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2013 PORTFOLIO


MARCHANY bianca

Candidate- Master of Interior Design Work Samples Fall 2013


EXPERIENCE

studio


STUDIO commercial MIT’s Legatum Center hosts young entrepreneurs who are building businesses off of a bottom up business model in order to stimulate underdeveloped economies. The Legatum Center space will allow for these students to come together and share ideas, make their business plans stronger and develop innovative ideas for their business models. This design is focused on how students can come together to work utilizing hot spots, or mixing stations, of collaborative opportunities.

The Legatum Center- MIt Summer 2012 crandon gustofson 3 weeks


The design of this space is meant to bring the Fellows together in multiple ways. There are huddle spaces created in each corner of the space making collaboration an open opportunity for everyone to have access to. The program included private office space for the Legatum Staff, private meeting rooms for investor meetings, a technology room for graphics work and video editing, a small kitchen area, a small lounge area, a fishbowl style conference room and multiple small huddle spaces as well as desking opportunities for the Fellows to sit still if needed. I space planned based on the idea of “hot spots,� a concept I derived from the idea of what happens at the water cooler in a typical working condition. I hope that this space plan will not only encourage the Fellows to come to the Legatum Center to work, which they currently do not, but also to work together. Plan

LEGATUM CENTER FOR DEVELOPMENT AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP


Part of my investigation about collaboration was to look at the different kinds of ways in which people worked and worked together. I designed the space with this in mind, to ensure that these multiple working conditions would be supported at the Legatum Center.

Plan


Not only is it important to investigate how people work throughout the day, but looking at how they change their positions throughout the day. And also, how the space transforms throughout the day. I looked at how this space might be arranged at 8am and then how it might be arranged at 4pm.

LEGATUM CENTER FOR DEVELOPMENT AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP


The Reflected Ceiling Plan shows how suspended clouds in the form of arcs are used to orient the occupant and direct them through the space ensuring they are aware of all of the different kinds of working spaces offered in the center. I didn’t want to impose a lot of down lighting onto the Fellows while they work, so I infused moments of cove lighting all around to add enough ambient lighting. There are pendant lights over the “hot spot” areas, the lounge area and the kitchen area. The space has a southern facing wall with a large set of windows so direct daylighting will provide a large amount of ambient light in the day, but will have to be managed well to ensure the lighting isn’t distracting and doesn’t create glare.

Reflected Ceiling Plan


Section Facing East

I chose to look at Haworth furniture because it seemed as though Haworth had taken the time to investigate collaboration space and how the furniture in the space Collaborative can influence they way people work. I felt Space this fit right into my concept of creating hot spots to encourage people to come together and work together. I was able to utilize two lines of furniture from Haworth. I chose the Reside, Beside, Belong line for the desking because it offered the opportunity to be rearranged throughout the day as needed. It also provided some typical desk workspace that some people are simply accustomed to. I chose the Reside, Beside, Enclose for the private meeting rooms because of the opportunities to videoconference and the white board space provided for pin up and idea generation. I think furniture selection is an imperative part of this process and I’m Northwest Axonometric curious what other furniture dealers are doing.

Presentation/ Large Collaborative Space

Haworth 109 Reside, Beside, Belong

Haworth 121 Reside, Beside, Enclose

Investor Meeting Room

Fishbowl Meeting Room

LEGATUM CENTER FOR DEVELOPMENT AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP


STUDIO lighting

FLO BAKERY Retail Fit-Out Spring 2012 Lukas Sturmand Amber Hepner 8 weeks


LIGHTING PLAN- DAYLIGHT and ELECTRIC

Daylight plan shows natural light coming from apertures.

N

Electric light plan shows fixtures lighting the space.


SECTIONS 0' - 7 1/8"

0' - 4"

3' - 1 3/4"

T.O. Masonry 11' - 2 1/4"

1' - 0"

Section Facing East

Cove Detail

Section Facing South

Wall Graze Detail


PERSPECTIVES

View From the Entrance

View From the Stage


S

SWITCH DIAGRAM 1

3

5 DIM

2

S

F-1 C-1

6 DIM

P-1

G-1

S

4 DIM


FIXTURE SCHEDULE Type

P 1

C 1

Description Pendant fixture, plumen designer CFL, e26 medium base 7.55”h x 3.93”l x 3.93”w, 11 watts, 680 lumens, nondimmable, CRI greater than 80, pendant set mount with black fabric cable (98” MAX), black metal ceiling rose 4.5” diameter, 1.5” height, 120 v, 2700k, general diffuse distribution

Manufacturers and models Plumen

Cove fixture, 12.8”l x 1.9”h x 2.1”w LED, 120v, 2700K, 290 lumens, CRI= 70, 6.5 watts, IP20, no shielding, direct Distribution, dimmable

General Electric LED Cove Lighting System

Lamp

#S7431

Notes Pendant set and bulb only, pendant cable 25” from base of rose to top of lamp

GE Lighting Solutions

LED Cove

Lighting System

11t3/e26/2700k/ PLUMEN NEW PRODUCT INFORMATION

Professional Series The first “designer” low energy bulb.

The Plumen 001 distributed by SATCO Products.

LC12/727/120V

73098

LED cove fixture, mounting track spec LC-MT48/0 0 degree track 48”, leader cable 73108 LC-LC/40 120v 480”, jumper cable 73109 LC-JC/3 120v 36”

S7431 11T3/E26/2700K/PLUMEN FEATURES AND BENEFITS The PLUMEN 001 is the world’s first designer low energy bulb. The dynamic, sculptured form contrast to the dull regular shapes of existing energy bulbs, in an attempt to make the Plumen a centerpiece, not afterthought. The PLUMEN 001 works like any other high quality low energy bulb – saving you 80% on your energy bills and lasting 8 times longer than a standard incandescent bulb. It screws into any standard bulb fitting, gives off a warm white light and will work either shaded or even better, completely naked. SPECIFICATIONS • 11 Watt

Graze fixture, 2700l, 10 x60 beam angle, 1’l x 2.1”w x 2.8”l, 120v, 427 lumens,34.1 efficacy, CRI 83, 15 watts, dimmable, linear LED surface light, direct distribution

G 1

F 1

o

Flood fixture, white, 3000K, CRI 85, 120v 50/60Hz, 15 watts, power factor less than .9, 36o beam spread, 90 delivered lumens, efficacy 57, dimmable,7 5/16”lx 2 ½”w x 7 5/8”h, direct distribution

Phillips eW Graze Powercore 523-000030-02

Lightolier Lyten Spot LED LLAB0 LLAB030RFWH

Dimming capability requires reversephase ELV-type dimmer, extruded anodized aluminum cool gray hinge, clear polycarbonate lens, fixture connectors are integral male/female waterproof connectors, run lengths 100 at 120v installed end to end, 20A circuit standard 50ft leader cable Dimming capability requires reversephase ELV-type dimmer, radius white track molded polycarbonate, track adapter housing die cast aluminum steel eyelet friction connection rotates 350o

• Power Factor: Greater than 50

• Energy Label • Switching Cycles:

• Lumen Maintenance: 70% after 6,000 hours.

