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Boating and Marine Industry

CAREERS GUIDE 2015

Boating Industry Association of Victoria Boating Industry Association of Victoria


CONTENTS

1 Welcome

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Forward Acknowledgement Message from the Minister Welcome to your Career Guide BIA Victoria Industry Fast Facts

4 5 5 6 6

2 Getting Started

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Apprenticeships and Traineeships VCE, VCAL, SBAT information Obtain a Marine Licence

7 8 9

3 Occupation Index

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4 Boat Building

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Boat Building and Repairer (Shipwright) Naval Architect (Naval Engineer)

5 Repairs, Redesign and Reconstruction

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Production Manager 14 Refit Coordinator and Trades Team 15 Cabinetmaker (Marine Carpentry) 16 Electrician 17 Electronics Technician 18 Plumber 19 Marine Fabricator (Upholsterer and Trimmer) 20 Sailmaker (Industrial Textiles Fabricator) 21 Boat Detailer 22 Graphic Design (Boat Signage) 23

6 Slipway

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Slipway Operator 24 Marine Technician (Mechanic) 25 Automotive Vehicle Refinisher (Painter) 26 Metal Fabricator (Boilermaker / Welder) 27 Rigger 28 Diver (Commercial Diver) 29


7 Boat and Trailer (Sales & Repairs) Trailer Manufacturer & Repairs Sales – Boat and Trailer (new & used) Boat Broker / Boat Dealer Parts Interpreter (Sales) Chandlery Retail

8 Boat Operation

30 30 31 32 33 34

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Coxswain 35 Deckhand 36 Yachting (Skipper / Sailor) 37

9 Marina Services

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Marina Manager 38 Dockmaster 39 Marina Attendant 40 Administration 41

10 Marine Tourism

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Marine Tourism in Victoria Tour Operator Onboard Marine Tourist Guide Dive Instructor (Tourism)

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Appendix 45 Links to Further Information – Education and Training

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Disclaimer This Guide is published by the Boating Industry Association of Victoria Ltd. All rights reserved. The use of this Guide for any other purpose other than as a reference guide, or reproduction of any part of this Guide, is expressly prohibited without written permission from the publisher. The publisher has taken every precaution to avoid errors and omissions in this Guide. The Boating Industry Association of Victoria Ltd hereby declares that is does not give any warranty, whether expressed or implied, as to the accuracy, correctness, relevance, suitability or reliability of this Guide or any information contained in it. The Boating Industry Association of Victoria Ltd excludes all liability for any loss (whether direct, indirect or consequential) arising out of the acquisition of use of reliance upon this Guide or any information contained in it. © Boating Industry Association of Victoria Ltd. Published 2015


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WELCOME Forward Acknowledgement The Boating Industry Association of Victoria Ltd has a vital part to play in ensuring that careers and employment information is presented to the key influencers of young people at the critical times of course and career planning. The Australian Centre for Career Education has assisted in the development of the Boating and Marine Industry Careers Guide and highly recommends its use for the delivery of career education programs in schools, TAFE, Learn Locals and Higher Education careers centres. Content in this guide is mapped to the Victorian Careers Curriculum Framework, the National Curriculum for Work Studies and Continuing Professional Development competencies for career professionals accessing this information for their practice. We encourage the use of information in this guide to broaden the knowledge base of young people so that they can make informed choices about engaging with a successful career in the boating industry.

Mapping to Frameworks Victorian Careers Curriculum Framework Year 9

Use career information resources to locate information on occupational and industry trends, education and training, social and economic trends. Explore the relationship between work and the community and how technological advances impact on work roles in the community.

Year 10

Explore the education and training requirements of various work roles in your preferred future occupation or work sectors. Use career information effectively in the management of your Career Action Plans.

ACARA Works Studies Curriculum

Year 9

Year 10

Work skills Investigate a wide range of occupations, and the skills and personal qualities required in these fields The nature of work Describe the nature of work in Australia and the implications for current and future work opportunities Complete an action project utilising entrepreneurial behaviours to address an identified challenge or opportunity

CICA Continuing Professional Development Competencies 6.3.2

Labour Market 6.3.2a (i) and (ii) 6.3.2.b (ii)

6.3.6

Information and resource management 6.3.6.a Collect, analyse and use information

Acknowledgements The Boating Industry Association of Victoria acknowledges the following organisations and staff for their contributions to this resource. • • • • • • • •

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Australian Centre for Career Education – Bernadette Gigliotti, Briony Penrose Aussie Boat Covers – Neil Hancock Chisholm Institute – Michael Barlow, Craig Brittle Department of Education and Training – Sue Wells Goulburn Ovens Institute of TAFE – Brett Ambrosio Holmsglen Institute – Denise Walker Outer Eastern Local Learning & Employment Network – Kaz Erbs PM Marine Manufacturing Pty. Ltd. – Paul Junginger

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WELCOME Message from the Minister Victoria has a long and proud association with boating, with our bay and waterways used as hubs of activity for sport and lifestyle. To continue to enable recreational boating and water use, it’s important to have strong, direct industry support. It is my pleasure to launch the Boating Industry Association of Victoria’s Boating and Marine Industry Careers Guide. The Boating Industry Association of Victoria is taking a positive position to promote careers to attract new entrants to the industry, and ensure the retention of skills. Raising the profile of the boating industry highlights an exciting range of careers and skills that are available, and will enable those who use our bay and waterways for work, or leisure, to do so in a safe and sustainable manner. This careers guide contains: • • • • •

useful links to explore career advice, a large range of occupations available in the boating industry, detailed descriptions of what tasks the job involves, the attributes an individual needs for the role, and information about the career pathways available for various occupations.

Direct industry feedback and active participation by the boating industry is vital to ensure the skills this industry needs are there to support employees and ensure viable businesses into the future. I commend the Boating Industry Association for the interest and hands-on action taken in the development of this careers guide. Hon. Steve Herbert MLC Minister for Training and Skills

Welcome to your Career Guide This Careers Guide, developed by the Boating Industry Association of Victoria, provides information to help you identify employment, education and training opportunities when deciding on career pathways that best suit your interests and abilities. Our industry values people with a wide range of backgrounds and diverse skills. The potential to develop your career is endless from small craft construction to super yachts, engine repairs to sails; marine equipment to marine electronics; marina management to marine tourism. This guide is an important resource for young people, career practitioners, teachers, parents and employers on jobs within the boating and marine industry in Victoria. Please visit the “Training and Employment” section on our website www.biavic.com.au/training-employment/ to find out more information Steve Potts Chief Executive Officer | BIAV

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WELCOME BIA Victoria the voice of the marine industry The Boating Industry Association of Victoria is the peak body for the boating and marine sector. It represents an industry worth $4.5 billion dollars to the Victorian economy and provides over 17,700 FTE jobs. The Australian Government believes that investing in education, skills and training will guarantee that Australia has one of the most skilled and best trained workforces in the world. The Boating Industry Association of Victoria (BIAV) was formed in 1961 and has a proud history of representing the boating and marine Industry. The BIAV is a member driven not-for-profit organization with an elected board that oversees the management of the association by a small dynamic staff, meeting the aims and objectives of the association to develop a progressive and sustainable industry and to promote recreational boating. Membership is drawn from a diverse range of marine interests such as boat and engine manufacturing, repairs and retailing, marine accessories manufacturing and retailing, boat and marine engine repairs, marine distribution, logistics and wholesale, boating holidays and tourism, marinas, clubs and much more. The BIAV own and operate the Melbourne Boat Show and Summer Boat Show with proceeds from this event funding the operations to benefit the industry via BIAV activities. Our goal is to help our members ‘Build Better Businesses’ by supporting them to improve their profit, performance and professionalism.

Boating Industry Fast Facts • The Boating Industry contributes $4.5 billion to the Victorian economy annually • 10% of the Victorian population (aged over 14) own a watercraft, which means Victorians own more watercrafts than caravans or motorbikes • There are over 17,700 full-time jobs in the Boating Industry in Victoria • Victoria has 268,336 marine licence holders and 172,805 registered boats • There are around 996,000 people across Victoria and Tasmania who spend time each year in the marine industry (Roy Morgan September 2014) • Research has shown that attracting and retaining skilled employees is a major opportunity for the boating industry • There is a need to promote career pathways in the boating industry

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GETTING STARTED Apprenticeship and Traineeship Information With boating being one of Australia’s leading leisure activities, the boating industry is both dynamic and diverse and there is an abundance of career pathways awaiting young people with an interest in spending their lives around boats and water. Joining the boating industry as an apprentice or trainee is a great way to get a head start in a career. Australian Apprenticeships (often referred to as apprenticeships or traineeships) offer opportunities for anyone of working age to train, study and earn an income in a wide range of occupations and trades. When you finish an Australian Apprenticeship, you will have a nationally recognized qualification that can take you anywhere in Australia.

Benefits of an Australian Apprenticeship • Nationally recognised qualification • Involves paid work and structured training that can be on-the-job, off-the-job or a combination of both • You can start your apprenticeship while at school (School Based Apprenticeship Traineeship, SBAT). A SBAT involves attending work + training + school between Monday and Friday each week and can provide credits towards the Victorian Certificate of Education (VCE) or Victorian Certificate of Applied Learning (VCAL). • ‘Competency based’ training allows individuals to complete their training faster when they reach the required skills level and enables existing skills and prior experience to be recognised and course credit granted.

Snapshot – Apprenticeships The best part of my job is seeing the boats completed and being collected by a happy customer. Don’t be afraid of making mistakes or asking for help. Know there are good days and bad days. Remember at the end of the course you will be a qualified tradesperson and proud of all you have achieved. Nathan Graham, apprentice at Evolution Boats in Bayswater

Finding An Apprenticeship Once you identify the type of occupation that appeals to you, the next step is to find your job or apprenticeship. Tell everyone you know, including your teachers, parents and friends that you are looking for a job or apprenticeship in the marine industry. Update your resume and seek career advice from a Career or Pathways Coordinator at school.

