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PORTFOLIO bianca verwaayen Ryerson University Bachelor of Architectural Science 2014-2016


CV

CURRICULUM VITAE EMPLOYMENT EXPERIENCE

bianca verwaayen CONTACT

519 319 7401

Email bverwaayen@ryerson.ca

Gymnastics Club, London

Personal Trainer | Self Employed: London Area Lawn Care & Yard Work | Self Employed: London Area

Student Painter | Student Works Painting, London, ON Grounds Keeping Technician | Old Oak Properties. London, ON

2011-2105 2014-2015 2011-2015 Summer 2016 Summer 2016

EDUCATION

High School Diploma | Medway High School, Arva, Ontario

2010-2014

Bachelor of Architectural Science | Ryerson University

2014-2018

Telephone

Recreational Gymnastics Coach | Forest City

Ontario Scholar - Academic Honours

BArchSc in Completion Current Year: 3

VOLUNTEER EXPERIENCE

Rendered CAD Drawings | Family Friend Meet Volunteer | Forest City Gymnastics Club, Emerald Cup Invitational Competition

2016 2010-2014

TECHNICAL SKILLS

EXTRA-CURRICULAR INVOLVEMENT/HOBBIES

AutoCAD Rhinoceros Sketchup Photoshop Indesign Illustrator Revit

SAGE National Business Competition| Medway High School Peers

2013-2014

Provincial Competitive Gymnast | Forest City Gymnastics Club

2003-2013

Second Place Spirit Award

20+ hours training per week Skills such as dedication, time management and goal setting


01

CANADIAN URBAN MULTICULTURAL CENTRE

02

SCULPTING SPACE ISAMU NOGUCHI MUSEUM OF STONE

03

LUMNIESENCE CORKTOWN DUPLEX

04

COMMUNITY LIVING MIDRISE CO-OP HOUSING

OTHER WORKS TRANSITION

05

TABLE OF CONTENTS

UNITY

TECTONIC AND MATERIAL EXPRESSION

TEHNICAL STUDIES

06

TC

DESIGN PROEJCTS

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN & HVAC


STUDIO PROJECTS

01

02 03

04


UNITYToronto Urban Multicultural Centre

Site master-planning, and integrated program spaces create a welcoming and inclusive hub for users of all backgrounds, creating a sense of unity and belonging.

SCULPTING SPACEIsamu Noguchi Museum of Stone

The Isamu Noguchi Museum of Stone is a museum dedicated to the Japanese-American sculptural artist; Isamu Noguchi

LUMINESENCECorktown Duplex

LUMINESCENCE features privacy to the individual units while providing non-private access to the rooftop. Allowing the rooftop to become one shared open-space allows for more social interaction and the availability for social events to take place.

COMMUNITY LIING48 Power Street Mid-Rise Co-op

Focus on creating an inviting community atmosphere, while bringing nature to the downtown core of the City of Toronto.


0 THE CANADIAN URBAN MULTICULTURAL CENTRE Toronto, ON

Front Street East, and Parliament Street Second Year: ASC 520 Integration Studio Professor: Paul Floerke September-December 2016


UNITY

THE CANADIAN URBAN MULTICULTURAL CENTRE The Canadian Urban Multicultural Centre, and the urban design proposal pertaining to master-planning of the Parliament and Front Street East Site, provides a connected and unified approach to the design of various spaces. This unification of spaces creates visual and experiential connectivity, which creates a sense of belonging and respect amongst all users of the site and building. Thus, the reasoning for programs to be joined with one another to gain this awareness and respect. Harmony between cultural groups and practices, and their representation through architecture, is an important driver for creating a sense of unity and belonging in the Canadian Urban Multicultural Centre. The Multicultural Centre features a diverse program which allows for connectivity and interaction. Through interaction, the visitors of the building become educated as they travel through the connected programs as well as open meeting spots for spontaneous human interaction. Program: - Seniors Drop-In - Daycare - Performance Hall - Community Centre - Urban Heritage Display and Offices - Federal Government Artifacts and Offices - Wellness and Recreation Facility


To intensify the public realm and enhance the quality of the neighborhood and downtown core, the proposed public park or potentially a public square, adheres to the visions and goals of the Toronto Official Plan and the Parliament-King Secondary Plan. The plans envisions and encourages new developments to preserve heritage when possible, and create more open and green spaces for the public.

