve our goal of more South Australians cycling.

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Bicycle South Australia Inc

Annual General Meeting Friday 29 November, 7:00pm Fullarton Park Centre, 411 Fullarton Road, Fullarton ominations are now open for current members with the skills and interest in standing for the Executive of Bicycle SA. We request that nominations are made on the nomination forms available at the office or from the website: <www.bikesa.asn.au>. We would like the nominations to reach the office by Monday 25 November to allow for ballot papers and information to be prepared for the meeting. Please indicate which positions you will be standing for and enclose a short profile of yourself (maximum of 200 words please) and a portrait photograph. We will publish this on the web during the week leading up to the AGM and it will also be distributed on the evening of the meeting. Information about the roles and expectations of Executive Committee members will be forwarded to you on receipt of your nomination. This does not indicate that you have been selected, but provides you with the opportunity to decide if you are able to accept your role and responsibilities. The information is available by contacting the office on 8168 9999. Positions available: President Secretary Three ordinary Executive members Each of these elected positions will be for two years Maureen Merrick, President On behalf of the Executive Committee

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Cycle Safe: More South Australians Cycling Christian Haag

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outh Australia’s cycling movement has reached a landmark moment with the launch by The Advertiser of its Cycle Safe campaign. Open up a copy of the paper and you’ll see that cycle safety is being championed. The Advertiser is showing great leadership with an entire campaign dedicated to improving safety for those South Australians who ride a bike and those who want to ride bike yet do not feel safe to do so. So what’s the campaign all about? The Advertiser’s editorial states: The Advertiser supports a campaign by peak cycling body Bike SA to counter these risks and dramatically improve road safety... the campaign, called Cycle Safe, will focus on bicycles as the key to a safe, healthy and sustainable state — but the measures we will be calling for help drivers, cyclists and pedestrians alike. Bike SA’s CEO, Christian Haag says: “The

State election next year provides a tremendous opportunity to make the case for increased and smarter investment in cycling. Bicycle SA is again proud to partner The Advertiser on this vital issue.” This is big news for South Australia’s cycling community. We encourage all members and supporters to follow the Cycle Safe campaign over the coming months.

Bikes outsell cars for past ten years

New Adelaide City Bike node opens

Michael Bridge

Michael Bridge

ike Sales have outstripped car sales for the tenth year in a row... Over 1.4 million bikes were imported into Australia in the last financial year. Adult bikes in particular are seeing significant growth. In a campaign week when $200m federal money is promised to the car industry, comparatively little is being invested in cycling infrastructure. Is it time for bikes to get more money? Read more at Bike Industry mag Bike Biz: <www. bikebiz.com/news/read/australian-bike-boomgets-zero-backing-from-government/015155>.

delaide’s got yet another City Bike node as more and more get hired out in Spring. Cruise down to Hostel 109 on Carrington Street! Another new Adelaide City Bike hire location has opened up on Carrington Street in the city. Hostel 109 joins Bonython Kiosk as the two new locations on the block. Now there are 14 places around the city to score a free Adelaide City Bike. More good news: the Unley Swimming Centre is open for business again after its winter hibernation, and Adelaide City Bikes are available there as well. See <www.bikesa.asn.au/AdelaideCityBikes>.

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www.bikesa.asn.au


Love your ride Velo-city announces key note speakers Adelaide City Council

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hree key note speakers have been confirmed for Velo-city Global 2014, the world’s premier international cycling planning conference that will be hosted in Adelaide next year. Janette Sadik-Khan, New York City’s Department of Transportation Commissioner, Mikael Colville-Anderson, CEO of Copenhagenize and Ethan Kent, Vice President, Project for Public Spaces (PPS) will present to delegates from around the world on best practices for creating and sustaining cycling-friendly cities where bicycles are valued as part of daily transport and recreation. Lord Mayor Stephen Yarwood said the speakers were internationally recognised and respected experts in cities. “The three speakers have brought about significant change in cities throughout the world, including converting some of the busiest parts of New York City to pedestrian and cyclist zones,

Life’s better on a bike >>>

building the cycling culture that Copenhagen is now famous for, and working to support Placemaking projects and organisations around the world. “Adelaide Velo-city Global 2014 will be much more than just a conference. We are planning a range of community events, activities and programs during the conference and beyond. “As well as delivering an economic boost to the state, it will cement Adelaide’s reputation as a vibrant, cycle-friendly city. More people on their bikes will lead to healthier community and city” Stephen said. Minister for Road Safety Michael O’Brien MP said that hosting Velo-city will raise the importance of improving safety for cyclists. “Some of the most respected and intelligent minds when it comes to planning and improving our city’s cycling network will be sharing their expertise.

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“Hosting the conference right here in Adelaide will help us plan improvements to cycling infrastructure to ensure greater safety, which will spur on even more people to take up cycling” he said. Current cycling projects include the Frome Street Bikeway which will incorporate separated kerb-side bike lanes and street upgrades, the continued installation of bike boxes that give cyclists right of way at busy city intersections, reallocating road space to create buffers between cars and bike lanes, and the greening of bike lanes into and throughout the city. To find out more about Velo-city 2014, please go to <www.velo-city2014.com>.

November 2013 – January 2014

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Gear Up Girl

Brenton Edwards

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n the weeks following the Tour De France or our own Tour Down Under, groups of Lycra-clad men swarm the streets on their state-of-the-art bikes. While this is a sign that these premier cycling events inspire some to outlay hundreds of dollars to look good and get fit, could the experience be a better one? Currently around 30 per cent of the South Australian population rides a bike each year, which seems a healthy number. Yet we have the lowest participation rate in the country and even worse, only one in five cyclists in Adelaide are female. So how do we redress this slump? The answer could well be to just ask a woman. Monique Bowley is as passionate about cycling for fun and a healthy lifestyle as she is about one of her other passions: baking. She was a contestant on the Great Australian Bake Off, coming in a credible fourth. It is this dedication to lifestyle and better living that has her riding her bike practically everywhere. “Adelaide is the perfect riding city. It’s so flat and it is pretty good weather most of the time” she says. Every day she rides from her home in Port Adelaide to her job as a journalist and producer for ABC Radio in Collinswood. Monique is now a Gear Up Girl SA Ambassador along with media personality Amanda Blair. Gear Up Girl SA is an event run by Bike SA to encourage as many women as possible to get on their bikes fitness and fun. On November 24, hundreds of women will ride either 15, 40 or 50 kilometres as part of the Gear Up Girl SA ride and can choose to fundraise for breast cancer with proceeds going to Cancer Council SA. This year also sees the addition of a new beach ride, going all the way to Port Adelaide. Bike SA Marketing and Communications Manager Julian Ferguson says that most women in car-dominated cities such as Adelaide don’t ride because of safety reasons. “Research shows that if more women ride, the level of rider safety rises, which in turn encourages more women to ride” Julian says. It is this message that Monique also advocates as a Gear Up Girl Ambassador. “Gear Up Girl is just about encouraging women who donít normally ride to just have a go” she says. “If you are just going to the shops or to work, I would encourage you to just try it once a week and see how you go. “I think you’ll find pretty soon you get addicted.” While Monique is a seasoned rider, her fellow Ambassador, Amanda Blair, is a recent convert. But both women are perfect examples of the very different types of women who ride. “We used to work on radio together and a couple of years ago I convinced her to buy a bike and get riding” Monique says. “As soon as she did she loved it too. “But she takes it really slowly. She’s got an old vintage bike called Eunice and she rides as a leisure activity.