I wanted to change careers to do something I would enjoy. I wanted a ‘job in paradise’ where you can surf. It’s an awesome trade because it touches on every trade I have ever done, you don’t get bored. Tristan, Penfold Marine, Williamstown

Check out the jobs advertised by BIAV members on the “Training and Employment” section of the BIAV website www. biavic.com.au/training-employment/

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GETTING STARTED VCE-VCAL-SBAT Information If you are still at school and interested in pursuing a career in the Boating and Marine Industry you have multiple options and pathways open to you. If you choose to stay on at school post year 10 you may have the opportunity to complete a School Based Apprenticeship Traineeship (SBAT), or choose to follow a VCE/ VET program, or a VCAL study program with a Structured Workplace Learning (SWL) component. Have a look at the School Pathways Flowchart and consider what your options are and which pathway may be right for you. Remember: there is no perfect pathway – it is about finding the pathway that is right for you and your career goals!

School Pathways Flowchart

START HERE

Speak to your School Career Practitioner

VCE

VCAL VCE / VET VET SBAT

TAFE RTO

Structured Workplace Learning

Employment, Apprenticeship, Traineeship

TAFE, Certificate II/III/IV, Diploma, Advanced Diploma

Higher Education, University

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GETTING STARTED Obtain a Marine Licence You must hold a current marine licence to operate a registered vessel on Victorian waters. If you are considering a career working with or around boats, it is advantageous to obtain a marine licence.

Licence Requirements There are two licence types: 1. General marine licence: required by anyone 16 years of age or over, operating a registered vessel. 2. Restricted marine licence: required by anyone over the age of 12 and under 16, operating a registered vessel.

Links to Further information / Education and Training https://www.vicroads.vic.gov.au/licences – To book a marine licence test telephone 13 11 71. www.marinetraining.vic.edu.au – Marine Training Services www.coastguard.com.au – The Australian Volunteer Coast Guard Association (AVCGA) conduct courses in metropolitan and regional areas

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OCCUPATIONS Occupations by alphabetical order

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Administration 41 Automotive Vehicle Refinisher (Painter) 26 Boat Broker / Boat Dealer 32 Boat Building / Repair (Shipwright) 11 Boat Detailer 22 Cabinetmaker (Marine Carpentry) 16 Chandlery Retail 34 Coxswain 35 Deckhand 36 Diver – Commercial 29 Dive Instructor (Tourism) 44 Dockmaster 39 Electrician 17 Electronic Technician 18 Graphic Design (Boat Signage) 23 Marina Attendant 40 Marine Fabricator (Upholsterer / Trimmer) 20 Marina Manager 38 Marine Technician (Mechanic) 25 Metal Fabricator (Boilermaker / Welder) 27 Naval Architect (Naval Engineer) 13 On-board Marine Tourist Guide 43 Parts Interpreter (Sales) 33 Plumber 19 Production Manager 14 Refit Coordinator and Trades Team 15 Rigger 28 Sailmaker (Industrial Textiles Fabricator) 21 Sales – Boat and Trailer (New & Used) 31 Slipway Operator 24 Tour Operator 42 Trailer Manufacturer and Repair 30 Yachting (Skipper / Sailor) 37

www.biavic.com.au Don’t forget to log on to the website for further information and real life occupational case studies.

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BOAT BUILDING Boat Building and Repair (Shipwright) What is this Job? A Boat Builder can construct, fit out, commission and repair all types of vessels from small pleasure craft through to a range of commercial and naval vessels (catamarans, luxury cruise ships, yachts, motor cruisers and small recreational boats). Boats can be custom built to clients’ specifications or produced on a production line. Materials used in boat building can include metal, wood, aluminum, fiberglass, plastic, composites or ferro-cement (reinforced cement or concrete). Boat Builders repair wooden, fiberglass and composite craft using a range of hand and power tools; prepare preliminary sketches of structural parts and sections of vessels; produce templates and patterns from full-size detail drawings; installation of engineering drive systems and fit out internal and external components.

Is this YOU? Enjoy practical and manual work, technical activities and have an eye for accuracy. Able to work at heights on scaffolding, outdoors or in a factory and can tolerant exposure to dust and paint fumes. Solve problems, are physically fit, can work independently and in a team. Organised have a methodical approach to your work and take pride in your craftsmanship.

Employment Pathways The boat manufacturing industry employs many specialised craftspeople, so there is almost no limit to where you might work with boat building skills. Shipwrights work on the waterfront in shipyards, in the repair sections of ports or in small boat yards and marinas. Shipwrights are employed in construction firms, the Australian Defence Force, companies building leisure craft, and in firms engaged in building and operating marinas. Boat builders may operate on a mobile basis. Substantial opportunities for self-employment also exist. Competition is strong for available apprenticeships. Other career pathways may include: Boat or Yacht Designer; Naval Architect (Naval Engineer), Draftsperson – Computer Aided Design (CAD), Aluminum, Fiberglass, Wooden or Composite Boat Builder, Model Maker; Master Boat Builder; Marine Equipment Manufacturing (boat trailers, marine electronics, rigging, boat lifts and pontoons).

Training Providers | Links to further information Certificate III in Marine Craft Construction – www.gotafe.vic.edu.au GOTAFE Certificate III in Engineering – Composites Trade – www.gotafe.vic.edu.au GOTAFE

Being involved in the marine industry has been a very rewarding experience for me. I have been lucky enough to travel to the USA and spent time with many marine personnel and companies from around the world. My goal in life is to follow my boat racing dream and hopefully one day become the F1 world champion. The opportunities that the marine industry has allowed are amazing and have fulfilled my high expectation every time. Caleb, Wes Frost Marine, Mornington

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BOAT BUILDING Snapshot – Boat building

It’s hard to find the right mix of skills and the quality trades people required so they often train on the job. It is healthy for business to always have an apprentice so that there are young staff coming up learning from experienced tradesmen. The boatyard needs a mix of skills including tickets for working on elevated platform, using the travel lift, dogging and rigging licence. Paul Vernon, Boatyard Manager Gippsland Ports Boatyards Jordan, apprentice at Gippsland Ports Boatyards

Webster Marine employs people that are multiskilled and have had a range of experiences working in different places. There are the traditional timber skills but fibreglass and electrical skills are also required. Business skills are important too and being able to work with customers. Webster Marine Paynesville Chris, apprentice at Webster Marine in Paynesville

It suits me that we are doing the metal and welding work… we do a lot of alloy work so the engineering skills are really useful. Penfold Marine Williamstown Alessandro, apprentice at Penfold Marine, Williamstown

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BOAT BUILDING Naval Architect (Naval Engineer) What is this Job? A Naval Architect (Naval Engineer) is a professional engineer dealing with the design, construction, maintenance and operation of marine vessels and structures. Naval Architecture involves basic and applied research, design, development, design evaluation and calculations during all stages of the life of a marine vehicle. Naval Architects undertake a range of tasks that include prepare preliminary design of the vessel (calculations), its detailed design (sketches and patterns), construction, trails, operation and maintenance, launching and dry docking and ship. The naval architect has strong knowledge and experience of many branches of engineering; work in a team taking responsibility for the overall project; stay current of technological trends and utilize complex computer aided design and analytical tools; meet international safety standards to ensure a safe, economic and seaworthy design is produced.

Is this YOU? A creative, enquiring and logical mind with an interest in the marine environment including hydrodynamics. You enjoy technical and engineering activities, have an aptitude for mathematics, physics, computing, technical design and good oral and written communication skills.

Employment Pathways Naval Architects can work across a variety of settings from an office to shipyards and at sea on board vessels for sea trials. Naval Architects are employed in marine design consultancy firms, international ship classification societies, boat and shipbuilding firms (shipyards), boat and ship repair and maintenance companies, port and harbor authorities, shipping lines and offshore engineering oil and gas companies. Opportunities may also exist with mining companies engaged in offshore exploration and manufacturers of marine auxiliary machinery, navigational aids and communications equipment. Employment pathways could include marine surveyor and mechanical or mechatronics engineer. To become a Naval Architect you usually have to complete a degree in engineering with a major in Naval Architecture. To get into these courses you usually need to gain your VCE. Prerequisite subjects, or assumed knowledge, in one or more of English, mathematics, physics and chemistry. A number of universities in Australia offer degrees in engineering with a major in naval architecture. The education and training given to the Naval Architect is designed to develop these skills and to lead them to a recognized qualification and professional status. With experience, you can expect to rise from technical ranks to managerial positions.

Training Providers | Links to further information Bachelor of Engineering (Ocean Engineering) – www.utas.edu.au University of Tasmania Bachelor of Engineering (Naval Architecture) – www.amc.edu.au Australian Maritime College Tasmania Bachelor of Engineering (Naval Architecture) – www.unsw.edu.au University of NSW Bachelor of Marine Sciences – www.international.mq.edu.au Macquarie University, Sydney

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REPAIRS, REDESIGN AND RECONSTRUCTION Once the hull construction is complete, the fit-out team interpret plans and specifications to fit and install the interior and above deck components. The fit-out team maintain key marine components such as bulkheads, decks, cabins, upholstery, propeller units. Refitting boats includes overhauling, detailing, trimming, engine and transmission maintenance, boat plumbing and electrics. Boats are brought into the workshop or at the marina for maintenance, enhancement or refurbishment. Depending on your area of speciality, you could work with all sorts of materials and construction techniques to assemble components.

Production Manager What is this Job? The Production Manager oversees the Refit Coordinator and the team of tradespeople who work on the fit-out or refit. Production Managers can be responsible for the entire scope of works for a project or program and control one or more production departments at a time as well as the recruitment and management of staff, contractors and sub-contractors. Tasks overseen by the Production Manager include the installation of marine electrical and electronic systems, the addition of cabin equipment and fittings, coordinate welding, thermal cutting and heating procedures, budgets (cost control monitoring), and report writing.

Is this YOU? Identify, analyse and solve problems, manage a team of people, think logically and objectively under tight production schedules, stay current in the market of new ideas and trends to meet client requirement.

Employment Pathways Production Managers usually have experience over many years in one or two trades sometimes beginning as an apprentice in that trade such as a boat builder, carpenter or engineer before progressing as a team leader/ manager. Entry requirements into this career will vary and include trade qualification and training in the area of specialisation.

