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DOWNTOWN COPPERAS COVE A MASTER PLAN PROPOSAL JANUARY 2011


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TABLE OF CONTENTS

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 ............... Downtown: The Heart of Copperas Cove . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 ...................... City Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8. . . . . . . . Downtown Anaylsis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 ................

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CIVIC IMPROVEMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 ................ Master Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 ......... Town Square . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 ............. Soldiers Memorial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 ................. City Hall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .22 ........ Streetscaping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 .......... Avenue D (between 3rd St & 2nd St) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .26 ...................... Avenue D (between 2nd St & 8th St) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .28 ...................... Core Streets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .30 ............

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ZONING GUIDELINES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 ................ Downtown Zoning District . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 ...................... A) Zoning Plan . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .36 .............. B) Use & Parking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 ................. C) Building Placement & Volume . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .40 ...................... D) Projecting Facade Elements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 ....................... E) Street Sections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 ..................

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EXAMPLE PROJECTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .49 ................ Retail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 ... Mixed Use . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .52 ....... Multi-Family . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 ......... Townhouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .56 ........

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .59 ............... A APPENDIX Implementation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 ............ Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 ......

COPPERAS COVE, TX Downtown Proposal

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY PROJECT ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

INTRODUCTION

ZONING GUIDELINES

This proposal has been developed for the purpose of exploring a Downtown Master Plan for the City of Copperas Cove. Its content is intended to be used and reproduced freely.

Copperas Cove would greatly benefit from a revitalized downtown. Downtown offers qualities and opportunities unique to its location. It can serve as a focus for community activity and civic pride. More than just a centralized commercial district, downtown can become a walkable neighborhood that offers a unique character. A vibrant, traditional downtown would help Copperas Cove stand out among neighboring communities

The city's current zoning code largely prohibits the kind of buildings that make traditional downtowns unique. This proposal outlines a new code specific to a special downtown zoning district. The code reduces setbacks, reforms parking requirements, and allows for a mix of uses within downtown. This section also provides street section guidelines for the redevelopment of downtown's public rights-of-way. The code outlines strategies for providing adequate sidewalks, street parking, plantings, and traffic lanes in the goal of creating thriving, walkable downtown.

This proposal was put together by Brian Hagood, former resident of Copperas Cove, with help from Charisma Panchapakesan. Brian Hagood is a practicing architect in Brooklyn, New York. HAGOOD ARCHITECT 45 Main Street, Studio 1210 Brooklyn, NY 11201 bhagood@hagoodarchitect.com

This section offers analyses of downtown's existing street system, walkability, zoning, and development opportunities. It lays the foundation for proposals in civic improvements, zoning changes, and examples of private development.

CIVIC IMPROVEMENTS The Proposed Zoning Guidelines within this document are based on the model code provided by: Duany Plater-Zyberk & Company. SmartCode, Version 9.2. The Town Paper Publisher. Reading List: David Evans and Associates. When a Highway Runs Through It: A Handbook for Oregon Communities . Oregon Department of Transportation, August, 1999. Dono, Andrea L., Editor. Revitalizing Main Street: A Practitioner's Guide to Comprehensive Commercial District Revitalization. National Main Street Center, 2009. Jacobs, Jane. The Death and Life of Great American Cities. New York: Random House, 1993.

A master plan of civic improvements can help guide the City in future development. Included in this proposal is a plan for a new public square. This square would serve as a focal point for the entire community. It would be laid out to include paths, a large plaza, lawns, and trees. It could be utilized for unstructured recreation and large public gatherings. Also proposed is a soldiers memorial and a new city hall to serve as examples of civic architecture complimentary to such a town square.

EXAMPLE PROJECTS The proposed zoning changes will have an impact on building forms and typologies. This section provides three examples of development that follow the proposed zoning guidelines. They include hypothetical projects for retail shopfronts, a mixed-use building, multi-family dwellings, and townhouses. These examples seek to express the kind of character such buildings would offer to the neighborhood.

Streetscaping is another means by which the City could positively affect downtown's character. The proposal outlines improvements along Avenue D, which is seen as the city's primary commercial street. Also included are street improvements for the other commercial streets of downtown. These changes would increase sidewalk width and connectivity, add street parking, install new street furniture, and decrease traffic speed in the goal of fostering a walkable neighborhood.

Kunstler, James Howard. The Geography of Nowhere: The Rise and Decline of America's Man-Made Landscape. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1993. McLaughlin, Patrick D. and Jerry K. Smith. Copperas Cove City of Five Hills: A Centennial History. Burnet, TX: Eakin Press, 1980.

COPPERAS COVE, TX Downtown Proposal

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INTRODUCTION

COPPERAS COVE, TX

Downtown Proposal

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INTRODUCTION

DOWNTOWN THE HEART OF COPPERAS COVE Deeply rooted in our nation's consciousness is a love for the American small town. In our most romantic visions of this ideal community there will be a thriving Main Street with shops, offices, and houses around the corner. There will be markers of civic identity: a courthouse, a city hall, or a proud monument marking the city's past. You will see people walking and neighbors socializing. It's a vision at the core of the American identity. Sadly, however, for many cities this is only a memory. Downtowns throughout the country have suffered in the past decades. The profusion of automobiles and the availability of oil and cheap land have fostered an explosion of growth out into the countryside. This suburbanization has produced homogenous housing subdivisions, strip mall shopping, big box stores, office parks, and seas of parking lots. Unfortunately, downtowns have suffered in the wake of this growth. Storefronts go empty, people move out, and cars take over. Modern zoning codes have only aided in the destruction of the traditional downtown. With the car minimizing distance as a factor, planners began to divide uses of land into narrow categories, separating work, home, and shopping. Such strict separation of function makes it impossible to build in the manner of traditional small towns. People no longer even have the option to live in such a neighborhood. It takes a car to go virtually anywhere. This makes children, the elderly, and the poor completely dependent on others to chauffeur them to meet their needs. Luckily, a movement has been growing in recent years to extol the virtues of traditional small town development. Much of it has focused on the restoration of downtown districts. Zoning codes have been amended to allow the kind of growth that these neighborhoods once thrived on. These efforts aim to protect existing building stock, improve sidewalk conditions, and steer future growth towards the traditional pattern. Cars are seen as secondary to the needs of the pedestrian. Focus is placed on civic improvements and the inherent desire to connect identity with place.

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Copperas Cove is a city in desperate need of a more vibrant downtown. Though our downtown may lack some of the assets commonly associated with other neighboring communities, like a courthouse square, an abundance of historic buildings, or an active train depot, Copperas Cove has many factors than can aid in a rejuvenated downtown. It is located in an expanding metropolitan region and can offer a more traditional alternative to the much larger neighboring city of Killeen. Copperas Cove has a strong sense of civic identity and an eager populace. There are many community members, especially downtown business owners, who recognize the need for a stronger downtown. Efforts have been made to bring festivals and commerce to the area. New buildings have gone up and the municipal government has shown a commitment to expanding its facilities within the historic core. It is imperative to combine efforts in order to affect the greatest positive change for downtown Copperas Cove. All vested parties within the community must work together to outline a strategy for improving the area. A strong push should be made to create a comprehensive Master Plan. A downtown district should be designated and special zoning regulations adopted that respond to the unique character of a traditional neighborhood. The city should make efforts to improve streets to better accommodate pedestrians and street parking. Visions for future public spaces should be included into a broad plan for the area, taking advantage of the city's architecture and geography. The following is a proposal for such a Master Plan. It seeks to provoke a dialogue that will one day lead to an official Master Plan supported by vested parties and the City alike. The primary goal is to create a vibrant downtown that serves as the heart of the community. To do this it proposes that efforts be made to increase the diversity of uses, foster a pedestrian friendly environment, enhance street character, provide civic focal points, establish public gathering space, and plan for mass transit connections. With these efforts Copperas Cove may one day have the kind of downtown that it deserves.


INTRODUCTION

Train Depot

Avenue D at Main Street (Circa 1905)

Avenue E School (circa 1900)

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INTRODUCTION

VIBRANT, MIXED-USE CHARACTER

PEDESTRIAN FOCUS

STREET ENCLOSURE

Most communities would love to have a vibrant downtown district. But for many cities, it has been decades since their downtown was an active place. Yet our collective memory recalls a time when it was. In many cases, over time the role of downtown has been simplified to serve only as a commercial district, centrally located, and composed of historical buildings. This idea does little to create a vibrant place. Traditionally, downtown hosted a mix of functions. People lived in close proximity to the stores on Main Street, often directly above them. Modern zoning has segregated functions, but people once built their cities for the convenience of living, shopping, and working in one place. Changes in zoning to allow for multiple uses is a key strategy to reinvigorate downtown Copperas Cove.

The defining character of a traditional downtown is the ability to walk around in it. Virtually every other commercial area we encounter must be driven to, and walking to a business across the street (or highway) may be a dangerous task. Traditional downtowns developed in an era without cars. A person's feet was the primary means of getting around: businesses and homes had to be close together; sidewalks had to be provided; and street life bustled because of it. But with the advent of the automobile, this special characteristic of downtown districts has been neglected. The primary asset, walkability, has often been forsaken for more parking and bigger traffic lanes. Copperas Cove should focus on differentiating downtown from the highway strip by fostering a pedestrian friendly environment, where cars are secondary to the needs of people.

Street enclosure is one of the more abstract qualities that make a downtown neighborhood special, but it is one of the most crucial. Simply put, building facades act like walls that can define an outdoor space. When buildings are close together and tall, the sense of enclosure is greater. This has the ability to make a street feel like a place, instead of an empty road. This characteristic is easily identifiable among America's traditional small towns. It adds to quaintness, charm, and beauty among city streets.

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There are many ways to help reinforce a street's sense of enclosure. The removal of large setback requirements is foremost. Having buildings close to the front of their lots is the primary means of accomplishing enclosure. Regularly spaced trees also have an effect on reinforcing the street wall. They also help create a "roof" overhead. Copperas Cove could benefit from zoning reforms and the planting of street trees throughout downtown.


INTRODUCTION

CIVIC FOCAL POINTS

PUBLIC GATHERING SPACE

MASS TRANSIT CONNECTIONS

A community's identity can strongly be solidified by the places it honors. Sometimes these places are monuments, buildings, natural features, or even water towers. Whatever the subject, such a place helps shape the community. Often such monuments or buildings are built in a special location, taking advantage of a long vista, or the center point of a public square. There are many opportunities in Copperas Cove publicly honor the community's virtues, like the sacrifice of our resident soldiers or the heritage of our settler past, for example. Likewise, any new opportunity to build a civic building should be given special care to properly reflect the community's values. An important building could be sited on a new open public space, complimenting the benefits of both features. Downtown would serve as an excellent host to any new such civic focal points.