PATHWAY Representation of the heritage of the site: The shape of the jail which once used to be on this site acts as a symbolic pathway which directs visitors towards the Multi-cultural

SEATING ROCKS Representation of the foundations of Upper Canada’s First Parliament buildings. These representational cultural and heritage references can be used in functional ways for seating when visiting the park.

STEPPING STONES - Through these stepping stones, there can be a metaphor of traveling through time while becoming educated with Canada’s Federal Government and Urban Heritage. Bringing heritage awareness of Canada’s Federal Government.


A

B B

A


WEST ELEVATION

EAST ELEVATION


NORTH ELEVATION

SOUTH ELEVATION


SECTION A-A

SECTION B-B


ENVELOPE CONDITION& Materiality

Experiential architecture intensifies spaces and enables them to become more inviting and intriguing. The conceptual envelope detail not only plays with light and shadow, giving an intriguing experiential quality to interior spaces, allows light to enter interior spaces, while providing semi-privacy.


02 STONE MUSEUM Toronto, ON

Pier 27: 39 Queens Quay East, Toronto Second Year: ASC 401 Design Studio 3 Professor: Garth Norbraten September-December 2015


EAST ELEVATION

SOUTH ELEVATION

LONGITUDINAL SECTION

TRANSVERSE SECTION

SCULPTING SPACE The Isamu Noguchi Museum of Stone is a museum dedicated to the Japanese-American sculptural artist; Isamu Noguchi


The Isamu Noguchi Museum of Stone is a museum dedicated to the Japanese-American sculptural artist; Isamu Noguchi. This museum is comprised of three main blocks which are stacked on top of one another, decreasing in length, and creating terraces off of the second and third blocks from the bottom. Toronto’s waterfront revitalization has allowed an extension of the shoreline to extend to the south, which the museum follows this notion and connects to Toronto’s history. The terraces are outdoor sculptural gardens of Noguchis large stone works, and with the glazed south facades of the building, the interior exhibition spaces have a direct and visual connection to the outdoor sculptural gardens. The “blinders”, the two walls on the east and west facades provide a more intimate feeling by providing a more enclosed space to the sculptural gardens which allows for focus on the building, and its contents. There is a sense of the artists background as well as his physical work; the materiality of the museum is stone, but the detailing and style is a Japanese style, as a connection to the artist himself.


Toronto's lake-shore has been an ongoing development process which has tied the city together, and allowed the area to become more inviting. This development has created more opportunities for the city to grow, by actually shifting Toronto's waterfront Landfilling extended Toronto's lake-shore south. The city needed the lake-shore to become more inviting and needed to incorporate green spaces to create a break from the concrete jungle. Located at Pier 27, a contemporary museum for stone works is created out of stone; the natural materials which come from our planet. This material in its raw un-tampered state, shifts its shape to form a museum that extends southward like Toronto's lake-shore. Noguchi is a very talented sculptor who believed that the sculptors task is to "shape space", giving order and meaning; saying that art should "disappear" or be one with its surroundings. Noguchi is an Japanese-IrishAmerican man who had a way of looking at the world in the sense of "openness". Noguchi worked with different materials; whatever he could get his hands on, although stone was one of the materials he used to create his sculptures. "Everything is sculpture, any material, any idea without hindrance born into space, I consider sculpture" - Noguchi.


SCULPTING SPACE Isau Noguuchi Stone Museum


LUMINESENCE Toronto, ON

03

44 Sumach St, Toronto Second Year: ASC 401 Design Studio 3 Professor: George Kapelos December-April 2016


LUMINESCENCE, a mixed use building which consists of a ground floor commercial use space, and 2 stacked residential units which focus on the penetration of light. Full storey windows in the living spaces such as the bedrooms and living rooms, are situated to the east and west of the site. The open-concept kitchen and living rooms are exposed to natural daylight, by curtain walls which covers the whole facade of the living room/kitchen. The curtain wall from the living room/kitchen brings a warm and luminous feel to the space, while providing outdoor access to a balcony. This commercial-residential duplex has one central circulation access point which connects all floors and units of the duplex to the rooftop - a relaxing haven from the hustle and bustle of the city. Enjoy relaxing on the outdoor living lounge, or sit under a pergola after preparing a meal on the outdoor kitchen. LUMINESCENCE features privacy to the individual units while providing non-private access to the rooftop. Allowing the rooftop to become one shared open-space allows for more social interaction and the availability for social events to occur. Although this duplex is small, the threshold of the building is made prominent by the full-buildingheight glazing which allows light to enter the stairwell to the entry points of the residential units, while creating an inviting, luminous and harmonious entry point of access.