Training Providers | Links to further information There are a range of training options for Production Management. Visit the following websites for more information: www.education.vic.gov.au/victorianskillsgateway Victorian Skills Gateway www.hobsonscoursefinder.com.au Hobsons Course Finder www.joboutlook.gov.au Job Outlook

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Refit Coordinator and Trades Team What is this Job? The ReďŹ t Coordinator manages the team of tradespeople and works closely with the customer to identify their requirements so they are communicated correctly to the team, suppliers and contractors. This role will vary and could include overseeing the installation of new electric or electronic systems in a fishing boat, organising repairs to woodwork or upholstery of a cabin cruiser or luxury houseboat, or managing the entire rebuild of an ocean racing yacht. Managing work schedules and timely delivery of supplies is important in this role. A Refit Coordinator may specialise across a range of roles including cabinet maker, plumber, electrician, marine upholsterer, sailmaker and marine mechanic. Tradespeople in the fit-out and refit team can include: Cabinetmaker, Electrician, Electronics Technician, Plumber, Upholsterer/Trimmer (marine fabricator), Sailmaker (Industrial textiles fabricator), Boat Detailer and Graphic Designer (signmaker).

Is this YOU? Manage small and large teams of people, communicate to tradespeople exact requirements of the job, time smart, high level technical skills, product knowledge and quoting abilities.

Employment Pathways Production Manager

Training Providers | Links to further information There are a range of training options for Production Management. Visit the following websites for more information: www.education.vic.gov.au/victorianskillsgateway Victorian Skills Gateway www.hobsonscoursefinder.com.au Hobsons Course Finder www.joboutlook.gov.au Job Outlook

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REPAIRS, REDESIGN AND RECONSTRUCTION Cabinetmaker (Marine Carpentry) What is this Job? Cabinetmakers design, install, repair, varnish, hand finish and fit cupboards, shelves, bunks, seating, tables and galleys on marine vessels either in the workshop or at the marina. This is a career for highly skilled tradespeople because many boats are beautifully finished, so you may be working with some of the world’s most expensive timbers and working with commercial designers to make exquisite interiors. Cabinetmakers communicate with clients to determine specific site layout for work to be undertaken; prepare and match furnishing styles and materials to client’s needs including the installation of hardware to furnishing, such as handles and hinges; perform on site repairs and adjustments; hold knowledge of current building materials and styles and OHS legislation; operate a range of hand and power tools including panel saw, edge bander, router and trimming tools.

Is this YOU? High level of accuracy with attention to detail and craftsmanship, able to make mathematical calculations hold excellent technical skills, can work in an environment that is exposed to noise, dust or fumes.

Employment Pathways Cabinetmakers are employed by boat manufacturers, marinas, on an individual mobile basis or casual employment contract living out at sea. There is a demand for specialised cabinetmakers because this is a skill industry. Opportunities are available for promotion to supervisor or manager, and with experience, competent cabinetmakers establish their own business. Cabinetmakers usually have previous experience in building furniture or working in a shop fitting manufacturing environment.

Training Providers | Links to further information Certificate II in Building and Construction Preapprenticeship – www.gotafe.vic.edu.au GOTAFE Certificate III in Cabinet Making – www.holmesglen.edu.au Holmesglen Institute Certificate III in Cabinet Making – www.federation.edu.au Federation University Certificate III in Cabinet Making – www.federationtraining.edu.au Federation Training Certificate III in Cabinet Making – www.kangan.edu.au Kangan Institute Certificate III in Cabinet Making – www.melbournepolytechnic.edu.au Melbourne Polytechnic Certificate III in Cabinet Making – www.rmit.edu.au RMIT University Certificate III in Cabinet Making – www.wodongatafe.edu.au Wodonga TAFE Certificate III in Cabinet Making – www.bhtafe.edu.au Box Hill Institute Certificate III in Marine Craft Construction – www.gotafe.vic.edu.au GOTAFE Certificate III in Carpentry – www.gotafe.vic.edu.au GOTAFE Certificate III in Carpentry – www.buildingskills.com.au Building Skills Centre Certificate III in Carpentry and Joinery – www.vu.edu.au Victoria University Certificate III in Carpentry and Joinery – www.chisholm.edu.au Chisholm Institute Certificate III in Carpentry and Joinery – www.bhtafe.edu.au Box Hill Institute Certificate III in Carpentry and Joinery – www.gotafe.vic.edu.au GOTAFE Certificate IV in Building and Construction – www.chisholm.edu.au Chisholm Institute Certificate IV in Furniture Design and Technology – www.holmesglen.edu.au Holmesglen Institute

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Electrician What is this Job? Electricians working in the marine sector are highly valued. Work undertaken by Electricians include installing, maintaining and repairing the specialised electrical systems, including both DC and AC components; installation or replace the bridge, cockpit and navigation lights, spotlights or stereo equipment; install and test snap freezers, holding freezers, portable generators, anchor winches or capstan winches; fit and repair older boats with new wiring; refit a portable generator to accommodate a microwave, AC TV, inverters for AC or dual supply refrigerators.

Is this YOU? Enjoy maths and solving problems, have a methodical approach to work, work safely and calmly.

Employment Pathways Promotion to supervisory, technician, engineering and management positions is possible with experience and further training. Pathways can include Electronics and Communications Technician; Telecommunications Technician, Electrician; Cable Jointer; and Electrical Linesperson.

Training Providers | Links to further information Certificate III in Automotive Electrical Technology - www.gotafe.vic.edu.au GOTAFE Certificate III in Automotive Electrical Technology - www.federation.edu.au Federation University Certificate III in Automotive Electrical Technology - www.kangan.edu.au Kangan Institute Certificate III in Automotive Electrical Technology - www.sunitafe.edu.au Sunraysia Institute of TAFE Certificate III in Electrotechnology Electrician – www.chisholm.edu.au Chisholm Institute Certificate III in Electrotechnology Electrician – www.gotafe.vic.edu.au GOTAFE Certificate III in Electrotechnology Electrician – www.agaustralia.com.au Apprenticeships Group Australia Certificate III in Electrotechnology Electrician – www.holmesglen.edu.au Holmesglen Institute Certificate III in Engineering (Electrical/Electronic Trade) – www.holmesglen.edu.au Holmesglen Institute Certificate III in Electrotechnology – www.bendigotafe.edu.au Bendigo TAFE Certificate III in Electrotechnology Electrician – www.federation.edu.au Federation University Certificate III in Electrotechnology Electrician – www.melbournepolytechnic.edu.au Melbourne Polytechnic Certificate III in Electrotechnology Electrician – www.rmit.edu.au RMIT University Certificate III in Electrotechnology Electrician – www.sunitafe.edu.au Sunraysia Institute of TAFE Certificate III in Electrotechnology Electrician – www.swinburne.edu.au Swinburne University of Technology Certificate III in Electrotechnology Electrician – www.vu.edu.au Victoria University

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REPAIRS, REDESIGN AND RECONSTRUCTION Electronics Technician What is this Job? A job working with electronics is interesting and varied. An Electronics Technician installs, calibrates, maintains and repairs the autopilot, radar, GPS (Global Positioning Satellites) electronic charts, receivers and computers; install and maintain HF and VHF receivers, emergency beacons, fish finders, marine stereo systems, inshore radio, marine TV/FM antenna, solar panel. Electronic Technicians must be aware of safety regulations and are often required to wear and use supportive protective equipment.

Is this YOU? Aptitude for mechanics, electronics and diagnostic ability, enjoy analysing and interpreting electrical data, have good problem solving skills, enjoy design and technology, able to do precise and detailed work, good eyesight (may be corrected) and normal colour vision.

Employment Pathways Telecommunications Technician; Electrician; Business Equipment Technician; Electronics and Communications Technician; Mechatronic Engineer; Patent Examiner; Telecommunications Engineer; Vending Machine Servicer; Navy Technical Sailor.

Training Providers | Links to further information Certificate III in Electronics and Communications – www.chisholm.edu.au Chisholm Institute Certificate III in Electronics and Communications – www.menzies.vic.edu.au Menzies Institute of Technology Certificate III in Electronics and Communications – www.novainstitute.net.au Nova Institute of Technology Certificate III in Electronics and Communications – www.swinburne.edu.au Swinburne University of Technology Certificate III in Electronics and Communications – www.sunitafe.edu.au Sunraysia Institute of TAFE Certificate III in Engineering – Electrical/Electronic – www.holmesglen.edu.au Holmesglen Institute Certificate III in Engineering – Electrical/Electronic – www.educationalliving.vic.edu.au Educational Living Diploma of Electrical Project Management – www.melbournepolytechnic.edu.au Melbourne Polytechnic Advanced Diploma of Electronics and Communications Engineering – www.menzies.vic.edu.au Menzies Institute of Technology Advanced Diploma of Engineering Technology – www.chisholm.edu.au Chisholm Institute Advanced Diploma of Engineering Technology – Electrical – www.rmit.edu.au RMIT University Advanced Diploma of Engineering Technology – Electrical – www.swinburne.edu.au Swinburne University of Technology Advanced Diploma of Engineering Technology – Electrical – www.vu.edu.au Victoria University

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Plumber What is this Job? A Naval Architect (Naval Engineer) is a professional engineer dealing with the design, construction, maintenance and operation of marine vessels and structures. Naval Architecture involves basic and applied research, design, development, design evaluation and calculations during all stages of the life of a marine vehicle. Naval Architects undertake a range of tasks that include prepare preliminary design of the vessel (calculations), its detailed design (sketches and patterns), construction, trails, operation and maintenance, launching and dry docking and ship. The naval architect has strong knowledge and experience of many branches of engineering; work in a team taking responsibility for the overall project; stay current of technological trends and utilize complex computer aided design and analytical tools; meet international safety standards to ensure a safe, economic and seaworthy design is produced.

Is this YOU? Enjoy math and solving problems, hands on aptitude. Use basic plumbing hand tools, read and interpret plans and specifications, produce technical drawings, carry out measurements and calculations.

Employment Pathways Building Contractor, Refrigeration and Air Conditioning Mechanic, Fire Protection Mechanic.