Residents need a place to gather, both formally and informally. Events like farmers markets, festivals, political rallies, and displays of civic pride need a flexible, open space. There are many types of public spaces that can serve this function: parks, greens, squares, and plazas. While Copperas Cove has a great system of recreational parks, it lacks a central open public space that can serve as a focus for community events. Downtown is a perfect location for such a place. When coupled with civic monuments or important buildings, a square could help give the community a greater sense of identity. Such a place would also help draw people into the neighborhood through special events.

The train depot at the center of town once defined Copperas Cove. Before paved roads, the railroad was crucial for getting products to market and traveling beyond the city's limits. With the advent of the automobile and the construction of the interstate highway system, focus has largely shifted to roads for transportation. However, there is still a need for mass transit systems. Currently, Copperas Cove benefits from such a system with the HOP buses. The HOP largely provides for those who do not readily have access to cars. It is critical to maintain this link for city residents to downtown. The future will likely bring higher gas prices and more expensive travel. Attention is slowly returning to the benefits of rail. It is entirely possible that within the next few decades, Copperas Cove may benefit once again from its location along a railroad. Any master plan for downtown should include a place for a new train depot. Such a beneficial link would greatly rejuvenate the importance of downtown Copperas Cove.

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INTRODUCTION

CITY ANALYSIS LUBBOCK

AMARILLO

Copperas Cove lies within the Limestone Cut Plains region of central Texas. It is located next to the country's largest military base, Fort Hood, and is part of the growing Killeen-Fort Hood metropolitan area. The city itself lies within an agglomeration of hills which provides for the town's nickname "the City of Five Hills." Before settlement began to change the landscape, the area was once part of a vast grassland, with tree studded hills and grazing bison. Once at the edge of territory fiercely controlled by the Comanche, American settlement came to the area largely after the Civil War.

It was not until World War II that Copperas Cove's role as a regional shipping point changed. When Fort Hood was established, the city quickly became a focus of suburban development. Within the next few years, economic development shifted to the support of Fort Hood soldiers and their families. Most of the town has grown in that familiar pattern of suburban sprawl seen elsewhere in the country. Highway 190 quickly overshadowed downtown as the primary commercial area. Despite the transient nature of many of the city's residents, Copperas Cove retains a strong identity and civic pride.

The community that became Copperas Cove began with the early settlers who came to this area for farming and ranching. In 1882, the Gulf, Colorado, & Santa Fe Railway took advantage of this growing region of agricultural production by building a railroad from the Gulf Coast through Central Texas. It was at this time that Copperas Cove started to become the town that we recognize today. Initially settlement focused around the train depot. People living within city limits ran businesses and other functions to serve the farmers and ranchers of the surrounding area.

The city of Copperas Cove has an enormous potential for growth. Situated next to the country's largest military installation, there are opportunities for residential development and commercial expansion as well. A vibrant downtown would be an important asset to help separate Copperas Cove from competing communities. A revitalized downtown would add to the city's identity and sense of civic pride. Situated at the heart of Copperas Cove, downtown is conveniently located and well connected to main thoroughfares running through town.

VIEW FROM RATTLESNAKE POINT (LOOKING NORTHWEST)

ORIGINAL POST OFFICE & STAGECOACH STOP

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FT WORTH

DALLAS

ABILENE MIDLAND EL PASO

ODESSA

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COPPERAS COVE AUSTIN HOUSTON SAN ANTONIO

CORPUS CHRISTI LAREDO

HIGHWAY 190 (LOOKING EAST)

GALVESTON


INTRODUCTION

FM 1113 FM 116

BNSF RAILWAY

TANK DESTROYER BLVD

Downtown Study Area

FM 116

FM 2657

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INTRODUCTION

DOWNTOWN ANALYSIS Downtown Copperas Cove has many assets which could help revitalize the area into a thriving neighborhood. To start with, it is excellently situated within the community. From when the railroad first platted the city's lots through to the present day, it has been the center of town. The district lies in close proximity to the city's main thoroughfare, US Highway 190. It is connected to it by East Avenue D, Robertson Avenue, and South Main Street. Downtown is also the main railway crossing point uniting the northern third of the city to its main body. From this section of town, FM 1113, FM 116, and Tank Destroyer Boulevard converge to connect Copperas Cove with surrounding communities. This crossroads makes downtown well suited for commercial development despite strong competition from the highway.

The infrastructural bones of Downtown are up to the task of neighborhood revitalization. The streets were laid out in a time when walking was the main means of getting around. The blocks are therefore appropriately sized for easy pedestrian maneuvering. The streets are generously proportioned and complimented by a system of alleys, which could be better utilized for parking and delivery service. Much of the existing building stock is consistent with that of a traditional, walkable downtown. Structures are close to the street and welcoming to passers-by. Although the area has seen development that is inconsistent with traditional design (large parking lots, deep setbacks, and little connection with the sidewalk), there are many opportunities for infill development that would help strengthen the character of the neighborhood. Such private development coupled with efforts by the city to improve sidewalk and street conditions would help lead to a revitalized town center.

AVENUE D AT MAIN STREET (LOOKING EAST)

AVENUE D AT MAIN STREET (LOOKING WEST)

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Area Shown On Opposite Page

AVENUE E AT 2ND STREET (LOOKING EAST)


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Downtown Copperas Cove serves as the crossroads for the entire community. It is the primary point for crossing the railroad and accessing the northern third of the city. Major roads FM 1113 and FM 116 pass through the area, making downtown a vital link to outside residents and communities. Though most traffic now occurs along US 190 to the south, Downtown is strongly connected to the highway through corridors along Avenue D and Main Street.

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INTRODUCTION

STREET HIERARCHY

There are many assets of the existing street system which are currently under-utilized. The town was originally platted with generous public rights-of-way (R.OW.). Most of the streets are adaptable to angled street parking and wide sidewalks. Additionally, alleys have become largely neglected in the area. These valuable assets could be put to use for rear parking and deliveries.

Traditional downtowns are walkable neighborhoods where residents and visitors rely on their feet more then their cars. Buildings that are close to the property line and have entrances onto the public sidewalk are strongly oriented to the pedestrian. This diagram illustrates a clustering of these buildings between Avenues D and E, and 1st and 2nd Streets. Unfortunately many of the buildings in Downtown have been built to suit the needs of the cars more than pedestrians.

These car-oriented buildings are set far back from the property line, devote much of their lot area to parking, and often lack sidewalks. This diagram illustrates a loose patchwork of sidewalks that makes it dangerous and unpleasant to walk from one location to another. A strong effort should be made to reinforce a continuous network of pedestrian paths. This would encourage a traditional, walkable character for the neighborhood, benefiting businesses and residents alike.


DEVELOPMENT OPPORTUNITIES

INTRODUCTION

EXISTING ZONING

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Existing zoning excludes any mixed-use development; commercial and residential functions are strictly separated. Since most of Downtown lots have been designated for commercial functions (zones B-2, 4, & 5), a substantial residential population cannot be established in the area. This limits the number of potential patrons who could help sustain Downtown businesses.

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Additionally, existing zoning regulations prevent new development from being consistent with a walkable, pedestrian friendly neighborhood. Current requirements for setbacks and parking allocations are appropriate for suburban settings but not for an urban core. Many of the existing buildings which define the character of Downtown could not be built with today's zoning regulations.

Even within the limitations of the existing zoning, there are many lots in Downtown that are underdeveloped. Several single family homes--some on large lots--could be developed into multi-family housing. Many commercial lots are dominated by gratuitous parking. With zoning changes allowing mixed-use development, ground floor commercial space could be supplemented with residential units above.

In addition to private development opportunities, some city-owned property could be more effectively developed. With the opening of a new police facility and the possibility of creating a new municipal building, city facilities and land could be turned over for private development. Also, in coordination with the BSNF Railway, railroad right-of-way on the north side of Avenue D could be developed for commercial purposes.

COPPERAS COVE, TX Downtown Proposal

13


HAGOOD ARCHITECT January 2011

14


2

CIVIC IMPROVEMENTS

COPPERAS COVE, TX

Downtown Proposal

15


MASTER PLAN

CIVIC IMPROVEMENTS

FOR CIVIC IMPROVEMENTS

Civic intervention is crucial to the revitalization of Downtown Copperas Cove. In addition to zoning changes that will help reshape the neighborhood through private investment, the municipal government can focus its own resources in ways that will transform public infrastructure. This Master Plan proposal highlights two fields of public investment: streetscaping and shared community space. The following proposes a new town square to act as a community focal point as well as physical guidelines for the redevelopment of Downtown's city streets.

In addition to town squares and public buildings, the City of Copperas Cove should focus resources on reshaping Downtown's streets. Currently, Downtown lack a continuous, safe, or shaded path of travel on foot. Generous amounts of public right-of-way have been sacrificed to the domain of the automobile. Investment should focus on making wide sidewalks with continuous plantings. Street parking should be made convenient and abundant. Car traffic should be slowed and made safe to the benefit of pedestrians. The following proposed streetscapes seek to revitalize the existing public right-of-way in manner that promotes a compact, walkable neighborhood.

In many communities throughout Texas, the central public square has special significance. It functions as the community gathering place for a number of civic activities, ranging from political rallies to farmers' markets. Currently, Copperas Cove lacks such a central public space. Adding a square to Downtown would provide a significant and valuable place to strengthen the city's sense of community. The following proposes the dedication of an entire city block to this purpose. The inclusion of a new City Hall building and a Soldiers Memorial adds utility and meaning to such an important public space.

TOWN SQUARE

STREETSCAPING

DN

UP

UP

UP

DN

UP

UP DN

DN

DN

DN

UP DN

DN

TOWN SQUARE

HAGOOD ARCHITECT January 2011

16

MONUMENT

CITY HALL

AVENUE D (3RD ST-2ND ST)

AVENUE D (2ND ST-8TH ST)

CORE STREETS


CIVIC IMPROVEMENTS

COPPERAS COVE, TX Downtown Proposal

17


NORTH DR

N 4TH ST N 2ND ST

N 3RD ST

N 5TH ST

N 7TH ST

AVE

SOUTH DR

S 6TH ST

S 4TH ST

S 2ND ST

S MAIN ST

S 1ST ST

S 3RD ST

1,100 sf plaza

S 5TH ST

A new Town Square in Copperas Cove would be a meaningful and abundantly useful addition to the City's infrastructure. Downtown would be a natural and meaningful location for such an important public space. The following proposes the redevelopment of a Downtown block into a Town Square.

