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WA S S A T Fashion between east and west

Spring/Summer ‘14


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Fashion between east and west

editorial Tradional is what all fashion designers are about these days. They are rarely spotted on the front row of a fashion show and favor discretion when placing orders, yet women from the Middle East have become the world‘s biggest buyers of high fashion. The trend may surprise given that many Arab women, particularly in the Gulf region, are traditionally kept under wraps. But their social calendar, which usually consists of 15-20 weddings a year and private parties every month, creates much bigger demand for couture than the occasional charity ball and high society party in Europe and in North America. And wearing the same dress twice is not an option. Traditional buyers of exclusive designer clothes tend to include members of rich industrial or royal families and expatriates. The biggest buyers of haute couture today center around the Gulf -- Saudis, Kuwaitis, Qataris and nationals of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) who do not hesitate to spend 50,000 euros on a low-cleavage lame for an event where no men will be present. „All the royal families of the Middle East are our customers,“ Catherine Riviere, head of haute couture at Christian Dior, told Reuters at the brand‘s show at Paris Fashion Week which ends on Wednesday. Middle Eastern customers have also recently shown growing support for Lebanese designers such as Elie Saab and Zuhair Murad. Fashion executives say the Middle East is likely to remain the top couture client for the foreseeable future if the economic environment deteriorates in Europe and North America. The luxury goods industry has not yet been hit by the global slowdown but many analysts fear it will not come out of the downturn unscathed, particularly if China‘s growth starts to slow down. „Women from the Middle East are our top buyers and they are likely to remain so,“ said Jeffry Aronsson, who became chief executive of Emanuel Ungaro three months ago, having run Donna Karan, Oscar de la Renta and Marc Jacobs in the past.

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Content

CONTENT

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Editorial

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Boutiques

Mira Hayek

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Bashar Srour

Lara Dahan

Louis-Philippe De Gagoue

Azza Fahmy

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Cross-Cultural Fashion

TRENDS

Rolling in the Deep

Ray of Light

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Desert Dreams

Debouis

Temperly London

Nour Hammour

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amuse

boutique 1

Amuse, Cairo’s premier fashion and lifestyle concept store offers the best edited collection of contemporary wear, fashion accessories, home accessories, giftware and art. With a unique and wide setting, you can easily shop comfortably and from a nice selection of statement pieces. Whether it‘s the latest clothing „it“ piece, jewelry and bags, funky home accessories, fun inventions and even fashion games, you‘ll certainly find it at Amuse.

Boutique 1 is the ultimate fashion and lifestyle destination in the Middle East, housing some of the world’s most coveted designers from around the globe. The Boutique 1 brand is renowned for personalized service, exclusivity & luxury, as well as for its pioneering spirit. Since its naissance five years ago, Boutique 1 now has two flagship stores. The Dubai store is situated on The Walk at Jumeirah Beach Residence and the Beirut store is located in Beirut’s Central District on Park Avenue. The stores attract the most discerning shopper with their unique and edited collections from world renowned designers, many of which are exclusive to Boutique 1.

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—The Walk, Jumeirah Beach Residence — Fashion Dome, Mall of the Emirates — Mirdif City Centre Ismail Mohammed Cairo, Egypt

Beirut 2 Park Avenue, Beirut Central District boutique1.com

amusecairo.tumblr.com

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west l.a.

cream

Tucked away in Sunset Mall sits West L.A, a new boutique that embodies the luxe-bohemian style of Los Angeles. West L.A brings effortlessly cool clothes straight to Dubai from the heart of L.A and Australia, where its just as sunny. In this fresh new concept store, you will find labels such as House of Harlow and Winter Kate, the lines created by California native Nicole Richie, along with Belle Noel, a celebrity jewellery collaboration between Pascal Mouawad and Kim Kardashian.

Cream is a fashion boutique based in Jeddah and Beirut, that brings together the crème de la crème of young and trendy designers from around the world! The owners of cream, Dana Malhas, Dania Ghandour, and Dana Abu Jamra handpick their collection every season choosing the funkiest & most exclusive pieces. Cream exhibits selective designers Paris, London, Milan, New York, Brazil, Belgium, Lebanon, Kuwait, Iraq, and recently from Saudi. To put it simply, Cream is a high-end fashion boutique that is very selective and never redundant. Its taste is continuously in touch with what is moving on the catwalks rather than the mainstream. Cream symbolizes diversity, modernity, and most importantly, femininity!

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Saudi Arabia Jeddah, Stars Avenue, 2nd Floor

