Page 1

Black Hills State University’s

THE JACKET JOURNAL Vol. 121 No. 2

www.BHSUmedia.com

November 30, 2018

College readiness program gears up for new start in 2019 Claire Scarborough Production Editor

When the trials of the former leaders of South Dakota’s GEAR UP, previously run by Mid-Central Education Cooperative, wrapped up in early 2018, it seemed to many like the end of GEAR UP’s chapter in South Dakota. South Dakotans don’t realize GEAR UP is still alive and well, and being ran on Black Hills State University’s campus, albeit after the program underwent a complete overhaul. “All the positions, anybody that worked for GEAR UP had to interview

again,” Dr. Peg Diekhoff, project manager for GEAR UP, said. “One person had, had some experience with GEAR UP, but that person is no longer here. Everybody is all new to the program.” GEAR UP, which stands for Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs, became synonymous with scandal in 2015 after one of the organization’s former administrators from Platte killed his wife and four children before setting their house on fire and committing suicide. The tragedy resulted in the discovery of over $1

What’s the buzz in this issue? Features........... Pg. 2 Spotlight.......... Pg. 3 Campus Beauty.. Pg. 4 Holidays........... Pg. 5 Clubs/Depart.... Pg. 6 Sports.............. Pg. 7 Stings and Giggles Pg. 8

million embezzled from Mid-Central and widespread misconduct on all levels of the program. GEAR UP, which the Board of Regents took over after 2015, has worked to make sure those mistakes don’t have the chance to occur again. Diekhoff said,“One thing that BHSU is really cognizant of being transparent and that we brought back some integrity and rebuilt that trust with our partner schools. We work with our state director on a daily basis. The state director, when we turn a claim in, goes through every claim that we have.

We document everything that happens and everything we spend. One of the main emphases is making fiscally responsible decisions, so making sure everything is tied to carrying out the program.” Rebuilding trust has been a primary goal for the new leaders of GEAR UP. After an official state audit was conducted, South Dakota’s Auditor General Martin Guindon spoke to the state Executive Board. The Mitchell Republic, which covered the investigation since 2015, reported Guindon said, “Funds Scott Westerhuis

Students exhibit finest works Lisa Kerner Contributing Writer

Join the photography students at Black Hills State University for the opening reception of Viewpoint, a student photography exhibition on Dec. 4, 2018 from 4 to 6 p.m. The exhibition reception will be held in the Photographer’s Gallery located in the Jonas Academic Building. The walls and halls of the photography department will be lined with student

work, ranging from Photo Special to Advance Photography. The subject matter will range from fine art photography to alternative photo printing methods. The photography will be on display through Spring 2019. Jennifer Anderson, a senior graphic design major, will be presenting a series of alternative prints that focus on how she sees memories. For many students, an exhibition in a student show is an important step in their

stole from Mid-Central came from the 14 school districts in the cooperative, not the GEAR UP program.” The audit also found that while GEAR UP money might have been misused, the embezzlement, that ultimately resulted in Mid-Central’s contract cancellation, came from the school districts Mid-Central served. After the completion of the trials for other leaders involved in the scandal, project managers on BHSU’s campus have focused on their roots, at-risk students... Continued at bhsumedia.com

burgeoning art careers. “It allows for networking with the community, other students and other artists. This could result in collaborative opportunities, jobs or commissioned works,” Anderson said. Photography professor Skott Chandler said, “It is critical for students to exhibit their work as artist/ photographers.” Chandler explained that exhibiting teaches students to  identify the highest quality images they have created during the semester, and how  to professionally present their work for public viewing... Continued at bhsumedia.com

Jacket Journal, 1200 University St USB 9003, Spearfish, SD 57799-9003 Phone: (605) 642-6389 Fax: (605) 642-6005 Email: JacketJournal@bhsu.edu


Feature

November 30, 2018

2

Herbarium serves as timeless vessel for students at BHSU Isabel Litzen Fact Checker

A third-year biology major sits, distressed, at her desk cluttered with opened plant identification books, scribbled-in notebooks and multiple laptops. She has been attempting to properly identify her recently collected plant for nearly three hours now, and she can’t decipher if the plant is Agave brateosa, Agave filigera or Agave lechuguilla. She has studied all of her resources and knows each of the plants characteristics like the back of her hand, but her plant could be any of the three. She is about to give up, but then she remembers that her school has an herbarium. She pays it a visit, easily picks out the three options amidst the array of shelved plant specimens, and compares her plant to each. Within minutes, she is sure that what she has found is