S 7TH ST

AVE D

S 8TH ST

AVE C

Description

AVE E

25,000 sf green space AVE F

0

AVE

AVE

ST

CLEMENTS

H

IG

H

W

A Y

19

LEE ST

T L S

TURNER

48 on-street parking spaces

O HO SC

S 2ND ST

ROBERTSON

VETERANS

18

CARPENTER ST

46 parking lot spaces S 1ST ST

January 2011

MEGGS ST

S 3RD ST

HAGOOD ARCHITECT

10,200 sf City Hall building footprint

AVE G

MARY ST

MARY ST

In the plaza's center stands a proposed monument dedicated to the city's soldier citizens. Tall and aligned with Main Street, it would serve as the civic focal point for the entire community. Other amenities are also provided, including a parking lot and ample street parking. The park has space for a playground, gazebo, flag poles, and civic signage.

1,100 sf of landscaped garden

S MAIN ST

The Square is centered on South Main Street and anchored on its eastern edge by a new City Hall building. The other edges are surrounded by regularly planted trees to create a sense of enclosure. Paths lead around landscaped areas into a public plaza, reflecting the unique geography of the five hills region.

S 7TH ST

Soldiers Memorial & fountain

S 5TH ST

CIVIC IMPROVEMENTS

D

EXAMPLE PUBLIC GATHERING SPACE

O

O

W

R

E

AVE B

SH

TOWN SQUARE


new pavilion

CIVIC IMPROVEMENTS

AVENUE E

new parking lot (46 spaces)

NEW SOLDIERS MEMORIAL

NEW CITY HALL

2ND STREET

MAIN STREET

new street parking (48 spaces)

new central plaza

new playground new streets trees in planters 30' apart

new garden

new town square sign (on axis with the soldiers monument and main street to the south)

MAIN ST

AVENUE F

COPPERAS COVE, TX Downtown Proposal

19


SOLDIERS MEMORIAL EXAMPLE CIVIC FOCAL POINT-SCULPTURAL

CIVIC IMPROVEMENTS

Description More than anything else, Copperas Cove is a city dedicated to the spirit of military service. Nearly every person in the community is connected to the military in some way. For decades now, Copperas Cove has hosted a continuous influx of soldiers and their families, many of whom decide to call the city home after concluding their service. Creating a civic focal point that honors this unique military identity would serve to strongly unite the city's diverse community.

20' tall copper sculpture engraved names of fallen service members 16' wide pool with fountain

The following is a proposal for a monument dedicated to those soldiers who call Copperas Cove home. The monument's form is derived from the yellow remembrance ribbon so ubiquitous among the bumperstickers, yard signs, and t-shirts seen throughout the city. The ribbon is shaped from a continuous copper mobius strip, symbolizing the unending commitment of the soldier's sacrifice and the eternal remembrance of the community. At the monument's base is a pool and fountain signifying the peace safeguarded by our soldiers' sacrifice. The names of community members who have fallen in the line of duty are engraved on the ribbon's surface.

MATERIALS (COPPER) HAGOOD ARCHITECT January 2011

20

MEMORIAL TO COMMUNITY MEMBERS WHO HAVE DIED IN THE LINE OF DUTY

INSPIRATION (REMEMBRANCE RIBBON)


CIVIC IMPROVEMENTS

COPPERAS COVE, TX Downtown Proposal

21


CITY HALL EXAMPLE CIVIC FOCAL POINT-ARCHITECTURAL

CIVIC IMPROVEMENTS

Description An inspiring civic building is the hallmark of a great town square. In neighboring Gatesville, the historic Coryell County Courthouse fulfills this vital role. It serves as a symbol for the entire community. Similarly, Copperas Cove would greatly benefit from such an emblematic public building. The following is a schematic design for a new City Hall, located on the proposed town square. It's programming and form are meant to be suggestive rather than prescriptive. The intent is to explore an architectural example representative of the unique character of Copperas Cove. Many solutions can be imagined.

23,400 sf of 3-story building with 48 ft high observation deck 100 person Council Meeting Chamber 250 person Banquet Hall 10,000 net sf of office space

The following design utilizes materials indigenous to the Five Hills region. The walls are constructed of limestone masonry. Metal elements are rendered in a copper tone. The building is oriented as a long, tall structure, providing a strong edge and backdrop to the adjacent town square. Within this linear form, an octagonal tower rises on axis with the Soldiers Memorial. This serves as a marker for the city's skyline, providing the town square, the building, itself, and the entire community with a well-defined center. Rather than mimic historical styles, this particular design seeks to present a contemporary aesthetic in a strong, ordered form. The use of extensive glass on the building's top elements is meant to evoke a sense of lift from the structure's rooted stone base.

MEMORIAL BANQUET HALL

COPPERAS COVE CITY HALL

FRONT ELEVATION

HAGOOD ARCHITECT January 2011

22


DN

UP

Stage CIVIC IMPROVEMENTS

Banquet Hall UP

DN

Lobby

Backstage

UP

UP

Office UP

UP DN

DN

Office

Office

Office

Office Elev

Elev

UP

DN

Lobby

DN

DN

Office Office

UP

Control

DN

Storage DN

UP

DN

Office

Meeting Chamber

GROUND FLOOR

3RD FLOOR

COPPERAS COVE, TX Downtown Proposal

23


STREETSCAPING Improving the character of the street is the most immediate way to affect positive change downtown. The Master Plan proposes transforming the public right-of-way into a more walkable and active place. To do this, traffic must be contained to travel at safe speeds. Appropriately sized lanes, street parking, and stops at intersections help keep cars safely aware of their surroundings. In order to create a friendly environment for pedestrians, sidewalks should be widened, shade trees planted, and street furniture installed. By providing this framework, private development will be encouraged to further transform the area into a walkable, active downtown. The photos to the right explain the goal of such a transformation with an example streetscaping of Avenue D between Main Street and 2nd Street: A. Existing Conditions: The street currently has four lanes of high-speed traffic that deliver residents as quickly as possible from this part of town to Highway 190. There are businesses on the street's south side, including some of Copperas Cove's oldest buildings. A vacant building occupies the north side of the street. B. Streetscaping Improvements: Traffic lanes are reduced to three. The public right-of-way has been expanded to accommodate generously sized sidewalks. Regularly spaced trees have been planted and street furniture installed. C. Private Development: In conjunction with zoning changes, over time private development occurs along the north side of the street, as well as the infill of empty lots on the south side. These new buildings act to enclose the street, providing a human-scaled environment well suited for commercial and mixed-uses.

AVENUE D (BETWEEN MAIN STREET & 2ND STREET): EXISTING CONDITIONS

View of Photos

S 4TH ST

S 2ND ST

S MAIN ST

AVE D

S 1ST ST

CIVIC IMPROVEMENTS

TRANSFORMING THE PUBLIC REALM

AVE E

AVE F

AVENUE D (BETWEEN MAIN STREET & 2ND STREET): STREETSCAPING IMPROVEMENTS

HAGOOD ARCHITECT January 2011

24


CIVIC IMPROVEMENTS

AVENUE D (BETWEEN MAIN STREET & 2ND STREET): PRIVATE DEVELOPMENT

COPPERAS COVE, TX Downtown Proposal

25


N 4TH ST

NORTH DR

E

11' Lane

11' Lane 50' Street

80' R.O.W.

11' Lane

N 2ND ST

N 3RD ST

N 5TH ST

S 8TH ST

S 6TH ST

S 4TH ST

S 2ND ST

S MAIN ST

S 1ST ST

S 3RD ST

S 5TH ST

0

AVE

CLEMENTS

AVE

(C) 2 LANES WITH PARALLEL PARKING

8' Park 10'

21'

Walk

Walk

11' Lane

11' Lane

38' Street

8' Park 21' Walk

80' R.O.W.

IG H

S 7TH ST

8' Park

H

W

A Y

19

LEE ST

T L S

8' Park 21'

S MAIN ST

26

11' Lane Walk

50' R.O.W.

HAGOOD ARCHITECT

(B) 3 LANES WITH PARALLEL PARKING

CARPENTER ST

ROBERTSON

VETERANS

50' Street

Walk

private development of north side of Avenue D between Main Street and 2nd Street

S 1ST ST

20'

11' Lane

MEGGS ST

S 3RD ST

8' Park

added street parking

AVE G

MARY ST

MARY ST

(A) 2 LANES WITH PARALLEL PARKING

AVE F

O HO SC

extension of 2nd Street across railroad tracks

new streetscaping along Avenue D including: wider sidewalks, curb bulb-outs, trees, and street furniture

ST

The Master Plan proposes to make Avenue D into the most walkable and pedestrian friendly street of downtown. It increases sidewalk widths, includes regularly planted trees, and provides for more on-street parking. The proposal would require the acquisition of railroad right-of-way to accommodate these efforts as well as coordination with the State Dept. of Transportation. To increase connectivity and ease traffic congestion, it is proposed that 2nd and 4th Streets be connected across the rail tracks. Efforts should also be made to develop the north side of Avenue D between Main Street and 2nd Street. Activating both sides of the street would add vibrancy to a renewed "Main Street" in downtown Copperas Cove.

AVE E

TURNER

expansion of right-of-way to accommodate 80' street section east of Main Street

S 2ND ST

Avenue D is the most prominent commercial street in downtown. Indeed, in many ways it is Copperas Cove's "Main Street." The street's early development occurred because of its close proximity to the train depot. Although the railroad's role has diminished, Avenue D serves as the town's hinge point, connecting the northern third of Copperas Cove to the rest of the city and Highway 190.

S 7TH ST

AVE D

S 5TH ST

CIVIC IMPROVEMENTS

AVE

SOUTH DR

AVE C

Description

January 2011

D

(3RD STREET TO 2ND STREET)

O

N 7TH ST

O

W R

AVE B

SH

AVENUE D STREETSCAPING


new curbs, street crossings, sidewalks, and trees along Avenue D

new retail and office space with service alley behind

existing public parking

A

new pocket park with relocated founder's monument

extended street connection across railroad tracks at 2nd st CIVIC IMPROVEMENTS

gradual private infill development of empty lots

C

B

2ND STREET

MAIN STREET

1ST STREET

3RD STREET

AVENUE D

COPPERAS COVE, TX Downtown Proposal

27


NORTH DR

N 4TH ST N 2ND ST

N 3RD ST

N 5TH ST

N 7TH ST

S 8TH ST

S 6TH ST

S 4TH ST

S 2ND ST

S MAIN ST

S 1ST ST

AVE F

LEE ST

H

W

A Y

19

0

AVE

AVE

ST

CLEMENTS

IG

TURNER

80' R.O.W.