The Sunset Mall in Jumeirah 3, Dubai westlaboutique.com

Lebanon Beirut, Lot 741, Saifi Village

Boutiques

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Young Talent

Mira Hayek

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Who’s Mira Hayek? Mira Hayek is a Lebanese fashion designer based in Beirut (with a slight addiction to popcorn!) Tell us more about your brand, your design background and what made you become a Fashion Designer. I graduated from LAU with a degree in Graphic Design, thereafter; I completed my studiess in Fashion Design at Istituto Marangoni in Milan, Italy. Upon completion of my Fashion Design degree, I decided to take my studies in Fashion further and graduated from Istituto Europeo di Design in Milan, Italy with a Masters Degree in Research Study in Fashion and Textile Design. My work experience commenced with an internship at Elie Saab in Beirut, Lebanon and with Erdem in London, UK. I decided to study Fashion Design after discovering a newfound love for fashion illustration during my studies in Graphic Design. The brand is dedicated to the urban lifestyle – a brand that is centered on contemporary sportswear looks for a creative crowd. Sporty, Fresh, Optimistic. What Fashion Design School have you attended and where?And do you think that we are lacking ‘good’ Fashion Design Schools in the Middle East? Istituto Marangoni and Istituto Europeo di Design, both in Milan. ESMOD is an excellent school for Fashion and Design in the Middle East; however, it would be great to see other renowned fashion schools opening in the Middle East to cater to the great talents that we have in this region. What kind of materials do you prefer to use in your designs? I don’t have any specific preferences as long as the final product makes you feel comfortable to a point where you would want to wear it day and night or even sleep in it. I also like to mix a match different materials, textures and colors in one garment to create graphic color blocs and patterns . How do you intend women to feel when wearing ‘Mira Hayek’ labeled clothing? “A l’aise”, Confident, Playful, Happy to stand out in a crowd. It‘s important for me that women wearing my designs feel like it reflects them back.

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How do you see Fashion in Lebanon and the Middle East? Do you think fashion is getting the attention needed in Lebanon and the Middle East? I think fashion is an important industry in Lebanon and the Middle East. Arab women have a strong sense of style; they definitely know their fashion and are constantly on the lookout for the latest trends. Fashion in the region is starting to be more and more recognized throughout the world but definitely has the potential for bigger exposure, especially in ready to wear. Can you tell us about your future projects? Keep evolving in what I’m doing and hopefully expand my brand. One thing I would love to do is to collaborate with different inspiring artists and designers. What advice would you give for aspiring designers looking to get into Fashion design? Go for it. Where can we purchase your designs? Mirahayek showroom - www.mysouk.com Any quote that you could leave us with? “In every job that must be done, there is an element of fun”. - Mary Poppins Where do you draw your inspiration? Every day life: more specifically lifestyle, film and animation, electronic music and graphic design.My Inspirations for my past collections include: The work of Brazilian graffiti artists Os Gemeos, “The Darjeeling Limited” by Wes Anderson (movie),Vintage cheerleader outfits, Cloudy days that make you want to stay home and cuddle, When you create something, what goes through your mind? I always start off my design process with a strong theme or a story. Two key qualities that I look for when designing a garment: comfort and originality. I also ask myself if I would wear it. If yes, then let’s do it. If not, let’s tweak it! How does your job as a designer influence your life? Do you feel that you see things around you differently for example? I sleep with my eyes open, always on the lookout for visual stimulation and tend to spot interesting hidden details. People watching is very important to me. I think it‘s the main sorce of inspiration for me. Mira Hayek

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Left Shirt: Avia Yellow 80 Euros

Mira Hayek

Skirt: Monia - Blue Skin 120 Euros Right Shirt: FAMIA TANK-TOP KNIT

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100 EUROS


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Mira Hayek

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Mira Hayek

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Left

Right Shirt: CAIT 110 EUROS

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Mira Hayek

Dress: mais 180 Euros


Mira Hayek

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Left Shirt: Kanian 80 Euros

Right Dress: CAITUN 210 EUROS

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Mira Hayek

Skirt: BUTHAIN 123 EUROS


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Bachar Srour Bachar Srour is a fashion photographer based in Beirut, Lebanon. For this shoot he teamed up with stylist Nicole El Msann, blending analog and digital techniques to hazy effect.

How did you get into fashion photography? While I was in my second year at college, I had an online portfolio packed with conceptual photos. It caught the attention of a Jordanian fashion magazine; that was my first editorial commission. Where did you draw your inspiration from for this shoot? What really inspired me were photos of Yemen. Though it was shot in a modern Beirut, we tried to deliver an implicit mood of Arabism. Your favorite thing about shooting in Lebanon? The sun, the people and Beirut itself. Describe your dream shoot. Minimalist. I‘d want it to be blunt with absolutely no message.

Bashar Srour

Any Lebanese designers to look out for this autumn/winter? Sara Melki and Sandra Mansour, for sure.

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Turban: vintage cloth Skirt: H&M 12 EUROS Earings: CAITUN 49 EUROS Bashar Srour

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Go for gold: heavyweight jewellery to inspire dreamy dressing

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Bashar Srour

Top: Jacket: ZARA 80 EUROS Necklace: Azza Fahmy 300 Euros Left: Turban: vintage cloth Skirt: H&M 12 EUROS Earings: CAITUN 49 EUROS Jacket: ZARA 80 EUROS

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Bashar Srour

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Shirt: COS Jacket: VINTAGE Pants: ALL SAINTS Headwear: Marakesh flee market

Lara Dahan

l A R A What is your life goal? My life goal in the future is to start out as being a stylist and fashion journalist in a magazine then moving on to being a celebrity stylist. Can you describe your style in 3 words? Girly Fun, at times edgy. What does fashion mean to you? How big is its role in your everyday life?Ever since I was young I felt that fashion is what made me different from a lot of other people, while my friends and classmates where excelling in school work and sports. I found myself always day dreaming about what would look good together. It was a huge escape. It’s a big role in my everyday life, because I always want to learn more about it.