Agave filigera, thread agave. Many people, including a vast amount of the BHSU student population, are unaware that there are nearly 100,000 preserved plant specimens within the very walls of Jonas science. These specimens make up the BHSU herbarium, a resource that has been a part of the school since it was a teaching college back in the late 1880s and early 1890s. The herbarium contains plant specimens from the U.S. and other countries. However, the most abundant sources are South Dakota and Wyoming. The plant specimen selection ranges from the present day to the oldest known specimen, collected in 1872. The herbarium can be used for more than plant identification. It can also be used to observe vegetation changes in certain areas over

time, to observe genetic changes in plants over time and to continue work on databasing the plants. The herbarium is currently being curated by university professors and botanists, Justin and Tara Ramsey. However, much work is still done by the retired botanist, Mark Gabel. Gabel took over the herbarium back in the 1980s when he was a professor at BHSU. Since his retirement, he continues to spend 35 to 40 hours a week in the herbarium, organizing and developing it, reducing backlog and writing grant proposals. “[Gabel] is really invested in growing and protecting the herbarium. The reason that it’s as good as it is is because of his efforts,” Ramsey said. When Gabel first became involved in the herbarium,

it only contained about 30,000 different species. Since his time, this number has increased by over 70,000 plants. Ten years ago, Augustana University’s herbarium, and Black Hills State’s herbarium was combined. In 2017, South Dakota State University’s herbarium, as well as the University of South Dakota’s herbarium, were combined with BHSU’s as well, making it the largest herbarium in the state with over 100,000 species being housed. “That’s really what made us jump up to 100,000. They probably had about 30,000 [species] at USD and I believe 6,000 at Dakota State,” Gabel said. Grant contributions have gone toward hiring student workers to continue expanding the database. These employees work to record the information

Student learning expands with new library technology

Allie Geier-Barlow Social Media Coordinator

BHSU recently added a space called the “Innovation Lab” in the E.Y. Berry Library-Learning Center, complete with 360 cameras, 3D scanners, virtual reality and 3D printing software. “It’s a resource to provide newer technologies and make them available to faculty and students,” Aaron Bauerly, systems librarian and coordinator of the Innovation Lab, said. This space allows students to experience and learn about technologies they may encounter in the workforce.

Bauerly called the lab “a technology petting zoo.” The Innovation Lab was started with the help of the previous library director and current provost of BHSU, who found the support needed to start it. “The Innovation Lab was something that many people on campus saw was necessary and on the horizon for a while,” said Bauerly. “The idea of the Innovation Lab has expanded with faculty involvement and excitement. The faculty are coming up with ideas on how to use the lab in their courses.” One faculty member

used 3D printed horse teeth fossils to demonstrate the evolution of horse teeth, along with the evolution of grasses. Another faculty member brought several education students to the lab. A student came up with the idea to 3D print pieces of Pangea to demonstrate the continental drift. The advantage of using these pieces versus paper was the addition of mountain ranges. Skott Chandler, assistant professor of photography, uses the technology available in the Innovation Lab to progress student learning. “We are preparing

students for the future,” Chandler said. “That’s why we have technology like the 3D printer and virtual reality. We’re using the technology to create learning tools and allow students to experiment.” Chandler recently helped shoot a virtual reality tour of the Sanford Underground Research Facility. This tour offers people unable experience the underground lab in person an interactive and engaging tour of SURF. The SURF tour is similar to the virtual reality tour of the International Space Station, which includes videos of scientists talking about the

found on the labels of the plants in the herbarium, image these plants and provide each with barcodes so that their page on the database can be easily accessed. From those labels, they take the information and type it into the computer. They are putting a barcode on it so the bar code can be linked to the database,” Ramsey said. The database can be found by simply going to www.bhsu.edu, searching “herbarium,” clicking on “database,” than “search the database.” Once these steps are followed, the viewer will be provided with easy access to over 200,000 plant records from 26 different herbaria around America. Historically, the herbarium has served as valued resource and will continue to do so for many years. space and projects. “We went underground, we took our 360 cameras, we started mapping out the areas and we’re making an immersive experience in that space,” Chandler said. Both Chandler and Bauerly are involved with the Instructional Innovation Creativity and Engagement Committee at BHSU. The goal of IICE is to find different ways to bring technology into the classroom. The Innovation Lab is open to all students and faculty Monday through Friday from noon to 4 p.m. in room 109 in the library. Students or faculty must contact Aaron Bauerly at Aaron.Bauerly@BHSU.edu to schedule session outside of that time slot.