VETERANS

50' Street

Walk

11' Lane

S 1ST ST

11' Lane

ROBERTSON

S 3RD ST

21'

11' Lane

T L S

MEGGS ST

new public parking lot of north side of Avenue D between 2nd Street and 4th Street redevelopment of former Police Department buildings into commercial space oriented to street

CARPENTER ST S 2ND ST

added street parking

O HO SC

S MAIN ST

AVE G

MARY ST

H

extension of 4th Street across railroad tracks

8' Park

28

S 3RD ST

new streetscaping along Avenue D including wider sidewalks, curb bulb-outs, trees, and street furniture

(D) 3 LANES WITH PARALLEL PARKING

HAGOOD ARCHITECT

S 5TH ST

AVE E

MARY ST

The Master Plan proposes to incorporate the eastern blocks of Avenue D into the fabric of downtown. High speed traffic should be subdued at the intersection of 8th Street. From this point through downtown, street parking and a maximum of two traffic lanes would reduce speed to a safe level. A turning lane in the center would help mitigate traffic flow. Sidewalks with tree planting would run continuously on both sides of the street. Crosswalks would enable west-bound drivers to park on the street and walk to businesses on the south side of Avenue D. Additionally, connecting 4th Street across the rail tracks and a new public parking lot would help incorporate this area into downtown.

expansion of right-of-way to accommodate 80' street section

S 7TH ST

The blocks of Avenue D between 4th Street and 8th Street represent an important transition between the rush of Highway 190 and the pedestrian character of Downtown. Currently Avenue D is treated like an extension of the highway, delivering traffic at high speed to the intersection at Main Street. This is problematic. It makes pedestrian activity extremely dangerous and discourages an activated street life.

S 7TH ST

AVE D

S 5TH ST

CIVIC IMPROVEMENTS

AVE

SOUTH DR

AVE C

Description

January 2011

D

(2ND STREET TO 8TH STREET)

O

O

W

R

E

AVE B

SH

AVENUE D STREETSCAPING

(E) 3 LANES WITH MIXED PARKING

8' Park

18' Park 10'

10'

Walk

Walk

12' Lane

11' Lane

60' Street

11' Lane

8' Park 5'

5' Walk

80' R.O.W.


new curbs, street crossings, sidewalks, and trees along Avenue D

AVENUE C

CIVIC IMPROVEMENTS

extended street connections at Avenue C and 4th Street

new Downtown gateway

new retail and office space with parking behind

E new public parking

D

8TH STREET

6TH STREET

4TH STREET

2ND STREET

AVENUE D

COPPERAS COVE, TX Downtown Proposal

29


NORTH DR

N 4TH ST N 3RD ST

N 5TH ST

N 7TH ST

N 2ND ST

S 8TH ST

S 6TH ST

S 2ND ST

S MAIN ST

S 1ST ST

S 3RD ST

S 5TH ST

S 4TH ST

O HO SC 0

AVE

(G) 3 LANES WITH MIXED PARKING

18' Park

8' Park 10'

10'

Walk

Walk

11' Lane

11' Lane

12' Lane

60' Street

8' Park 10'

80' R.O.W.

AVE

(H) 2 LANES WITH PARALLEL PARKING

18' Park Walk

CLEMENTS

11'

10'

11' Lane

11' Lane

38' Street

Walk

8' Park 5'

5' Walk

80' R.O.W.

11'

H

IG

H

W

A Y

19

LEE ST

T L S

30

ROBERTSON

ST

HAGOOD ARCHITECT

MEGGS ST

private infill development

TURNER

80' R.O.W.

CARPENTER ST S 2ND ST

60' Street

Walk

AVE G

MARY ST

S MAIN ST

12' Lane

new town square between Main Street and 2nd Street, and Avenue E and Avenue F, to include: new park, civic building, and Soldiers Memorial (see pages 18-23)

VETERANS

10'

12' Lane

AVE F

S 1ST ST

18' Park

added street parking

S 3RD ST

(F) 2 LANES WITH ANGLED PARKING

AVE E

MARY ST

The proposed streetscaping would widen sidewalks, add tree plantings, increase on-street parking, and include new street furniture. It would strive to make downtown an interconnected neighborhood, easily traversed on foot. Also included is a proposal for a new town square, which would serve as a focus point for the entire community. The ideas behind this proposal are outlined on previous pages in Section 2.

new streetscaping along core streets, including: wider sidewalks, curb bulb-outs, trees, and street furniture

S 7TH ST

A traditional downtown is more than just one "Main Street." It is a neighborhood composed of many streets, with different functions and varying degrees of intensity. This section deals with the core commercial streets of downtown. It seeks to create a standard of sidewalks, street parking, and traffic lanes that can be applied interchangeably to different portions of the street, depending on the situation's specific needs.

S 7TH ST

AVE D

S 5TH ST

CIVIC IMPROVEMENTS

AVE

SOUTH DR

AVE C

Description

January 2011

D

(1st St, Main St, 2nd St, Avenue E, and Avenue F)

O

O

W

R

E

AVE B

SH

CORE STREETSCAPING


H

G G G

F F F

F

G H G

F

2ND STREET

F

MAIN STREET

H

F

Downtown Proposal

CIVIC IMPROVEMENTS

AVENUE D

F

AVENUE E

H

F

AVENUE F

COPPERAS COVE, TX 31

4TH STREET

2ND STREET

MAIN STREET

1ST STREET

3RD STREET


HAGOOD ARCHITECT January 2011

32


3

ZONING GUIDELINES

COPPERAS COVE, TX

Downtown Proposal

33


DOWNTOWN ZONING DISTRICT

NORTH DR

N 4TH ST

D

O

N 2ND ST

O AVE

N 3RD ST

W

R

N 5TH ST

These guidelines focus on creating a more diverse, compact, and walkable neighborhood. They aim to foster the character of a traditional downtown: stores directly fronting the street, houses with front porches close to the sidewalk, and alleys used for parking and deliveries. These proposed regulations acknowledge the necessity of accommodating the car, but they do not sacrifice a built environment suited for pedestrians . They seek to balance the needs of modern life with the desire for a beautiful and vibrant downtown.

E

AVE B N 7TH ST

The following are proposed guidelines that seek to achieve a vibrant downtown core. Below is a map showing a proposed special Downtown Zoning District. The following pages outline guidelines for regulating use, parking, building placement and volume, and projecting facade elements. In addition, streetscape designs are provided for the zones within this district.

SH

ZONING GUIDELINES

Downtown districts are unlike any other within a city's limits. They represent the heart of the community and should reflect the town's vibrancy, aspirations, and civic pride. Downtowns have a unique nature. We expect them to have a distinct sense of place, a continuity with history, and a reflection of local values. The current Copperas Cove zoning code, however, offers no distinction between downtown and any other commercial district within the city. The same standards of parking, building setbacks, and strict separation of use that define the commercial strip along 190 are applied to the town's historic central blocks. It is time for the City to recognize the distinct nature of downtown and devise a set of zoning regulations that will suit its unique needs.

SOUTH DR

S 6TH ST

S 4TH ST

S 2ND ST

S MAIN ST

S 1ST ST

S 3RD ST

S 5TH ST

S 7TH ST

AVE D

S 8TH ST

AVE C

AVE E

Proposed Downtown Zoning District

AVE G

MARY ST

SC

CARPENTER ST

OL

HO

S MAIN ST

S 7TH ST

AVE F

LEE ST

ST

34

ST

AVE

January 2011

CLEMENTS

AVE

19 0 Y W A H

S 2ND ST

VETERANS

S 1ST ST

S 3RD ST

MARY ST

S 5TH ST

HAGOOD ARCHITECT

AVE

TURNER

ROBERTSON

H IG

MEGGS ST


A) ZONING MAP

B) USE & PARKING

UNDESIRABLE

Zone Table

General Building Use Table

Zoning Map

Required Parking with Shared Parking Factor Desirable & Undesirable Parking Examples

e Sid Int

C) BUILDING PLACEMENT & VOLUME

' 30 r a Re

D) PROJECTING FACADE ELEMENTS

ZONING GUIDELINES

Specific Use & Function Table

E) STREET SECTIONS

ide

'

tS

12

Ex

Lot

Public R.O.W.

Public R.O.W.

Lot

Int Sid

'

Sid

e

Int

12

' 15 r a Re

e

' 30 r a Re

6'-0" min

ide

6'

tS

Ex

ide

'

tS

12

Ex

' 44 t n Fro

2 Stories Max Ht

' 24 t n Fro

8'-0" min

3'

2 Stories Max Ht

2 Stories Max Ht

' 24 t n Fro

Uncovered Parking

Desirable & Undesirable Building Placement Examples

Awnings & Marquees

Parking Lane Public Right-of-Way Map

Lane

Parking

Building Placement & Volume Constraints Table

Balconies

Street Section Diagrams (80' R.O.W.)

Building Placement & Volume Diagrams

Colonnades & Arcades

Street Section Diagrams (50' R.O.W.)

Stoops & Front Porches

Misc: Shade Trees, Curb Bulb-Outs, Alleys, & Furniture

Bay Windows

COPPERAS COVE, TX Downtown Proposal

35


A) ZONING MAP The following plan is founded on a concept of transect-based zoning. Transects were originally conceived to describe natural ecologies, analyzing varying physical characteristics through different zones such as shores, wetlands, plains, and uplands. Similarly, this concept has been extended to the human environment. Transects are used to describe the type of neighborhood desired. The proposed zoning guidelines are designed to help form these neighborhoods.

The diagram below shows six transect zones from rural to urban, as well as a "Special District" zone to cover those places not easily fit into neighborhood fabric. These six zones vary by the level and intensity of their physical and social character. Zones T-3, T-4, and T-5 are most appropriate for development within Copperas Cove. Furthermore, zones T-4 and T-5 are best for an active downtown.

One of the principles of transect-based planning is that certain forms and elements belong in certain environments. For example, an apartment building belongs in a more urban setting, a ranch house in a more rural setting. Some types of thoroughfares are urban in character, and some are rural. A deep suburban setback destroys the spatial enclosure of an urban street; it is out of context. These distinctions and rules work to maintain the desired character of a given neighborhood. (Zoning concepts and diagrams are based on the model code provided by Duany Plater-Zyberk & Co., SmartCode, Version 9.2.)

APPROPRIATE FOR DEVELOPMENT IN COPPERAS COVE

T-1 NATURAL

T-2 RURAL

T-3 SUB-URBAN

T-4 GENERAL URBAN

T-5 URBAN CENTER

T-6 URBAN CORE

SD SPECIAL DISTRICT

Lands approximating or reverting to a wilderness condition, including land unsuitable for settlement due to topgraphy, hydrology, or vegetation.

Sparsely settled lands in open or cultivated states. These include woodland, wetland, and agricultural land. Typical buildings are farmhouses, agricultural structures, cabins, and villas.

