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illustrator. Graphic designer. Barister. Explorer. foodie. I was never good at problem solving. Not until I realised I was a visual learner. I like to see ideas develop from start to finish; how does one truly grab the entirety of a situation if not knowing the nostalgic inspirations that passed by on the flick of a face, smile of a stranger, or the smell of burnt asphalt the day you’re car broke down on your first big gig. Its the process that makes for memories; its the blood, sweat and tears that make something sentimental. To me, design is communication. Good design is invisible, great design invokes emotion. It takes you on a trip.


create a brief and a schedule. choose a cafe. Rebrand, package, media, illustrate and print. The role of a graphic designer is a wide reaching and varied one, and most projects involve combining a variety of skills. Project management is one of the most important talents and will be developed over the course of this assignment. A brief was devised that encompassed all required elements, combining different skills and design principles. These included branding, packaging, working website, multipage document, three illustrations and three digital images.


objective Govindas is an organic vegetarian restaraunt situated in the cultural hub of Burleigh. It is part of the Australia wide Hare Krishna charity organisation. The client requires a rebrand of their current identity to better portray there values. Client is interested in eco-friendly solutions. Concept is based on the following words: organic, hearty, earthy, ecofriendly, community.

required material Quote designed on singular sections of overall objective. Each section includes 2 free changes then additional costs apply. Printing is not included and a seperate quote will be proposed at time of production. Client requires the following items: Corporate identity 1000 Signage: outdoor 2x0.8m and a-frame 200 Website 800 Packaging solution 500 Interior fitout moodboard 50 Printed booklet 200 Visual elements for future use 300


organic. earthy. healthy. hearty. community. eco-friendly. Client bases input on the rebranding of Govindas. The inspiration for the design outcome stood firmly in nutrient-rich soul, smothered in rustic coloured spices and steaming with freshly cooked aromas. A green colour scheme was rejected by client as it was felt uninspiring and too assuming. Thus, the colour scheme adapted the elements of spice, natural and earthy ochres that suggest the elements of earth and heart. To separate the Burleigh strand of Govindas from its other associates, a visual coastal element was developed into the branding to connect location with branding, and thus the local community with the cafe itself.


tricolour. earthy. flowing. organic. hearty. rich. The development of the logo began with the interpretation of the descriptive words received from the client. The resulting design reflects organic shapes and impurities while the colours chosen invoke feelings of warmth and contentment. Most assumptions about organic cafes involved greens and raw vegetables; this colour scheme adapts to the curries and indian-style cuisine that Govindas has adapted and which it is locally reknowned for.


eyecatching. logo relatable. caricature. compact. directional. The icon was designed to be used in place of the original logo when need be or to act as support material as a secondary visual element. The flick at the top and slow curve of the stem suggest movement and fluidity; an organic development of shape. It represents the letter ‘G’ while also acting as a caricature.


identity. location. need. complimentary card. loyalty card. catering card. business card. After consultations with client it was evident there was no need for electronic stationery. Produce and maintanence tasks are aquired locally but it was felt that a print stationery set would be handy. Several cards were produced to strengthen the brand identity and promote recurring visits from customers. Also featured is exerpts from the multi page booklet promoting the business.


Delicious. nutritious. warm for the heart and soul. These are the core ideals of Govindas. When possible vegetables are sourced from local farms and all meals available are vegan orientated. Govindas is about community, giving back and rejoice in the simple and humble act of sharing a meal. The brand strives to be organic and smooth, environmentally friendly and resourceful where possible. This includes sourcing local materials, eco-friendly products and giving back to the local community in Burleigh Heads.


practical. easy navigation. no tricks. essential. To retain the brand essence, a style guide has been developed to assist future production. Three shades of burgandy/red were chose as focal colours. They work in association with black and white photography and paper white.The corporate colours are: C: 22 M:100 Y: 87 K: 13 C: 39 M: 92 Y: 67 K: 53 C: 55 M: 86 Y:57 K: 68

Tomato Red Aubergine Beetroot

Fonts used are Bebas Neue and Source Sans Pro. Source Sans Pro is only used for body copy; any other text is to use Bebas Neue. Photos must be grayscale. Only use white text over images, supported by a tint to make text legible. Only small amounts of text may overlay images, as it has poor readability. Logo is only to be used overlaying the ‘beetroot’ corporate colour. It is not used on a white, black or coloured background. Mung Bean pattern provided is a secondary element to be used sparingly in typographic work. It may overlay a photograph to provide texture, likewise with a large negative space, at a low opacity.