High heels or flats? BOTH. Your favorite brands? Topshop,Zara, COS. Who is your style icon? Brigitte Bardot, Jane Birkin. What accessory you like most? Chunky necklaces always catch my attention, and they can be worn with everything- casual, fancy ect. Your top 3 designer bags. Chanel Purse, Prada, Bottega. How often do you go shopping? Probably every other month, but I check up on my favorite stores every two weeks just to see if I might spot something. Do you have a favorite piece of clothing that you wear all the time? What is it? My favorite piece of clothing that I own is probably my 22

black leather jacket, it looks good with everything and adds an edge to most girly dresses I might wear. The must have items every? A black sturdy purse, that’s classy and reliable for heavy lifting. What is your signature perfume? My signature perfume Scarlett by Cacharel. What inspires you the most? Art, music, history, every-day-life? What inspire me are normally artists like Frida Kahlo, artists that show their pain and happiness by painting, it’s not something that many people can achieve. I also feel that music plays a huge role in my inspiration, especially when the lyrics speak or sometimes scream out to me.


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Shirt: FANTUNA Jacket: MASIMO DUTTI Pants: MARAA Headwear: Turban

D a h a n ry time I had a big dinner or a party I would make something, when I started getting asked about them, I started taking requests. Middle eastern symbols and traditional wear have been used by many western fashion desigerns over the years. How do you feel about the west using them? Do you own any items with middle eastern influence? If yes, which? I think that the Middle Eastern symbols and traditions that we have been seeing on the runway is very impressive, I love how something so personal to us like the evil eye can be something just that’s just a graphic print to someone else but still mean something. I also feel that where you come from and the 23

traditions that you grow up have a huge affect on what you like and dislike while designing a collection. I do own a turban actually, many which always makes me feel stylish without having to try hard. Where do you see yourself in the future? Hopefully I will be styling many important people and maybe starting my own line.

Lara Dahan

Which fashionistas do you admire the most? Mira Duma, Alexa Chung, Olivia Palmero. Who are your favourite designers? Dolce and Gabanna, Miuccia Prada, Olivier Rousteing. Who are your favorite Arab designers? And why? My favorite Arab designer would have to be Elie Saab because of ethereal designs and dresses that he makes which I believe can any woman feel like a princess. You design hair accessories. (if i remember correctly)What got you into that? Every time I see a girl with a unique hair accessory in her hair or maybe something as simple as flowers, I admire her. At first it was something I did for myself, eve-


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Louis-Philippe De Gagoue Our newest interviewee has everything a fashion addict could ask for. He prooves that a unique style combined with a happy smile and being unafraid of trying new things are the key to success and an expressive look. Louis Philippe De Gagoue took some time to answer questions for Project Quality, so be ready to dive into the world of this extra-ordinary young man and find out more about him and his journey in the fashion industry.

De Gagoue

Text : Fatima hilwani photo : Khalil Zaatatr

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Jacket: VINTAGE Headwear: Marakesh flee market

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What/who inspires your outfits and try to describe When I put pieces together to make an outfit I‘m also mixing cultures, your style with not more than 3 words. civilizations and travels through history. Other inspirations include music (I am also a huge fan of the pop art movement), nature, my environment, people who I meet, my friends, family.........3 words: bold, eccentric, unique How and when did you discover your interest in I first discovered my intrest for fashion when I was in high school, I had a brief fashion and how did you end up blogging and career as a model. And that’s how I got a first glimpse of ‚the fashion world‘. posting looks on lookbook.nu? Two years ago I opened my first blog but it took me a lot of time to work on it so I let it down. Then one day I decided to open a new one and put my energy in it, shared my looks and my personal vision of fashion. And then a blogger friend of mine suggested to me to share my looks on lookbook.nu to get more attention. What is it that fascinates you Thank you. What facsinates me about vintage clothes is that they have a story, about vintage clothes? and that they make me travel back in time. How does your style affect your carrer regarding I think it doesn‘t because I‘m still a student. that people like lawyers usually wear business clothes to express some sort of professionalism? How did you get into the fashion industry and Initially it began in a small circle with close friends. I shop a lot for myself so what is that job like? every time I went out unconsciously I found something for one of them and so that trend went on for a while. Eventually they started to ask me to come with them when they went shopping. One day, I can’t recall exactly when, I realised I could make money off doing this. Considering that it’s something that I love doing for free anyways I though ‚why not‘. And what I like about my job is finding a new style for people. Is there any piece or accessory you really want to What I would love to have right now is buffalo platform sneakers. have right now? If the world was going to end tomorrow what I would wear a white suit with a train and big white wings, buffalo platform would you wear? sneakers and a golden crown. I have choosen the white colour because it represents purity for me. Please tell us about your craziest experience that The craziest experience that I had with fashion was styling and shooting had to do with fashion. twelve outfits in two hours for a lookbook.

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Any personal style advice that you want to give The advice that I would share with the world is to be yourself, never be afraid to the world? of people‘s look, dare and play - fashion is a play ground.