• Equivalent to 60W Incandescent Light bulb

Firm Name: ______________________________________________________

• Lifetime 8,000 Hours

Project: _________________________________________________________

o

• Lamp Dimensions: 7.55” x 3.93”

• 680 Lumen • Medium Base (E26)

Date: _____________________________ Type: _________________________

• Colour Rendering: Greater than 80

More than 10,000 • Warm–Up time: Less than 30 Seconds

• If the PLUMEN 001 breaks, please go to www.epa.gov/cfl.

• Non–dimmable

• Mercury Content: Less than 5mg

• Kelvin Temperature: 2,700K

• Luminous Flux: Initial Output 680 Lumen, final results pending.

• For the best way to dispose of the PLUMEN 001, please go to www.epa.gov/cfl.

eW Graze Powercore eW Graze Powercore Powercore linear LED lighting fixtures are ideal for surface grazing and wall-washing applications that require high-quality white light. Featuring Powercore technology, eW Graze Powercore processes power directly from line voltage, eliminating the need for external power supplies. Fixtures are available in eight color temperatures, ranging from a warm 2700 K to a cool 6500 K, including standard color temperatures of 2700 K and 4000 K. eW Graze Powercore offers superior illumination quality and dramatic energy savings for new installations and retrofit upgrades. A space-efficient, low-profile aluminum housing and flexible mounting options allow discrete placement within a wide range of compact architectural details. • Tailor light output to specific applications — eW Graze Powercore is available in standard 1 ft and 4 ft exterior-rated housings, and standard 10º x 60º and 30º x 60º beam angles. • High-performance illumination and beam quality — Superior beam quality offers striation-free saturation as close as 6 in (152 mm) from fixture placement with no visible light scalloping between fixtures. • Supports new applications for white light— Long useful source life (50,000 hours at 70% lumen maintenance) significantly reduces or eliminates maintenance problems, allowing the use of white lighting in spaces where lamp maintenance may be limited or unfeasible. • Universal power input range — eW Graze Powercore accepts line voltage input of 100, 120, 220 – 240, and 277 VAC. • Versatile installation options — Constant torque locking hinges offer simple position control from various angles without special tools. The low-profile extruded aluminum housing accommodates installation within architectural niches of many different shapes and sizes. • Support for installations requiring conduit to fixtures — eW Graze Powercore Conduit fixtures have flying leads and threaded openings for 1/2 in NPT conduit to support installations in North America where conduit is required.

16.95 ea.

$

Master carton quantity: 12

2700 K, 10º x 60º beam angle Linear LED surface light for wall washing and grazing

National Toll–Free: 1-800-43-SATCO(1-800-437-2826) Visit Our Web Site at: www.satco.com 3.4 in (85 mm) 12 in (305 mm)

2.8 in (71 mm)

EXECUTIVE OFFICES & WAREHOUSE; NEW YORK, 110 Heartland Blvd., Brentwood, NY 11717 • 800-437-2826 • (631) 243-2022 • FAX (631) 243-2027 FLORIDA, 900 N.W. 159th Drive, Miami, Fl 33169 • 800-437-2826 • (305) 624-2044 • FAX (305) 623-0286 TEXAS, 2000 Valwood Parkway, Farmers Branch, TX 75234 • 800-437-2826 • (972) 247-2437 • FAX (972) 247-5408 CALIFORNIA, 31288 San Benito St., Hayward, CA 94544 • 800-437-2826 • (510) 487-4822 • FAX 9510) 487-8955 WASHINGTON, 4710 116th St. S.W., Mukilteo, WA 98275 • 800-437-2826 • (425) 789-3300 • FAX (425) 789-3310 PUERTO RICO, Bldg 3, Campeche St. 23 Julio N. Matos Industrial Park • Bo Martin Gonzales Carolina, PR 00984 • (787) 757-3510 • FAX (787) 757-3540

24 in (609 mm) / 36 in (914 mm) / 48 in (1219 mm)

3.4 in (85 mm)

17.4 in (442 mm) / 29.4 in (747 mm) / 41.4 in (1052 mm) 3.16 in (80 mm) 2.7 in (69 mm)

.88 in (22 mm) 2.25 in (57 mm)

2.1 in (53 mm)

.38 in (9.5 mm)

2.36 in (60 mm)

1.38 in (35 mm) .28 in (7.2 mm) x4 Substrate

1.94 in (49 mm) .38 in (9.5 mm)

1.75 in (44 mm)

.38 in (9.5 mm)

1.4 in (39 mm) 2.36 in (60 mm)

.88 in (22 mm)

1.38 in (35 mm) .22 in (5.5 mm) x6 Fixture

LLAB0

.813 in (21 mm)

• Wide range of custom configurations — Additional fixture lengths, beam angles, and color temperatures up to 6500 K are available as custom configurations. See the eW Graze Powercore Ordering Information specification sheet for complete details. • “Cool lighting” functionality — eW Graze Powercore fixtures do not heat illuminated surfaces, discharge infrared radiation, or emit ultraviolet light.

Lytespan Spot LED Page 1 of 3 4

For detailed product information, please refer to the eW Graze Powercore Product Guide at www.colorkinetics.com/ls/essentialwhite/ewgraze/

5

1

2 1/2 in [64 mm]

• Dimming capability — Patented DIMand technology offers smooth dimming capability with selected commercially available reversephase ELV-type dimmers.

2

3

ENERGY STAR

6

7

7 5/8 in [194 mm]

9 5/8 in [244 mm] Ø5 7/16 in [138 mm]

8 9 7 5/16 in [186 mm]

1 11/16 in [43 mm]

Features 1. Track attachment fitting: Molded polycarbonate. Integral color in gray, black or white. Rotates in to track and locks into place with the use of push tab. 2. Push tab: Molded polycarbonate. Locks and detaches unit. 3. Track adapter housing: Die cast aluminum. Steel eyelet friction connection. Rotates 350°. 4. Movable contact: Solid Brass. Extends for connection to 2cd circuit in Advent track. 5. Ground contact: Solid Brass. 6. Vertical pivot mount: Stainless steel eyelet friction connection. Rotates +/-90° from vertical aim to floor. 7. Driver housing: Extruded aluminum with die cast aluminum end caps. 8. Integrated heat sink: Die cast aluminum effectively cools leds providing a minimum 50,000 hr lifetime at 70% lumen maintenance. 9. Optic assembly: Efficient TIR (total internal reflection) optically clear thermoplastic lenses held securely by frosted translucent thermoplastic holder. Positive securement into luminair with screws and accurately positioned on leds with locating pins. Prevents dust and contaminants from entering led compartment. 10. Light source: 9 high brightness white led. 80-85 CRI, LEDS selected for tight color consistency between luminaires single 3 step MacAdam ellipse max.

10

Accessories: Requires 8595 accessory holder. Accepts two accessories. Snoot: 23SNT6WH/BK/AL Louver: AL4HC Series Diffusion/special filters: AF4 Series Color filters: ADF4 Series* Mounting For use with Lytespan Basic, Advent, Radius track, and monopoints. May be used with Lytespan to ProSpec adaptor 26075BK/WH when ProSpec track is preferred. Finish Powder coated finish * will project colored light on ceiling.