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“Amanda is your more relaxed rider wheras I like to get from A to B fast, efficiently and cheaply.” Compared to Europe, the numbers of female riders in Australia are significantly less than that of men, with national figures mirroring those of South Australia. In bike-friendly countries like the Netherlands, more than half of all cyclists are women and around a quarter of all trips are on bikes. To help redress these numbers and allow for safer travel and an increasing cycling population, the Adelaide City Council has installed Europeanstyle bike infrastructure across the city such as shared bike paths through the parklands and green bike lanes. There are also green bike boxes at key intersections where cyclists have priority over vehicles, increased dedicated bike parking and secure storage in council carparks. Bike SA and the ACC also have a popular free bike hire service called Adelaide City Bikes. The State Government is also commitment to promoting cycling. In the five years from 2006 to 2011 the length of the metropolitan bicycle

network, Bikedirect, has increased by 76 per cent from 604 to 1,062 kilometres. Monique is pragmatic about the pro’s and con’s being a female cyclist. “Riding takes only five minutes more than driving wherever youíre going. You donít have to worry about parking, you donít have to worry about fuel, it’s really good for your body and your mind” she says. “The only downsides are you might get a bit sweaty and your hair might not look brilliant, but if you pack shower-in-a-can or a hairbrush, you get over that pretty quickly.” So apart from a mild case of helmet hair, Monique says the best thing is to just give bike riding a go. “I just think more girls need to get onto their bikes. You don’t have to be Lycra-clad and riding all weekend and you don’t even need a great bike. “You just need something with two wheels, some pedals and some brakes and have a go.” To register for the Gear Up Girl SA ride on November 24, go to <www.bikesa.asn.au/ gearupgirl>

Cycling to work improves productivity Michael Bridge

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usinesses are being asked to make an investment in their bottom line, and support cycling employees. A recent article by Triple Pundit writer RP Siegel has made the case for businesses to view cycling facilities in the workplace as an investment, not an expense. Siegel points out that employees who exercise before work have improved productivity of an average of 15%, and that healthier, fitter employees take fewer sick days and make fewer task errors.

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In the words of Malcolm Shepherd, Chief Executive of UK charity Sustrans: “Cycle parking and showers in an office should be as common as a printer and a coffee machine.” We couldn’t agree more! Read the full Triple Pundit article here: <www. triplepundit.com/2013/08/biking-improvesemployee-productivity>. See how Bike SA can help your workplace become more cycle friendly here: <www.bikesa. asn.au/Workplaces>.

www.bikesa.asn.au


RIDE TO BEAT BREAST CANCER Ride to beat breast cancer at the 2013 Gear Up Girl bike ride on Sunday November 24 At Cancer Council SA, we believe that the 13,500 women diagnosed with breast cancer in Australia this year should all survive. We ask you to bring your family and friends together; â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Gear Upâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;, ride your bike and raise funds to help us beat breast cancer. Ride commences at 9:30 am at Elder Park and you can choose to ride a 15km River Ride, 35km Beach Ride or 50km Hill Ride.

Register to fundraise at

cancersa.org.au/gear-up-girl For more information about the ride contact Bike SA, ph 08 8168 9999 email bikesa.asn.au


Cycle!

Gear Up Girl SA: Amanda Blair and Monique Boley Gear Up! Jessica Olle

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ike SA’s women’s only bike ride, Gear Up Girl SA, has two great ambassadors on board. We decided to ask them a few questions before they cycle with a thousand other like minded women. Bike SA: What made you sign on as an ambassador for Gear Up Girl? Amanda: I think cycling is great but like many other people, often forget to take the bike and instead take the lazy option and drive. Bad for me, bad for the environment, bad for traffic congestion! So, by doing Gear Up Girl I’m forcing myself to take up cycling again. Monique: I love riding my bike. It gets the blood pumping, the wind in your hair, some vitamin D on your face and some extra cash in your wallet that you’d normally spend on petrol and parking. BSA: Why should girls get involved in cycling? What do you think stops them? A: Sometimes we are so busy looking after everybody else that we forget to take care of ourselves. I think people are unaware of how convenient cycling can be. It gets you where you need to be (usually on time) and helps keep you fit. M: Girls, it’s honestly the best. It only takes about five more minutes to get where you’re going,

you can park right out front, it burns a heck of a lot of calories (*so you can eat more gelati) and the blood flow makes your brain and body work better. Helmet hair can be a worry. And getting sweaty. But, once you learn to braid your hair sweetly and carry your shower in a can, no worries. BSA: Do you have any funny, interesting or ridiculous cycling stories or memories? A: I just remember being a kid and riding my bike everywhere. It gave me such a taste of freedom and I really loved it. When I got back on my bike (Eunice) two years ago all those memories came flooding back. When I cycle, life seems to slow down a notch or two and I really do stop and smell the roses (particularly the ones in Veale Gardens!) M: You get to take in a lot more of the world when you ride. I can think about my day, or listen to podcasts, or make phone calls as I pedal along. I’ve been able to stop and push broken-downcars, help people that are stranded, help little old ladies and men cross the roads, all things you can’t do when you’re zooming past in a car. Being on the bike gives you flexibility to stop and help people. You feel like the best person in the world, not only are you riding your bike, saving the planet from your carbon emissions, doing the right thing for your body

and mind, but you’re helping people too? Awesome. I once saw a bike rider in front of me smoking a durry as he rode, with an icecoffee in his drink holder, and I thought that was great. It proves you don’t have to be a Lycra-lad or lady to ride. Just hop on a bike, iced coffee and all. BSA: Which ride will you be doing on Nov. 24: 15, 40 or 50 km? A: The shortest one. M: I’d really like to do the 50 km but that will just about knacker me. I’ll have to pack some snacks to take along for that one. BSA: Where’s your favourite spot to cycle in Adelaide? A: Through the parklands with the kids. M: To work and back. It’s the best de-stresser I can think of.