SITE PLAN

FIX KITCHEN AND DINING LUMINESENCE LUMINESCENCE features privacy to the individual units while providing non-private access to the rooftop. Allowing the rooftop to become one shared open-space allows for more social interaction and the availability for social events to take place.


GROUND FLOOR

SECOND FLOOR

THIRD FLOOR

BEDROOM: UNIT 2 FOURTH FLOOR

LUMINESENCE Corktown Duplex

FIFTH FLOOR


48 POWER STREET COMMUNITY LIVING Toronto, ON

04

48 Power St. Toronto Second Year: ASC 401 Design Studio 3 Professor: George Kapelos December-April 2016


COMMUNITY LIVING Focus on creating an inviting community atmosphere, while bringing nature to the downtown core of the City of Toronto.


Power Street Community Living, is a 7-storey Residential-Commercial building which focuses on creating an inviting community atmosphere, while bringing nature to the downtown core of the City of Toronto. The ground floor entails a retail unit, which is permanently a flower and vegetable shop , which residents of the co-op can dedicate time to contribute to this activity and interact with the other community members of the complex. A studio, recreation centre and multiuse room for events, meetings and gatherings are located on the ground floor, followed by residential units from the second to seventh floors. This building is composed of two “wings� which face inward to a courtyard; the circulation space is located such that it also faces inward to the courtyard. This fully-glazed courtyard brings light into the residential units and their living spaces. Oriented to the East, all bedrooms are located on the East side of their units to allow morning daylight to enter the units - the glazed circulation core facing the courtyard allows for the west wing to also receive this Eastward Sunlight. All units receive sunlight from the East and West facades of their units.


SECTION: Through Lobby/Greenhouse

Bringing together community living through thinking green and bettering our environment.


UNIT TYPES

SECOND FLOOR

THIRD FLOOR


Oriented to the East, all bedrooms are located on the East side of their units to allow morning daylight to enter the units - the glazed circulation core facing the courtyard allows for the west wing to also receive this Eastward Sunlight. All units receive sunlight from the East and West facades of their units.


CRITICAL DESIGN STUDY

05

Transitional Elements from concrete to glass, from solid to void. The use of exposed structural members creates greater expression, as well as provides an interesting appearance, revealing what is usually hidden.

THE CONDITION


SPATIAL CONTEXT OF THE CONDITION


TECTONICS & MATERIALITY The condition chosen for this analysis was chosen to explore a transitional space which occurs in the design of the Canadian Urban Multicultural Centre, and develop how through materiality, joints, light and shadow, that this space could be enhanced and provide a sense of transition. Transitioning the material palette, the tolerance of light and shadow, lightness versus heaviness, and the shape and directionality has allowed for the joints and elements which compose this transitional space, to gain architectural, material and tectonic expression. A sense of movement or directionality as the space transitions from heavy concrete to light glass, as well as a glazed trough by the window which is lit up from beneath, creates a sense of direction, leading the passerby to travel down this path.


-THE CONDITION- DETAIL #1

HEAVINESS TO LIGHT: ILLUSION OF FLOATING AND SENSE OF DIRECTIONALITY Transitioning from heavy concrete in the vestibule area with the elevated illuminated bench, the seamless connection with the glass panel into the concrete base creates the illusion of a “jointness connection” however it is a joint itself. A sense of lightness held together by a much heavier element creates a sense of phenomena.


-THE CONDITION- DETAIL #2

LIGHT AS A MATERIAL: ENTERING THE TRANSITIONAL SPACE Light becomes a material as the light and shadows it casts on the interior space creates a sense of directionality and experiential qualities.