Job Information Job Name: Cat. No.: Notes:

Type:


STUDIO residential simple.logical.rational Single Family Home Fall 2012 Heath Cody and Gabriella Gatto 8 weeks


site.19 william st, cambridge impact of site • entry condition • public transportation access • neighborhood walk ability • clearly defined consistent way finding system • opportunity for external services, recreation and jobs

cambridge city center

site showing neighborhood walk ability and public transportation access

proximity to schools for the blind

site

schools for the blind

trans node

downtown Cambridge


indoor air quality.direct sun

first floor

N

second floor

third floor

roof


program.concept the Cardoza family

Frank: Professor of Criminal Justice at Northeastern University, enjoys cooking Juli: Real Estate Agent, enjoys gardening Jason: 11, class clown, loves video games and to play outside, very protective of his little sister Gia: 10, suffers from gross near sightedness that developed at the age of 3, enjoys playing with her brother, gardening with her mother and cooking with her dad, also has a seeing eye dog named Rufus program

Gathering spaces: great room, living room, kitchen, dining room, activity room, roof garden, storage Personal space: 3 bedrooms, office/guest room, 3 bathrooms simple.logical.rational

The design of this house will be as simple and clear to understand as possible in order to offer Gia the most control over her decisions to move through the house. She will be able to develop a method for which she can easily orient and reorient herself. The intent is that this house will then become the foundation for which she is comfortable to move through the city of Cambridge as she grows up and gains her independence.


conceptual.plans

circulation

It was very important to me that this house made sense to Gia very quickly. I designed the interior space plan based on a rigid circulation plan, allowing you to only turn left, right, go forward or turn completely around. This was derived from looking at the circulation of the City of Cambridge. I postured all primary programmatic functions in a manner that makes the most logical sense as you enter that floor. All primary circulation for the floor is off to the right, while primary circulation between floors is off to the left. This is the same on every floor as well.


logical.bubbles

first floor

gathering wet

second floor

third floor

storage

circulation

personal

roof

N


logical.plans

first floor

second floor

third floor

roof

N


first.floor

entrance


living.room living room interior elevation

crown molding detail

I selected a neutral color pallet that allowed for contrasting variation specifically identifying what material was floor material, wall material and ceiling material. This notion is carried on throughout the entire house as to be consistent in order for Gia to understand its meaning. The furniture specified for the living room maintained a rectilinear form in order to fit in with the rectilinear circulation around. I also specified a low back, wide armed sofa system so that it would differ from other seating selections in the house. All furniture specified for this house has a simple and logical design.


first floor.kitchen and dining The kitchen is a popular place for any family and wanted to be sure Gia knew where she was within the kitchen at all times. The kitchen island surface is a Vermont marble, cool to touch, very hard, and also white. Where as the dining room table is a monolithic wood, warm to touch, softer than marble and dark in color. The kitchen cabinets are a pencil yellow, postured in front of a slate gray tile backsplash. All appliances will be white so that they are easy to identify against the yellow cabinetry

kitchen elevation

utility pull out drawer


first floor.lighting SSS

Juno 4� LED Down Light

(120v, 2700k, 600 lumens, IC rated)

S

Lumapro LED Lightbar

(1.5w, 120v, 2700k, 150 lumnes)

Lighting in the house would play a large role of whether or not this house will be successful for Gia. I chose cove lighting to be the ambient light source for the entire house. I specified down lighting over circulation spaces to serve as a beacon for Gia as she moves through the house at night.

SS

down light cove light

decorative pendant light

lighting concept image


third.floor

great room


third floor.gia’s space Gia’s private space

Great room

Another big family space is the great room. This is a more casual space where everyone can be together to play games and watch movies. I created a special nook space for Gia to be with a soft couch and highly materialized throw pillows. I also added a pendant light fixture that can be dimmed with multiple lamps so that Gia can control her ambient lighting. I thought this would be a cool space for a young girl to hang out and listen to music or spend time with her friends.


furniture.specification FURNITURE SPECIFICATION SUMMARY ITEM CODE DESCRIPTION

IMAGE LIVING ROOM

QTY.

UNIT COST

EXT. COST

Hive Place Sofa

C-1

Metal Frame, wood structure, polyurethane foam, 2 seater

2

Usona Occasional Chair

C-2

Bultex and beech structure with oak feet.

1 call to request

Topsider Coffer Table T-1

Rhythymic plank patern, solid shesham wood DINING ROOM

1

$449.00

$449.00

Terra Dining Table

T-2

Monolithic structure built from FSC certified wood

1

$499.00

$499.00

Metal Schoolhouse Counter Stool

C-3

Cantileve styled metal chair to be used around kitchen island

4

$149.00

$596.00

Saarine Tulip Arm Chair

C-4

Aluminum base, fiberglass with an upholstered seat GREAT ROOM

4

$1,559.00

$6,236.00

Drop in Sectional

C-5

Steel structure, wood footings, upholstered

1

$8,040.00

$8,040.00

$7,820.00

COMMENTS

$15,640.00

#VALUE!

TOTAL:

$31,410.00


STUDIO residential This multifamily project is situated in the heart of South Boston. We were encouraged to investigate neighborhoods that we were not too familiar with. Though I have worked in South Boston at the Design Center, I never really ventured past Drydock Avenue. I thought South Boston would be a great place to investigate ideas for how to build a community within a community. In this design project, our client would be a developer, who will be looking to rent space in a three family home.

Three family home Fall 2012 Heath Cody and Gabriella Gatto 8 weeks


South Boston, MA

“They may take you or break you, but they’ll never forsake you.” -Southie Is My Hometown, Jerome L. Proctor


History

Present Day: developed by the Boston Wharf Company 1880: used for iron foundries and shipyards 1776: “Dorchester Neck� used for grazing livestock

N


The Neighborhood Southie 30,000 residents 3.3 square miles

Planning District Neighborhood

N


Age Distribution Researching demographics is essential to understanding the kind of people that live in South Boston, and the kind of people that will most likely look into living in this newly developed triple decker. The key demographic notes studied help me design a space that would fit the most likely candidate for the space.

Marital Status

Demographics Southie

48.1% of residents are 25-44

Education

Household Population about 45% of men and women have at least a Bachelors Degree

average household size is 2-3 people


Site585 E. 5th Street Site Site Public Transportation Major Roads

Con

gre

Community Activity

Su

mm

ss

er

Str

Str

Site selection became a pragmatic approach to what a developer would want to attract tenants. I chose a site right in the heart of South Boston within walking distance to market, transportation and entertainment.

eet

ee

t

ad

ro

tB

s We y

wa

Do

N

St

L Street

rch

er est

East Broadway

t ree

Program: -Unit to accommodate a single person -Unit to accommodate a couple -Unit to accommodate a small family of three -Community gathering space on first and second floors -Community gathering space on roof -Storage space in the basement -Laundry facilities in the basement -Elevator -Two stair options, main and emergency -Incorporate sustainablilty


585 E 5th Street Site

I walked South Boston looking for the perfect block and I settled in on this one. I’ve chosen to put my building in the heart of the block, just as the neighborhood is deep within the heart of South Boston. * Located in the heart of the South Boston Neighborhood * Close proximity to major thoroughfare * Close proximity to public transportation * Close proximity to local marketplace * Residential street, parking all around* Located in the heart of the South Boston Neighborhood * Close proximity to major thoroughfare * Close proximity to public transportation * Close proximity to local marketplace * Residential street, parking all around

N


The Dichotomies of Southie Pride old segregated/ isolated blue collar “neighborhood” Community

rural traditional

Family

new inclusive/ community white collar “planning district” urban contemporary

shipyards/ iron works

business

preserve

develop

In order to enhance the relationship between the original residents of South Boston and newly relocated urban professionals, we must find a way to balance the strength of historic pride and the existence of gentrification. This can be done by blurring the boundaries of community and preserving the working nature of South Boston.