Five minutes with Jessica Braithwaite, Ride2Work Day Ambassador Julian Ferguson

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ife is busy for Jessica Braithwaite: by day sheís out on the road for Channel 10 News, reporting on anything from wild weather to the best of entertainment, while in her downtime sheís on stage with guitar in hand with her indie pop band, Gemini Downs. We talked to the Ride2Work Day Ambassador about cycling in Adelaide, why life is better on two wheels and what it takes to get organised for the commute to and from the newsroom. What’s your earliest bike riding memory? My earliest bike riding memory is my dad trying to teach me to ride in our backyard in Mount Gambier. My older brothers were there cracking up laughing at me because I was pretty wobbly and once I got going I wasn’t sure how to stop. I screamed a bit then crashed into the back fence, which my brothers of course found even more hilarious. Whereís your favourite spot to ride in Adelaide? I love riding along the Torrens. It’s so pretty riding along the water and there are always lots of other people out cycling, walking and running, so it’s a really fun atmosphere to be exercising in. What do you like about riding to work? It’s just the best way to start the day. I’m out in the fresh air and I get my blood pumping through my body and by the time I arrive at work I’m feeling completely energised. I swear I have some of my best ideas when I’m riding my bike — I think the

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exercise helps to get the creative energy flowing — and it’s also a really effective way to squeeze some fitness in to a ridiculously busy working week. I love breezing past queues of banked up traffic in the city: the drivers are often stuck frustrated in their cars and I’m just there flying past on my bike, listening to my music and having a great time! With a busy work schedule including Channel 10 reporting as well as performances with your band, Gemini Downs, how hard is it to fit riding into your diary? It’s perfect because it’s basically a necessity. Parking is tricky in the city so riding is by far the easiest option, and I honestly believe that the morning exercise helps me be more creative, energetic and pumped up when I get to work in the morning. I’ve also got a really cool guitarshaped back pack that I can slip my guitar in, so it’s great for cycling to jam sessions and music events. It’s actually easier than driving because you don’t have to pay for parking, taxis or petrol. What are the personal benefits of riding to work? I lead a super busy lifestyle, so sometimes it’s hard to set aside time for exercising. Riding to work is an awesome way of getting some fitness in to the week. Plus, it forces me to exercise even when I can’t be bothered, because that’s how I have to get home! How much preparation does it take to ready yourself for work once you arrive at the office? It’s all pretty simple. I shower once I get to work and change into my reporting clothes there.

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(Apologies here to any colleagues of mine who have to listen to me singing in the shower.) Helmet hair and TV reporting aren’t really a great match, so I do my hair once I’m at the office. Ride2Work day took place on 16 October from 7 am to 9 am in Hindmarsh Square/Mukata. Free breakfast was served courtesy of Australian Bananas, Bakers Delight and Adelaide City Council.

www.bikesa.asn.au


Love your ride A few of my favourite (bicycling!) things Jessica Lovett

My favourite jersey From Australian company, Cannibal annibal has an interesting name and some even more interesting cycling and triathlon apparel. They are an all-Australian company, based in Tweed Heads, NSW, so you can either order on line, or ring them up, discuss any questions and they will post your orders to you, which after talking to a very friendly and helpful Diane in the factory, I have usually received within a day or maybe two. I’ve only discovered the company this year and was surprised to learn that they have been quietly producing garments since 1989, many of them custom-made for clubs and organisations. They source the highest quality materials for their unique factory made and designed products and they pride themselves on trying to keep jobs in Australia and in being a green company, recycling all of their paper and fabric waste: all of which makes me feel very happy to support them. Genuinely Australian, Cannibal would have to be one of the few clothing companies that still manufacture their garments here and not in Asia: unlike another company who claimed to be ‘true-blue Aussie’ and whom I dealt with thinking that I was supporting Australian products, only to discover that they had their clothing manufactured overseas and posted from Hong Kong via a Swedish postal service that took three weeks to get to me! My favourite long-sleeved winter Cannibal jersey attracted many favourable comments for its unique pattern when I wore it to the Strathalbyn Grand Slam. With its vibrant motif of abstract sequin-like flowers on a white background, you will not find anything like it in any other company’s (Australian or overseas) repertoire: and of course it’s great to wear something different! However, if my favourite jersey also catches your eye, you might need to order quickly, as Cannibal is frequently replacing the old with new and innovative designs. I’ve found their sizing to be accurate, but if there is any problem, since they are in Australia, return is quick and easy. For summer I’m eyeing off some of their (again) unique cycling jersey designs, their well-made cycling shorts and their very vibrant bathers. Their prices are extremely competitive anyway, but if you are lucky, they often have reductions that make their products bargains that we don’t have to leave the computer or phone to find. Check out their wares, for men, women and children on <www.cannibal.com.au>, (07) 5524 5280, thebigc@cannibal.com.au.

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My favourite bike Shop Corsa Cycles Corsa Cycles are unique in that their showroom/shop and their workshop are open plan, so that you can observe and even chat with

Life’s better on a bike >>>

one of the two expert technicians (they are more than mechanics!) as they work. And you also know that each of the two gentlemen who will work on your bike, are specialists of long standing with a wealth of experience unequalled elsewhere. One of the few things that I have in common with my cycling hero Robbie McEwan is that both of us have used Steve Nash to tune our bikes: the difference is that I discovered Steve’s skills about 20 years before Robbie! Steve Nash and Michele Primato are in demand for their expertise by International Teams and the world’s top riders during each Tour Down Under, and in fact, Michele was the manager of one of UniSA’s winning teams in the TDU. They also regularly work for neutral service in big Australian competitions like the Sun Tour, so you know that your bike will be in the best hands when it needs servicing or adjusting. Because only either Steve or Michele will work on your bike, the person you speak to about what is needed or any questions you may have, is the one who will be doing the work, so there is no possibility of miscommunication and things not being passed on correctly. As I mentioned Steve has been all of my bicycles’ guardian angel over many years and another advantage of having his or Michele’s work, is that I can collect my bike and know that its running will be perfect from the get-go, with no nasty surprises and no need to test it before entering an event. But as with other professional service providers, you should make a booking in advance for work on your machine or a bike fitting. And speaking of bike fitting, Steve and Michele are the best in the business, so if there is any adjustment needed to be made to ensure that your position on the bike is the optimum one for comfort and power output, then they can set you up to ensure this. Corsa Cycles also stock an interesting and exclusive line of bikes and accessories that are well worth checking out. Their establishment is in Gouger Street, west of Morphett Street, and so very handy to combining shopping at the Market with bike business, I always find! Both the Corsa Cycles’ personnel are real gentlemen, friendly, approachable, knowledgeable, and great communicators. And perhaps the nicest thing for me is that Steve and Michele always treat me (an elderly woman of limited riding ability) and my bike with exactly the same care, interest and courtesy as if I was one of the elite riders who also frequent their shop. Contact: 182 Gouger Street Adelaide, 8221 5068, corsacyclecentre@bigpond.com, <www. corsacyclecentre.bikeit.com.au>