Training Providers | Links to further information Certificate II Plumbing (pre apprenticeship) – www.bendigotafe.edu.au Bendigo TAFE Certificate II Plumbing (pre apprenticeship) – www.chisholm.edu.au Chisholm Institute Certificate II Plumbing (pre apprenticeship) – www.federationtraining.edu.au Federation Training Certificate II Plumbing (pre apprenticeship) – www.thegordon.edu.au The Gordon Certificate II Plumbing (pre apprenticeship) – www.gotafe.vic.edu.au GOTAFE Certificate II Plumbing (pre apprenticeship) – www.plumber.com.au Master Plumbers and Mechanical Services Association of Australia Certificate II Plumbing (pre apprenticeship) – www.melbournepolytechnic.edu.au Melbourne Polytechnic Certificate II Plumbing (pre apprenticeship) – www.ncat.vic.edu.au Northern College of the Arts & Technology Certificate II Plumbing (pre apprenticeship) – www.rmit.edu.au RMIT University Certificate II Plumbing (pre apprenticeship) – www.swtafe.vic.edu.au South West Institute of TAFE Certificate II Plumbing (pre apprenticeship) – www.swinburne.edu.au Swinburne University of Technology Certificate II Plumbing (pre apprenticeship) – www.vu.edu.au Victoria University Certificate III in Plumbing – www.gotafe.vic.edu.au GOTAFE Certificate III in Plumbing – www.chisholm.edu.au Chisholm Institute Certificate III in Plumbing – www.holmesglen.edu.au Holmesglen Institute Certificate IV in Plumbing and Services – www.gotafe.vic.edu.au GOTAFE Certificate IV in Plumbing and Services – www.chisholm.edu.au Chisholm Institute Certificate IV in Plumbing and Services – www.holmesglen.edu.au Holmesglen Institute

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REPAIRS, REDESIGN AND RECONSTRUCTION Marine Fabricator (Upholsterer / Trimmer) What is this Job? Upholstery is a major component of a boat’s interior, whether it’s waterproof seating for a ski boat or expensive furnishings for a luxury cruiser or yacht. The marine fabricator creates an interior that is both comfortable and practical and understands the special considerations of crafting products that will be affected by corrosion, moisture and vibration. Some of the tasks undertaken in this role include design, install, repair and replace seating, lay carpets and construct and fit canopies, spray dodgers, biminis, covers and curtains and create glamorous interiors for luxury vessels.

Is this YOU? Hold a flair for design, a keen eye for detail and craftsmanship, precise measurement skill, operate an industrial sewing machine.

Employment Pathways Sailmaker; Furniture Upholsterer, Interior Decorator, Leather Goods Maker, Interior Designer, Cabinetmaker, Clothing and Soft Furnishing Technician, Machinist; Cutter, Blind and Awning Installer. You could also start a small business in canvas goods.

Training Providers | Links to further information Certificate III in Automotive and Marine Trimming Technology – www.holmesglen.edu.au Holmesglen Institute Certificate III in Textile Fabrication – www.rmit.edu.au RMIT University

Snapshot – Marine Fabricator I started as an apprentice and today I am running a successful business with my own staff and apprentices. My main source of work is boat upholstery but have expanded our expertise to include Ute canopies, tarps and anything that can be custom made. Michael Walker Avtek Covers, Cranbourne

Michael at work, Avtek Covers in Cranbourne

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Sailmaker (Industrial Textiles Fabricator) What is this Job? If you love sailing and the idea of applying the latest technology to improving the performance of sailboats, then you might consider a career in sail making. The Sailmaker also known as an Industrial Textiles Fabricator, designs, makes, maintains and repairs sails for sailboats. They apply 3D computer modelling and the structural properties of sailcloth materials to create sails that optimise performance. You will work closely with sailcloth suppliers to implement their latest technological advances in sailcloth and design. You will experiment in the latest fibres and lamination systems and consult champion sailors to develop and produce a first class finished sail. This is a highly skilled occupation requiring an excellent understanding of technology and science applying to sailing. You could end up working in a world-class Sailmaker’s loft, consulting with champion sailors from around the world and creating sails with perfect shape, precise construction and performance. Today, one of a Sailmaker’s most important jobs is to show customers how to set and trim their sails to get the most out of them. Sometimes a Sailmaker will accompany the client out on the water and adjust the sails.

Is this YOU? Embrace computer aided technology in design and sewing process, operate an industrial sewing machine and hand sewing ability, good eyesight and attention to detail, methodical approach to your work and be open to new designs and technology.

Employment Pathways Textile technician, Marine Fabricator, Uupholsterer, Sailmaker, Furniture Upholsterer, Interior Decorator, Leather Goods Maker, Interior Designer, Cabinetmaker, Clothing and Soft Furnishing Technician, Machinist, Cutter, Blind and Awning Installer. You could also start a small business in canvas goods.

Training Providers | Links to further information Certificate III in Textile Fabrication – www.rmit.edu.au RMIT University Certificate III in Automotive and Marine Trimming Technology – www.holmesglen.edu.au Holmesglen Institute

Snapshot – Sailmaker Our customers are either world champions or eager competitors. You definitely have to have a passion to create an article that is both beautiful and performs at its full potential. Jacob MacDonald Goodall Design, Bendigo Jacob from Goodall Design in Bendigo

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REPAIRS, REDESIGN AND RECONSTRUCTION Boat Detailer What is this Job? Good Boat Detailers are highly sort after. They are responsible for thoroughly cleaning and polishing the boat once the fit-out, refit or repair is complete. Detailers are responsible for giving a luxury boat its spectacular finish and improving its overall appeal. The length of time it takes to detail a boat depends on the customer’s specification and the condition of the vessel. Boat Detailers work outdoors or indoors in showrooms and workshops, or may even operate a mobile service from a van. Boat Detailers operate cleaning equipment such as vacuums, steam cleaners, machine buffers, shampoo machines and treatments such as waxes, solvents and leather care oils.

Is this YOU? Energetic and physically fit to climb in and out of boats, do not have allergic reactions to chemicals and cleaning fluids, eye for detail, have good customer service skills, work under pressure to tight deadlines and customer expectations, reliable and able to follow instructions and can work independently.

Employment Pathways Professional Cleaner, Deckhand, Catering Attendant, Handyperson and Facilities Officer. Opportunities exist for experienced Boat Detailers to work for large contract cleaning companies or boat retailers on a casual basis. Self-employment is popular.

Training Providers | Links to further information Certificate II in Automotive Body Repair Technology – www.gotafe.vic.edu.au GOTAFE Certificate II in Automotive Body Repair Technology – www.thegordon.edu.au The Gordon Certificate II in Automotive Body Repair Technology – www.kangan.edu.au Kangan Institute Certificate II in Automotive Body Repair Technology – www.sunitafe.edu.au Sunraysia Institute of TAFE Certificate II in Automotive – www.handbraketurn.org.au Hand Brake Turn Certificate III in Cleaning Operations – www.atel.com.au Apprentices-Trainees-Employment Certificate III in Cleaning Operations – www.ashleyinstitute.com.au Ashley Institute of Training Certificate III in Cleaning Operations – www.bsilearning.edu.au BSI Learning Institute of Education Certificate III in Cleaning Operations – www.complexinstitute.edu.au Complex Institute of Education Certificate III in Cleaning Operations – www.gotafe.vic.edu.au GOTAFE Certificate III in Cleaning Operations – www.madec.edu.au MADEC College Certificate III in Cleaning Operations – www.stepsaustralia.com.au STEPS Australia

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Graphic Design (Boat Signage) What is this Job? With computer-generated, and state-of-the-art digital printing and cutting edge technology now available, a Signwriter or Graphic Designer can do almost anything in signage from traditional Signwriting techniques to 3-dimensional, digitally printed or painted. Companies employing Graphic Designers are able to use materials and processes on boats that are designed to withstand harsh weather environments. Some of the tasks performed will include technical, creative and conceptual skills to create designs that meet clients brief; solve a range of visual communication problems; sound understanding of design theory; operate a range of computer programmes to produce designs.

Is this YOU? Creative and imaginative, eye for detail, computer savvy to embrace computer aided, understanding of colour and form and able to work under pressure and meet deadlines.

Employment Pathways Signmaker, Graphic Pre-Press Tradesperson, Illustrator, Textile Designer, Visual Merchandiser.

Training Providers | Links to further information Certificate II in Signage and Graphics (pre-apprenticeship) – www.vu.edu.au Victoria Univeristy Certificate III in Signage (apprenticeship) – www.vu.edu.au Victoria University Diploma of Graphic Design – www.chisholm.edu.au Chisholm Institute Diploma of Graphic Design – www.holmesglen.edu.au Holmesglen Institute Advanced Diploma of Graphic Design – www.holmesglen.edu.au Holmesglen Institute There are a range of training options for Graphic Designer. Visit the following websites for more information: www.education.vic.gov.au/victorianskillsgateway Victorian Skills Gateway www.hobsonscoursefinder.com.au Hobsons Course Finder www.joboutlook.gov.au Job Outlook

Snapshot – Boat Signage Signage may be part of a corporate campaign, the final touch for a boat manufacturer, or the enthusiastic boat owner looking to set their boat out from the crowd. Graphic designers create high resolution artwork that is printed on marine grade quality vinyl wrapping and applied to the boat – and the result is transforming! Jonathon, apprentice at Formasign.

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SLIPWAY Slipway Operator What is this Job? A Slipway Operator is responsible for organizing the work, which takes place on the slipway. The slipway is the hub of work activity on the waterfront. It is where boats are dry docked for repairs and maintenance and where new boats are launched. As well as on the slipways, repairs and maintenance are also conducted on wet berths and moorings. A number of people experienced in trades work on the slipway including Metal Fabricators who repair metal work; Marine Mechanics who repair and service engines; maintenance staff carry out antifouling work to protect boats; riggers overhaul and replace rigging on yachts. Boats will be brought to the slipway for service, external repairs or storage. The role of the Slipway Operator involves planning and coordinating the work to be carried out by a range of skilled sub-contractors. The Slipway Operator or his team may operate a straddle carrier (equipment to lift boats from the water) and transport them to a hard stand or dry storage using a crane, travel lift or forklift. As a Slipway Operator you are required to hire, orient and train personnel in job duties, employer policy and performance requirements and ensure regulations and practices around safety and environment are in place.