Precedent Studies Community Union Wharf- Baltimore City, MD -Bozzuto developed this 250+ Unit complex with community in mind, the building encourages its residents to gather with various activities such as a spa, yoga and chic lounge areas. Monumental Stair -Designed to slow movement to allow the occupant to appreciate the environment

Yoga at the Union Wharf

Monumental Stair- Cefalu, Italy

Sanchinarro Mirador Housing, Mardrid -MVRDV Architects explore privacy and publicity with this 21-story housing project. They offer multiple opportunities for public space within the building through circulation and courtyard. -Reinterpreted the American Fire Escape by centralizing it. Egress Stair- Mirador

Mirador Housing Project


Conceptual Floor Plans

Community

Community Family

Basement

N

Unit 1

Unit 2

Unit 3

Roof


Unit Floor Plans Community Master Bedroom

Entry

Master Bedroom

Master Bedroom Bathroom

Closet

Bathroom

Closet

Closet

Closet

Closet

Office Closet

Closet

Closet

Closet

Kitchen

Kitchen

From the demographic research conducted, I decided I would design each unit a little differently. The first floor unit I designed for young, single people. These people might be looking to live in a shared condition with a roommate. Here the space offers room for each tenant to have separate private spaces while gathering spaces are central, and building circulation is also central. The second floor is for a young couple. Here they can share a bedroom with larger bathroom facilities and they also have a large living area for possible entertaining. The third floor is for the young urban professional who probably works a lot and spends little time at home relaxing. I’ve added a bonus home office space for this tenant, so that he/she may separate work from home.

Living Area

Kitchen

Bedroom Living Area Bathroom Bathroom

Unit 1

N

Unit 2

Living Area

Unit 3


Community Spaces Community Storage Unit Laundry Station Roof Deck

Storage

Bike Racks

Roof Deck View of the City

Storage Unit

Air Conditioning Units

Mechanical Room

Water Tanks

Bike Racks

Storage Unit

Basement

Roof Deck

Laundry Station in Basement

N

Solar Panels

A large part of creating a community is creating the space for the community to interact. I found two opportunities to do this within the building. In the basement, a laundry and storage facility is provided for the tenants. Since the site is in close proximity to other facility, I’ve provided bike storage as well for the tenants who choose to ride their bikes to work or school. On the roof, I’ve created multiple areas for socialization and retreat. Here, the tenants can enjoy summer roof parties or an afternoon with the Sunday paper.


Key Elevations Community Entry- West Elevation

Kitchen Counter Detail

Bathroom Elevation Basement- West Elevation

Water Systems

Storage Unit

Wall Mounted Bike Racks

Storage Unit


Visually and Audibly Permeable Elevator

Community

A large part of my concept for building community within this building was the centralized circulation. I wanted to use an elevator that would still allow for visual connectivity from there to the stair, so as tenants moved throughout the building, they would be encouraged to interact with one another, getting to know each other. Early Elevator Technology

Vertical Concept Diagram Elevator Concept Image


Finish Selection: Entry

Community I chose a rich pallet for the entry condition to represent South Boston’s rich history. I incorporated a mudroom cabinetry system for the tenants to use as a point to drop their bags while they check their mail or if they were just caught in the rain. I wanted to use a mailbox system that could be aged, possibly an antique from the late 19th century.

Rubik Console Table Entry Elevation- Facing East

Inspiration for Mailbox System

Material Selection


US Green Build Council LEED Credit Opportunities Indoor Environmental Quality 161: design entryway with track of mats on the exterior Energy and Atmosphere 1: utilize thermal mass of concrete EA48: optimize energy performance (HVAC, domestic hot water, appliances, lighting) EA60: specify different window glazing for windows with different orientations EA90: provide indoor lighting controls EA101: solar hot water Innovation and Design4: manage noise ID5: design with indoor air quality in mind ID7: universal design ID8: optimize layout ID9: sheltered entryway ID10: storage Materials and Resources 117: use high recycled, formaldehyde free content

Sustainable Implementation Community


STUDIO furniture Furniture Design Studio is intended to teach interior design students about wood, wood working and furniture construction. What I found most exciting about this studio was the opportunity to see one of my designs come to fruition. I enjoyed the problem solving required to develop joints to support the weight of my table and ensure it came together as I had hoped. I implemented a few complex angles into my design and it was imperative that I tested different approaches to ensure they worked well. I am proud of my design, a little frustrated with some of the details, however, overall glad that I have a fantastic coffee table!

Coffee table spring 2013 Joe Deveau and Kelly Jean Ard 16 weeks


We began the course with an inspiration board. We were to select multiple ideas that we are interested in and document them in a way that demonstrated the concepts I was interested in. I was interested in the idea of a bridge as a connector because connectivity is a common concept I have investigated in other studio design projects. I thought there could be an interesting way to develop this concept into a piece of furniture. The view of a city is always in high demand. Whether it’s real estate or a hotel room, people will pay for a view. I’ve lived in a few great cities around the world, and I’ve come to appreciate how city centers begin to develop their own identity through a skyline. As a designer, we are encouraged to be efficient and functional in the way we design. I thought it would be interesting if my piece of furniture could serve two purposes.

A Bridge as a Connector

The View of a Beautiful City

efficiency in multi functionality

Bianca Marchany February 1, 2013 Candidate- Master of Interior Design


As we developed our inspirational ideas into sketch model and mock up, I began to understand where this design would go. I was suggested to read the book, “Invisible Cities” by Italo Calvino because of my interest in the concept of city. The book discussed ancient cities and their relationships to each other, the water, the people and the dead. I found myself drawn to the city of Eusapia where the city revere the dead and in return the dead revere the city. I found there to be an interesting fine line between living and not living that could easily be misconstrued. I thought this could be an interesting opportunity to design. As I progressed through a design the evolved from abstracted views of my favorite cities, I landed on a design that would investigate void and connectivity as well as the fine line connecting them.

a subtle dialogue between the living and the dead

E

a i p usa

“the Eusapia of the living has taken to copying its underground copy” - Italo Calvino, Invisible Cities

Bianca Marchany Candidate- Master of Interior Design March 11, 2013 Furniture Design Studio


a subtle dialogue between the living and the dead

As this piece developed, joint study became an imperative part of the design to investigate joint in order to ensure my table would be structural without breaking the line connecting each piece to the next. I used miter joints at each corner, however given the complex angles at four points, I added a partial spline for added support. I was able to maintain the grain throughout the entire piece, which was awesome, however I was frustrated with how some of my miters came out. Miters are tough, anyone who is familiar with wood working recommends a different joint, however miters are seamless, and that was important to me. I chose a rosewood veneer backed with a quarter sawn wenge. I chose the rosewood because it had beautiful cathedraling, and the wenge because it would serve a nice dark underside, to represent the dead. The rosewood darkened a little after finish, but fits in quite nice with my home aesthetic.