My favourite safety hi-viz vest From Rapha cycle clothing company Rapha is an interesting company, specialising in expensive, high-end bicycle clothing: they claim they make the best performing and most stylish cycling clothes and accessories in the world

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and they are the suppliers of Team Sky’s apparel. They are not for everyone, but I find it is the old story of quality and thoughtful design costing more but often more than paying for the initial outlay by having a longer life-span and offering greater wearing pleasure. Rapha headquarters are in London, but they do make buying their products as easy and convenient as possible, offering tracking of shipments, long lasting guarantees and a rather unique after sales service that I can vouch for. If you are not 100% satisfied with your purchase —for whatever reason — you can return it for an exchange or refund, provided it is within 90 days of receipt of your order and the item is as new and in the original packaging. Rapha also offers a free repair service where a crash or accident has damaged a garment or if a failure has occurred even after significant usage. In Australia, there is a Reply Paid address to Victoria for returns and so refunds or replacements, like deliveries, happen quickly. I have to say also that when I returned an item because I had chosen the wrong size, the refund to my credit card included the total amount for which I had been charged, including the overseas taxation fee charges and Rapha are the only company I have known to do this and to ensure that I was not even a few dollars out of pocket, for my mistake. I have not found a better or more visible cycling vest (or Gilet) than the Rapha Hi-Viz Gilet that comes in men’s and women’s models. Firstly, the colour is a vibrant pink with two-tone (cream and black) reflective stripes for exceptional, distinctive stylishness and visibility that like bright tail and head lights makes riding on the road so much safer (and by the way, the latest independent research shows that contrast — such as the stripes — increases visibility greatly). Its durable, slightly stretchy fabric is windproof and shower resistant in the front, but has mesh part way down the back for breathability. Shaping, but no elastic at the hem, means it never rides up and allows the vest to be cut longer at the back to keep out road spray. One of the nicest attributes is the fact that unlike most vests, it has two large pockets at the back, so that you can easily reach any accessories you are carrying. Plus there is a small zipped security pocket that I find ideal for money and car keys. Contact <www.rapha.cc>, enquiries@rapha.cc

My favourite bicycle tour organiser in Australia Bicycle SA And I’m not naming Bicycle SA as my favourite

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A few of my favourite (bicycling!) things tour organiser because this is for their magazine! Just think: why does Bicycle SA have a long waiting list for would-be riders who left it too late to enter for the Annual Tour and who are hoping for cancellations, and why do they have staff and volunteers who return year after year and riders who do the same? And one of the answers is: because they remain true to their aim of offering a family type atmosphere with enough riders for new friendships to develop but not too many to spoil the cosiness and logistical manageability. I have ridden with the other big Australian bicycle organisations from the eastern states and I have to say that there is no comparison as far as relaxation and enjoyment are concerned : these other tours have just become too big and unwieldy and logistical nightmares. In spite of the fact that have all said at one time that the number of riders on the tours would be capped, Bicycle SA is the only organisation that has actually made the enjoyment of the riders paramount and closes entries when the optimum number has been reached, rather than be tempted by the extra entry fees. As I would have to on other interstate organised tours, I have no desire to queue for an inordinate amount of time to get to the showers (and even worse, toilets!) after a ride, to queue again on a food line that snakes forever, or to hunt for half an hour to find my luggage van and then the luggage: or even longer if someone else has mistakenly appropriated it! I don’t believe that there is another cycling organisation (certainly not in Australia and likely the world!) that has such an experienced group of organisers, so no wonder things operate like clockwork with a minimum of glitches and none that they can’t sort out quickly and competently. I’ve been on the annual Bicycle SA tours on and off since the early 1990s when I met Maureen and Ray Merrick who even back then were part of the backbone team of workers who made the tours so successful. And would you believe that they and other staff are still some of the backroom boys and girls beavering away quietly and efficiently to provide a wonderful cycling holiday for the riders. Maureen looks after everyone on tour, but officially is the Volunteers and Catering Co-ordinator and a tribute to her caring style is the fact that there is never a problem getting volunteer help, as the same group are eager to return year after year. Ray and his team are the towers of strength behind the expertly placed (and collection of ) signage, so that even geographically challenged riders like myself don’t get lost and he is also one of the last people back in camp, driving the sag wagon and having ascertained that everyone is safely home. Of course it is not just Maureen and Ray who make the Annual tour so successful, as besides the volunteers there is a dedicated and loyal core group of Bicycle SA staff working to the same end. I’ve enjoyed the deceptively laid-back but highly organised leaderships of previous Event Manager Michael Bridge (now General Manager) and the

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current Event Manager Russell Miatke who have also both been around in the demanding job for considerable years. And of course this all generates a dedicated group of riders who look forward to returning year after year to support the Annual Tour. For most of us, joining the tour has the same feeling as returning to the family home for a holiday where you will be welcomed and which you know will, without a doubt, be super enjoyable. So my advice to new members of Bicycle SA or those who have not yet participated in an Annual Tour is: put your entry in for the next expedition as soon as it opens, or you may miss out on what will become your favourite Australian cycling tour! Contact: <www.bikesa.asn.au>, 8168 9999

My favourite international bicycle touring company Punto Tours I’ve been to many parts of the world on active expeditions and cycling tours over the years (more than I care to admit to!), but I have to say that none of them have matched the care, professionalism, fantastic organisation and just plain enjoyment, of those overseas with Perth- based Punto Tours. Like Bicycle SA, the secret behind the Punto Tours’ success is the organisers’ genuine care for their participants, the conviction that an enjoyable holiday experience is utterly paramount, and the belief that each rider is an individual with differing needs and expectations and is treated as such. On each trip at least one of the guides is one of the two owners of the company, with thus a guaranteed interest in ensuring a happy experience and returning custom. But having said that, Australian born Vince Ulgiati and proud northern Italian Andrea Nicosia are the type of caring people who would do the best for anyone, anyway. By far the largest group who take part in a Punto Tour are returning customers, like myself, who having toured with them on three trips, would not look to book with any other company. Both gentlemen speak fluent Italian and English and know all of the best accommodation, eateries, and entertainment, as well as stunning cycling routes in the most spectacular parts of Italy. They have delightfully different personalities: Vince is thoughtful, with a true gentlemanly manner, while Andrea is exuberant, with a delightful sense of humour and fun but both are extremely well-organised, and are expert bike riders and careful leaders who quickly attune themselves to the skills and wishes of the participants. They also believe that a visit to Italy should not just be about the bike, but after the cycling—as often and as demanding or as relaxing as each person chooses—there should always be time for cultural experiences. So,