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Blouse: Kenzo Headwear: Marakesh flee market

Shoes: FIZZA Pants: African cloth

Shirt: COS Jacket: VINTAGE Pants: ALL SAINTS Headwear: Marakesh flee market De Gagoue

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De Gagoue

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Shirt: FANTUNA Jacket: MASIMO DUTTI Pants: MARAA Headwear: ADIDAS CLASSICS CAP

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He is a blogger a personal shopper, a model a law student and of course a stylist yet this guy is so different from what you find on various fashion platforms all over the internet. De Gagoue

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Shirt: H&M Jacket: VERSACE VINTAGE Headwear: VINTAGE

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Shirt: FANTUNA Jacket: MASIMO DUTTI Pants: MARAA Headwear: ADIDAS CLASSICS CAP

Be yourself, never be afraid of people‘s look, dare and play...

„ De Gagoue

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Azza Fahmy

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Necklace: IZMIYALIA 3499 EUROS

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the fist lady of cultural jewellery

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Azza fahmy “My long journey with jewellery-making all started with a book…”

Azza Fahmy

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The evolution of Azza Fahmy Jewellery

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Earings: FATUA 600 EUROS

Azza Fahmy started her journey in the passageways of old Cairo’s Khan El Khalili learning the craft. Today, forty years later, she is internationally recognized as the leading jewellery designer of the Arab world and Egypt’s first designer label.

Azza Fahmy

As the product and brand grew stronger locally, the potential of international markets became very apparent and opportunities for expansion started presenting themselves. Retail expansions started unfolding materializing in several local outlets, as well as standalone and distribution outlets in London, Jordan, Qatar, Bahrain and Dubai. With such rapid expansions, Azza Fahmy realized that internal change was vital to accommodate the growth in the business. Over the past six years the business has gone from being a company run by an entrepreneur to an established and strategically structured organization comprising of marketing, sales, design, planning and quality control departments, supported by strong financial and human resource teams to enable the company to sustain its product quality whilst meeting the newly demanded volumes, and to be able to grow steadily in competitive markets.

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Ms. Fahmy is currently the Chairwoman of the organization and the Chief Designer. Having once run the business single handedly on every level, she has now handed over all operations to senior management and directs most of her attention to design, she leads a team of designers and model makers, daily training and developing her team to add to the design house, the heart and soul of the company and, its core competency. Ms. Fatma Ghaly, Ms. Fahmy‘s daughter, has now taken the helm as managing Director. With a new marketing strategy and company vision, together with a structured organization, she now has all the elements needed to drive through the transformation from a small private business into a globally competitive establishment. Today, the Studio & Workshop is located in 6th of October Industrial City; and employs over 170 people varying between skilled labor, designers, engineers and marketers. Expansions are happening fast, and the company looks forward to an even more extensive presence in the Middle East and Europe, with the US soon to follow.


The evolution of Azza Fahmy Jewellery

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To immortalize heritage, some write books, others take pictures, on the other hand, at Azza Fahmy they design jewellery. It all started when Azza Fahmy came across an art book about classical jewellery of the Middle Ages in Europe. The book was in German and cost 17.5 EGP - a fortune at the time- but neither language nor price barriers stopped her from buying it. Fascinated with the designs of the jewellery, this book was the light that ignited her inspiration. With a B.A. in Interior Design, Azza Fahmy had planned to join the Faculty of Fine Arts to get a second degree in the Applied Arts Department, she soon discarded this plan in favour for an on the job training in the field of jewellery design. She decided to become an apprentice in Khan El Khalili and learn at the hands of one of the most skilled masters in this craft. „So I tied my hair back, put on my overalls and spent my days in a workshop full of men learning the tricks of the jewellery making trade.“ It was culturally and socially unacceptable for a fine arts graduate who held a respectable job in the government to work as an apprentice in a workshop. Though she was deemed crazy by colleagues and friends, her goal was crystal clear for she had found her niche in life. ”My apprenticeship period in Khan El Khalili stretched for two years I recall with nostalgia and affection” Azza Fahmy reminisces. The first time Fahmy actually handled the tools of the craft, she made a few small rings that were sold at her first exhibition attended by friends, journalists and intellectuals. However, in the mid seventies when the British Council decided to send her on a fellowship to study jewellery craft in the City of London Polytechnic School Azza saw her real chance of turning her dream into a reality. There, she learned the theoretical aspect of what she had practically learned of the craft. It was an enormous leap forward, and she felt deeply grateful for the opportunity to learn how to best execute most of her designs. Fahmy came back to Cairo with a wider horizon and greater confidence as a jewellery maker. By the early eighties, she had set up her own workshop and employed a team of only two workers. Always searching for new sources of inspiration and innovation

Fahmy did not stop there. She conducted countless hours of research and readings with the desire to translate one of her other passions, poetry, into jewellery collections of her own. As a result, her rendition of colloquial poems became an instant success. Fahmy read the poetry and engraved the verses on necklaces, bracelets, earrings, rings and key chains. This brought broad and immediate appeal as many people not only chose beautiful, unique jewellery but the approach seem to satisfy a much needed cultural requirement as they feasted their souls with meaningful verses. From that point on, jewellery with inscribed and engraved verses became Fahmy‘s signature. Fahmy took this a step further through her love and passion with traditional jewellery. Her studies of the various ages and civilizations were the catalyst for the next turning point in her design career. Fahmy had found the winning combination; she chose traditional proverbs, had them written with beautiful calligraphy, inscribed them on silver and laid them with gold and, so, the Azza Fahmy trademark Culture Collection was born. She became an instant success; one so strong it would take her through the next twenty years. Azza Fahmy continues to take her passion to new heights. She continues to do her favourite thing - designing jewellery, researching, being inspired and inspiring other people through her jewellery. By doing so, she has successfully transformed the concept of jewellery making from a craft to an art, and has managed to add new dimension.