Bianca Marchany Candidate- Master of Interior Design May 13, 2013 Furniture Design Studio


SEMINAR thesis Thesis Seminar is meant to prepare us for entry into thesis ensuring we have developed a strong thesis proposal securing a site and a thesis advisory panel for the year to come. I chose to continue to investigate ideas from the Graduate Research and Writing class I took the semester before. I investigated the notion of the “adjacent possible” and idea developed by Steven Johnson in his book, “Where Good Ideas Come From.” In this book, Johnson discusses the essential steps to developing an innovative idea. The first step is the “adjacent possible” which states that in order for an idea to develop, it must connect to another existing idea. There will always be a finite number of existing ideas, however the more they connect, the better chance these ideas will build off of one another. I’ve translated this concept into the workplace and have begun to learn about the many different ways we can create collaborative space where ideas can begin to connect with one another.

spring 2013 Paul Joyce 16 weeks


>

a space for collaboration >

Cultivating an environment that supports innovation for MIT’s Legatum Center

Boston Architectural College > Master of Interior Design > Spring 2013

Bianca Marchany > Student > ______________________________________________________________

Kara Hanson > Advisor > ___________________________________________________________________

Crandon Gustafson > Head, School of Interior Design > _______________________________________

Paul Joyce > Instructor > _________________________________________________________________


Cultural Context > Cultural Collaboration

Fellow Country of Origin

“When designed to foster cross-cultural collaboration and innovation, work environments can help build trust—the currency of collaboration— among coworkers, and between employees and managers. Establishing trust is paramount to success abroad—and can be accomplished by studying the local cultural traits that outwardly manifest themselves in the workplace.” ~ The Culture Code Team, Steelcase 360

21/27 Fellows are conducting their work in their country of origin.


United States

> > create visual connectivity

> visual communication important > individualistic work style

> accepting of group activity

Spain

> relationships are important

> relationships not as important

> maintaining harmony is paramount

Morocco

> offer moments of solitude

> accepting of dense space > support multiple postures

> offer multiple work spaces

Italy

> work spaces reflect tradition > value in personalized space

> integrate brand messaging

India

> appreciate “tech-rich” space > not accepting of change > accepting of change

> working lunch common

China

> incorporate lounge opportunities > incorporate cafe atmosphere

> spaces to relax at work, not common > “go-with-the-flow” attitude

*Diagrams courtesy of Steeclase Cultural Research Team*


Precedent Study > Vodafone Vodafone Headquarters in Amsterdam was a design collaboration between Steelcase and OCS Workplaces in order to create an office environment that achieved the following: -optimized business organization -facilitated mobile working -encouraged collaboration, and -ensured all branding was visible. Designers utilized the concept of “the changing workplace� in order to offer Vodafone office members multiple opportunities to work in different working conditions. The design incorporates visual connectivity with glass partitions between conference areas, semi-private office areas and circulation space in order to add to the opportunity for serendipitous encounters fostering the adjacent possible. The design also incorporates multiple seating style options ranging from lounge chairs to bar stools, to a very clever niche option. What I can draw from this design is the execution of the concept with particular attention to the need for people to change their body position. The use of transparency to create visual connectivity and also to allow light to pass deep into a space.

The Changing Workplace


>

Precedent Study > Blackduck

Blackduck Software, Burlington, MA was designed by SGA out of Boston. This project takes on a character of its own with a secret script left for employees only. The use of binary code as a part of the environmental graphics is one of the few design elements that inspires Blackduck employees.

Designers created a collaborative space for employees to spend more time working together than glued to their multiple computer screens by lowering panel partitions between workstations. They also included nomad space, spaces for anyone to come and work, integrated between workstations. Workstation included white board and pin-up panels for employees to post and write, there were similar opportunities in conference rooms utilizing a glass panel with quadrant styled tinting, to be used as a calendar, or a graph, or whatever the users needed. Another aspect of the design for this space was to incorporate a cafe atmosphere for the employees to have another opportunity to collaborate. Here there are small round tables, low work bars, high work bars, and lounge chairs. The space is also highlighted with two televisions to keep employees updated on current events, or whatever they want to watch.

Office Code


Precedent Study > IDEO The use of “pin up” space is a method to allow all ideas to be viewed by all in order to evoke new ideas. The space these ideas are displayed becomes a hot spot for innovation to occur. IDEO utilizes this method during the beginning steps of their innovation process. They call it the “deep dive” or “focused chaos,” a non-conventional brainstorming session with rules: >one conversation at a time >stay focused on the topic >encourage wild ideas >defer judgment >build on the ideas of others. As the office members brainstorm ideas they pin them up on corkboard-covered walls. By the end of a three- or four-hour session, hundreds of ideas have been pinned up. The pin up method is crucial to IDEOs method and is furthermore crucial to the concept of the adjacent possible. What else is interesting about IDEO is the space for which they work in. They pride themselves on the idea of personalizing their spaces and the ability to make changes that each individual believes is better for the whole.

Focused Chaos


Site >

>

My proposed site will be the Legatum Center at MIT, this site is for students of the Sloan Business School who have been accepted into the Legatum program because they have a great idea for a business that will stimulate a third world economy. These students will use the space to work together to build business plans, to meet with investors, to present their ideas and to gather as a community. The site is located at 238 Main Street, 4th Floor, Suite 401 in Cambridge. The building has strong north and south facing facades and is located within a block from the intersection of Memorial Drive and the Longfellow Bridge. The site is one block away from the Charles River situated on the east side of the MIT campus. The site is accessible via the Red Line

Cities of Boston and Cambridge

MIT Campus Map


Site Analysis > Sun and Wind

N

N

Based on ASHRAE Handbook of Fundamentals Comfort Model, 2005 “For people dressed in normal winter clothes, Effective Temperatures of 68°F (20°C) to 74°F (23.3°C) (measured at 50% relative humidity), which means the temperatures decrease slightly as humidity rises. The upper humidity limit is 64°F (17.8°C) Wet Bulb and a lower Dew Point of 36F (2.2°C). If people are dressed in light weight summer clothes then this comfort zone shifts 5°F (2.8°C) warmer.”


>

Site Analysis > Circulation and Access

This corner of campus is a typical bustling part of Cambridge. The Kendall T Station and a Hub Station are just across the street making access to the site easy.