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although some of my best riding experiences have been with Punto, I’ve equally enjoyed the opportunity to visit cheese makers, chocolate factories, winemakers, truffle hunters, cookery demonstrations and classes, sailing expeditions, visits to festivals, caves and grottoes, palaces and gardens and to interact with genuine local personalities and absorb as much as possible of the culture of Italy as well as its scenic beauty. After booking a Punto Tour, everything in Italy is organised, accommodation, meals (except lunches), transport of luggage, extra non-riding activities, a Garmin GPS computer with routes preloaded, a back up van is always on hand and there is always at least one riding guide and you have the choice of either taking your own bike or hiring a top carbon fibre Willier bike, set up to correctly fit you, from Punto. As with Bicycle SA, I can compare touring with Punto (who also strictly limit numbers to a maximum of 12 and often less) to seeming like returning to a secure and welcoming family for new adventures. Contact: <www.puntotours.com>, info@ puntotours.com, Vince 0418 163 544 (Australia), Andrea +39 340 504 0368, Vince +39 347 108 8855 (Italy)

My favouriteride in South Australia Bicycle SA’s Tuesday Treadlers These Tuesday outings are always thoughtfully designed and interesting: offering satisfying challenges (sometimes not for the faint-hearted!) and with some of the best scenery on the planet and great coffee stops in the beautiful Adelaide Hills. There are always friendly, enthusiastic riders and the rides are invariably impeccably organised and communicated by one of the world’s nicest and most conscientious co-ordinators, Tony Fackrell, assisted by Bob and Graham.

My favourite place in australia to ride The Flinders Ranges With Bicycle SA, of course!

My Favourite Overseas Riding Destination The island of Sardegna With Punto Tours: naturally!

www.bikesa.asn.au


Love your ride Adelaide City Bike Art Trail Des Chabrel

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he Adelaide City Council and Arts SA launched their Adelaide City Bike Art Trail on Sunday 30 June. Public art works have been developed for eleven significant locations around the city, which either sit alongside or incorporate a public bike rack, forming a unique cycling art trail through the CBD. The trail will later be extended into North Adelaide. The organisers set up a registration hub beside Bike SA headquarters in Franklin Street where interested people gathered with their own bikes or with bikes hired free of charge from Bike SA. There were the usual support vendors offering food and hot beverages at the start and also a display of rideable bicycle sculptures provided by Tongues of Fire. The first group of cyclists set off about 10 am and tours continued throughout the day with the last one departing at 12:30 pm. Each tour had a leading guide at the front and an assistant who rode at the rear to help with keeping the group together and ensure safe passage through the traffic. There were six tours in total which attracted between eight and fourteen riders each. Cyclists were led from one exhibit to the next using cycle lanes where possible. Many of the Bike Art Trail artists were in attendance alongside their artworks to describe the concept and setting of their works to the tour groups. Each exhibit reflected its chosen location, ‘Onion Rings’ located near the Market, the ‘Coat Hangers’ near the clothing shop

in Rundle Street East and the ‘Branchrack’ near the Botanic Gardens. The Art Trail has been funded by the Government of South Australia through Arts SA. It is joint initiative of the Adelaide City Council and Arts SA, based on a similar trail in Hobart (see <www.hobartcity.com.au/Community/Arts_and_ Culture/Public_Art/Artbikes>). The selection process for the artworks followed an expression of interest sent out to

Cobwebs: Group riding for all Greg Staker

What is Cobwebs? obwebs is a group ride organised under the Rides Programme of Bicycle SA. It has been running for 12 years and generally attracts between 60 to 120 riders each Saturday. These numbers vary depending on the time of year and weather on the day. Overall, there are about 250 people in the group including a large female membership. We start next to the Buffalo tall ship on Colley Terrace, Glenelg at 8 am every Saturday. We ride to Outer Harbor (where there is a brief break) and return, a total distance of 53 km. Riding time varies between approximately 1 hour 25 minutes and two hours, depending on the subgroup. The group rides as eight separate speed-related sub-groups, these being 25s, 28s, 29s, 30s, 31s, 32s, 34s and Opens. This large number of sub-groups caters for the differing abilities, ambitions and ages of our riders. In summer some of these groups will further split to create more manageable sized groups. The above numbers are the approximate average speed in kilometres per hour that the group expects to ride at. Cruising speed will, however, be higher to achieve the group’s average. Individual riders are able to move between groups to find the one that best suits their requirements and abilities.

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Riding style The 25s generally ride two abreast with each other sub-group using a combination of rolling turns (rotation) and pace line. Riders that are new to Cobwebs generally start with either the 25s or 28s (unless they are vouched as competent group riders).This allows them to learn our hand signals, calls, the route, etc, as well as how to safely participate in a group ride. We have a Cobwebs Group Ride Guide on the Bicycle SA site which explains the conventions adopted by our group. Ride Leader structure Each sub-group has a Ride Leader and also an alternate Leader who can be called on. Each Ride Leader carries a first aid kit. RAA have kindly supplied us with Ride Leader jerseys. Safety is our most important focus. Group riding requires each person to ride to the pace of the group. The Ride Leader concept has been very successful in reducing surging and other negative rider behaviour that often reduces the effectiveness and pleasure of riding in a group. We have four overall leaders (Glenn, Russell, Alan and me) who share the role on a rolling threemonthly basis. At the beginning of each ride one of these people will advise the Group of any topical matters. Individuals can also advise the group of matters that they believe are of interest.

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South Australian artists to respond to an artist brief. A panel representing ACC, Arts SA, SA arts institutions and SA artists witnessed concept presentations and made the final selection of artworks based on agreed criteria. Congratulations to the organisation committee and the artists for providing South Australia with another interesting cycle trail. For details and a map, see <www.cityofadelaide.com.au/adelaidecity-bike-art-trail>.

The leader then sends off the groups by speed group, with the fastest starting first. This allows the groups to progressively arrive at our coffee stop at the Watermark Hotel, Glenelg. We moved to the Watermark about two monthsí ago and are very happy with the service and friendliness that we receive there. Whilst the coffee stop isn’t mandatory, it is a very pleasant and social way to finish off the ride. Summary and how to join Cobwebs provides riders with a group ride where they can ride with an organised group of riders with similar abilities. This is a most enjoyable experience and new riders of all ages or experience who like this concept are very welcome to join us. There are no fees but riders must join Bicycle SA before their fourth ride. People wishing to join the group should arrive at the Buffalo a bit before 8am and introduce themselves to one of the people wearing a Ride Leader’s jersey. This person will then introduce them to the relevant group leader for assistance in settling in. If you have any queries, our email address is cobwebsadelaide@yahoo.com.au There is also some information on our group, including our Cobwebs Group Ride Guide, on the Bicycle SA site.

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Noteworthy...