Azza Fahmy

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that would shape her creations, Fahmy began exploring the artistic, intellectual and cultural history of Islamic design. Combining her research with her love for architecture, Azza Fahmy began to design one of her first collections which won her wide appeal and gave instant recognition to the collection. The collection was titled ‚Houses of the Nile‘ and was inspired by Nubia and the traditional architecture of Egypt. It featured jewellery in the shape of small houses gorgeously encrusted with palm trees or rocks. As one critic wrote at the time, „the beauty of this collection is that most people never thought of wearing mud houses...Azza Fahmy did.“


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TOP Earring: FATUA 600 EUROS Necklace: FARAO 1899 EUROS Bottom left: Earrings: Izaaf 320 EUROS

Azza Fahmy

Bottom right: Necklace: FASTUKE 800 EUROS Ring: MIRA 220 EUROS

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Azza Fahmy

Bracletts: FUNJA 3AMBAR 500 EUROS EACH


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Cross

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fashion photography by: supplied

Cross Cultural Fashion

For Tahir Sultan, a powerful woman is the ultimate source of inspiration and through his own personal interpretation of this in his designs, he works to express femininity in every way. ‘The moment I realised I wanted to be a designer was when I saw Madonna in a beautiful white dress in Vogue,’ he says. ‚From then on I knew what I wanted to do.‘ Sultan’s first foray into creativity was studying architecture in Florence and London’s Architectural Association. He put this career on hold however when he changed his course to study fashion design at Central St Martins College.

ticated and much more daring in how they dress than Western women, although a lot of designers don’t realise this,’ he says. Sultan says his brand is an outlet for his his creative impulses utilising cut and form to create a look that is both modern and edgy. He says: ‘It is aimed at a woman with a lot of character who is not afraid to express who she is. She interacts with the world and has depth to her personality, whether that is through collecting art or owning her own business. I like to think that I make clothes that educate women and push boundaries while trying to keep a look that is classical and beautiful. It is the wearer that embellishes the dress and you don’t need a lot of add-ons to make it look beautiful.’   Designing also provides an excuse to explore and research. He says that time is usually spent with different textiles and shapes until he lands on a particular look that people have come to associate with him. ‘People know they are my clothes when they see them.‘   Although he agrees that there is potential for designers in the region, he does believe that there is more space for creativity.‘What a lot of designers in the region don’t do is explore themselves through their work. Fashion is really about opening up your mind and pushing the confines of what you are trying to create.’  

Then he spent a brief stint at Alexander McQueen, followed by John Galliano, which gave him a different perspective on how the industry operated. His brand, Tahir Sultan, is now based in Dubai and he uses crosscultural references of his experiences in the Emirates and Europe and works to advance fashion in the area. ‘My culture plays a strong role in my clothes and you can see this in the way I work. My experiences with architecture also contribute to my style, in its shape and form. It is avant-garde but also modern.‘   The designer says his brand works so well in the region because he understands the sensibilities of Arab women, who, he points out, take an extreme interest in their appearance. ‘They are sophis-

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Shoes: FIZZA Pants: African cloth

Blouse: Kenzo Headwear: Marakesh flee market

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Cross Cultural Fashion

Shirt: COS Jacket: VINTAGE Pants: ALL SAINTS Headwear: Marakesh flee market


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Cross Cultural Fashion

Blouse: Kenzo Headwear: Marakesh flee market

Shoes: FIZZA Pants: African cloth

Shirt: COS Jacket: VINTAGE Pants: ALL SAINTS Headwear: Marakesh flee market

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Cross Cultural Fashion

Shirt: FANTUNA Jacket: MASIMO DUTTI Pants: MARAA Headwear: ADIDAS CLASSICS CAP


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Cross Cultural Fashion

For Tahir Sultan, a powerful woman is the ultimate source of inspiration and through his own personal interpretation of this in his designs, he works to express femininity in every way.

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Cross Cultural Fashion

Shirt: DOLCE & GABANNA Jacket: VINTAGE Pants: ALL SAINTS Headwear: Marakesh flee market


trends from tsaE to west

How ancient symbolism became a la mode. The real meaning behind Kenzo‘s Eys print and Versace‘s head wraps.