Red Line Major Road Network Minor Road Network


Site Analysis > Culture Centers, Innovation Centers, Libraries > mit campus Culture Center/ Department Info/ Technology Center Library Resource Center Dining/ Cafe Site Sloan School of Business, Schools of Architecture and Engineering

Culture Center Innovation Center Library Site


Building Code  Analysis Project  Name: Project  Loca9on:

MIT Legatum  Center 238  Main  Street,  Cambridge

ITEM

ISSUE

ZONING REQUIREMENTS 1 Zoning District 2 Lot Area 3 Maximum Floor Area Ratio 4 Total Building Area

Building Code:

Ordinance CHAPTER/ARTICLE Requireme nt

Actual

RES C-3B 26,622 sf

Cambridge Zoning

82,390 sf 5 stories

5 Building Height - No. of Floors 6 7 8 9 10

Minimum Yard dimensions (front, rear, side) Off Street Loading Off Street Parking Landscaping Other relevant ordinances

BUILDING REQUIREMENTS 1 Occupancy Classification (s) 2 Height and Area Limitations a) Exceptions to Area Limitations

304

B

1

Table 503 504

Types of Construction

1A

601

Mixed Occupancy Separations Req.Hrs of Fire Resistance Exterior Bearing Walls

601

Exterior -Nonbearing Walls

601

Interior Bearing Walls

601

Interior Nonbearing Walls

601

Columns

601

3 1 3a 0 3a

601

3a

Floor Construction

601

Roof Construction

601

2 1a/2b

Columns Supporting Roofs Only Beams Beams Supporting Roofs Only

Elevator Framing Mezzanine Floors Basement Construction Driveways and Loading Spaces Fire - Resistive Requirements a) Stairway Enclosures

708

4

b) Elevator Enclosures

708

4

2 2

c) Enclosures of Heating Rooms d) Enclosures of Wells & Chutes

0

706

g) Storage Rooms over 100sq.ft h) Boiler Rooms i) Corridors j) Fire - Resistive Materials and Construction

1018

0

1

21 Fire Protection Equipment a)Sprinkler Systems

903

Yes

1

b)Special Requirements

22 Openings in Required Stairs 23 Combustible Materials EXIT REQUIREMENTS 1 Types of Exits 2 Automatic sprinkler system? 3 Minimum Number of Exits 4 Travel Distance to Exits (in feet)

44 in

a) Stairs in inches

1009

1

44 in

b) Corridors in inches

1018

2

44 in

c) Doors in inches

1008

1

32 in

1 Toilets(WC)

2902

1.1

2 Women

2902

1.1

2

3 Men 4 Urinals

2902

1.1

2

04.25.2013

Agency/ Test No.

NOTES

Height limit within the District is 120 ft 300 sf Lot Area: Dwelling Unit

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

Revolving Doors Landings

Handrails

Stair Construction Enclosures Headroom

Distance Between Exits

Accessible Entrance & Vestibule Doors

SANITATION REQUIREMENTS

IPC 419

2

5 Lavatories

2902

1.1

6 Women

2902

1.1

2

7 Men

2902

8 Drinking Fountains

2902

1.1 1.1

2 1

9 Accessible Toilet Room Facilities

1109

2

1 ea

2902

3.2

500 ft

10 Toilets and Fountains Max. Travel Dist.

5.01 Height Limitations

Table 503

5.02 Area Limitations

Table 503

UL UL

5.03 Height Increase for Sprinklers

504

2

20 ft

5.04 Area Increase for Street Frontage

506

2

0.1833

5.05 Area Increase for Sprinklers

506

3

200%

1

2

1016

1

200 ft

a)Increases Permitted (in feet) b)Dead End Corridor (in feet)

1016

1

100 ft

1018

4

50 ft

c) Common Path of Travel

1014

3

100 ft

a) inches of exit width per occ. - Stairs

1005

1

30 in

b) Total Exit Width in inches - Stairs

1009

1

44 in

c) People per unit of exit width - Doors

1015

1

49 per

5 Capacity of Exits

If= (20/P -.25)W/30

If= (214/583 -.25)15/30

OCCUPANCY

1 Occupancy Classification 2 Mixed Occupancy

3 Maximum Accessory Assembly Area 4 Occupancy Calculations

Noncumbustible

Occupant Load:

TOTAL =

10,000 s.f.

100

s.f./person

Businesss

6

15

s.f./person

Assembly - Conf.

s.f.

assembly a possibility

7

15

s.f./person

Assembly - Café

s.f.

café a possibility

8

xx

s.f./person

Assembly - Locker

s.f. s.f.

9

xx

s.f./person

Assembly - Gym

10

xx

s.f./person

Assembly - Auditor.

s.f.

11

xx

s.f./person

Storage

s.f.

TOTAL

10000 s.f.

100

ACCESSIBILITY REQUIREMENTS 1 Scope

1101

1

2 Elevators

1109

6

3 Signage

1110

4 Toilet Rooms and Shower Faculties Facilities

1109

2

5 Doors

1008

1

1 ea 32 in

6 Controls and Operating Mechanisms

1109

12

7 Accessible Entrance

1105

1

8 Drinking Fountains

1109

5

1

13 Seating, Tables, & Work Surfaces

1109

10

5%

14 Accessible Route

1104

11 Platform Lifts

12 Alarms

300 ft total travel dist.

Occupants

5

10 Accessible Toilet Sinks

1021

18.33% ?

5.06 Unlimited Area Buildings

9 Telephones

Yes

ADA 602

HEIGHT AND AREA LIMITATIONS

12

e) Battery Rooms f) Interior Wall and Clg.Finishes

Require- Drawing/ ment N/A Sheet No.

1

6 Minimum Width of Exits

Sprinkled BLDG 20'/ story

2

b)Mixed Occupancy Buildings

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

> Date:

IBC

1009

d) Total Exit Width in inches - Doors

Name: Bianca  Marchany

15 Areas of Rescue Assistance 16 Curb Ramps 17 Ramps 18 Stairs

19 Detectable Warning Floor Finish


EXPERIENCE work As a technical designer with Workflow Interiors, I was quickly brought on to draw office furniture plans and installation drawings. I worked on furniture specifications especially with regards to as built conditions for resale and reuse as well as new office conditions to assist installers. I’ve been fortunate to have been apart of a few large scaled projects to include EnerNOC’s Marina Bay building, and an Appnexus design for their San Francisco and Seattle offices.

Workflow interiors spring 2013 peter elliot 3 months and counting...


Once furniture plans are made it is essential to identify power cores for each group of workstations. Here we can be sure the power can be integrated directly into the workstations without allowing for loose cables. Each power core can supply power to up to eight workstations, but we typically prefer it support four to six workstations. Power cores are dimensioned off of exterior walls or columns, in some cases off of significant interior partitions.


Installation drawings are merely the furniture plan with workstations dimensioned off to the nearest exterior wall, column or particularly significant interior partition. We try to give the installers just enough information without overwhelming the drawings with dimension lines. Here they can understand what our intentions are, and still make necessary on site decisions.


Furniture specifications can be complex. For the EnerNOC offices alone, there were ten furniture acknowledgements, each with their own associated plan, an example is featured above. Here, we are able to ensure each and every piece of the furniture has been ordered and at the right count. Our crude way of color coding may seem a bit archaic but it works, and I hope one day I can develop a better method for specifying a project.


EXPERIENCE work The BAC conducted a second pilot study of a CityLAB course intended to introduce BAC graduate students to the concepts of mapping and palimpsest as each student studies and investigates the city of Boston. The future intention of the course is to ensure every student at the BAC earns this knowledge and possible the essential design principles. As a Teacher’s Assistant, I was responsible for supporting the lead instructor, Alyson Tanguay in every aspect of the position from research to course packets builds to coordinating site visits. I also co-taught two design software workshops, Photoshop and InDesign, for the students as in introduction to design products and to prepare them for the final presentations. Even though I was a TA, I felt like I was apart of the course, discovering new perspectives of the city through the eyes of new interior designers and investigating different ideas as I moved in and out of the city.