Inner suburbs are cycling hotspots Julian Ferguson

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delaide’s inner suburbs are hands-down our biggest commuter cycling hubs, with Goodwood-Millswood, Unley-Parkside, Norwood, St Peters-Marden sporting the highest number of cycling commuters per head of population. Data from the 2011 Census has been analysed by InDaily, and shows a clear concentration of workers who nominated cycling as their form of work transport in the inner (particularly southern) suburbs.

Bicycle SA CEO Christian Haag says this reflects the attitude towards cycling in these council areas: “Unley appears to be the largest ride source. Interestingly, the council has a strong culture of [cycling] encouragement but also I would see the 40 km/h zones throughout the council area as creating an environment conducive to more people getting on their bike; proof yet again that reduced speed limits works to mitigate those real and perceived barriers that roads are unsafe.”

Adelaide Cyclist Brett Howell Read the full article at Indaily: <indaily.com. au/news/2013/10/08/mapped-adelaide-cyclinghotspots>.

Pedal powered taste of Kangaroo Island Julian Ferguson

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The descent to Cape Willoughby

Easter Cycle in Kapunda Michael Bridge

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ur Easter Cycle is the ideal long weekend of relaxed fun for family and friends. From long day-trips chasing the horizon for committed roadies, to little loops for tackers on trainer-wheels — as well as our famous Night Ride — our Easter Cycle has plenty in the programme to keep the entire mob occupied all long-weekend. Out of the saddle, there’s walking, historic museums and galleries, regional treats and fine wine, plus plenty of country pubs to choose from. Back at base you can put your feet up and relax, without a care in the world. The hardest decision you have to make is which ride to join next! As one rider was heard to say towards the end of the weekend last year “Where has the weekend gone, no sooner than I have pitched my tent, it is time to pack up and go home.” Such is the unique nature of these Easter weekends. See <www.bikesa.asn.au/EasterCycle> for more details. Easter riders

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Mark Mallitt, 55, of NSW is also returning for

s Cycle! magazine goes to press over 200 cyclists will take in the sights and sounds of Kangaroo Island (KI) from October 19 – 26 as part of Bicycle SA’s Annual Tour. The 2013 event sold out six months in advance, the fastest of any Annual Tour so far, indicating strong interest in both cycle tourism events and KI as a destination. Ranging in age from 13 to an impressive 78 years, participants will travel from all over Australia, providing an excellent opportunity to showcase KI to interstate visitors. Marjorie White, 75, from Victoria has been on several annual tours and is looking forward to exploring KI for the first time. She cites the use of local organisations for catering and accommodation as a favourite feature of the tours.

another tour: “Each time I come to SA on tour I’m

We need more children cycling to school

Save the date: Boileau VeloAdelaide 2014

going to a region I haven’t been to before...there’s plenty of time to stop and look around” he says. In Australia, cycle touristm is valued as contributing $2.4 billion every year to the national economy. On each trip, cycle tourists spend an average of $244 each per day but make an overall contribution of AU$447 a day. “Cycle tourism is a driver of economic development for regional communities, and events like our Annual Tour continue to brand the state as a cycle tourism destination” says Christian Haag, CEO of Bicycle SA. More news will follow when he hear about some of the great stories from riders!

Julian Ferguson

Michael Bridge

recent survey conducted by Bicycle SA shows that most parents won’t let their children ride to school because they are too fearful of the safety risks. More than 85 per cent of parents also said they wanted their children to receive formal cycle training at school, our survey of almost 500 respondents found. “Cycling to school gets children into a routine of daily physical activity,’’ Bike SA chief executive Christian Haag told The Advertiser. “There is no doubt education is a major driver for cycling participation and lessons in road safety will help increase the number of children who ride to school.” Bike SA is working hard to get more kids cycling to school! If you’re a member, you’re helping support our cause!

ruise down the Freeway with thousands of other for Boileau VeloAdelaide on Sunday 23 March. Boileau VeloAdelaide is back, with its unique ride up the SE Freeway and 35km of fully closed roads through the Adelaide Hills. From Crafers to Mt Lofty, Summertown, Ashton and Montacute the roads will be closed for cyclists, so you can enjoy a car-free ride through beautiful country including a sweeping ride down from the Mt Lofty Ranges. Next year will feature a revised loop extension to the Mt Lofty Challenge so hard core roadies can stretch their legs towards the magic 100 km. There will be short options and escape routes, so hillhating cyclists can still enjoy the thrill of the closed roads but avoid the harder bits. And the Family Fun Ride offers something for parents and children. Check the Bike SA website for more details.

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Love your ride Cringe-worthy commute Ryan Beggs Here at Bike SA, Ryan Beggs is our new hero for two reasons: he does a mammoth 100 km round trip cycling commute and he is willing to publicly humiliate himself to give us a laugh, and some inspiration. He has been brave enough to share this horrifying commuting incident with us: thanks Ryan! If anyone can better it, we’d love to hear the story... – Jessica Olle ver had one of those private cringe-worthy undignified moments you’re still trying to forget? I have one of those, except I was dressed in Lycra in the middle of stationary peak hour. My once weekly bike commute begins at 5am from down south. I travel along the Veloway, going through the city, then onwards through Collinswood, Clearview and ending up at work at Parafield Airport. It’s a long drive and a long ride: about 100 km there and back. I never thought I would be riding to work: 50 km one way just seemed too far. However with modern technologies in bikes now days making them cheaper, lighter, with very little rolling resistance and some fantastic cycling infrastructure the ride is very easy to achieve. My commute by bike only takes me 20 minutes longer on a Thursday night than it does by car! When I first started commuting three years ago it was on a mountain bike with skinny tyres. I was not willing to commit financially to my new hobby. Just in case the love was lost. It was not lost. I soon found myself upgrading everything. Including my clothing or if youíre a cyclist your ‘kit’. I went from T shirts to jerseys, supermarket helmet to a bike store helmet, sneakers to cleats, and finally board shorts to Lycra shorts. To wear Lycra you have to have a sense of humour. It is one of the most undignified sporting apparels: especially on me.

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So I was riding home from work in my new Lycra shorts trying to stay incognito in the traffic. It was peak hour on Goodwood Road. I was sat on my bike out the front of the pub at the lights waiting patiently for the lights to turn green. There were a few punters out the front who sounded like they were going to need a lift home; I think driving would’ve been beyond them at that time. The lights turn green and it catches me by surprise, I stumble on the pedals and slip, getting my new Lycra shorts caught on my seat. I get frustrated and stamp on my pedals, standing up on the bike to take off quickly. The punters give off a deafening roar, they whistle, they clap. Horns start honking and drivers start to join in on the fun. I think why? My stumble was barely noticeable! I feel a breeze. I look down. My Lycra pant waist elastic is caught under the front of my seat. I am

doing a mid peak hour accidental front and rear nudie ride down one of the busiest arterials in Adelaide. I squirm to un-hook my pants. I hear threads snapping. This is not a good place to be. I take a breath, wait for a clear metre to take my eyes off of the road, look down and with one hand (whilst semi-standing/squatting on the bike) unhook my Lycra shorts. Now, the thing about peak hour is that you generally stay with the flow of traffic, leap frogging each other as you go. I was still getting wolf whistles as I was climbing up the northern end of the veloway 20+ km later. I don’t commute along Goodwood any more. I still wear the Lycra though.