Low density residential areas adjacent to higher zones with some mixed use. Home occupations and outbuildings are allowed. Planting is naturalistic and setbacks relatively deep. Blcoks may be large and the roads irregular to accommodate topography.

Mixed use but primarily residential urban fabric. Commercial activity often located at corner lots. Wide range of buildings types: apartment buildings, duplexes, and rowhouses. Buildings have strong connection to sidewalks and street.

Higher density of mixed use buildings that accommodate retail, offices, and multi-family housing. Has a tight network of streets with sidewalks and regular street tree planting. Buildings strongly oriented to street. Home to important civic structures.

The highest density and height, the greatest variety of uses, and civic buildings of regional importance. This zone may have larger blocks; steady street tree planting and buildings set close to wide sidewalks. Typical only in large towns and cities.

Appropriate for areas with buildings that by their function, disposition, or configuration do not conform to one of the six other zones. Suitable for manufacturing, transportation, development along highways, and other uncategorized uses.

BUILDING PLACEMENT

N/A

varies

large and variable front and side yard setbacks

shallow to medium front and side setbacks

shallow setbacks or none; buildings create street wall

shallow setbacks or none; buildings create street wall

varies

BUILDING HEIGHT

N/A

1- to 2-story

1- to 2-story with some 3-story

2-3 story with a few taller mixed use buildings

3-5 story with some variation

4-plus story with a few shorter buildings

varies

ZONING GUIDELINES

ZONE

GENERAL CHARACTER

HAGOOD ARCHITECT January 2011

36


NORTH DR

N 4TH ST N 2ND ST

N MAIN ST

V 1ST ST

N 3RD ST

AVE

N 5TH ST

D

N 7TH ST

O

O

W

R

E

SH

AVE B

SOUTH DR

AVE C

ZONING GUIDELINES

S 6TH ST

S 4TH ST

S 2ND ST

S MAIN ST

S 1ST ST

S 3RD ST

S 5TH ST

S 7TH ST

AVE D

S 8TH ST

SD

SD

T5

AVE E

T4 T5 T4

AVE G

MARY ST

SC HO

CARPENTER ST

OL

T5 LEE ST

ST

MEGGS ST

CLEMENTS

Y A W H IG

TURNER ST

S 2ND ST

S MAIN ST

VETERANS

AVE

AVE

C: Commercial Overlay

S 1ST ST

SD: Special District

S 3RD ST

T4: General Urban

MARY ST

S 5TH ST

T5: Urban Core

19 0

N AVE

ROBERTSO

ZONING LEGEND

H

7TH ST

AVE F

COPPERAS COVE, TX Downtown Proposal

37


B) USE & PARKING

SHARED PARKING FACTOR PARKING CALCULATIONS The Shared Parking Factor for two functions, when divided into the sum of the two amounts as listed on the Required Parking table below, produces the Effective Parking needed for each site involved in sharing. Conversely, if the Sharing Factor is used as a multiplier, it indicates the amount of building allowed on each site given the parking available.

The vibrant, mixed-use character of a traditional downtown relies on a presence of different building uses and a minimum of off-street parking. Unlike people, cars need large amounts of space. When parking requirements are gratuitously high, buildings become spaced far between each other, and it quickly becomes dangerous and unfeasible to walk from place to place. While huge parking lots may make sense for businesses located off the highway, a traditional downtown must balance the need to maintain a walkable neighborhood with providing parking for patrons. The following guidelines represent reasonable parking requirements that do not dominate valuable lot space. They also provide the opportunity for neighboring businesses with complimentary parking needs to share spaces. The goal is to provide what is truly necessary to accommodate cars, while not sacrificing the desire to create a walkable downtown.

WITH

RESIDENTIAL

RESIDENTIAL

LODGING OFFICE RETAIL

FUNCTION

LODGING

1 1.1 1.1 1.4 1 1.4 1.2 1.7 1.7 1.2 1.3 1 1.3 1.2 1.2 1

OFFICE RETAIL

REQUIRED PARKING

Beginning in the mid-twentieth century, building codes began to separate buildings into different use categories in the hopes of creating cleaner, more ordered cities. Though it might make sense to separate factories from houses, strict separation of commercial from residential prevents the kind of diversity and activity that once defined downtown districts. A downtown neighborhood can greatly benefit from a resident base of patrons who will choose the convenience of walking over the hassle of driving. The following guidelines provide for the right mix of residential, lodging, office, and retail uses in a vibrant downtown. ZONING GUIDELINES

FUNCTION

RESIDENTIAL

LODGING

OFFICE

RETAIL

CIVIC

T-3

2.0/dwelling

1.0/bedroom

3.0/1,000 sf

4.0/1,000 sf

by warrant

T-4

1.5/dwelling

1.0/bedroom

3.0/1,000 sf

4.0/1,000 sf

by warrant

T-5

1.0/dwelling

1.0/bedroom

2.0/1,000 sf

3.0/1,000 sf

by warrant

GENERAL BUILDING USE RESIDENTIAL

LODGING

OFFICE

RETAIL

CIVIC

T-3 SUB-URBAN

Restricted: Dwellings on each lot are restricted to one within a principal building and one within an accessory building, with 2.0 parking places for each. Both dwellings shall be under single ownership. The habitable area of the accessory unit shall not exceed 440 sf, excluding parking area.

Restricted: Lodging bedrooms on each lot are limited by 1.0 parking place for each bedroom, up to five, in addition to the parking requirement for the dwelling. The lodging must be owner occupied. Food service may be provided in the a.m. Length of stay shall not exceed 10 days.

Restricted: Office use on each lot is restricted to the first story of the principal or the accessory building and by the requirement of 3.0 assigned parking places per 1,000 sf of net office space in addition to the parking requirement for each dwelling.

Restricted: Retail use is restricted to one block corner location at ground level for each 300 dwelling units and by the requirement of 4.0 parking places per 1,000 sf of net retail space. The specific use shall be further limited to neighborhood store, or food service seating no more than 20.

(See table on opposite page.)

T-4 GENERAL URBAN

Limited: Dwellings on each lot are limited by the requirement of 1.5 parking places for each dwelling, a ratio which may be reduced according to the shared parking standards.

Limited: Lodging bedrooms on each lot are limited by 1.0 assigned parking places for each bedroom, up to twelve, in addition to the parking requirement for the dwelling. The lodging must be owner occupied. Food service may be provided in the a.m. Length of stay shall not exceed 10 days.

Limited: Office use on each lot is limited to the first story of the principal building and to the accessory building, and by the requirement of 3.0 assigned parking places per 1,000 sf of net office space in addition to the parking requirements for each dwelling.

Limited: Retail use is limited to the first story of buildings at corner locations, not exceeding one per block, and by the requirement of 4.0 parking places per 1,000 sf of net retail space. The specific use shall be limited to the neighborhood store, or food service seating no more than 40.

(See table on opposite page.)

T-5 URBAN CORE

Open: Dwellings on each lot are limited by the requirement of 1.0 parking places for each dwelling, ratio which may be reduced according to the shared parking standards.

Open: Lodging bedrooms available on each lot are limited by 1.0 assigned parking place for each bedroom. Food service may be provided at all times. The area allocated for food service shall be calculated and provided with parking according to retail function.

Open: Office use on each lot is limited by the Open: Retail Use is limited by the requirement of 2.0 assigned parking places requirement of 3.0 assigned parking places per 1,000 sf of net office space. per 1,000 sf of net retail space. Retail spaces under 1,500 sf are exempt from parking requirements.

HAGOOD ARCHITECT January 2011

38

(See table on opposite page.)


In a traditional downtown parking is best left adjacent to the street curb or in the rear lots. In this example a road leads to a back parking lot shared with other businesses. This allows for customers to park in one place and walk to multiple locations via the sidewalk.

SPECIFIC USE & FUNCTION USE/FUNCTION Residential

Surface Parking Lot

Attached Single Family

Religious Assembly Gasoline

Accessory Unit

Automobile Service

UNDESIRABLE

T5

SD

Truck Maintenance

Hotel (no room limit)

Drive-Through Facility

Inn (12 rooms max)

Rest Stop

Bed & Breakfast (5 rms max)

Roadside Stand

School Dormitory

Billboard Shopping Center/Mall

Office Building

Civil Support

Live-Work Unit

Fire Station

Retail

T4

Automotive

Detached Single Family

Office

T3

Civic (continued...)

Duplex

Police Station

Open-Market Building

Cemetery

Retail Building

Funeral Home

Display Gallery

Hopsital

Restaurant

Medical Clinic Education

Push Cart

College/Trade School

Liquor Selling Establishment

Secondary School

Adult Entertainment

Primary School

Bus Shelter By providing enough space for cars to back up, this type of pull-in parking completely obliterates the pedestrian path. There is no sidewalk to speak of and passers-by must worry about cars pulling in and backing out. In a downtown setting, parking is better left adjacent to the curb, both calming traffic and protecting pedestrians.

USE/FUNCTION

Sports Stadium

Civic

UNDESIRABLE PARKING

SD

Live/Work Unit

Kiosk

UNDESIRABLE

T5

Playground

Lodging

This type of parking is used when a building is completely removed from the street. It is designed only for cars and provides no accommodation for pedestrians. It offers no interaction with neighboring businesses and cannot take advantage of passers-by.

T4

Apartment Building

Semi-Detached Single Family

UNDESIRABLE PARKING

T3

ZONING GUIDELINES

DESIRABLE PARKING

Childcare Center Industrial

Convention Center

Heavy Industrial Facility

Conference Center

Light Industrial Facility

Exhibition Center

Truck Depot

Fountain or Public Art

Laboratory Facility

Library

Water Supply Facility

Live Theater

Sewer & Waste Facility

Movie Theater

Electric Substation

Museum

Cremation Facility

Outdoor Auditorium

Warehouse

Parking Structure

Produce Storage

Passenger Terminal

Mini-Storage

By Right By Special Approval COPPERAS COVE, TX Downtown Proposal

39


C) BUILDING PLACEMENT & VOLUME

BUILDING PLACEMENT & VOLUME CONSTRAINTS ZONE

T-3 SUB-URBAN

T-4 URBAN CENTER

T-5 URBAN CORE

Residential

restricted use

limited use

open use

Lodging

restricted use

limited use

open use

Office

restricted use

limited use

open use

Retail

restricted use

limited use

open use

Principal Building

2 stories max

3 stories max

5 stories max

Outbuilding

2 stories max

2 stories max

2 stories max

Lot Size

6,000 sf

1,800 sf

1,800 sf

Lot Width

60 ft min, 120 ft max

18 ft min, 150 ft max

18 ft min, 180 ft max

Lot Coverage

60% max

70% max

80% max

Front Setback-Principal

24 ft min

6 ft min, 16 ft max

0 ft min, 6 ft max

Front Setback-Secondary

12 ft min

6 ft min, 16 ft max

0 ft min, 6 ft max

Side Setback

12 ft min

0 ft min**

0 ft min, 24 ft max**

Rear Setback

30 ft min

15 ft min*

15 ft min*

Frontage Buildout

40% min at setback

60% min at setback

80% min at setback

Front Setback

44 ft min

26 ft min

40 ft max from rear prop

Side Setback

3 ft or 6 ft at corner

0 ft or 3 ft at corner

0 ft min, 2 ft at corner

Rear Setback

15 ft min*

15 ft min*

15 ft min*

Uncovered

except within 24' of front

except within 26' of front

except within 20' of front

Covered

except within 44' of front***

except within 26' of front***

except within 20' of front***

BUILDING FUNCTION

The placement, size, and shape of buildings are essential in determining the character of a neighborhood. Traditional downtowns have buildings that are compact, close to the street, and interactive with pedestrians. When commercial buildings are close to the sidewalk, people can walk freely from business to business, unencumbered by long walking distances or the danger of dodging cars. In a residential setting, houses placed close to the sidewalk promote social interaction among neighbors. Providing closer eyes and ears to the street, they increase safety in the neighborhood. Buildings also have the ability to create a sense of enclosure, giving streets a sense of place.