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Trends: From East to West

Harem Pants

Harem pants or harem trousers are baggy, long pants tapered at the ankle, with side flapson the hip that button at the waist area. Harem pants, which originated in Arabian Peninsula, are like a cross between a skirt and a pair of skinny jeans. The legs, from the knees down, are fitted. The crotch area is loose and baggy as if it were cut to be a skirt. Traditional harem pants can be extremely large and baggy, with a very wide and full fit, very roomy, loose fitting, oversized, puffy, spacious, with elastic in waist and at ankles, and with the

crotch below the knee almost to the ground. Harem pants are commonly worn with a pleated skirt — a short skirt that covers the top portion of the harem pants. Both harem pants and pleated skirts are commonly used in belly dancing. A „modern“ version of harem pants was popularized in the late 1980s by M. C. Hammer and became known as Hammer pants. The modern version is intended to be made more fashionable and require less fabric. In 2012, recording artists Justin Bieber and Psy wore harem pants, possibly due to their shared

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manager, Scooter Braun. Similar pants are also known as dimije, tshalvar, schalwar, salwar kameez, kaccha, patiala salwar, shintijan, sirwal, sharovary, Turkish trousers, aladdin pants, balloon pants, drop crotch pants, pantaloons,[citation needed] zouave, pluderhose, and pumphose. There is a garment similar to harem pants in Thailand, called „Hmong Pants“, which is normally worn by hill tribes in the Northern Hills.Another very similar garment to harem pants is found in India. For material, single piece of fabric with wood block peacock


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Nazars, charms are used to ward off the evil eye. The evil eye is a malevolent look that many cultures believe able to cause injury or misfortune for the person at whom it is directed for reasons of envy or dislike. Talismans created to protect against the evil eye are also frequently called „evil eyes.“ The term also refers to the power attributed to certain persons of inflicting injury or bad luck by such an envious or ill-wishing look. The evil eye is usually given to others who remain unaware. The „evil eye“ is also known in Arabic as Aayn al-Hasūd, in Hebrew as

áyin hā-rá, in Kurdish çaw e zar (eye of evil/sickness), in Persian as chashm zakhm (eye-caused injury) or chashm e bad (bad eye), in Turkish as Nazar (nazar is from Arabic Nadhar which means eye vision or eyesight), similarly in Urdu/Hindi/ Punjabi the word Nazar or Boori Nazar (bad eye/look) is used, in Amharic buda, in Afghan Pashto cheshim mora, and also „Nazar“, in Greek as to máti, in Spanish as mal de ojo, in Italian as malocchio, in Portuguese mau-olhado („act of giving an evil/sick look“), in Swedish as „ge onda ögat“(to give an evil look), and in Hawaiian it

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is known as „stink eye“ or maka pilau meaning „rotten eyes“. The idea expressed by the term causes many cultures to pursue protective measures against it. The concept and its significance vary widely among different cultures, primarily the Middle East. The idea appears several times in translations of the Old Testament. It was a widely extended belief among many Mediterranean and Asian tribes and cultures. Charms and decorations featuring the eye are a common sight across Turkey, Iran, and have become a popular choice of souvenir with tourists.

Trends: From East to West

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Trends: From East to West

hamsa

The hamsa (Arabic: khamsah, also romanized khamsa, meaning lit. „five“) is a palm-shaped amulet popular throughout the Middle East and North Africa, and commonly used in jewelry and wall hangings. Depicting the open right hand, an image recognized and used as a sign of protection in many societies throughout history, the hamsa is believed to provide defense against the evil eye. The symbol predates Christianity and Islam. In Islam, it is also known as the hand of Fatima, so named to commemorate Muhammad‘s daughter Fatima Zahra (c. 605 or 615 – 633). Levantine Christians call it the hand of Mary, for the Virgin Mary. Jews refer to it as the hand of Miriam in remembrance of the biblical Miriam, sister of Moses

and Aaron. In Ottoman Turkish this sign is called: ‚pence-i al-i aba‘, with ‚pence‘ meaning ‚hand‘ or ‚five‘, referring to the household of the Islamic prophet Muhammed. The household of Muhammed is enumerated as those five people over whom the prophet held a cloth; they are: Fatima-tül Zehra, Ali-el Mürteza, Hasan-ül Mücteba, Hüseyin-i Desht-i Kerbela, Muhammed.Etymology Khamsa is an Arabic word that literally means „five“, but also „the five fingers of the hand.“ Symbolism and usage: Door knocker in Morocco. The Hand (Khamsa), particularly the open right hand, is a sign of protection that also represents blessings, power, and strength, and is seen as potent in deflecting the evil eye.

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One of the most common components of gold and silver jewellery in the region, historically and traditionally, it was most commonly carved in jet or formed from silver, a metal believed to represent purity and hold magical properties. It is also painted in red (sometimes using the blood of a sacrificed animal) on the walls of houses for protection, or painted or hung on the doorways of rooms, such as those of an expectant mother or new baby. The hand can be depicted with the fingers spread apart to ward off evil, or as closed together to bring good luck. Highly stylized versions may be difficult to recognize as hands, and can consist of five circles representing the fingers, situated around a central circle representing the palm. It symbolizes the Five.