Commute by bike and save millions Michael Bridge

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ver had someone tell you that cyclists don’t pay their way? Well here’s a counter argument. The economy benefits by more than $21 every time a person cycles 20 minutes to work and back, according to then Deputy Prime Minister Anthony Albanese. Recently the federal government announced it wants to increase the number of people who make short trips by bicycle in response to a report predicting big challenges to transport infrastructure. Construction of bike paths is relatively cheap — only about $1.5 million a kilometre — compared with road costs. The government has agreed that, where practical, all future urban road projects must include a safe, separated cycle way. “For shorter trips we need to get more people

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choosing alternatives to the car,” Mr Albanese said in a speech. “People will walk or cycle if it’s safe and convenient to do so.” The economic benefits of riding and walking to work include better health, less congestion, reduced infrastructure costs, reduced greenhouse gas emissions, better air quality, noise reduction and savings in parking costs. Find out how to start commuting by bike at <www.bikesa.asn.au/Commuting> and getting started at <www.bikesa.asn.au/BikeStart>.

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Jessica Olle commutes

November 2013 – January 2014

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Tailwind

Let’s begin with a quote: Obesity is a complex social problem requiring a multidisciplinary approach. In a new scientific article we combine data from biomedical studies of the subjects’ bodies with ethnological data on their experiences during the 13-week trial period. This enables us to explain the background for the surprising fact that 30 minutes of daily exercise is just as beneficial as a full hour of hard fitness training. The ‘lightweight’ group of exercisers appear to get more energy and be more motivated in relation to pursuing a healthy lifestyle,” says Professor Bente Stallknecht from the Department of Biomedical Sciences at the Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen. That comes from a report entitled ‘Moderate exercising encourages a healthier lifestyle’ of a recent study at <machineslikeus.com/news/moderateexercising-encourages-healthier-lifestyle>. Did you need encouragement? Here’s another quote: We’ve got to stop seeing paint on the road as adequate for cyclists. That comes from a page on The Conversation, at <theconversation.com/ ride-to-work-youll-need-a-bike-barrier-for-that-19111>. The final paragraphs: With the rest of Europe, the UK, and now even the US moving to broad-appeal bike transport policies, we must ask why Australians still mistake paint on the road for bike infrastructure. That could be changing. A few local governments are already defying state level policies by building protected cycle tracks, like the Burke Street cycle track in Sydney. Transport economists serving the former Labor commonwealth government issued a report last July recommending protected bike infrastructure be included with every new urban road, because A$14.30 indirectly flows back to our economy each time one of us chooses a bike for a 20 minute commute. The automatic association Australians make between cycling and sport indirectly hinders the development of bike transport infrastructure. As a competitive cyclist myself for more than 20 years, I would be the last to blame Cadel Evans, or even our MAMIL prime minister, for how things have played out. I would blame any daring competitive cyclist though who presumed to speak on behalf of all cyclists, from their experience, without recognising that most other Australians can ride a bike too, but are rightfully scared to. The Dutch, and other Europeans got it right.

Neat, but someone’s entomology is awry: that’s not a grasshopper but a mantis

Yet another electric scooter. This one’s the Stigo, about which you can read at <stigobike.com>. It’s described as: ... the world’s fastest-folding electric scooter that can be taken along wherever one wishes to go – a restaurant, apartment, on public transportation or a small elevator. This novel, max 25 km/h electric scooter weighs only 17 kg and its footprint is mere 45×40 cm when folded. Not impressed by the lack of personal protective equipment

Most cyclists would have a dog story, but here’s someone with a cat story... Watch the video at <www.sbs.com.au/cyclingcentral/video/49988163823/stray-cat-

The Guardian newspaper’s website has a ‘Europe: show us your bicycle’ page, at <https://witness.theguardian.com/assignment/5237e f4be4b0bdcddbf1fcf2>. It seems that more bicycles were sold than cars in Spain last year — just one sign of Europe’s wider economic malaise. Wherever you live in Europe, if you’ve bought a new bicycle in the last year — or you’ve given up your car in favour of cycling or walking — we’d like to hear... How far could you ride your bike backwards? Queenslander Andrew Hellinga recently broke the Guinness world record for the longest distance travelled while cycling backwards., raising funds for Challenge for Change in the process. There’s a report at <www.sbs.com.au/ cyclingcentral/news/51661/queensland-rider-sets-new-world-recordfor-cycling-backwards> Just don’t try it in traffic.

makes-a-move-on-the-uci-time-trial-course>

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www.bikesa.asn.au


Love your ride Support the stores that support us Aldgate Bike Shop Avanti Plus Salisbury Bernie Jones Cycles Bicycle Express Bicycles Mount Barker Bike About Bike Lane Bike Society The Bike Station Bio-Mechanics Brooks Cycle Depot Challinger’s Cycles The Classic Bicycle Shop Clark’s Cycles Complete Cycle Corsa Cycles Cumberland Cycles Cycle On Cycleworx Cycle Worx Avanti Plus Euride Flinders Active Lifestyle Flinders Cycles G&D Cycles Gawler Cycles

120 Mt Barker Rd Stirling 8339 5954 3/1760 Main North Rd Salisbury Plain 8258 8885 239 Diagonal Rd Warradale 8296 9652 124 Halifax St Adelaide 8232 7277 12a Walker Street 8391 4777 2/80 Onkaparinga Valley Road Woodside 8389 7681 Shop 69 The Golden Way Golden Grove 8288 7766 100 Anzac Highway Everard Park 8297 9952 391 Brighton Road Hove 8358  500 394 Main North Road Blair Athol 8262 5449 352 Brighton Road Hove 8296 6011 260 Waymouth Street, Adelaide 8410 9499 63 Bridge Street Murray Bridge 8532 2868 8 Tyler Street Port Lincoln 8682 3468 254 Pulteney Street Adelaide 8232 3330 354 Magill Rd Kensington Park 8332 3083 45 Cliff St Port Noarlunga 8327 0200 182 Gouger Street Adelaide 8221 5068 468 Goodwood Rd Cumberland Park 8271 6550 2/19 Albyn Terrace Strathalbyn 8536 3211 106 Semaphore Rd Semaphore 8449 8199 820 Port Rd Woodville 5011 8268 6404 122 Unley Rd, Unley 8271 8001 135 Semaphore Road Semaphore 8449 8199 102 King William Rd Hyde Park 8272 0422 1a Pattinson Road Newton 8336 9958 197 Rundle Street Adelaide 8223 3315 Lindes Lane, Rear 93 Rundle Mall Adelaide 8223 1913 1 Hospital Rd Port Augusta 8641 0269 52 Commercial St East Mt Gambier 8725 6002 63 Murray Street Gawler 8522 2343 17/485 Main North Road Evanston 8522 2343