create a brief and a schedule. choose a cafe. Rebrand, package, media, illustrate and print. The 2.00 x 0.80m sign was redesigned with the new logo and corporate colours. It has a wooden rim around the edge which was important to represent the organic and welcoming theme of the brand. A chalkboard A-frame will be made of matching wood to support the main signage item. It has been deemed mobile and can therefore be placed inside, under cover or down the street. A back hook has also been provided so during peek hour traffic it can be mounted on the wall to reduce the risk of being hazardous to commuters.


create solution to awkward handling. eco-firendly and recyclable. Client required a packaging solution in relation to the amount of utensils required for takeaway. The three standard sizes have corresponding cardboard slips that hold both cutlery and serviettes. Cutlery is made from bamboo, which is a recyclable and eco-friendly product. It was found that retaining plastic containers was the most cost affective solution and the positives of adapting to a more environmental solution could not be upheld for an agreeable amount of time.


communicate. values. community. why govindas. The role of the multipage booklet is to involve the community in the values of Govindas. It describes the essence fo what the business is all about, and also what the Hare Krishna values are. The booklet is designed 8cm x 15cm to fit into the carboard sleeve that is part of the redesigned packaging.


easy to navigate. simple. effective. set the scene. Website made through wix. It was designed with simplicity in mind. Client clarified they are not particularly interested in electronic media, yet they are open to opportunity. The site includes a gallery, about us, contact us, menu and location tabs with built in google maps and email form. It also has a sliding banner to attract the wandering eye and links to other social media sites.


organic. warm. welcoming. spatious. uncluttered. clean. Client required a mock up of interior design solutions. At present, the interior of the business location does not match either its previous or present branding. Client is gradually working towards a more cohesive aesthetic.


client required visual media for immediate installation to site. open brief but had to related to organic theme Personal works for the interior fitout of Govindas. Client required several pieces with a high visual retention rate. The works explore the importance of the environment in our society, and how we can become overgrown by other people or their ideologies. It touches on Hare Krishna values and critiques society on not living life to a humble structure of happiness and health.


Brief: produce an advertising campaign on plastic water bottles provide six media specific materials Originally the Brief received was designed to advertise a ‘Drop One Product’ campaign. After the research conducted into plastic water bottles, an alternative position was developed. The idea of the Go PETE campaign is to accept that change is a slowand developmental process and to promote an active choice in the chosen demographic. This campaign has been designed to work in association with the Colour Run event so the overall design is campaigned towards 18-24 year old’s who participate in this event. It was found that there is an environmentally conscious and health certified option in the many varieties of plastic water bottles available.


Campaign: Go PETE Target: !8-24 year olds engaged in Colour Run In Association with: Colour Run Strategy: cultural saturation After several group tutorial exercises it became evident to me that most connotations about plastic water bottles are of the negative sort; people generally believe several vague ideologies about this type of packaging and stick to their attitude regardless of the level of research done. After delving into several data bases and scientific resources, I started to question my own knowledge on plastic. Basically, everyone thinks plastic is bad for the environment, and bad for us. I’m not saying they’re wrong but when it comes down to making a useful advertising campaign, working with vague facts and generally morbid statistics became a bit overwhelming. Alternatives were investigated, but the fact of the matter is the globe is just not interested enough to invest in a campaign that says NO to plastic water bottles. Go PETE is designed to raise awareness to the fact that there is much more than meets the eye to the typical plastic debate. It encourages the demographic to question the information they believe and investigate for themselves. It encourages a conscious decision.

PETE plastic (type 1) is biologically inert if digested, safe during handling and non-hazardous if inhaled

It does not contain BPA (BPA is found in type 7 products)

It does, however, leech antimonies. Test results proved the amount to be less than 1% of the daily tolerated intake

PETE plastics are designed as ‘single-use’ packages (not widely known)

PETE flake can be recycled into further plastic products, fibres for the textile industry, and woven into polyester fabric

For every pound of recycled PETE flake used, energy use is reduced by 84% and greenhouse gas emissions by 71%

The entire packaging is 100% recyclable

So really, I was searching for a positive outlook where initially there was none. There is a positive choice to be made, an option to make a difference in the direction of the future. Go PETE is all about education, initiating conscious involvement and providing food for thought.