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The keffiyeh/kufiya (Arabic: kafiyyah, originally from the city of Kufa, also known as a ghutrah or shemagh, and also known by some as mashadah, or in Persian chafiye, Hebrew soderah and in Kurdish cemedanî, is a traditional Middle Eastern headdress fashioned from a square, usually cotton, scarf. It is typically worn by Arabs, as well as some Kurds and Jews. It is commonly found in arid regions to provide protection from direct sun exposure, as well to protect the mouth and eyes from blown dust and sand. Its distinctive woven check pattern may have originated in an ancient Mesopotamian representation of either fishing nets or ears of grain, but the true origin of the pattern remains unknown. The keffiyeh has been worn by

Arabs residing in regions in Arabia, Jordan, and Iraq for over a century, but its prominence increased in other regions in the 1960s with the beginning of Palestinian movements and its adoption by Palestinian politician Yasser Arafat. The keffiyeh has been a fashion accessory in the United States since the late 1980s. In the early 2000s, keffiyehs were very popular among adolescents in Tokyo, who often wore them with camouflage clothing. Bahraini potter with keffiyeh making vases During his sojourn with the Marsh Arabs of Iraq, Gavin Young noted that the local sayyids – „venerated men accepted...as descendants of the Prophet Mohammed & Ali ibn Abi Talib“ – wore dark green keffiyeh or Cheffiyeh, in contrast to the

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black-and-white checker ones typical of the area‘s inhabitants. Many Palestinian keffiyehs are a mix of cotton and wool, which lets them dry quickly and keep the wearer’s head warm. The keffiyeh is usually folded in half, into a triangle, and the fold is worn across the forehead. Often, the keffiyeh is held in place by a rope circlet, called an agal in Arabic. Some wearers wrap the keffiyeh into a turban, while others wear it loosely draped around the back and shoulders. Sometimes a taqiyah is worn underneath the keffiyeh, and, in the past, it has also been wrapped around the rim of the fez. The keffiyeh is almost always of white cotton cloth, but many have a checkered pattern in red or black stitched into them.

Trends: From East to West

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Trends: From East to West

kaftan

A kaftan or caftan ( ‫ ناطفق‬qaftân) is a front-buttoned coat or overdress, usually reaching to the ankles, with long sleeves. It can be made of wool, cashmere, silk, or cotton, and may be worn with a sash. It is a variant of the robe or tunic, versions of which have been worn by countless cultures around the world, for thousands of years. The kaftan is associated with Islamic or Islamicate cultures. Kaftans were often worn as court robes; the splendor and specific decorations of the kaftan indicated the rank of the wearer. Sovereigns often gave ornate kaftans as a mark of favor. Persian robes of honor were commonly known as khalat or kelat. Ottoman Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent adorned in a Kaftan of complex woven fabric. The kaftans worn by the Ottoman sultans are preserved in one of the most splendid collections of Topkapı Palace in Istanbul. Lavishly decorated kaftans were given as rewards to important dignitaries and victorious generals. The decorations— colours, patterns, ribbons, and buttons—indicated the rank of the person to whom they were presented.

From the 14th century through 17th centuries, textiles with large patterns were used. The decorative patterns on the fabrics became both smaller and brighter in the late 16th and in the 17th centuries. By the second half of the 17th century, the most precious fabrics were those with ‚yollu‘: vertical stripes with various embroideries and small patterns, the so-called „Selimiye“ fabrics. Most fabrics manufactured in Turkey were made in Istanbul and Bursa, but some textiles came from as far away as Venice, Genoa, Persia (Iran), India and even China. Kaftans were made from velvet, aba, bürümcük (a type of crepe with a silk warp and cotton weft), canfes, çatma (a heavy silk brocade), gezi, diba, hatayi, kutnu, kemha, seraser (brocade fabric with silk warp and gold or silver metallic thread weft), serenk, zerbaft, tafta. Favoured colours were indigo blue, kermes red, violet, pişmis ayva or „cooked quince“, and weld yellow. The Topkapı Museum, Istanbul, possesses a large collection of Ottoman kaftans and textiles.

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Kohl is an ancient eye cosmetic, traditionally made by grinding galena (lead sulfide) and other ingredients. It is widely used in South Asia, the Middle East, North Africa, the Horn of Africa, and parts of West Africa to darken the eyelids and as mascara for the eyelashes. It is worn mostly by women, but also by some men and children. Kohl has also been used in India as a cosmetic for a long time. In addition, mothers would apply kohl to their infants‘ eyes soon after birth. Some did this to „strengthen the child‘s eyes“, and others believed it could prevent the child from being cursed by the evil eye. The Arabic name kuḥl and the Biblical Hebrew kaḥal (c.f. modern Hebrew „blue“) are cognates, from a Semitic root. Transliteration variants of Arabic dialectal pronunciation include kol, kehal or kohal. The Arabic word was loaned into a number of languages which fell under Muslim influence; the Persian word is sorme. It is known as either surma/sirma or kājal/gājal in South Asia. In West Africa, it is also

known as tozali or kwalli. The English word alcohol is a loan of the Arabic word (via Middle Latin and French; originally in the sense „powder of antimony“; the modern meaning is from the 18th century). The Russian word for antimony, is a loan from the Persian term. The Greek and Latin terms for „antimony“, stibium, were loaned from the Egyptian name sdm. Middle East and North Africa Egyptian kohl cosmetic tube inscribed with the cartouches of Amenhotep III and Queen Tiye. Kohl has been worn traditionally since the Protodynastic Period of Egypt (ca. 3100 BC) by Egyptian queens and noble women, who used stibnite (the sulfide of antimony rather than of lead). The cosmetic palettes used for its preparation assumed a prominent role in late predynastic Egyptian culture. Kohl was originally used as protection against eye ailments.[citation needed] There was also a belief that darkening around the eyes would protect one from the harsh rays of the sun.