-THE CONDITION- DETAIL #3

LIGHTNESS: ILLUMINATING AND GUIDING MOVEMENT The glazed illuminated trough acs as a linear guide along the transitional space, which causes people to naturally wander in the direction which it is leading to.


TECHNICAL STUDIES

06

BUILDING SCIEN

02

BUILDING SCIENCE


NCE

01


ENVELOPE SYSTEM

As a study to choose sustainable and efficient building materials for the envelope of a building, this non-residential commercial building wall type, is designed to have an envelope that acts as a separator/building system that resists environmental loads.

ELEVATION 1:20

WALL SECTION 1:20 PLAN 1:200


ANALYSIS & CONCLUSIONS

ANALYSIS

Wall type three is a non-residential, commercial building. Building envelope acts as a separator/building system that resists environmental loads due to: - sheathing: blocks rain and condensation from entering the interior of the building, or limits the amount of it - membranes: weather protection: barrier between interior and exterior - coated glazing: little head gain through the window - separates exterior conditions of the wall from interior conditions of the wall, and low emissivity - durable roof to sustain wind/rain/snow laods - brick veneer cladding: durability of material and the brick ties and concrete backing provides structural integrity: allowing resistance to environmental loads

In the case of inevitable condensation, ways of managing and controlling it are: For Glazing: provide glazing which have a low U-value and provide supporting heat to the glazing to increase surface temperatures.

For Insulation/Membranes/Barriers: Use tall wall sheathing panels which can reduce air leaks by 60%, and include a vapour barrier of 1.0 perm. or less on the side of the wall that is warm in the winter is required. OSB sheathing is also a good idea to use as it is “smart� vapour barrier system because the permeance as well as relative humidity is low. - In dryer months permeance increases as does the relative himidi ty; meaning there is a greater availability of air movement - allowing the wall to dry faster.

For Roofing: Flat Roofs: Roofs with no cavity space - fewer condensation problems due to there being little air movement to move moisture -laden air into the roof, as well as the roof deck and the use of a rigid insulation can form a reasonable interior vapour barrier. Source: www.norbord.com

Overall, from doing this study and focusing on this wall type, I discovered different wall types and insulation as well as different barriers and membranes which could be used in commercial buildings while not compromising it’s architectural expression. After researching efficient as well as economical materials to be used in the wall, window and roof systems, I came to the conclusion to use polyurethane sprayed foam (75mm) due to it serving as an air barrier as well as a class 2 vapour barrier, simplicity and elegance in a single piece design; not compromising architectural integrity, its general stability as well as its ability to conserve energy as well as reduce heating/air conditioning system size, would be an appropriate and efficient material to use. The Polyurethane spray foam is a great insulator and also minimizes air infiltration that can condensate and result in mould and mildew growth. Other materials and systems such as CMU (concrete masonry units), limestone aggregate with perlite fill (200mm) was chosen as it s an affordable, durable, and good insualtive material for the envelope, to help control internal and external temperatures of the system, while providing support for the system and resist against environmental loads. The vapour barrier; polyethylene, allows for lower relative humidity in order to avoid condensation and water to enter the system. The perlite fill adds extra insualtive value to the CMU blocks, allowing for more thermal resistance and avoid lots of thermal heat transfer. The chart provided is there to represent the properties and values for the materials within the system and produce the calculations which show conductance, thickness, permeance etc. The OSB (oriented strand board) has a conductivity which is divided by the thickness pf the board (12.7mm)/ Finding this allows for the calculation of the thermal resistance (R) which is the inverse of the conductance (C). Other calculations were made such as the heat flux, which by finding this you can calculate the temperature difference among the different materials of the system. To find the heat flux calculate U (1/Rtotal), and multiply it by detlaT(change in temperature) --> ((1/Rtotal)*(deltaT). Take the individual R values and then multiply them by the heat flux found in order to find the temperature difference.


BODILY COMFORT SYSTEMS

Understanding HVAC Systems For Bodily Comfort


As as study to understand how HVAC systems work, a basic return and supply plan was created from a dwelling unit from a project in the ASC 401 Design Studio course.


Bianca Verwaayen Architecture Portfolio 2017: In-Progress