ZONING GUIDELINES

Zoning guidelines can do a lot to dictate the character of a neighborhood. Modern zoning codes often strive to create a suburban landscape. They dictate expansive lawns with buildings removed far from the street. Commercial functions are segregated to highway strips with gratuitous parking. While this may have its place in a more rural setting, it is contradictory to the the traditional character that once defined small towns throughout America. The following guidelines strive to create a neighborhood that is more compact, socially interactive, and pleasing to inhabit. They propose building types that were once common, but have until recently been neglected by misguided zoning codes.

BUILDING HEIGHT

LOT SIZE

SETBACK (PRINCIPAL BLDG)

SETBACK (OUTBUILDING)

PARKING

UNDESIRABLE DESIRABLE BUILDING PLACEMENT

UNDESIRABLE BUILDING PLACEMENT

Houses with front porches set close to the street promote social interaction.

Houses dominated with garages and expansive lawns do little to add character to the public realm.

HAGOOD ARCHITECT January 2011

40

*Or 15 ft from center line of alley, whichever is less. Excludes corner lots for which there is no rear setback requirement for the nearest 60 ft of lot width adjacent to side street. **5 ft min if structure is detached (i.e. not built on lot line). ***Covered Parking structures must also comply with the side & rear setback requirements for Outbuildings.


T-3 SUB-URBAN

T-4 URBAN CENTER

PRINCIPAL BUILDING

5 Stories Max Height

PRINCIPAL BUILDING

2 Stories Max Ht

3 Stories Max Height

PRINCIPAL BUILDING

T-5 URBAN CORE

' 12 e Sid Int

' 15 r a Re

' 15 r a Re

' 30 r a Re

ZONING GUIDELINES

2 Stories Max Ht

ide

OUTBUILDING

t

n Fro

2 Stories Max Ht

tS

'

Ex

12 6'

2 Stories Max Ht

ide

'

tS

12

Ex

' 24 t n Fro

OUTBUILDING

OUTBUILDING

3'

S Int ' 15 r a Re

ide

2'

tS

Ex

ide

' 15 r a Re

' 15 r a Re

6'

ide

3'

tS

Ex

ide

tS

Ex

' 40 t n Fro

' 44 t n Fro

' 26 t n Fro

Uncovered Parking

PARKING

Uncovered Parking

Uncovered Parking

PARKING

PARKING

3'

Int e

Sid 5'

Covered Parking

ide

' 24 t n Fro Fro

' d) 44 vere o C ( nt

' 15 r a Re red) ve (Co

Covered Parking

Covered Parking

3'

tS Ex

ide

6'

tS Ex

1 r a Re red) ve (Co

' 15 r a Re red) ve (Co

' 26 t n Fro red) ve (Co

' 20 t n Fro red) ve o C (

COPPERAS COVE, TX Downtown Proposal

41


D) PROJECTING FACADE ELEMENTS

6'-0" min

COLONNADES & ARCADES

8'-0" min

BALCONIES

8'-0" min

5'-0" min

8'-0" min

ZONING GUIDELINES

AWNINGS & MARQUEES

8'-0" min

Depth = 5' minimum

Depth = 6' minimum (for 2nd floor)

Depth = 8' minimum clear

Height = 8' minimum clear

Height = 8' minimum clear

Height = 8' minimum clear

Length = 25% to 100% of Building Front

Length = 25% to 100% of Building Front

Length = 75% to 100% of Building Front

The requirements listed above apply to first floor Awnings & Marquees only. Awnings & Marquees may occur forward of the minimum setback line and extend into the Public R.O.W. up to 2' before the curb line. High-gloss or plasticized fabrics are prohibited.

HAGOOD ARCHITECT January 2011

42

Balconies may occur forward of the minimum setback line and extend into the Public R.O.W. up to 2' before the curb line.

Colonnades may occur forward of the minimum setback line and extend into the Public R.O.W. up to 2' before the curb line.

Balconies may have roofs but are prohibited from being enclosed spaces. They must be open to the exterior.

Colonnades may have roofs, balconies, or enclosed space above. The ground floor, however, must be completely open to the exterior.

Balconies are permitted to wrap wrap building corners to face side streets.

Colonnades are permitted to wrap wrap building corners to face side streets.


FRONT PORCHES

BAY WINDOWS

ZONING GUIDELINES

STOOPS

8'-0" min

4' max

Depth = N/A

Depth = 8' minimum

Depth = 4' maximum

Height = N/A

Height = N/A

Height = N/A

Length = 5' minimum

Length = 25% to 90% of Building Front

Length = 8' maximum

Stoops may occur forward of the minimum setback line. They may only extend into the Public R.O.W. with special approval. Stoops may be covered or uncovered.

Front Porches may occur forward of the minimum setback line but may not extend into the Public R.O.W. Front Porches are required to be open to the exterior and un-conditioned space. Only a maximum of 25% of the porch floor area forward of the minimum setback line may be screened in.

Bay Windows may occur forward of the minimum setback line. Second floor or higher bay windows may extend into the Public R.O.W., but not past 2' before the curb line. Bay Windows must have fenestration on both front and side surfaces. Multiple Bay Windows may not be closer than 6' from each other.

COPPERAS COVE, TX Downtown Proposal

43


E) STREET SECTIONS

T-5 URBAN CORE (80' R.O.W): 2 LANES WITH ANGLED PARKING

T-5 URBAN CORE (80' R.O.W): 3 LANES WITH PARALLEL & ANGLED PARKING

The original streets of Copperas Cove were generously sized when they were laid out by the Gulf, Colorado, and Santa Fe Railway. Most of Downtown's streets have an 80' public right-of-way. This is a flexible dimension that accommodates many different configurations of sidewalks, parking, and traffic lanes. The following street sections show different layouts that would compliment a pedestrain-friendly downtown. They are designed to help meet the goals of the proposed downtown zoning guidelines. Also included are sections for streets of 50' R.O.W., which is a dimension more common among the city's newer streets.

PUBLIC RIGHT-OF-WAY

80'

(including proposed expansion of Ave D east of 1st St from 50' to 80')

50'

Lot

Public R.O.W.

Public R.O.W.

Lot

Lot

Public R.O.W.

Public R.O.W.

Lot

30'

N 2ND ST

N 3RD ST

D AVE

N 5TH ST

O O

N 7TH ST

W

R

E

AVE B

SH

NORTH DR

N 4TH ST

20' (alley)

SOUTH DR

AVE C

18' Parking

S 8TH ST

S 6TH ST

S 4TH ST

S 2ND ST

S MAIN ST

S 1ST ST

S 3RD ST

S 5TH ST

S 7TH ST

AVE D

10'

12' Lane

12' Lane

18' Parking

60' Street

Walk

AVE E

8' Park 10'

10'

Walk

Walk

80' R.O.W.

6'

11' Lane

12' Lane

11' Lane

18' Parking

60' Street

10' Walk

80' R.O.W.

Max Setback

6' Max Setback

AVE F

AVE G

HO OL ST

S 2ND ST

MEGGS ST

SC

CARPENTER ST

LEE ST

MARY ST

S MAIN ST

S 7TH ST

commercial street

commercial street

building frontage types: forecourt, stoop, shopfront, colonnade, & arcade

building frontage types: forecourt, stoop, shopfront, colonnade, & arcade

minimal 10' wide sidewalks

minimal 10' wide sidewalks

tree placement: +/- 65' in planters

tree placement: +/- 65' in planters

AVE

IG

TURNER ST

44

VETERANS

January 2011

S 1ST ST

S 3RD ST

MARY ST

S 5TH ST

HAGOOD ARCHITECT

CLEMENTS

H

W A

Y

19

0

AVE ROBERTSON

H

ZONING GUIDELINES

The public right-of-way is land set aside to facilitate the movement of people and materials. How we shape the public R.O.W. is one of the strongest ways in which we shape the character of our streets and ultimately our community. To obtain a walkable downtown, the streets must be designed for pedestrians as much as cars. A walkable street has generous sidewalks, trees to provide shade, and parking as a buffer between pedestrians and moving traffic.


Lot

Public R.O.W.

Public R.O.W.

8' Park 21'

11' Lane

11' Lane

T-4 URBAN CENTER (80' R.O.W) : 2 LANES WITH ANGLED PARKING

Lot

Lot

Public R.O.W.

8' Park

60' Street

Walk

18' Park 21'

10'

Walk

Walk

80' R.O.W.

6'

6'

Max Setback

Min Setback

Public R.O.W.

12' Lane

12' Lane

60' Street

T-4 URBAN CENTER (80' R.O.W): 2 LANES WITH PARALLEL PARKING

Lot

Lot

Public R.O.W.

18' Park

8' Park 5'

5'

11'

Walk 80' R.O.W.

Public R.O.W.

10'

11' Lane

11' Lane

38' Street

Walk 16'

6'

Max Setback

Min Setback

ZONING GUIDELINES

T-5 URBAN CORE (80' R.O.W): 2 LANES WITH PARALLEL PARKING

Lot

8' Park 5'

5'

11'

Walk 80' R.O.W.