#1 (PET or PETE) plastic is the kind used for bottled water, and are regarded as safe. They have been show to leach antimonies into the water but studies have shown these levels are less than 1% of the daily recommended intake. PETE plastic bottles are designed as single-use packaging solutions; prolonging the recommended usage leads to the leeching of said substance. #2 (HDPE), 4 (LDPE) and 5 (polypropylene) plastics are generally regarded as safe. HDPE is often used to make milk cartons, toys and some plastic bags. #3 (PVC) and 6 (styrene) plastics pose health risks and should be avoided. They aren’t used for bottled products but are often food containers. #7 plastic is usually polycarbonate and contains BPA. This category is a catch-all for ‘other’ plastics. A new generation of compostable plastics, made from bio-based polymers like corn starch, is being developed to replace polycarbonates. These are also included in category #7, which can be confusing to the consumer.


Dual colour scheme of pink and orange attract the eye. Posters come in A2 format. The poster is designed as an eye-catcher, with a QR code provided for more information. The logo is the focal point of the design, following the rules of visual hierachy. The paragraph on the bottom right is a blurb on the values og ‘Go PETE’ and the reasoning behind making a better choice. Posters were chosen as part of the principle campaign media as it suits the demographic target group and can be displayed in significant locations such as creative workplaces, universities, bus shelters, notice boards, shop windows and schools.


You’ve been told about BPA, and warned away from plastic. There are seven types of plastic, and only one type contains this chemical. Opt for PETE plastic, or classification ‘1’ and you’ll be avoiding all the nasty toxins associated with ‘seeping plastic’. PETE, or Polyethelene terephthalate, is a biologically inert substance, dermally safe when handling and non-hazardous when inhaled. Not only are PETE bottles safe for use, each bottle is 100% recyclable. Byproducts of recycled type 1 PETE flake include plastic products, textiles and polyester fibres which are weaved into fabric. For every pound of PETE flake recycled, energy use is reduced by 84% and greenhouse gas emissions by 71%. So next time you’re thirsty, remember there is a positive choice out there. Go PETE plastic, go pro health and pro environment.

You’ve been told about BPA, and warned away from plastic. There are seven types of plastic, and only one type contains this chemical. Opt for PETE plastic, or classification ‘1’ and you’ll be avoiding all the nasty toxins associated with ‘seeping plastic’. PETE, or Polyethelene terephthalate, is a biologically inert substance, dermally safe when handling and non-hazardous when inhaled. Not only are PETE bottles safe for use, each bottle is 100% recyclable. Byproducts of recycled type 1 PETE flake include plastic products, textiles and polyester fibres which are weaved into fabric. For every pound of PETE flake recycled, energy use is reduced by 84% and greenhouse gas emissions by 71%. So next time you’re thirsty, remember there is a positive choice out there. Go PETE plastic, go pro health and pro environment.


magazine advertisement designed for demographic. think frankie, cosmopolitan and health magazines. The abstracted graphic is the focal point supported by text material in the lower third. This was designed for the greatest impact to viewers; those who don’t read the information still retain a strong memory of the visual elements of Go PETE and the type 1 plastic logo. This will spark interest/acknowledgement when another principle media is observed. The dual colours can work in conjunction with one another, or in conjnction with the polyester clothing advertisement.


So, you don’t like plastic water bottles? Prepare to be surprised. BPA is the substance we all know, linked to dangerous endocrine inhibitors; molecules that enter your body to mimick specific hormones such as estrogen. You’ve been told about BPA, and warned away from plastic. But did you know there are seven types of plastics, and not all contain this chemical? Opt for PETE plastic, or classification ‘1’ and you’ll be avoiding all the nasty toxins associated with ‘seeping plastic’. PETE, or Polyethelene

terephthalate, is a biologically inert substance, dermally safe when handling and non-hazardous when inhaled. Not only are PETE bottles safe for use, each bottle is 100% recyclable. Byproducts of recycled type 1 PETE flake include plastic products, textiles and polyester fibres which are weaved into fabric. For every pound of PETE flake recycled, energy use is reduced by 84% and greenhouse gas emissions by 71%. So next time you’re thirsty, remember there is a positive choice out there. Go PETE, go type 1 plastic, and be 100% happy.


magazine advertisement designed for demographic. think frankie, cosmopolitan and health magazines. Advertisement designed to communicated that clothing can be environmentally friendly. The main three text points remain the same, connecting the different imagery to other principle media examples. The secondary visual elements are still present and lay the subtle theme of water as a background. Again, the logo is high in the visual hierachy and the QR code links to the mobile-friendly website. In this way, the main point of this advertisement is to promote the unexpected uses of plastic byproducts.


website provided for desktop, tablet and phone. qr code linked. Website is information based, creating a foundation of awareness of scientific knowledge on which target demographic will be able to make more positive lifestyle choices. The site includes information on the seven types of plastic, recycling processes and purposes, statistics on environmental and economic services alongside a health guide. An events page also links to the facebook page and Colour Run website to gain momentum into the social media reality. QR codes visible on posters will link up to the mobile friendly site for easy access.