Teacher’s Assistant- CityLAB, BAC Winter 2012-13 Len Charney, Alyson Tanguay 8 Weeks


CITYLAB INTENSIVE Winter 2012-2013 Photo collage of the city of Boston as expressed on the rear wall of a conference room, Boston Society of Architects, Boston, MA.


CITYLAB INTENSIVE: COURSE PLANNING This course was in its second round as a pilot, so fortunately we had a good amount of work to use as a starting point. The most imperative decisions we needed to make was what the scale of the course would be in reference to what parts of Boston we would investigate. Collaborative, we designed the course to look at the city of Boston in different scales, specifically investigating the neighborhoods of the Back Bay and the North End. These neighborhoods were selected because of their inherent palimpsest nature. When investigating each neighborhood, we began with a site walk, investigating the city at the street scale, then looking at the city from above to identify how scale changes perceptions


CITYLAB INTENSIVE: DAY 1 Day one of the course was an introduction to the course ensuring each student understood the concepts of palimpsest and mapping as they apply to the idea of city. We wanted to be sure they could compare and contrast two distinctly different parts of Boston. We started with the Back Bay because it is the home of the Boston Architectural College and where the students might already be familiar. The design of the course was meant to compare two neighborhoods to show how the notion of palimpsest exists in different ways. Looking at the Back Bay and how its was filled over 200 years compared to the North End and how it has been preserved in a similar way.

CITY LAB INTENSIVE 01.18.13 – 01.25.13

DAY ONE: FRIDAY 01.18.13 BACK BAY TRACINGS 8:00am

Breakfast at BAC Fishbowl Introduction to CityLAB: Personal Introductions and Course Objectives Distribution and Introduction of Workbook Discussion: Preconceived Notions, Three Things You Don’t Know About Boston and the City Hypothesis Discussion/ Lecture: Mapping, Tracing and the City of Boston • Review and Discussion of Pre-readings • Maps as artifacts; A short history of mapping, map typology, map terminology • Introduction to Boston: historical and geographical overview • Palimpsest: why layers, traces and remnants matter

11:00am

Initial Observations: Silent Site Walk to the Prudential Center • 3-5 experiential impressions documented in writing/ sketching

11:30am

Site Visit: Prudential Center Skywalk Discussion: Frame of Reference: A View From Above • View Back Bay model • How does a bird’s eye perspective change our understanding of the worm’s eye vantage we assumed during our recent site walk? • Given your new perspective, what are the questions you would like to answer when your back on the ground?

12:30pm

Lunch: Prudential Center Cafeteria (self pay, roughly $8-10)

1:30pm

Back Bay Palimpsest Quest: Prudential Center to the Esplanade • Discovering Traces: Find 5 examples of palimpsest along the way • Exploring the language of stoops, sidewalks and yards through streetscape sections

2:45pm

Site Visit: Church of the Covenant • Group Tour by Brian Reardon • Group Discussion: Review of palimpsest quest findings.

after hours

Reading: • Lynch, Kevin. Image of the City. Massachusetts: MIT Press, 1960. (pp 14-25, 46-90) • Mikoleit, Anne and Moritz Purckhauer. Urban Code. Massachusetts: MIT Press, 2011. (pp.10, 14, 30-31, 38-40, 52-53, 74-75, 98-99) *Available : CityLAB 2013 Reading Folder in Dropbox


1

2

1/ Site Visit with Dan Shanahan to the Prudential Center.: Dan spoke to us about the design of the Prudential Center and possible expansion plans. 2/ Student Sketch: This student traced her route from the BAC to the Prudential Center while looking down from above. 3/ The Back Bay From Above 4/ Student Sketch: Sketched by a student during the Back Bay Site Walk from the Prudential Center to the Church of the Covenant. This student found a stone detail to be interesting. 5/ Site Visit with Brian Reardon to the Church of the Covenant: Students learned a brief history of the church and we also discussed the space as a site for gathering.

3

4

5


CITYLAB INTENSIVE: DAY 2 Day 2 served as the second day in the Back Bay. As we continued to investigate the Back Bay as a palimpsest we also continued to look at gathering spaces. We spent the morning discussing the day before and the readings. Then conducted a scavenger hunt where the students set out to find elements of what Kevin Lynch describes in terms of mapping: paths, edges, districts, nodes and landmarks. We convened at the Boston Public Library and discussed the idea of the “voice of transition” by investigating thresholds and paths. The students navigated their way through the library and documented it with a sectional sketch or a plan. We closed the day with a Photoshop Skills Workshop lead by Aisha Densmore-Bey and me. We introduced the students to basic editing skills and explained how Photoshop software can be a useful tool for them as they progress through design schools. They were able to edit some of their sketches from the day.

CITY LAB INTENSIVE 01.18.13 – 01.25.13

DAY TWO: SATURDAY 01.19.13 BACK BAY TRACINGS 8:00am

Breakfast at BAC Fishbowl Review: • Day One Findings and Readings • Three Things and City Hypothesis Update Discussion: Patterns in our Physical Environment • Introduction to Cognitive Mapping and Image of the City as a lens for viewing (and knowing) Boston • Lynch’s Kit of Parts (Nodes, Paths, Edges, Landmarks, etc)

10:00am

Image of the City Scavenger Hunt • Begin as a group at Copley Square • Individual/Small Group Scavenger Hunt in Back Bay/Boston Garden/Boston Common • Documentation to include sketches, descriptions, diagrams and photographs

12:00pm

Lunch: Meet at the Boston Public Library Maproom Café, self pay or brown bag View Mapping Exhibit: Boston in the Guilded Age: Mapping Public Places in Leventhal Map Room

1:00pm

Site Visit: Boston Public Library • Voice of Transition Exercise and understanding the relationship between exterior and interior public realms

3:00pm

Regroup at the BAC Fishbowl • Review Findings from Days One and Two • Intro to Big Dig and prepare for Days Three and Four

4:00pm

Skills Workshop: Photoshop • Scan and edit an image • Image Adjustments • Layers/ Masks • Editing Tools: crop, magic wand, lasso, pen, eraser

after hours

Readings: • Murray, Hubert. “Paved With Good Intentions: Boston’s Central Artery Project and Failure of City Building.” Harvard Design Magazine 22 (Spring/Summer 2005): 74-82. • Murray, Hubert. “Reforming Boston: Re-evaluating the Big Dig in the Wake of Tragedy.” Architecture Boston 10.1 (Jan/Feb 2007) 12-15. *Available : CityLAB 2013 Reading Folder in Dropbox


1

2

1/ Student Sketch: A student marked the threshold and 3 entry conditions of the Reading Room at the Boston Public Library. 2/ Student Sketch: A student described her entrance to the library from Copley Square in plan marking the stair condition and elevation changes, also pictured in image 4. 3/ Student Photograph: A student found this detail from the Copley Square doors to be architectural, she then edited the photo on her phone to give the impression of age, with respect to the age of this part of the library. 4/ Site Visit to the Boston Public Library: Here a student, seen on the far right, sits and sketches a bride having her photo taken.