Spotlight

November 30, 2018

“What’s your favorite part of the holiday?”

Name: Adrienne Gossard Major: Mass communication with emphasis in graphic communication Academic Year: Junior “Skiing or staying inside watching TV with hot chocolate.” photo/content by Cody Cline

“What is your favorite winter activity?”

Name: Mercedes Winegar Major: Music Education Academic Year: Freshman “My favorite part about the holidays is sitting in blankets with hot chocolate.” photo/content by Cody Cline

“What is your favorite holiday treat?”

Name: Alyssa Strobel Major: Mass communication with emphasis in public relations Academic Year: Junior “Going on trips with my family.” photo/content by Cody Cline

Name: Starr Paul Major: Political Science Academic Year: Sophomore “Like Michelle Obama, my favorite holiday food is sweet potato -- well, a sweet potato dish with marshmallow and brown sugar.” photo/content by Cody Cline

3

https://www.shutterstock.com/search/ xmas+lights

“What is your favorite holiday/winter memory?”


Campus Beauty

November 30, 2018

4

A photo of the Black Hills State University campus on a winter day captures 1st place for Brittany Schoenfelder in the Campus Beauty Photo Contest. photo by Brittany Schoenfelder

Below: Keegan Baatz gets creative with his dorm room and a black-andwhite print, winning the People’s Choice award in the Campus Beatuy Photo Contest. photo by Keegan Baatz

Cody Cline places 2nd in the Campus Beauty Photo Contest for showcasing one of South Dakota’s famous sunsets on campus. photo by Cody Cline

Left: Morgan Seymour places 3rd in the Campus Beauty Photo Contest. photo by Morgan Seymour


Holidays

November 30, 2018

5

Student-submitted recipes spice up holiday season

graphic found on PlusPNG

Momma’s Sweet Cherry Pie

Ingredients 1 can of unsweetened cherry pie mix 2 cups of sugar 1.5 sticks of butter 1 cup of flour 1 cup of brown sugar Corn starch 2 pie shells

Samantha Rider’s “My Momma’s Sweet Cherry Pie.” photo by Samantha Rider

Directions In a medium sauce pan, heat up the can of cherry pie mix. When the pie mixture is near a boil, add two cups of sugar. Mix the sugar and the pie mixture until the mixture is mostly liquefied. In a small cup, mix a spoonful of cornstarch with water until the mixture resembles milk. Slowly add a little of the cornstarch mixture at a time to the pie filling until thickened. Remove from heat and set aside to cool.

graphic by Yasmen Foos

In a medium mixing bowl, combine flour, brown sugar and butter with a fork until mixture is crumbly. Set mixture aside. In the pie pan, spread a small amount of butter on the inside until well covered. Lay in pie shell and press down until no air bubbles are visible. Slowly pour in cherry pie mixture until filled. Add small scoops of brown sugar mixture on top of the cherry mixture until the top is completely covered with the crumbly mixture. Lay out second pie shell and cut into several long pieces. Carefully pick up one slice at a time and make a lattice design. Bake at 375 degrees for 45 to 60 minutes. Remove from oven and cool. Best served slightly warm and with vanilla ice cream.

Merry Christmas

submission from Samantha Rider

Strawberry Santas Ingredients and Tools Strawberries Cream cheese spread (OR vanilla frosting) Black icing Piping bag (OR ziplock bag) x2 Piping nozzle (OR just cut tips off ziplock bag corners) x2 Knife

Katie Giesler’s “Strawberry Santas.” photo and recipe retrieved from smartschoolshouse. com

graphic by Lisa Kerner

Directions Wash strawberries. Put cream cheese spread (or vanilla frosting) into medium nozzle tipped piping bag. Put black icing into small nozzle tipped piping bag. Cut off strawberry top so it is flat and can sit up on the plate. Cut ¾ cm of strawberry tip, leaving two parts – DO NOT THROW AWAY Squeeze cream cheese spread on middle of strawberry. Top with strawberry tip. Use black icing to make two eyes on the cream cheese spread. submission from Katie Giesler

from the Jacket Journal and BHSUMedia.com staff


Clubs and Departments

November 30, 2018

6

BHSU Theatre Society showcases ‘See How They Run’