Is this YOU?

Have an excellent knowledge of boats, technical skills, may have a number of skills that include machine operation (crane, forklift, heavy truck) an ability to coordinate and lead a team. Strong time management when working to tight time schedules, a commitment to ensure the protection of our environment and waterways and safe work methods.

Employment Pathways Marina Manager; Slipway Supervisor.

Training Providers | Links to further information There are a range of training options for Slipway Operator. Visit the following websites for more information: www.education.vic.gov.au/victorianskillsgateway Victorian Skills Gateway www.hobsonscoursefinder.com.au Hobsons Course Finder www.joboutlook.gov.au Job Outlook

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SLIPWAY Marine Technician (Mechanic) What is this Job? Good Marine Technicians are in high demand for the manufacturing process and at slipways, marinas and repair and service outlets. If you’re mechanically inclined consider becoming a marine mechanic. A Marine Mechanic is responsible for performing maintenance and repair work on watercraft equipment. Professional Marine Mechanics are able to service and repair inboard and outboard boat engines, fuel systems, steering systems, electrical systems, manual starters, and navigational systems on different types of watercraft. A Marine Mechanic spends a significant amount of time studying various types of boat engines. They are trained to diagnose mechanical, electrical and electronic faults. A Marine Mechanic may work at boat dealerships, marinas, boat manufacturing facilities, or be self-employed. A marine mechanic must have good communication skills in order to explain technical problems to boat owners.

Is this YOU? Hold good mechanical and diagnostic skills, physically fit, enjoy problem solving, a great active listener.

Employment Pathways Marine Mechanic/Technician: Marine Dealership Owner-Operator, Panel Beater, Spray Painter, Automotive Air Conditioning Technician, Exhaust or Tyre Fitter, Electrical Accessory Fitter, Agricultural Machinery Mechanic, Heavy Vehicle Mechanic, Light Vehicle Mechanic, Motorcycle Mechanic, Workshop Supervisor, Workshop Manager, Assessor, Service Manager and Bicycle Service Mechanic.

Training Providers | Links to further information Certificate III in Marine Mechanical Technology – www.chisholm.edu.au Chisholm Institute Certificate III in Marine Mechanical Technology – www.kangan.edu.au Kangan Institute

Snapshot – Marine Technician From experience, I can tell you that there is currently a lack of good, dedicated and committed marine mechanics in Victoria. I would strongly encourage anyone who has a keen interest in mechanics, a love of the water and a passion for boating to consider becoming a marine mechanic / technician. Nicholas Purvis Coastline Marine, Carrum Downs

Nicholas at his premises in Carrum Downs

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SLIPWAY Automotive Vehicle Refinisher (Painter) What is this Job? A Refinisher uses a range of techniques including abrasive blasting in environmentally friendly facilities to prepare paint surfaces and apply coatings to hulls to protect them against corrosion and fouling as well as specially prepared anti-fouling paints and finishes.

Is this YOU? Attention to detail and accuracy, enjoy practical and manual work, have good hand-eye coordination, have normal colour vision, have no breathing-related problems and have no allergies to thinners or paints.

Employment Pathways Boat Builder, Vehicle Painter, Painter.

Training Providers | Links to further information Certificate II in Automotive Vocational preparation – www.gotafe.vic.edu.au GOTAFE Certificate III in Automotive Refinishing Technology – www.chisholm.edu.au Chisholm Institute Certificate III in Automotive Refinishing Technology – www.gotafe.vic.edu.au GOTAFE Certificate III in Automotive Refinishing Technology – www.thegordon.edu.au The Gordon Certificate III in Automotive Refinishing Technology – www.kangan.edu.au Kangan Institute Certificate III in Automotive Refinishing Technology – www.mmtc.com.au Murray Mallee Training Company Certificate III in Automotive Refinishing Technology – www.sunitafe.edu.au Sunraysia Institute of TAFE Certificate III in Automotive Body Repair Technology – www.chisholm.edu.au Chisholm Institute Certificate III in Automotive Body Repair Technology – www.dentprotraining.com Dent Pro Training Certificate III in Automotive Body Repair Technology – www.federationtraining.edu.au Federation Training Certificate III in Automotive Body Repair Technology – www.thegordon.edu.au The Gordon Certificate III in Automotive Body Repair Technology – www.gotafe.vic.edu.au GOTAFE Certificate III in Automotive Body Repair Technology – www.kangan.edu.au Kangan Institute Certificate III in Automotive Body Repair Technology – www.mmtc.com.au Murray Mallee Training Company Certificate III in Automotive Body Repair Technology – www.sunitafe.edu.au Sunraysia Institute of TAFE

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SLIPWAY Metal fabricator (Boilermaker / Welder) What is this Job? Metal Fabrication Specialists make regular repairs and structural adjustments to boats on slipways. They perform welding, automatic and manual burning, blueprint reading, layout and template making, CAD (computer aided drawings), rigging, operation of mobile and stationary cranes, operation of shears, brakes, rolls, drill press, saws and all other metal fabrication equipment. They may be required to work in confined spaces or in high places on top of large vessels. Workers often use acetylene torches, power grinders and other potentially dangerous equipment.

Is this YOU? Enjoy technical activities and working with machines, have the strength to handle materials, tools and machines, have good hand-eye coordination ,interested in computer programmable machinery, are able to work in a team, are able to work independently, have patience and work accurately, have no skin or breathing allergies and safety conscious.

Employment Pathways Shipwright, Vehicle Body Builder, Engineering Tradesperson (fabrication or mechanical), Metal Surface Finisher.

Training Providers | Links to further information Certificate II in Competitive Systems and Practice – www.gotafe.vic.edu.au GOTAFE Certificate III in Engineering (Fabrication Trade) – www.chisholm.edu.au Chisholm Institute Certificate III in Engineering (Fabrication Trade) – www.gotafe.vic.edu.au GOTAFE Certificate III in Engineering (Fabrication Trade) – www.holmesglen.edu.au Holmesglen Institute There are a range of training options for Metal fabricator (boilermaker/welder). Visit the following websites for more information: www.education.vic.gov.au/victorianskillsgateway Victorian Skills Gateway www.hobsonscoursefinder.com.au Hobsons Course Finder www.joboutlook.gov.au Job Outlook

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SLIPWAY Rigger What is this Job? A Rigger is an occupation specialising in lifting and moving of large or heavy objects, often with the assistance of machines such as cranes. The term comes from the days of sailing ships where a Rigger was a person who worked with rigging, that is, ropes for hoisting the sails. Sailors could put their rope skills to work in lifting and hauling, in an era before mechanical haulage. Rigging is a specialised occupation where one day you could overhaul a maxi-yacht spar, and be inspecting rigging on a cruiser the next. Other tasks undertaken by Riggers include install, adjust, and modify sailboat standing and running rigging and assemble and dress masts and spars; installs and tunes the rigging of racing yachts, custom make spars, beach dollies and trailers, and modifies or customises fittings; works with rope and wire to make wire fabrications for lifelines and install various types of balustrades. The Rigger must be able to splice almost any type and size of rope, including eye splicing, rope-to-rope, rope to wire and rope tapering.

Is this YOU? Eye for detail and accuracy, have knowledge and experience of sailing and rope splicing, enjoy practical outdoor work, are physically fit, are able to work at heights, are good with your hands and are able to work as part of a team.

Employment Pathways Riggers are employed at Marinas, Slipways, and Wharfs and also with building and construction firms on a full time or casual (seasonal) basis. Mobility between occupations is common such as a crane driver and scaffolder with labour hire firms.

Training Providers | Links to further information Certificate III in Dogging – www.holmesglen.edu.au Holmesglen Institute Certificate III in Dogging – www.worksafetraining.com.au Worksafe Training Centre Certificate III in Rigging – www.federationtraining.edu.au Federation Training Certificate III in Rigging – www.worksafetraining.com.au Worksafe Training Centre Work Safely at Heights (CPC Unit) – www.auseasytrain.com.au Australian Easy Train Work Safely at Heights (CPC Unit) – www.chubb.e3learning.com.au Chubb Training Group Work Safely at Heights (CPC Unit) – www.csaa.com.au Construction Safety Assurance Licence to Perform Rigging (Basic Level CPC Unit) – www.auseasytrain.com.au Australian Easy Train Licence to Perform Rigging (Basic Level CPC Unit) – www.csaa.com.au Construction Safety Assurance Licence to Perform Rigging (Basic Level CPC Unit) – www.aceassessment.com.au Ace Assessment Licence to Perform Rigging (Basic Level CPC Unit) – www.topendtraining.edu.au Top End Training Perform High Work Risk Licence Construction Induction Card – www.worksafe.vic.gov.au

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SLIPWAY Diver (Commercial Diver) What is this Job? Commercial Divers can be engaged to manage underwater repairs, inspections, reporting, and cleaning of ships in ports and marinas. If you love diving and boats, you could work for a contract commercial diving company as a member of a dive team making underwater inspections and repairs. This profession is highly regulated given the need to protect our waterways from pollutions, so the diver is required to operate ethically and undertake their work within strict legislative guidelines. You will rely on your visual and video inspection skills to check for corrosion or damage and to determine what repairs are needed. You will be cleaning hulls, utilizing hand tools, grit-blasting, water-blasting or making wet welding repairs. For many Divers, commercial diving in the marine industries offers a well-paid way to see the world - underwater! Commercial diving is a rewarding yet dangerous business with little margin for error. It demands proper planning and endurance, skill, hard work and knowledge.

Is this YOU? Love of diving and can swim; physically fit to stay in the water for long periods of time and able to pass a strict medical examination. Committed to protecting our environment; responsible and safety conscious, able to work as part of a team.

Employment Pathways Police Diver, Scientific Diver, Media Diver and Diving Instructor, Deckhand, Fish Farmhand.