4


CITYLAB INTENSIVE: DAY 3 Day three was a sort of transition day from the Back Bay to the North End. Here we had the opportunity to discuss the Rose Kennedy Greenway and the Big Dig and how this design impacted the North End community. Again, we started with a site walk from the Aquarium T Station to the Customs House Tower where we were able to take a look from above. At the Customs House Tower, Maria Bellalta spoke to the students about her involvement with the planning of the Big Dig and the Greenway. The students learned a little more about urban planning and design and how it effects architecture and interior design. We then moved over to the Boston Society of Architects’ space to investigate gathering space in a different way. We also shared lunch with other Big Dig/ Greenway planners to include Ed Brown and Richard Dimino. They spoke to us not only about the design intention, but also about the logistics and the politics behind the design. After Lunch, Crandon Gustofson, Head of the Interior Design Program at the BAC, lead us on a wayfinding exercise through South Station. Here the students learned the concept of wayfinding and why it is so important to interior design. We closed the day with a second skills workshop. Aisha and I gave the students a quick introduction to InDesign in preparation for the presentation on the final day of the course.

CITY LAB INTENSIVE 01.18.13 – 01.25.13

DAY THREE: TUESDAY 01.22.13 GREENWAY TRACINGS 8:00am

Meet at Aquarium T Stop Site Walk: Initial Observations Silent Site Walk to Customs House Tower • 3-5 Experiential impressions documented in writing/ sketching along our walking route

9:00am

Site Visit: Customs House Tower Discussion: Big Dig Discussion hosted by Maria Bellalta • Frame of Reference: How does a bird’s eye perspective change our understanding of the Big Dig/ Greenway? • Given the juxtaposition between these perspectives, what are the questions we want to answer when we get back on the ground?

10:00am

Mapping Connections Along Greenway: Customs House to the Boston Society of Architects • Site reconnaissance and analysis at 3 distinct sites along the Kennedy Greenway

11:00am

Lunchtime Discussion: The Big Dig with A Better Community’s Richard Dimino and Perkins + Will’s Ed Brown [Lunch provided by Boloco]

12:30pm

Site Exploration: The BSA Space

1:30pm

Site Visit: South Station • Finding the Logic with Crandon Gustafson Review: Day’s Findings and Three Things/City Hypothesis check in

4:00pm

after hours

Skills Workshop: InDesign • Formatting a document • Layers • Editing Tools: text, lines, forms, graphics Readings • Puleo, Stephen. The Boston Italians. Boston: Beacon Press, 2007. (pp. IX-XV, 65-73, 254257,281-286) • Puleo, Stephen. Dark Tide: The Great Boston Molasses Flood of 1919. Boston: Beacon Press, 2004. (Author’s Note, Prologue, Ch 2) *Available : CityLAB 2013 Reading Folder in Dropbox


1

2

1/ Photograph by the BAC: From the top of the Customs House Tower of the North End, the view from above portion of the experience. 2/ Photograph by the BAC: Student observing the North End from the top of the Customs House Tower. 3/ Photograph by BAC: Lunch with Richard Dimino and Ed Brown during a discussion of the Big Dig/ Greenway design. 4/ Personal Sketch: I drew this sketch of South Station in section to show the approach to the front plaza from the train platforms.

3

4


CITYLAB INTENSIVE: DAY 4 Our second day of the North End began with a “Why is it worn?” exercise to investigate the age of common things around the North End. The students began with a experiential walk from Haymarket T station to Regina’s Pizza. As we walked through the North End we looked for indication of use since the birth of the North End. During lunch, the students conducted personal interviews with local business owners and people in the street. The learned that many of the residents of the North End had been residents for over 3 generations. Finally, we visited the Old North Church. Old North served to be a nice closing site to visit as we drew the class to a close, because the site served as a gathering space in multiple fashions, from military hospital to house of worship.

CITY LAB INTENSIVE 01.18.13 – 01.25.13

DAY FOUR: THURSDAY 01.24.13 NORTH END TRACINGS 8:00am

Breakfast at BAC Fishbowl Review: • Reflect on Day Three findings and discuss readings • Intro to the North End as a cultural and historical palimpsest, principle of authenticity • What does Authenticity mean in the North End? The importance of primary personal accounts --Travel to Haymarket Station as a group with T--

10:30am

Why Is It Worn? in the North End • Quest/ Scavenger Hunt starting at Haymarket Station to Regina Pizza (11.5 Thatcher Street) • Find and document given examples, and discover at least 3 more

12:00pm

[Lunch: En route, self pay. Pizza Suggested] North End Interviews: Getting to Know the Neighborhood • Personal Interviews with North End residents, visitors and proprietors • Documentation to include photographs, interview reports, sketches, maps

2:00pm

Site Visit: Old North Church • Compare the civic gathering spaces in the North End to the Back Bay through sketches, photographs and writing • Short guided tour by church staff

3:00pm

Discussion • Regroup: Three Things and City Hypothesis check-in • Discuss final presentation

after hours

Prepare Presentations


1

2

1/ Image of a post outside of the Paul Revere House, here you 4 can easily see how the post has taken a new form over the years from people brushing up against it and using it as an arm rest. 2/ The students conducted personal interviewers with local business owners to learn about their migration to the North End and how their business’ have been since the Big Dig. 3/ These women have been in the North End for 3 generations. 4/ This is a small Veteran’s Memorial just behind the Old North Church. 5/ The organs of the Old North Church have been preserved for just short of 300 years.

3

5


CITYLAB INTENSIVE: DAY 5 The final day of the course was a final presentation by the students on their experiences during CityLAB. The students did an excellent job of summing up their experiences over the past week and presenting to a large group of reviewers. My favorite part of this experience was being on the other side of the table, in terms of student and teacher. I’ve been in teaching positions before in my experiences in the military, however in a design setting, this was completely new to me and I wasn’t sure if I could do it well. I was honored and excited to be invited to be a Teacher’s Assistant, however, I wasn’t an expert on the City of Boston, I don’t even consider myself a local; however I am an excellent project manager and logistician and I was able to put those skills to work. I’m also grateful for sharing experiences with incoming BAC students and for the opportunity to make myself available to them as they progress through their design studies. I found my studio TAs to be a good example of what I wanted to be like as a student at the BAC, and I was honored to be in the position to support future students like I was supported.

CITY LAB INTENSIVE 01.18.13 – 01.25.13

DAY FIVE: FRIDAY 01.25.13 8:00am

12:00pm

Breakfast at BAC Fishbowl Charrette for Final Presentations • Instructors and TAs available for individual critiques and feedback on issues of scale, representation, presentation, layout, plotting and printing, etc. Lunch: Fresh City- BAC Provided with Invited Critics, Instructor and TAs

1:30pm

Presentations: Individual/group presentations with discussion

3:00pm

Reflections: A Week in Review • Reflections of Pin Ups • Three things you know about the city, three things you don’t know about the city. • Things you still wonder about……

after hours

***Get out now! Explore … more! Have a great semester!***


Being Innovative in a History-Driven City

NEIGHBORHOODS Architecture

Layout

CITY LAB Spring 2013 Amanda McCracken, Milicent Armstrong, Patrick Cash-Peterson

People


THANK

you

Work Samples  

This publication will offer insight into the work I have completed in the last two years of the Master of Interior Design program at the Bos...

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