Cody Cline Copy/Content Editor

The Black Hills State University Theatre Society presented their performance of the British farce “See How They Run” on Nov. 15, 16 and 17 at 7:30 p.m. in the Black Box Theatre in Woodburn Hall. “See How They Run” is a dysfunctional comedy which contains mishaps

and mistaken identities. The plot involves an American actress, a maid, an American soldier, a village spinster, a Russian spy, a bishop and multiple vicars, according to the BHSU Theatre Program website. The performance was open to students and community members alike. Admission was free for BHSU students,

$5 for adults and $3 for children. Every year, the Theatre Society performs a play which is released in November. “See How They Run” was chosen as the 2018 play. Cast members included Gabriella Hertz as Penelope Toop, JD Schroeder as Sergeant Clive Winton, Kyle Graves as Reverend Lionel

Toop, Rachel Rindinger as Ida, Benjamin Parks as Reverend Arthur Humphrey, Parker Schlenker as the Russian spy, Justin Woodward as the Bishop of Lax, Walker Schouviller as the Sergeant and Kylee Jone as Miss Skillon. Schroeder and Rindinger were nominated for the Irene Ryan award. As a result

of their nominations, the actor and actresses will compete at the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival against hundreds of other college theatre students. At KCACTF, Schroeder and Rindinger will be judged on their performances and have the possibility to compete in Washington D.C.

of their best work. Writers ranged from first time amateurs to people who have been writing their entire lives. Approximately 40 people attended the event, providing a welcoming audience for upcoming writers. President of Three Peaks Review, Joe Mitchell said, “One specific highlight was when a member of the Spearfish community, Marsha Mittman, went up to the mic. She not only read us some unique pieces that

covered topics of love and living in New York City, but also gave a short speech on crafting written pieces. She discussed the importance of taking time to be alone while writing and making an effort to write something down everyday.” Mitchell organized the event and posted information all over town in preparation. In addition to Mittman’s performance, Mitchell said one of the highlights of the event “was seeing how

many people came to read, as well as the wide variety of readers. We started off with only a couple 3PR members volunteering to read, but other students, members of the community and BH staff showed up to read as well.” Sophomore Isabel Litzen, majoring in outdoor education and minoring in journalism and creative writing, introduced each speaker and entertained the audience between performances. Litzen said, “I really enjoyed being able to hear all of the talent that BHSU

has to offer. Being the emcee was fun because I got to introduce everyone and make them feel kind of famous.” Three Peaks Review have a variety of other events coming soon in the future months. Jan. 11 is the deadline to enter their winter writing contest. The theme of this year’s contest is “blizzard” and a variety of different creative works will be accepted. Winners will receive publishing in the spring edition of the Three Peaks Review.

Three Peaks Review takes the stage at Open Mic Night

Madison Pankratz Proofreader

Three Peaks Review offered students and community members alike the opportunity to participate in Open Mic Night at Common Grounds Coffee on Nov. 15. First up to perform a written piece was BHSU professor Bradyn Johnson. Johnson recited a variety of poems, kicking off the event. Following him was eight other writers showcasing some

BHSU professor Bradyn Johnson kicks off Open Mic Night at Common Grounds by reciting a variety of original poems. photo by Brook Kiecksee

Sophomore Isabel Litzen serves as emcee. photo by Brook Kiecksee


Sports

November 30, 2018

7

Triathlon ends season strong Allie Geier-Barlow Social Media Coordinator

The Black Hills State University women’s triathlon team placed third in Division II at the Women’s Collegiate Triathlon National Championships in Tempe, Ariz. on Nov. 25. Leading the Yellow Jackets was sophomore Mathilde Bernard who finished third individually in 1:08:46. Tereza Zimovjanova

of Queen’s University (Kingston, Ontario, Canada) won the division with a time of 1:05:48, which was less than three minutes faster than Bernard’s time. BHSU had two other racers compete, including freshman Taylor Lundquist who finished 14 in 1:15:35 and senior Katie Christy who finished 16 in 1:17:46.