16' Max Setback

commercial street

primarily residential street

primarily residential street

building frontage types: forecourt, stoop, shopfront, colonnade, & arcade

building frontage types: porch, forecourt, stoop, shopfront, & colonnade

building frontage types: porch, forecourt, stoop, shopfront, & colonnade

generous 21' wide sidewalks

5'-10' wide sidewalks

5'-10' wide sidewalks

tree placement: 30' in planters

tree placement: 30' in planting strip or planters

tree placement: 30' in planting strip or planters

COPPERAS COVE, TX Downtown Proposal

45


T-4 URBAN CORE (50' R.O.W.): YIELD LANE WITH PARALLEL PARKING

T-3 SUB-URBAN (50' R.O.W.) : YIELD LANE WITH PARALLEL PARKING

ZONING GUIDELINES

ZONING GUIDELINES

T-4 URBAN CORE (50' R.O.W.): 2 LANES WITH PARALLEL PARKING

Lot

Public R.O.W.

Public R.O.W.

11' Lane 10'

11' Lane 30' Street

Walk 6'

50' R.O.W.

Min Setback

Lot

Public R.O.W.

8' Park

Public R.O.W.

Lot

Lot

Public R.O.W.

5'

10'

Walk

Walk 16'

6'

Max Setback

Min Setback

30' Street

5'

5'

5'

5'

30' Street

Walk

Walk 50' R.O.W.

Lot

8' 14' 8' Park Yield Lane Park

8' 14' 8' Park Yield Lane Park 5'

Public R.O.W.

16'

24'

Max Setback

Min Setback

5'

5' Walk

50' R.O.W.

24' Min Setback

primarily residential street

primarily residential street

primarily residential street

building frontage types: porch, forecourt, stoop, shopfront, & colonnade

building frontage types: porch, forecourt, stoop, shopfront, & colonnade

building frontage types: common lawn, porch, forecourt, & stoop

5'-10' wide sidewalks

5'-10' wide sidewalks

5' wide sidewalks

tree placement: 30' at planting strip or planters

tree placement: 30' at planting strip or planters

tree placement: 30' at planting strip

HAGOOD ARCHITECT January 2011

Lot

46


CURB BULB-OUTS

Trees planted at regular intervals along residential streets provide shade for pedestrians and cars alike. They also help define a sense of enclosure, making streets more inviting for people to explore.

Crossing the street can be a dangerous endeavor. Marked crosswalks are a good start, but the addition of curb bulb-outs can drastically increase pedestrian safety. They limit street crossing time and make pedestrians more visible to on-coming traffic.

ALLEYS

STREET FURNITURE

RETAIL SIDEWALKS WITH SHADE TREES

Alleys are great tools for maintaining the cleanliness and order of city streets. By funnelling parking, deliveries, and trash pick-up to the middle of the block, streets can focus on the needs and desires of the pedestrian.

Streets require furniture that engage people directly. Benches provide a place for people to rest, people watch, or just enjoy the scenery; bike racks can facilitate alternative forms of transportation; and trash cans can help ensure a clean environment.

Trees help create a pleasing environment for city streets. They provide shade, beauty, and a connection to nature. When planted at regular intervals, they reinforce the special, enclosed nature of downtown streets. Care should be taken to select the right species.

ZONING GUIDELINES

RESIDENTIAL SIDEWALKS WITH SHADE TREES

COPPERAS COVE, TX Downtown Proposal

47


HAGOOD ARCHITECT January 2011

48


4

EXAMPLE PROJECTS

COPPERAS COVE, TX

Downtown Proposal

49


NORTH DR

N 4TH ST N 2ND ST

N 3RD ST

N 5TH ST

AVE

N 7TH ST

D

EXAMPLE ON AVENUE D BETWEEN MAIN ST & 2ND ST

O

O

W

R

E

AVE B

SH

RETAIL PROJECT

SOUTH DR

Description

A Y

EXAMPLE PROJECTS

20' wide rear service alley

DOWNTOWN GRILL

GARDEN 48 BBQ

WELCOME TO COPPERAS COVE

FRONT ELEVATION

HAGOOD ARCHITECT January 2011

50

AVENUE D BOOKS

LIANTONIO LAW OFFICE

BLUEBONNET FLOWERS

IG

H

W AVE

ST

CLEMENTS

H

TURNER

VETERANS

S 1ST ST

EDDY'S BARBER SHOP

AVE

0

LEE ST

ROBERTSON

S 3RD ST

BARK & PURR GROOMING

T L S

S 2ND ST

MEGGS ST

O HO SC

CARPENTER ST

19

AVE G

MARY ST

MARY ST

SUD'S LAUNDRY

S 6TH ST

S 4TH ST

S 2ND ST

S MAIN ST

S 1ST ST

S 3RD ST

AVE F

S MAIN ST

T-5 zoning parking requirements: 24~35 (depending on use) -14 street parking spaces provided -the remainder provided for in the adjacent public parking lots T-5 zoning setback requirements: 0' front, 0' side, & 15' rear -0' front setback provided -0' side front setback provided -20' rear front setback provided T-5 zoning projection allowance: 5' deep min awning at 8' min height -6' deep awning at 9' height provided public pocket park with relocated founders monument

A service alley in the rear facilitates deliveries and other necessary back-of-house functions. By extending 2nd Street across the railroad tracks, accessibility and pedestrian connectivity would be greatly enhanced. The addition of a new public parking lot on the other side of 3rd Street would provide greater convenience for people driving to this location.

S 5TH ST

AVE E

S 5TH ST

The proposed commercial spaces are linked architecturally with a continuous cornice, awning, and the repetition of storefront bays. The bays can be combined as required to meet the spatial needs of larger occupants. The pocket park contains a monument to highlight the park's role as a community focal point. The proposal shows the founders monument, presently located in the adjacent existing parking lot, moved to this location.

8 commercial units, reconfigurable as required (1,400 sf~1,500 sf)

S 7TH ST

This site is perfectly situated to become the central focus of a reinvigorated Avenue D streetscape. The following proposes the construction of single-story commercial spaces with the inclusion of a public pocket park. A renovated streetscape should include parallel parking and closely spaced street trees to enhance the pedestrian friendly character of Downtown.

S 7TH ST

AVE D

S 8TH ST

AVE C


Unit 4

Unit 5

Unit 6

Unit 7

Unit 8

EXAMPLE PROJECTS

Unit 3

52'-8"

Unit 2

S 2ND STREET

20'-0"

S MAIN STREET

56'-0"

Unit 1

Service Alley

30'-0" TYP

AVENUE D

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

COPPERAS COVE, TX Downtown Proposal

51


NORTH DR

N 4TH ST N 2ND ST

N 3RD ST

N 5TH ST

N 7TH ST

AVE

SOUTH DR

S 6TH ST

S 4TH ST

S 2ND ST

S MAIN ST

0

AVE

Hall

2-Bed Apt

1-Bed Apt

Hall

2-Bed Apt

SECTION

AVE

H

IG

H

W

A Y

19

LEE ST

1-Bed Apt

CLEMENTS

ST

2-Bed Apt

TURNER

Hall

VETERANS

1-Bed Apt

S 1ST ST

S 3RD ST

EXAMPLE PROJECTS

T L S

ROBERTSON

MARY ST

52

O HO SC

MEGGS ST

Commercial Space

HAGOOD ARCHITECT

CARPENTER ST S 2ND ST

T-5 zoning setback requirements: 0' front, 0' side, & 15' rear -0' front setback provided -0' side front setback provided -65' rear front setback provided

AVE G

MARY ST

106

ELEVATION

S 1ST ST

AVE F

S 5TH ST

106

S 3RD ST

AVE E

S 7TH ST

T-5 zoning parking requirements: 11~15 (depending on use) -4 street parking spaces provided -16 parking spaces provided in rear lot

S 5TH ST

2,600 sf commercial space, reconfigurable as required; 6 one-bedroom and 3 two-bedroom residential units

S MAIN ST

The key to an active neighborhood is a diversity of uses. Mixed-use buildings offer that diversity with the combination of commercial and residential functions. In the following proposal, the ground floor utilizes an open floor plan that can be used as office or retail space. Above are three floors of residential units of varying sizes. Residential and commercial entrances are separated. Balconies provide outdoor space for the residents. The rear of the property functions as a shared parking lot. The complimentary schedules of the building's multiple functions minimize the number of parking spaces needed.

S 7TH ST

AVE D

S 8TH ST

AVE C

Description

January 2011

D

EXAMPLE ON AVENUE E BETWEEN 1ST ST & MAIN ST

O

O

W

R

E

AVE B

SH

MIXED-USE PROJECT


AVENUE E Balcony Bedroom

Balcony Living/ Kitchen

Living/ Kitchen

Bedroom

Building Hall 90'-0" UP

DN

UP

Living/ Kitchen Bedroom

Master Bedroom

50'-0"

Balcony

DN

60'-0"

Apartment Lobby

Elev

Comm Lobby Commercial Space

UP

SITE PLAN

EXAMPLE PROJECTS

5'

UPPER FLOORS

UP

GROUND FLOOR

COPPERAS COVE, TX Downtown Proposal

53


NORTH DR

N 4TH ST N 2ND ST

N 3RD ST

N 5TH ST

N 7TH ST

AVE

SOUTH DR

S 6TH ST

S 2ND ST

S MAIN ST

S 1ST ST

S 4TH ST

O HO SC

CARPENTER ST

0

AVE

ST

AVE

IG H

TURNER

VETERANS

S 1ST ST

CLEMENTS

H

W

A Y

ROBERTSON

19

LEE ST

T L S

S 2ND ST

MEGGS ST

S 3RD ST

EXAMPLE PROJECTS

AVE G

MARY ST

MARY ST

T-4 zoning projection allowance: 8' min deep porch composing 25%~90% of the length of the building -10' deep porch composing 40% of the length of the building

AVE F

S MAIN ST

T-4 zoning setback requirements: 6' front, 0' int side, 12' ext side, & 15' rear (out-building: 26' front, 0' int side, 3' ext side, 15' rear or c.o. alley) -10' front setback provided (out-building: 113' provided) -12' side setback provided (out-building: 5' provided) -75' rear setback provided (out-building: 5' to c.o. alley provided)

FRONT ELEVATION

54

S 3RD ST

T-4 zoning parking requirements: 18 parking spaces -7 street parking spaces provided -24 parking spaces provided in rear lot

T-4 zoning maximum height: 3 stories (out-building: 2 stories) -2 stories provided (out-building: 2 stories)

HAGOOD ARCHITECT

S 5TH ST

AVE E

S 5TH ST

Architecturally, the buildings seek to further engage with the neighborhood by utilizing large porches that, in addition to their aesthetic value, will increase neighborhood safety by keeping more watchful eyes on the street. Each building has a simple breezeway that provides access from the apartment units to the sidewalk and the rear parking lot. The scale of development is consistent with other buildings currently in the area.