Training Providers | Links to further information To be employed as a commercial diver you must be aged over 18 years and hold certificates in First Aid, CPR and oxygen administration together with a current occupational diving medical clearance and a commercial diving certificate. Qualifications for commercial diving are available through short courses that follow the Australian Diver Accreditation Scheme (ADAS) – www.adas.org.au

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BOAT AND TRAILER (SALES AND REPAIRS) Trailer Manufacturer and Repair What is this Job? Repairs, servicing and sales activities, particularly those relating to trailerable boats are conducted from commercial retail outlets, showrooms and industrial workshops. There are a range of occupations available in this sector. Trailer manufacturers perform on site or mobile repairs and adjustments and are proficient in mig welding and sheet metal fabrication.

Is this YOU? Hold excellent technical skills , enjoy practical and manual activities and can problem solve.

Employment Pathways Trailer Repairs, Engineering Tradesperson (fabrication), Welder, Blacksmith, Warehousing Operations.

Training Providers | Links to further information Certificate III in Engineering (Fabrication Trade) – www.gotafe.vic.edu.au GOTAFE Certificate III in Engineering (Fabrication Trade) – www.holmesglen.edu.au Holmesglen Institute Training Certificate III in Engineering (Mechanical Trade) – www.chisholm.edu.au Chisholm Institute Certificate III in Engineering (Mechanical Trade) – www.gotafe.vic.edu.au GOTAFE Certificate III in Engineering (Mechanical Trade) – www.holmesglen.edu.au Holmesglen Institute There are a range of training options for Trailer Manufacturer and Repair. Visit the following websites for more information: www.education.vic.gov.au/victorianskillsgateway Victorian Skills Gateway www.hobsonscoursefinder.com.au Hobsons Course Finder www.joboutlook.gov.au Job Outlook

Snapshot – Boat Trailers Dunbier Marine Products operate a large manufacturing site and distribution centres. They employ staff in fabrication, assembly, warehouse operations, sales and administration.

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Sales – Boat and Trailer (New & Used) What is this Job? Boat Dealers and Boat Brokers employ sales representatives on both full time, part time and on a casual basis, to sell new and used (second-hand) boats, boat trailers and other associated accessories. It is the job of a professional salesperson to sell its company’s products and services (e.g. boats, engines, trailers and other associated products) to appropriate buyers. By utilising professional selling skills and techniques to solve the customer’s problems the salesperson will turn the customer’s wants into needs, thereby meeting and exceeding the customers’ expectations. In most cases this can be achieved by demonstrating to the customer exactly how the identified problems can be solved by correctly using the salespersons products and/services on offer. The success of a Salesperson is measured by the amount of sales he or she is able to make during a given period and their ability to persuade individuals to make a purchase. If a Salesperson is employed by a company, in some cases compensation can be decreased or increased based on the amount of goods or services sold, sometimes referred to as; sales incentive, commission or bonus. A competent salesperson uses skills and mastery of both internal and competitive product information and represents all of the products to be sold in a professional, ethical, honest and compelling manner.

Is this YOU? Ambitious, motivated, enthusiastic, people-orientated and willing to work hard. Enjoy interaction with customers and can build trusting relationships. Have a passion for boats, firsthand experience using boats and have good product knowledge of boats and the industry. Have excellent communication and interpersonal skills and have a strong work ethic. Competent business software and competent with the internet and the use of social media.

Employment Pathways Retail Manager, Chandlery Manager, Sales Representative.

Training Providers | Links to further information Certificate III in Automotive Sales – www.gotafe.vic.edu.au GOTAFE There are a range of training options for Trailer Manufacturer and Repair. Visit the following websites for more information: www.education.vic.gov.au/victorianskillsgateway Victorian Skills Gateway www.hobsonscoursefinder.com.au Hobsons Course Finder www.joboutlook.gov.au Job Outlook

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BOAT AND TRAILER (SALES AND REPAIRS) Boat Broker / Boat Dealer What is this Job? A Boat Broker is an appointed sales agent who acts on behalf of a vendor as the appointed vendor agent on a commission basis only, without having title or ownership to the property in which they are selling (aka: consignment sale). The term Boat Broker largely pertains to the sale of used (second-hand) boats and/or trailers, but not always. The vendor agent is engaged formally by the seller (much like a real estate agent) to find the right buyer for the boat and/or trailer at the right price. Boat Brokers often assist the parties by providing, coordinating or accessing marketing, ďŹ nancing, insurance, survey (pre-purchase inspections), legal, maintenance and/or repair services. A Boat Dealer is a person (or company) who has the title and ownership to the boat and/or trailer in which they are selling. The term Boat Dealer largely pertains to the sale of a brand new boat and/or trailer, but not always.

Is this YOU? Enjoy negotiation - have an excellent knowledge of boating and boats (product knowledge) - enjoy interaction with customers and can build trusting relationships, have a passion for boats, have excellent communication skills and interpersonal skills, strong work ethic, ambitious and willing to work hard, knowledge of boating locations, keen to excel in a competitive market place, licensed second-hand dealer, competent in the use of email, social media and the internet as a tool to interact with buyers and sellers.

Employment Pathways Business Development Manager, Marketing Coordinator, Sales Representative.

Training Providers | Links to further information There are a range of training options for Boat Broker/Boat Dealer. Visit the following websites for more information: www.education.vic.gov.au/victorianskillsgateway Victorian Skills Gateway www.hobsonscoursefinder.com.au Hobsons Course Finder www.joboutlook.gov.au Job Outlook

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Parts Interpreter (Sales) What is this Job? Parts Interpreters sell automotive or marine parts and accessories in retail or wholesale outlets, including engines, components, cleaning equipment, lights. Parts Interpreters talk to customers to find out their exact needs and recommend appropriate parts; identify the make, model and variations of their boat or vehicle, check catalogues or computer databases to identify and locate the source of required parts; order parts from warehouse and external suppliers; collect, pack and dispatch or deliver ordered parts; assist customers in repairing or replacing parts.

Is this YOU? Interested in motor or marine parts and their functions, enjoy clerical and administrative work, neat personal appearance, good communication and sales skills, organised approach to work, problem-solving skills, able to work quickly under pressure, aptitude for working with computers.

Employment Pathways Light Vehicle Mechanic, Vehicle Dismantler.

Training Providers | Links to further information Certificate III Automotive Sales (Parts Interpreting) – www.gotafe.vic.edu.au/ GOTAFE Certificate III Automotive Sales (Parts Interpreting) – www.kangan.edu.au KANGAN Certificate III Automotive Sales (Parts Interpreting) – www.kangan.edu.au The Gordon Certificate III Automotive Sales (Parts Interpreting) – www.linkemploy.org.au/ Link Employment and Training There are a range of training options for Parts Interpreter. Visit the following websites for more information: www.education.vic.gov.au/victorianskillsgateway Victorian Skills Gateway www.hobsonscoursefinder.com.au Hobsons Course Finder www.joboutlook.gov.au Job Outlook

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BOAT AND TRAILER (SALES AND REPAIRS) Chandlery Retail What is this Job? The chandlery is a shop that specialises in selling boating accessories including rocket launchers to a bung, life vests and wet suits, flares, bait and fishing tackle, books and souvenirs. Chandlers give advice to customers on products which will best suit their circumstances and budget. They need to be fully familiar with safety requirements for boats and have good customer service and communication skills. This job role assist customers source the products they need and have a good knowledge of brands and accessories relating to recreational boating.

Is this YOU? Have fantastic selling skills or previous experience in a retail environment, prepared to learn about new products – Strong communication skills when dealing with customers and suppliers enjoy boating or fishing so as to better understand the industry and environment they are working in commit to learning about new products entering the market, may have to work within a set of sales targets or key performance indicators to achieve work goals, prepared to learn about new products and communicate with customers, may have to work within a set of sales targets or key performance indicators to achieve work goals.

Employment Pathways Sales Assistant, Sales Representative, Parts Interpreter, Retail Buyer, Retail Merchandiser.

Training Providers | Links to further information There are a range of training options for Chandlery Retail. Visit the following websites for more information: www.education.vic.gov.au/victorianskillsgateway Victorian Skills Gateway www.hobsonscoursefinder.com.au Hobsons Course Finder www.joboutlook.gov.au Job Outlook

CH Smith Marine in Collingwood

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Coxswain What is this Job? Coxswains usually start their careers in the maritime industry as deck hands before gaining enough experience to sit the Coxswain Certificate of Competency Test.

Coxswain as Marine Engine Operators Coxswains manage the operation of small commercial marine vessels such as fishing boats, ferries, water taxis, jet boats, yachts, catamarans and tourist craft. A Coxswain is the person in charge of a boat, particularly its navigation and steering. Coxswains may operate vessels up to 12 metres in length in waters up to 15 nautical miles seaward off the coast. Coxswains plan and navigate a passage for a vessel up to 12 metres or more; Operate inboard and outboard motors; Operate main propulsion unit and auxiliary systems; Apply basic survival skills in the event of vessel abandonment and survive at sea using survival craft; Follow procedures to minimize and fight fires on board a vessel.

Is this YOU? To be a Coxswain/Marine Engine Operator you must be 18 years of age, complete minimum sea service requirements, meet specific medical and eyesight standards. Have a marine radio operators certificate of proficiency. Have a shipboard safety certificate. Have a first Aid certificate level 2 – willing to undertake physical tasks and work in all kinds of weather.

Employment Pathways Fishing Charter Operator: manages a fishing charter business which may include work as a Coxswain. Fishing Charter Operators lead and manage crews with a strong sense of deadline and schedule management. Integrated Ratings Worker: is responsible for assisting with berthing and unberthing, securing cargo, assisting with maintenance and repair of the ship, assisting with watchkeeping, cleaning the ship of rust, steering the ship under supervision and splicing ropes and wires.