The collective performance of the team earned the Yellow Jackets a third place finish with a total of 31 points. Queen’s University earned the Division II title with seven points and Colorado Mesa University followed with 28 points. This meet concluded the 2018 season for women’s triathlon.

Graphic by Claire Scarborough

Women’s cross country runners take off at the starting line at Regionals in Denver, Colo. photo submitted by Blake Hartman

Both BHSU women’s and men’s cross country teams have qualified for the national meet at the NCAA DII level. This is the first time in BHSU DII history that the women’s team has ever qualified for nationals. For the men this trip to Nationals will be the second in 4 years, the last one being in 2015. “Both teams ran very well at Regionals! It was the highest placing for our women’s team and tied the highest placing for the men,” said men’s and women’s cross country coach Scott Walkinshaw. The Regional meet was held in Denver, Colo. on Nov. 17. It was hosted by Metropolitan State University of Denver. The men competed in a 10km race and the women competed in a 6k. The men’s team placed 6th at the meet, when they

were ranked to place 9th. The leading place finisher on the men’s side was BHSU senior Jonah Theisen, who placed 9th out of 181 runners, earning him an all-region honor. This is the 2nd highest place for a male individual at regions in BHSU cross country history. “I was very pleased with my own individual performance, but I was more pleased with the team’s performance and how each of us ran the race we needed to come together for our team goal of qualifying for nationals,” Theisen said. BHSU junior cross country athlete Jordan Theisen was especially pleased with how he and the rest of his team performed at regions. “Each one of us laid everything out on the line and bled for it. And the results were worth it. Division II nationals team wasn’t a goal, but a reality

Cross Country runs to best finish in school history

that our team made for ourselves. And soon we will be living it,” said Jordan Theisen. The women’s team also placed 6th at the meet. This side was led by junior Nicole Allerdings. Allerdings, who did not qualify for the Regional meet last year, ended her race in 19th place out of 205 women, also earning an All-Region honor. T shis is the highest ever place for an individual female at Regionals in BHSU cross country history. “It was the first time we’ve had two athletes earn All-Region honors...Jonah Theisen [took] 9th and Nicole Allerdings [placed] 19th,” Walkinshaw said. In order for the teams to achieve a spot at Regionals, both teams received one of 10 at-large bids from the NCAA. This means that teams were chosen based off of their performances

Isabel Litzen Factchecker

all season out of all of the Division II teams in the nation, excluding the teams that placed in the top three at their region meets. Harsh weather conditions created additional challenges for both teams throughout the season. “The sleet made the course pretty rough and bumpy as well as stung when it hit you and made it difficult to see. But I was so proud with how the team pushed through the weather,” said Yellow Jacket senior Savannah Davis. Sophomore Abbie Fredrick agreed with Davis. “I knew I was running but I couldn’t feel where my feet were landing,” said Fredrick Despite the difficulty the weather presented them with, many of the running Yellow Jackets found that it played an advantage.

“We have been training in some cold days and we were pretty prepared for it, unlike some schools coming from Texas and New Mexico,” said senior Tori Moore. Both teams have high expectations for the national meet. The men have chosen to focus more on individual performances because “if everyone has their best race, then the team will be given the best place we can as well,” said Jordan Thiesen The women have more team-oriented goals in mind. “We have goals of placing higher than we are currently ranked and trying to beat a few teams that got the best of us at Regionals,” said senior Cailey Roth... Continued on bhsumedia.com


Stings and Giggles Contributors to this Issue of the Jacket Journal:

• Cody Cline, Copy/Content Editor • Claire Scarborough, Production Editor • Brook Kiecksee, Production Editor • Madison Pankratz, Proofreader • Isabel Litzen, Fact Thank You Checker to our • Katie Giesler • Allison Geier-Barlow Supporters • Lisa Kerner • Sarah Satterlee • Samantha Rider • Yasmen Foos • Dr. Mary Caton-Rosser, advisor