You’ve been told about BPA, and warned away from plastic. There are seven types of plastic, and only one type contains this chemical. Opt for PETE plastic, or classification ‘1’ and you’ll be avoiding all the nasty toxins associated with ‘seeping plastic’. PETE, or Polyethelene terephthalate, is a biologically inert substance, dermally safe when handling and non-hazardous when inhaled. Not only are PETE bottles safe for use, each bottle is 100% recyclable. Byproducts of recycled type 1 PETE flake include plastic products, textiles and polyester fibres which are weaved into fabric. For every pound of PETE flake recycled, energy use is reduced by 84% and greenhouse gas emissions by 71%. So next time you’re thirsty, remember there is a positive choice out there. Go PETE plastic, go pro health and pro environment.


dual colour options. aimed to be big, bold and resilient. Billboards need to be quick, simple and effective. Branding is cohesive with all other principle media examples. Website link is as simplified as possible to ensure memory retention. Billboards must be area-specific; for example on highway areas with a high rate of demographic viewers. Only the most important information is displayed and is designed to invoke curiosity and a connection between all other media elements. Basically to saturate the demographic with visual stimulus.


affective for social media. instantly accessible and easily spreadable. Social media is centered around the chosen demographic so is an excellent choice of principle media. In association with Colour Run, the facebook page can promote events in which the demographic can interact and share with their peers. After consulting the demographic it was obvious a facebook page must be used as support material for the print media belonging to the Go PETE campaign.


credible sources. credible campaign. Governments will always play a huge part in solving big problems. They set public policy and are uniquely able to provide the resources to make sure solutions reach everyone who needs them. They also fund basic research, which is a crucial component of the innovation that improves life for everyone. -Bill Gates


Almeida, H A et al. 2013, ‘Green Design, Materials and Manufacturing Processes’, pp. 345-350, reviewed October 2013 via <http://www.crcnetbase.com.libraryproxy.griffith.edu.au/doi/abs/10.1201/b15002-67?prevSearch=%255BFulltext%253A%2Bplastic%2Bbottles%255D&searchHistoryKey=> EPA 2013, Wastes - Resource Conservation - Common Wastes & Materials, reviewed October 2013 via <http://www.epa.gov/osw/conserve/materials/plastics.htm> Horton, J 2013, What’s BPA, and do I really need a new water bottle?, reviewed October 2013 via <http://science.howstuffworks.com/environmental/green-science/bpa1.htm> Lambropoulou, D A, Evgenidou, E 2013, ‘Handbook of Water Analysis, Third Edition’, pp. 917-942, reviewed October 2013 via <http://www.crcnetbase.com.libraryproxy.griffith. edu.au/doi/abs/10.1201/b15314-45?prevSearch=%255BFulltext%253A%2Bplastic%2Bbottles%255D&searchHistoryKey=> NAPCOR 2013, What is PET?, reviewed October 2013 via <http://www.napcor.com/ PET/whatispet.html> Shotyk , W et al. 2006, ‘Contamination of Canadian and European bottled waters with antimony from PET containers’, Journal of Environmental Monitoring, vol. 8, no.2, pp. 288–92, retrieved October 2013 <via https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16470261> WHO (World Health Organisation), Guidlines for Drinking-Water Quality, n.d., viewed October 2013 via <http://www.who.int/water_sanitation_health/dwq/chemicals/antimonysum.pdf> Facts on PET: Frequently Asked Questions 2013, reveiwed October 2013 via <http:// www.factsonpet.com/frequently-asked-questions/> How Plastic Bottles Are Recycled Into Polyester 2009, video file, retrieved via <http:// www.youtube.com/watch?v=zyF9MxlcItw> PET Flakes Recycling and Washing Product Line, n.d., image, viewed October 2013, <http://image.made-in-china.com/2f0j00wBVaMhGRnLkd/PET-Flakes-Recycling-and-Washing-Production-Line.jpg> PET Recycling, n.d., reviewed October 2013 via <http://www.benefits-of-recycling. com/petrecycling/>



Bianca Taylor-Andrews GD2 folio