Training Providers | Links to further information Certificate II in Maritime Operations – Coxswain Grade 1 Near Coastal www.federationtraining.edu.au Federation Training Certificate II in Maritime Operations – Coxswain Grade 1 Near Coastal www.marinetraining.vic.edu.au Marine Training Services Certificate II in Maritime Operations – Coxswain Grade 1 Near Coastal www.swtafe.vic.edu.au South West Institute of TAFE Certificate II in Maritime Operations – Marine Engine Driver Grade 3 Near Coastal www.federationtraining.edu.au Federation Training Certificate II in Maritime Operations – Marine Engine Driver Grade 3 Near Coastal www.marinetraining.vic.edu.au Marine Training Services Certificate II in Maritime Operations – Marine Engine Driver Grade 3 Near Coastal www.swtafe.vic.edu.au South West Institute of TAFE

Snapshot – Coxswain The South West Institute of TAFE Trainer Brett Davis, and the Certificate In Maritime Operations, came strongly recommended to me by other ships captains I had met over the years. Having completed the course, I understand why. The Trainer, an experienced former ship’s captain, delivered a “handson, real world course. Andrew Dart, PNG Explorer, Papua New Guinea, Graduate Master 5 at South West TAFE.

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BOAT OPERATION Deckhand What is this Job? Deckhands undertake a wide range of fishery and maritime work on land and at sea including communicating, supply, seamanship, hospitality and stores. A Deckhand’s general duties vary depending on the type of boat they work on. Deckhands employed on sailing vessels have to work with rigging and may have to scale a 10 meter mast when they are on lookout. Deckhands on fishing boats will catch, sort, store and clean the catch. Deckhands on charter boats primarily take care of the passengers sometimes serving drinks and food or assisting them to rig fishing gear. Deckhands on cargo boats may be involved in moving cargo on and off boats and assisting crane drivers as they shift heavier items. Deckhands operate winches and other deck and marine equipment (radio, buoys, anchors, nets, lines, traps for fish, crustaceans and molluscs; operate dinghies and dories; sort, clean process, preserve and package catches of sea fish; rely information to crew, other ships and harbour authorities using radio and satellite equipment; provide hospitality services such as table prep, cabin care for patrons, bar services.

Is this YOU? Physically fit and enjoy working outdoors in all weather conditions, normal colour vision (to become a skipper, however restricted licences are available), knowledge of maritime safety, good hand-eye coordination and sense of balance. Able to work independently or as part of a team, commit to early morning starts.

Employment Pathways Although you can work as a deckhand without formal qualifications, you may be able to develop and have recognized additional skills under the Maritime or Seafood Industry training packages that will expand your career opportunities within this industry. You can undertake a traineeship in Transport and Distribution (Marine Operations/Marine Engine Driving) or Seafood Industry (Aquaculture/Fishing Operations). The fishing sector provides the most job opportunities for Deckhands, however demand for people to work on fishing vessels can vary seasonally. Employment as a Deckhand is available on recreational, transport and other commercial vessels including marinas and fisheries agencies and research vessels. Related jobs can include Coxswain, Diver, Fish Farmhand, Fisheries Officer, Navy Sailor, Ships Officer or Integrated Rating Worker.

Integrated Ratings Worker Although you can work as a deckhand without formal qualifications,

you may be able to develop and have recognized additional skills under the Maritime or Seafood Industry training packages that will expand your career opportunities within this industry. You can undertake a traineeship in Transport and Distribution (Marine Operations/Marine Engine Driving) or Seafood Industry (Aquaculture/Fishing Operations). The fishing sector provides the most job opportunities for Deckhands, however demand for people to work on fishing vessels can vary seasonally. Employment as a Deckhand is available on recreational, transport and other commercial vessels including marinas and fisheries agencies and research vessels. Related jobs can include Coxswain, Diver, Fish Farmhand, Fisheries Officer, Navy Sailor, Ships Officer or Integrated Rating Worker.

Training Providers | Links to further information Coxswains Short Course, Marine Engine Driving, Master 5 Skipper 3, Marine Engine Driving Med 2 & 3 www.swtafe.vic.edu.au South West Institute of TAFE www.marinetraining.vic.edu.au Marine Training Services

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8

BOAT OPERATION Yachting (Skipper / Sailor) What is this Job? A Skipper or Yachtmaster is certified to handle a sailing boat or motor boat in specific areas of operation ie; Yachtmaster Coastal, Offshore and Ocean. There is a structured pathway of courses that leading from beginners to advanced skills in skippering recreational, racing and commercial vessels.

Is this YOU? Physically fit, stamina to work in all kinds of climate conditions, hold a current first aid certificate, meet specific medical and eyesight standards, hold a marine radio operators certificate of proficiency, hold a shipboard safety certificate and hold first Aid certificate level 2.

Employment Pathways Marine Engine Driver, Coxswain, Sailor (yacht).

Training Providers | Links to further information www.yachtmaster.com.au – Yachtmaster offers internationally recognised qualifications for both sail and motor from beginner to yachtmaster (Navigation, radio, SSSC and ICC; YA/YA certificate courses; teaching sail and motor). A Yachtmaster qualification is a certificate of competence of the ability to handle either a sailing boat or motor boat. The RYA administers Yachtmaster Certificates of Competence and examines candidates under the authority of the Maritime & Coastguard Agency (MCA). http://www.yachting.org.au/case-study-pathway-grow-skills-sailing-business/ Yachting Australia – Case Study: A Pathway to Grow Skills, Sailing and Business Three different titles are specified. Yachtmaster Coastal (Coastal Skipper) – Yachtmaster Offshore – Yachtmaster Ocean.

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9

MARINA SERVICES A marina is a sheltered harbour where boats and yachts are kept in the water and where services are geared to the needs of recreational boating. Boats are moored, either on buoys, or on fixed or floating walkways that are tied to an anchoring piling by a roller or ring mechanism (floating docks or pontoons). Many marinas have re-fueling, washing and repair facilities, ship chandlers, stores and restaurants. Marinas may offer a slipway, boat hoist and repairs and maintenance facilities. They may also offer customers an out-of-waterstorage facility for their boats. Other services that are often available at marinas include boat hire, boat sales or brokerage services. Some marinas have members’ social areas or large function centers.

Marina Manager What is this Job? The role of the Marina Manager is to maintain the smooth and efficient running of the marina complex. This role will also involve the upgrading of existing facilities, enhancing the range of services offered, dealing with marina personnel, maintaining customer contact, staying abreast of emerging technology and legislation applying to the boating industry including environmental performance and occupational health and safety. In short, you will have overall responsibly for all of the activities conducted in the marina including maintaining its business operations. Marinas may be owned and operated by a private club, especially yacht clubs and also as private enterprises or municipal facilities.

Is this YOU? Have excellent organisational and interpersonal skills, have good business management skills and strong commercial instincts, have good leadership skills and can work both autonomously and in a team , understand the boating industry and can relate well to customers.

Employment Pathways Training and education required for marina management positions will vary depending on your position and the size, conditions and services at the marina. Marina Management, Dockmaster, Marine Attendant, Sales Manager, Operations Manager, Crane Operator, Restaurant Manager, Customer Service, Receptionist, Administrative Assistant, Fuel Attendant, Security Guard, Boat Rigger.

Training Providers | Links to further information www.marinas.net.au Marina Industries Association (MIA) There are a range of training options for Marina Management. Visit the following websites for more information: www.education.vic.gov.au/victorianskillsgateway Victorian Skills Gateway www.hobsonscoursefinder.com.au Hobsons Course Finder www.joboutlook.gov.au Job Outlook

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9

MARINA SERVICES Dockmaster What is this Job? A Dockmaster works to ensure the smooth functioning of boats docking and departing a marina. They may also provide special services or accommodation for customers using the marina and are responsible for inspecting the marina and making sure that necessary repairs get done, or that any problems are reported to the proper authorities. Marinas employ a Dockmaster to oversee the docks and give support, advice or directions to those using the marina and provides overall assistance to the general public regarding marine information, marina rules and regulations, docking fees, transient docking and safe boating practices. Dockmasters may also safeguard the marina from illegal use or incursion on the property. Since marinas often contain boats that are worth millions of dollars, security guards may be employed along with a dockmaster.

Is this YOU? Enjoy working with, and helping people, thorough knowledge of boating and nautical affairs, can interpret legislative requirements in relation to safe boating and the environment, can manage people and make quick decisions and have the stamina to work outdoors in all kinds of weather.

Employment Pathways Training and education required for marina positions will vary depending on your position and the size, conditions and services at the marina. Marina Manager, Dockmaster, Marine Attendant, Sales Manager, Operations Manager, Crane Operator, Restaurant Manager, Customer Service, Receptionist, Administrative Assistant, Fuel Attendant, Security Guard, Boat Rigger.

Training Providers | Links to further information www.marinas.net.au Marina Industries Association (MIA) There are a range of training options for Dockmaster. Visit the following websites for more information: www.education.vic.gov.au/victorianskillsgateway Victorian Skills Gateway www.hobsonscoursefinder.com.au Hobsons Course Finder www.joboutlook.gov.au Job Outlook

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9

MARINA SERVICES Marina Attendant What is this Job? Marina Attendants report to the Dockmaster or Marina Manager. They assist customers with their day to day needs, help with fuelling, assisting with tie up, advising of maintenance work and health and safety hazards, ensuring the marina is kept clean and hazard-free.

Employment Pathways Deckhand, Marina Supervisor, Maintenance Manager, Customer Service Operator, Public Relations Manager, Marine Mechanical Technician.

Training Providers | Links to further information www.marinas.net.au Marina Industries Association (MIA) There are a range of training options for Marina Attendants. Visit the following websites for more information: www.education.vic.gov.au/victorianskillsgateway Victorian Skills Gateway www.hobsonscoursefinder.com.au Hobsons Course Finder www.joboutlook.gov.au Job Outlook

Snapshot – Marina Attendant

Connor began with Western Port Marina mid 2011 for weekend work experience. Even though he had no knowledge of boats or marinas to start, his enthusiasm to learn and his hard work has paid dividends and he now understands most facets of the marina industry Connor, Marina Attendant at Western Port Marina

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9

MARINA SERVICES Administration What is this Job? A good Receptionist and Administrative staff are highly valued on the marina site. These roles encompass a range of duties and in some cases, the first point of contact and ambassador or face of the marina. Roles include answering incoming calls, maintaining communication systems, coordinating vessel movements, maintenance of the customer database, accounts duties including debt management and accounts payable; liaising with all suppliers, visitors and tradespeople to ensure communication is delivered to the right parties; general duties required to support the marina management team.