ART CLUB BEELINE DRUMLINE BHSU ARCHERY CLUB BICYCLING CLUB BUZZ ARCADE CAB CAMPUS VENTURES CIRCLE K

November 30, 2018

8

BHSU CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS

BHSU offers more than 80 clubs and organizations for students to join. Do you want to join one, but do not know where to start? Find a sampling of the clubs and organizations in the word search below to BHSU CLUBS begin your adventure. W T Z J X F F U E Z A P S P Q P T P G E Q M S WA VMD Z Y H N L O J C C MU Z P M R H U U T WO L O RW I T Y A L T U G B E R O C A A Q E T G E A R K B C Y P UMA T L C S J Q P C U L Z F A K U B U L C N G I H B K B M T A B Y T E I C O U S T U D E N V Z E Y I C I S K T L T V X J E H Y D K F F E U C D J A M B I A J I R FCLUB O A F WQ D ART

BEELINE DRUMLINE BHSU ARCHERY CLUB BICYCLING CLUB COLP BUZZ ARCADE ENACTUS CAB ENGLISH CLUB CAMPUS VENTURES CIRCLE K DESIGN FASHION COLP JACKET PACK ENACTUS

N Y S U Z A N I S H H S B Q L N E H S R A I L I C B C K I O Y U R I J T C L A K L E C C Z R K I G Y E B B R L X D U O I H R S Z W T G C Z Z S E D S C F V O A J S R E T A T S E N A NMO A T E N A C T S K B M C H O X V Z VWOM E R Q G T Q ENGLISH CLUB

E C D E N R N R P Z R G A P I E E T O U X B N L

FASHION DESIGN CLUB JACKET PACK JAZZ ENSEMBLE KAPPA DELTA PI LAKOTA OMNICIYE MATH CLUB CLUBPRAIRIE TO PLATE PROPS AND LINERS PSYCHOLOGY CLUB

A L I N U T Y D T W U E N R H G H E K S R C I I

Q A X S P B U B I L Y I L U D C C E I L D N A S O C G N I D N S H G R R U T B UWQ H E E H V I E V E J WM O S L H E P T T I K X R B E N G L B H K E D N S G C D O Q C P A R GWO U J U A B P T WM H U P C O L P L S A L I C C B N L N X H C N E E G T A E Y Y E A N N S T E MD VREADING J H COUNCIL G Y K

L H I P A T L E D A P P A K L X X U H D R F U O

Z P T H O C O R E R U U E J N J G A L Z I Z S E H N C S L E UM B B S L B E B X M T Y Z D J YW

ROTARACT SHUTTERBUZZ CLUB MATHSPANISH CLUB SPECTRUM PRAIRIE TO PLATE STUDENT SENATE PROPSTHEATER AND SOCIETY LINERS WOMEN IN STEM PSYCHOLOGY CLUB YELLOW GRAPHICS DESIGN CLUB READING COUNCIL YELLOW JACKETS VETS CLUB

Y T U P V B U L C G N I L C Y C I B D L B J Q X

JAZZ ENSEMBLE ROTARACT KAPPA DELTA PI SHUTTERBUZZ For more information on BHSU clubs and organizations visitSPANISH bhsu.edu/Student-Life/Clubs-Organizations LAKOTA CLUB Want to see yourOMNICIYE

work published in the Jacket Journal or BHSUmedia.com?

Submit content under the “Submit Now!” button at BHSUmedia.com

The Jacket Journal 1200 University Street USB 9003 Spearfish, SD 57799-9003 (605) 642-6389 bhsumedia@gmail.com www.BHSUmedia.com

All Jacket Journal and bhsumedia.com stories and advertisements for publication may be submitted by email. The deadline for all submissions is Wednesday at noon, one week prior to publication.

The opinions or view of advertisers do not reflect the opinions or views of the Jacket Journal staff or BHSU. Subscription rates are $15 per year. Circulation 1,500. USPS 851-840. To subscribe call 605-642-6389. The Jacket Journal welcomes letters to the editor on issues affecting the newspaper and/or the university. The Jacket Journal staff reserves the right to edit all letters for grammar, spelling, length and clarity. The opinions are those of the writer and not necessarily those of the Jacket Journal staff or Black Hills State University. The Jacket Journal is a student organization and all students are welcome to participate. The Jacket Journal also supports courses in mass communication under the College of Liberal Arts. BHSU Jacket Journal is an American Scholastic Press subscriber and member. BHSU Jacket Journal copyright 2018. All rights reserved.

SP ST TH WO YE YE

The Jacket Journal Nov. 2018  
The Jacket Journal Nov. 2018  
Advertisement