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Trends: From East to West

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Trends: From East to West

turban

A turban, is a kind of headwear worn by grace bowman based on cloth winding. Featuring many variations, it is worn as customary headwear, usually by men. Communities with prominent turban-wearing traditions can be found in South Asia, Southeast Asia, the Near East, the Arabian Peninsula, North Africa, the Horn of Africa, and parts of the Swahili Coast. Turbans worn in South Asia are known as Pagri. Wearing turbans is common among Sikhs, who refer to it as a Dastar. In certain other faith communities, the headgear also serves as a religious observance, including among Muslims, who regard turban-wearing as Sunnah Mu‘akkadah (Confirmed Tradition). Additionally, turbans have often been worn by nobility, regardless of religious background. They are also sometimes donned to protect hair or as a headwrap for women following cancer treatments. Illustration of Arab men in the fourth to sixth century, wearing turbans and keffiyeh (middle) The turban is known as a very religious millinery hat. Though turbans have been around for thousands of years, the first me tioning of them was in the fourteenth century at the end of the Moorish rule in Spain.

The Prophet Muhammad is believed to have worn a turban in white, the most holy colour. Many Muslim men choose to wear green, because it represents paradise, especially among followers of Sufism. In parts of North Africa, where blue is common, the shade of a turban can signify the tribe of the wearer. There have been over sixty-six types of Turbans. Hindus tend to reserve their turbans for ceremonies and significant occasions, whereas Sikh men wear them all the time. In Islamic countries, the headgear is regarded as Sunnah Mu‘akkadah (Confirmed Tradition). The origins of the turban is uncertain. Early Persians wore a conical cap encircled by bands of cloth, which historians have suggested was developed to become the modern turban, but other theories suggest it was first widely worn in Egypt. Sikh men commonly wear a peaked turban that serves for the purpose of covering their long hair, which in respect for God‘s creation is never cut. Devout Sikhs do not cut their beards either, so many instead twist them and tuck them up into their turbans. A style of turban called a phakeolis was also worn by soldiers of the Byzantine army. 52


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Rolling in the Deep

Photo : Laila Hinda

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Shirt: FANTUNA 89 EUROS Necklace: ZARA COLEECTION 40 EUROS

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Rolling in the Deep

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Rolling in the Deep

Shirt: FANTUNA 89 EUROS Jacket: ZARA COLEECTION 65 EUROS Slippers: MANGO 48 EUROS Head Piece: AZZA FAHMY 99 EUROS

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Rolling in the Deep

Overall: CHANEL 400 EUROS Vest: ISABEL MARRANT 65 EUROS Scarf: MANGO 48 EUROS

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Shirt: FANTUNA 89 EUROS Jacket: ZARA COLEECTION 65 EUROS Shoes: GUCCI 259 EUROS Hat: STELLA MCCARNTNEY 200 EUROS Rolling in the Deep

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Laís Ribeiro Photographer

John Russo

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Dress: GUCCI ARABIA BIRA KAFTAN Shoes: SPORTMAX

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Shirt: GUCCI ARABIA COLLECTION 289 EUROS Shoes: SPORTMAX BLACK 430 EUROS

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Shirt: GUCCI ARABIA COLLECTION 239 EUROS Harem Pants: GUCCI FATUA 239 EUROS Shoes: SPORTMAX BEIGE 340 EUROS

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MARKUS PRITZI Fashion Edior

Desert Dreams

ISABELLE THIRY

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Desert Dreams

Overall: CHANEL 400 EUROS Vest: ISABEL MARRANT 65 EUROS Scarf: MANGO 48 EUROS


Shirt: GUCCI ARABIA COLLECTION 289 EUROS Shoes: SPORTMAX BLACK 430 EUROS

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Dress: GUCCI ARABIA COLLECTION 399 EUROS Shoes: SPORTMAX BLACK 430 EUROS Bikini Top: ZARA 40 EUROS


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left GUCCI ARABIA COLLECTION Shirt: 124 EUROS right: Shirt: FUNIRA199 EUROS

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Desert Dreams

Dress: GUCCI ARABIA COLLECTION 399 EUROS Shoes: SPORTMAX BLACK 430 EUROS Bikini Top: ZARA 40 EUROS


Shoes: SPORTMAX BLACK 430 EUROS

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Dress: GUCCI ARABIA COLLECTION 399 EUROS Shoes: SPORTMAX BLACK 430 EUROS Bikini Top: ZARA 40 EUROS

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SABRINA THEISSEN Stylist LORENA MAZA

Debouis LE CHIC FOLKLORIQUE ARAB Debouis

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Temperley london Model

Fracisca Mowe Photographer

Anissa Helu

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Temperly London

Dress: Izabella in wight


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Temperly London

Dress: Azizzeh 950 EUROS Headpiece: 90 EUROS

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Dress: AL KHALILA YUMMA 500 EUROS

Temperly London

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Dress: AL KHALILA YUMMA 500 EUROS

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Dress: Azizzeh 950 EUROS Headpiece: 90 EUROS

Temperly London

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NO U R Syrian Fashion designer

Nour Hammour

Living in Paris

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Jess Jonson Photographer

Anissa Helu

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