Is this YOU? Team player, flexible, multi-skilled and capable of responding to change, strong communication skills with the ability to deal with the public, capable of working autonomously and unsupervised, strong work ethic and passion for marine industry sector, well-spoken and dress professionally, have good time management skills, can type proficiently; report writing and use a range of word processing/software packages and a knowledge of boating and nautical affairs, understanding of legislative requirements in relation to safe boating and the environment, understanding of all the tenants; spaces and operational (opening and closing) times in the marina.

Employment Pathways Office Administrator or Manager, Data Entry Operator, Personal Assistant, Marina Manager, Public Relations Coordinator, Financial Controller.

Training Providers | Links to further information There are a range of training options for courses in Administration, Accounting and Reception Management: www.education.vic.gov.au/victorianskillsgateway Victorian Skills Gateway www.hobsonscoursefinder.com.au Hobsons Course Finder www.joboutlook.gov.au Job Outlook

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10

MARINE TOURISM Marine Tourism in Victoria Coastal and Marine Tourism includes recreational activities which involve travel away from one’s place of residence which have as their host or focus the marine environment and/or the coastal zone. There are many diverse and interesting career opportunities in the marine tourism industry. Victoria’s tourism industry provides jobs for over 200,000 Victorians and contributes 7 per cent of employment in tourism and other industries. Tourism remains a significant economic driver for Victoria worth $19.1 billion in 2011-2012 – worth 5.8 per cent of the State’s Gross State Product in 2011-2012, increasing from $18 billion in 2010-2011.

Want to know more? visit these tourism sites www.tourism.vic.gov.au Tourism Victoria http://biavic.com.au/ Boating Industry Association of Victoria

The BIAV members love boating and want everyone around Victoria to know it. Boating is a great fun, family friendly adventure. It’s easy and it’s affordable, just try it out and see for yourself. From kayaks and canoes to water skiing, fishing boats, sailing, jet skis and the big luxury cruisers there’s a boat to suit you. The BIAV own and operate the Melbourne Boat Show (MBS), which is the largest promotion of boating in Victoria. With competition for recreational time at an all-time high; the MBS aims to give the public a positive boating experience and allows them to imagine boating as part of their lifestyle, there by contributing to Victoria’s Tourism economy.

Tour Operator What is this Job? Tour Operators may offer a range of tourist services including operating charter boats including for fishing trips and boating excursions to tourist attractions.

Is this YOU? Are skilled in boat operation, like working with a diverse customer base, have specialist knowledge in relation to tourist attractions, have excellent communication and customer service skills, have good business management and organizational ability, have a flair for marketing and have a commitment to safe operating procedures and to the environment.

Employment Pathways Marine Engine Operator, Event Management, Public Relations Officer.

Training Providers | Links to further information There are a range of training options for Tour Operators including Certificates II, III and IV in Tourism. Visit the following websites for more information: www.education.vic.gov.au/victorianskillsgateway Victorian Skills Gateway www.hobsonscoursefinder.com.au Hobsons Course Finder www.joboutlook.gov.au Job Outlook

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10

MARINE TOURISM On-board Marine Tourist Guide What is this Job? Boat Tour Operators provide opportunities for tourists and holiday makers to enjoy Australia’s waterways. Commercial Tour Operators offer an exciting range of services from harbour and river cruises, ďŹ shing trip charters, whale watching, eco-tours to jet-boat rides. Some charter operators employ tour guides whose role may include providing a tour commentary; pointing out places of interest; providing information about Australian waterways and marine life, the environment, safety regulations; prepare and serve refreshments.

Is this YOU? Have excellent communication and customer relation skills, can observe safety and emergency procedures, enjoy learning about culture and heritage, can work in a socially diverse environment, have a commitment to safe operating procedures and to the environment, may be bi lingual and a good memory to retain points of interest and may have had previous experience in retail or hospitality background.

Employment Pathways Customer Service Assistant, Marketing Officer, Event Officer You can also become a tourist information officer through a traineeship in Tourism or Tourism Visitor Information Services. Entry requirements may vary, but employers generally require Year 12.

Training Providers | Links to further information There are a range of training options for On-board Marine Tourist Guides. Visit the following websites for more information: www.education.vic.gov.au/victorianskillsgateway Victorian Skills Gateway www.hobsonscoursefinder.com.au Hobsons Course Finder www.joboutlook.gov.au Job Outlook

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10

MARINE TOURISM Dive Instructor (Tourism) What is this Job? A dive instructor has the opportunity to teach diving across a broad field ranging from novice divers, overseas visitors and travelers, school groups and advanced divers. Dive instructors are an asset to the marine tourism industry because they can showcase the beautiful waterways in Victoria including Port Phillip Bay.

Is this YOU? Strong level of enthusiasm, outstanding customer relations skills. PADI or SSI instructor certification. Current dive medical AS4005.1. Senior level 11 first aid, current drivers licence, Working with children’s check and Oxygen Therapy provider. CPR training, defibrillator training, Coxswains certificate and computer literacy skills.

Employment Pathways Dive Master; Dive Coach; Media or Police Diver.

Training Providers | Links to further information www.divevictoria.com.au Dive Victoria

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Boating and Marine Industry Careers Guide


APPENDIX

Links to Further Information, Education and Training

Website

Description

www.aapathways.com.au

Australian Apprenticeships Pathways

www.aapathways.com.au/Self-Help/Step-byStep-Guide

Step by Step Guide‘ to becoming an Australian Apprentice

www.aatinfo.com.au/Home

Australian Apprenticeships and Traineeships Information Website. 133873 – Australian Apprenticeships telephone referral line

www.australianapprenticeships.gov.au

The Australian Apprenticeships website provides current information on Australian apprenticeships

www.australianapprenticeships.gov.au/ australian-apprenticeships-ambassadorsprogram

The Australian Apprenticeships Ambassador program provides real life success stories.

www.australianapprenticeships.gov.au/tradesupport-loans

Trade Support Loans. A $20,000 Trade Support Loan is available to apprentices in skills shortage trades and is paid in instalments into their bank account over four years. These loans are intended to assist apprentices with everyday costs while they complete their apprenticeship.

www.business.gov.au

Online Australian business community offering access to government information, forms and services.

www.careerone.com.au

Job search site

www.centrelink.gov.au

Centrelink Career Information assists job seekers in identifying options on education and training pathways to work by providing access to career information and disability employment services.

www.ceta.org.au

Certified Electronics Technicians Association

www.coastguard.com.au

Australian Volunteer Coastguard

www.coastalpatrol.asn.au

Royal Volunteer Coastal Patrol

www.education.gov.au/career-bullseyeposters

Career Bullseye posters, posters of school subjects that link to occupations

www.education.vic.gov.au/school/principals/ curriculum/Pages/apprentice.aspx

School-based apprenticeships and traineeships (SBAT). An SBAT allows senior high school students to work for an employer, train towards a recognized qualification while they are completing secondary school studies.

www.education.vic.gov.au/training

Search for general information on Victoria’s apprenticeship and traineeship system on the Department of Education and Training’s Further Education and Training website.

www.education.vic.gov.au/ victorianskillsgateway

Victorian Skills Gateway is a comprehensive one-stop-shop website about vocational training information

www.employment.gov.au

Australian Government Department of Employment

www.employment.gov.au/new-enterpriseincentive-scheme-neis

New Enterprise Incentive Scheme (NEIS).

www.engineersaustralia.org.au

Engineers Australia

www.grouptraining.com.au

Group Training Companies are businesses that employ apprentices/ trainees, and place them with one or more host employers.

…continues over page

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APPENDIX

46

Links to Further Information, Education and Training

Website

Description

www.jobsearch.gov.au

Australia’s largest free online jobs website.

www.jobaccess.gov.au/content/australianapprenticeships-access-program

The Australian Apprenticeship Access Program identifies what you need to get an Australian Apprenticeship

www.lmip.gov.au

Labour market information

www.marinas.net.au

Marina Industries Association (MIA) is the peak industry body for the marina industries in Australia, Asia and the Pacific regions. A core objective of the association is to provide industry training that addresses requirements for the basic marina attendant level through to experienced marina industry professionals. For those who are new to the marina industry, MIA offers the Marinas 101 and Marina Attendant Course. For more experienced industry professionals, the MIA offers the Intermediate Marina Management and Advanced Marina Management Courses

www.marinecanvas.com

The Marine Fabricators Association (MFA) represents companies who make custom interiors and exteriors for both powerboats and sailboats. The MFA is a division of IFAI and provides resources and programs for nearly 320 marine fabricator members and establishes standards of excellence for business practices, products and craftsmanship. This website is dedicated to keeping marine fabricators and consumers updated on the latest news and information about the association and the marine fabrication industry

www.myfuture.edu.au

National career info and exploration service.

www.myskills.gov.au

Online information about vocational education and training options 131823 TAFE Training Line

www.myuniversity.gov.au

Information about Australian universities and higher education

www.neca.asn.au

National Electrical and Communications Association

www.rescue.org.au

Volunteer Rescue Association

www.seek.com.au

Job search site

www.studyassist.gov.au

For students seeking assistance with Vocational Educational Training (VET) fees

www.yachting.org.au

Yachting Australia

www.youthcentral.vic.gov.au/jobs-careers/ planning-your-career/employability-skills

Employability Skills are a set of 8 core skills identified as those required by employers within a job role (work). The 8 skills are communication, teamwork, problem solving, Initiative and enterprise, planning and organization, self- management, learning and technology

https://www.vicroads.vic.gov.au/licences/ licence-and-permit-types/marine-licence

To obtain your marine licence.

Boating and Marine Industry Careers Guide


the voice of the marine industry

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Boating Industry Association of Victoria

Boating Industry Association of Victoria

Boating Industry Association of Victoria

Level 1, 24 York Street South Melbourne Victoria 3025 E: info@biavic.com.au T: 03 8696 5600 F: 03 9686 5334 www.biavic.com.au

Boating & Marine Industry Careers Guide  

This Careers Guide, developed by the Boating Industry Association of Victoria, provides information to help you identify employment, educati...

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