Giant Adelaide Glenelg Cycles International Cycles JT Cycles Lifecycles Mike Turtur Cycles Mitcham Cycles Moonta Cycle & Sports Norwood Parade Cycles Over the Edge Oxygen Cycles Plympton Cycles Ray’s Outdoors Road Rage Cycles South Coast Cycles Standish Cycles Star Cycles Super Elliotts Tailwind Cycles The Classic Bicycle Shop Trak Cycles Treadly Upfront Bikes Victor Harbor Cycle & Skate

Tailwind ...continued The revised Britannia roundabouts are now open to traffic, but how well do they cater for cyclists? At his page on Adelaide Cyclists, Mark Parnell asks the Minister: What consultation was undertaken with representatives of cycling and pedestrian organisations before announcing this project?

How does the Government hope to achieve its Strategic Plan target to double the number of people cycling by 2020 if it doesn’t take the opportunity to incorporate cycling facilities when major road junctions are upgraded? Read the whole thing, with comments, at <www. adelaidecyclists.com/forum/topics/cyclingthrough-brittania-roundabout-s>.

2 –3 53/67 Hindmarsh Square Adelaide 8223 5978 754 Anzac Highway Glenelg 8294 4741 70 Payneham Rd Stepney 8362 2609 266 Pulteney St Adelaide 8359 2755 650 North East Rd Holden Hill 8369 0550 45 Kensington Rd Norwood 8331 3255 55 Main North Rd Medindie 8342 1882 21 – 23 Belair Road Kingswood 8271 0692 49 George Street Moonta 8825 3222 216 The Parade Norwood 8332 1889 6 Stuart Street Melrose 8666 2222 143 Main Road McLaren Vale 8323 7345 428b Marion Rd Plympton 8297 0312 399 – 403 Main North Rd Enfield 8359 5866 721 Tapleys Hill Rd Adelaide Airport 8355 4333 1 Phillip Hwy Elizabeth 8252 0166 199 Payneham Road St Peters 8363 1003 125 Beach Rd Christies Beach 8326 1664 290 Unley Road Unley 8271 9733 ?? Shop 12 Tea Tree Plaza, 976 Main North Rd Modbury 8264 6001 348 North East Rd Klemzig 8261 1696 26 Park Tce Salisbury 8285 1144 Marion Shopping Centre Marion 8377 1752 170 Main South Rd Morphett Vale 8384 4704 Shop 24 West Lakes Mall 8356 5492 195 Henley Beach Rd Mile End 8443 5435 5 Barfield Crescent Elizabeth West 8255 1979 200 Rundle St Adelaide 8223 3946 40 – 44 Blackburn St Reynella 8322 6714 254 Pulteney Street Adelaide SA 8232 3330 138 The Parade Norwood 8431 5711 5/4–10 Ebenezer Place Adelaide 8232 0158 7/47–67 Main South Road O’Halloran Hill 8381 9069 73 Victoria St Victor Harbor 8552 1417 For something really different, take a look at Jimmy’s Tall Bike Adventures at <jimmystallbike. blogspot.com.au>. Tall stories, bikes, art and life, and based right here in Adelaide.

New Members Tricia Arbon John Athanasiou Jason Atkinson Neville Bebee Alex Beltrame Peter Bennett Susanne Bertram Simon Best Giacomo Betti Ine Beyen David Bills James Binder Roderick Binsted Dylan Bos Richard Bowey Craig Branson Merv Brash Amanda Bridge Peter Brimson Therese Brock Stephen Brooks

Jillian Brooks Dale Broomfield Lindy Burton Simon Calland Mario Calleja Thomas Carlier Peter Clark Michael Colagrossi Jordan Collette Daniel Collingwood Mary Connelly Brandon Cooper Victoria Costessi Ingrid Cother Stephen Cowling Judith Crane Natasha Darke Gabriella De Mey Mark DeConno Claudio Diluzio Philippa Dominish

Life’s better on a bike >>>

Andrew Downing George Dutton Kristy Edwards Greg Eldridge Craig Ford Andrew Geue Richard Gray Jill Hadden Robert Hall Jacinta Hannon Tony Harding Lawrence Harrison Alecia Hines Steve Holdsworth Dennis Hooijmaijers Paul Hubbard Graham Hutchinson Daniel Ivett David Jackson Craig Johansen Kate Johnson

Contents

Tracy Johnson Daryl Kendall Rob Killin Wayne King Keith Knott Mark Kroehn Jessica Lacorte Stephen Lane William Leonard Honorah Lowe Paul Main Philip Marshall Andrew Martin Allison McKay Todd McKenzie Judith Meacham Gillian Miller Nick Miller Gianni Monti Kathryn Neil Jen O’Loughlin

Stephen Oster Carrie Parton John Penna Steve Pepper Paul Pezanis-Christou Shaun Pick Andrew Potts Malcolm Racz Jonathon Read Terry Richardson Christine Richardson Bryce Routley Caroline Rule Mark Schwarz Paul Schwarz Sara Slayman Leong Sook Yan Jane Soutar Matt Starczak Kate Stephenson Mal Stewart

Deborah Susman Garry Thomas Roger Thompson Suzie Tucker Phillip Vagnoni David Visockis Marlize Viviers Jai Wain Matthew Walden Adam Webster Lachlan Whetton Jackie White Robert Wilde Rick Williams Barry Wilson Anthony Winter Wayne Wolfaardt Andrea Woolger Rene Zimmermann Jim Zissis

Welcome all

November 2013 – January 2014

>>>> 15


RIDE TO BEAT  BREAST CANCER Ride to beat breast cancer at the 2013 Gear Up  Girl SA bike ride on   Sunday November 24 At Cancer Council SA, we believe that the 13,500 women diagnosed with  breast cancer in Australia this year should all survive. We ask you to bring  your family and friends together; ‘Gear Up’, ride your bike and raise funds  to help us beat breast cancer. Ride commences at 9:30 am in Adelaide  and you can choose to ride a River Ride,  Beach Ride or Hill Ride. Come and join us! 

Register to fundraise at  

cancersa.org.au/gear-up-girl For more information about the ride contact   Bike SA, ph 08 8168 9999  email office@bikesa.asn.au   

Cycle Magazine  

Welcome to the last edition of Cycle Magazine for 2013.

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