8 one-bedroom and 4 two-bedroom residential units

S 7TH ST

By utilizing the proposed code changes, this vacant lot could easily be developed into a multifamily building that fits well within a traditional neighborhood. Many of the multi-family buildings currently being constructed in Downtown disengage from the street with large parking lots and the absence of sidewalks. The following proposal aims to create a pleasant streetscape by siting the buildings at the front of the lot and placing parking in the rear.

S 7TH ST

AVE D

S 8TH ST

AVE C

Description

January 2011

D

EXAMPLE ON AVENUE F BETWEEN 3RD ST & 1ST ST

O

O

W

R

E

AVE B

SH

MULTI-FAMILY PROJECT


AVENUE F 80'-0"

16'-0"

80'-0"

12'-0"

10'-0"

12'-0"

Bedroom

Building Breezeway

Bedroom

SITE PLAN

Living Room

Living/ Kitchen

Kitchen/ Dining DN

Master Bedroom

EXAMPLE PROJECTS

10'-0"

S 1ST STREET

40'-0"

Bedroom Living/ Kitchen

SECOND FLOOR (1ST FLOOR SIMILAR)

COPPERAS COVE, TX Downtown Proposal

55


NORTH DR

N 4TH ST N 2ND ST

N 3RD ST

N 5TH ST

AVE

N 7TH ST

D

EXAMPLE ON AVENUE E BETWEEN 2ND ST & 4TH ST

O

O

W

R

E

AVE B

SH

TOWNHOUSE PROJECT

SOUTH DR

Description

CARPENTER ST

EXAMPLE PROJECTS

216

FRONT ELEVATION

HAGOOD ARCHITECT January 2011

56

214

212

IG

H

W ST

AVE

H

TURNER

VETERANS

S 1ST ST

S 3RD ST

MARY ST

S 5TH ST

CLEMENTS

T-4 zoning maximum height: 3 stories (out-building: 2 stories) -2 stories provided (out-building: 2 stories provided)

218

AVE A Y

ROBERTSON

0

MEGGS ST

19

T-4 zoning setback requirements: 6' front, 0' in side, 12' ext side, & 15' rear (out-building: 26' front, 0' int side, 3' ext side, & 15' rear or c.o. alley) -8' front setback provided (out-building: 81'-6" provided) -0' int side setback provided (out-building: 0' provided) -65' rear setback provided (out-building: 15' c.o. alley provided) T-4 zoning projection allowance: 5' min long stoop -6' long stoop provided

220

S 6TH ST

S 4TH ST

S 2ND ST

S MAIN ST

S 1ST ST

S 3RD ST

S 5TH ST

AVE G

MARY ST

LEE ST

S 7TH ST

AVE F

T L S

T-4 zoning parking requirements: 3 parking spaces/house -1 street parking space/house provided -3 parking spaces/house provided in rear

O HO SC

The example project utilizes three adjacent lots currently home to derelict structures. By replatting the area into five 30' wide lots and reclaiming the alley behind for public use, a row of three-bedroom townhouses can be sited side-by-side. Adherence to the shallow front setback helps maximize space for a back yard. A separate apartment is placed over the garage at the rear of each house. These independent residences could be used for extended family members or rented out for additional income.

AVE E

S 2ND ST

5 three-bedroom houses with additional garage + 1-bedroom apartment out-building

S MAIN ST

The following proposal demonstrates a townhouse development, which can greatly help densify Downtown while maintaining a traditional scale.

S 7TH ST

AVE D

S 8TH ST

AVE C


DN

30'-0" Typ

AVENUE E Master Bedroom

UP

Living Room DN

8'-0"

Kitchen/ Dining

42'-0"

Laundry

Deck

Bedroom

Bedroom

31'-6"

DN

28'-6"

UP

EXAMPLE PROJECTS

Back Yard

DN

Living/ Kitchen

5'-0"

Garage

9'-2" 20'-10"

Bedroom SITE PLAN

GROUND FLOOR

2ND FLOOR

COPPERAS COVE, TX Downtown Proposal

57


HAGOOD ARCHITECT January 2011

58


APPENDIX

A COPPERAS COVE, TX

Downtown Proposal

59


IMPLEMENTATION (1) FORM A DOWNTOWN MASTER PLAN COMMITTEE

(2) OBTAIN PROFESSIONAL ANALYSIS

(3) ADOPT A DOWNTOWN MASTER PLAN

The primary public policy tool that will bring change to Downtown Copperas Cove is the adoption of a new Downtown Master Plan. Such a document would outline the important public projects and zoning changes needed to form future development in the area. To pursue this goal, a Master Plan Committee must be established. It should be composed of representatives from all the important stakeholders who are able to research and develop a Master Plan benefiting the community as a whole.

To develop a well-informed and effective Downtown Master Plan, qualified consultants are needed for effective analysis. These professionals will offer information regarding infrastructural upgrades, traffic quality and volume, and market needs.

Once the proper information has been gathered, a formal proposal can be made for a new Downtown Master Plan. Prepared either by municipal staff or a hired Planning firm, the document should include a new zoning code for a defined Downtown area. Ideally, these zoning changes will encourage a unique traditional character which focuses on a vibrant, mixed-use, pedestrian-friendly environment.

Since the Downtown Master Plan will ultimately be a function of public policy, the committee should be formed by the municipal government and under its direction. The Downtown Association, the Chamber of Commerce, the Economic Commerce Commission, and any other vested group should also be represented. The group's mission is the drafting of a Downtown Master Plan to be brought before the municipal government for approval. In the pursuit of this goal, the committee should be provided with funds to obtain the professional analysis needed to properly inform their proposal.

Infrastructural The City Engineer should provide analysis of Downtown's existing capacities for water, wastewater, energy, and drainage. New development may require upgrading this infrastructure. Traffic Until recently, traffic studies have focused narrowly on the efficient movement of vehicles. However, in a walkable neighborhood like Downtown, traffic must be understood as the efficient movement of people, not just cars. A Level of Service (LOS) analysis should be conducted to recommend improvements for on-street parking, roadway corridors, and sidewalks in a manner consistent with a vibrant, walkable neighborhood.

IMPLEMENTATION

Market An analysis of the existing markets for office, housing, and retail space would help community leaders better understand which businesses and development to attract to Downtown. City Planning The most important consultant will be a city planner, who will balance the practical needs of development with the desire to create a vibrant, mixed-use downtown. The City Planner should lead the effort to draft a Downtown Master Plan. HAGOOD ARCHITECT January 2011

60

In addition to a new zoning code for the neighborhood, the Downtown Master Plan should outline new projects for public improvement. Such projects should include pedestrian-friendly streetscaping, locations for public parking, and new places for civic gathering. Such projects should be realistic about cost and timeline. A thoughtful Master Plan should be forward looking and include projects that may take years see to come to fruition. Once the Downtown Master Plan is submitted by the Committee, it should go before the public in accordance with normal procedures. After any necessary amendments directed by the City Council, the proposal should be adopted by the municipal government and implemented accordingly.


(4) SECURE FINANCING

(5) MAKE PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS

(6) ENCOURAGE PRIVATE DEVELOPMENT

Proposals for change in Downtown Copperas Cove will only be effective if the proper financing is secured. The following strategies are commonly used as the means for funding both public and private development in historic downtown neighborhoods.

In addition to zoning changes that will lead to more mixed-use and compact development, the Downtown Master Plan should outline specific projects for improvement within the public domain. Such projects should include pedestrian-friendly streetscaping and new public spaces. After funding is secured and designs have been submitted by consultants, the city should pursue these projects for the betterment of the community.

Private development is a critical component to revitalizing Downtown. After the City has laid the formal groundwork through zoning changes, it is up to the business community to encourage commercial investment in the neighborhood. The following are tools for bringing private development into Downtown.

Business Improvement Districts (BID) are defined areas within which the businesses pay a special tax to fund infrastructural improvements, including sidewalks, sewer, lighting, etc. Establishing a BID in Downtown Copperas Cove would require consensus among downtown business owners and creating a cooperative agreement with the City. Capital Improvements Programming The City of Copperas Cove should devote a portion of its general Capital Improvement Program toward projects in Downtown. Adaptive Reuse & Historical Preservation Tax Credits The federal government provides tax incentives for businesses renovating older structures. The program provides a 10% tax credit for substantial rehabilitation of income generating buildings over forty years old. It doubles that amount for buildings over fifty years old, or on the National Register of Historic Buildings.

Streetscaping In order to create a pedestrian-friendly environment, Downtown's streets must be improved. Automobile traffic should be calmed, sidewalks widened, street trees planted, and curb-side parking provided. These changes will enable traditional development to flourish in an environment designed for walking. A civil engineer should be consulted with to implement the desired street sections outlined in the Master Plan. Public Buildings & Spaces Downtown is uniquely entrusted with the role of housing important public spaces. Currently, the neighborhood has many municipal facilities, but lacks a strong public gathering place. The Master Plan should outline opportunities for such new spaces. Whenever a new facility is needed, a site within Downtown that also offers an activated public space should investigated. Opportunities may include the formation of a Town Square or a pocket park.

Commercial Recruitment Complimentary businesses for downtown should be actively recruited. The Downtown Association should look for businesses that will fit in with the local character of the area and that are appropriate for the market. It is important for business leaders, especially from the Chamber of Commerce, to share their expertise when helping businesses establish themselves in the neighborhood. Leasing Incentives Property owners in Downtown can help encourage new businesses by providing incentives to prospective tenants. These include deferred or reduced rents, reduced-cost financing, and flexible leasing terms. Such approaches allow businesses to establish themselves without being overburdened by heavy start-up costs. Funding Assistance The state of Texas runs a small business loan program to provide financing for businesses that face challenges raising capital. Such loans are typically administered through local banks and can be used for labor or leasing costs. Vacant Lots There are many vacant or underutilized lots in the Downtown area. The Downtown Association should keep an index of properties that are available for development. COPPERAS COVE, TX Downtown Proposal

61

IMPLEMENTATION

Tax Increment Financing (TIF/TIFZ) is a common tool used by municipalities to obtain funding for infrastructural improvements. Loans are secured by borrowing against future property tax revenues anticipated as a result of the infrastructural improvements.


GLOSSARY Accessory Unit: an Apartment not greater than 440 square feet sharing ownership and utility connections with a Principal Building; it may or may not be within an Outbuilding. Apartment: a Residential unit sharing a building and a Lot with other units and/or uses; may be for rent, or for sale as a condominium. Arcade: a Private Frontage conventional for Retail use wherein the Facade is a colonnade supporting habitable space that overlaps the sidewalk, while the Facade at sidewalk level remains at the Frontage Line. Backbuilding: a single-story structure connecting a Principal Building to an Outbuilding. Bed and Breakfast: an owner-occupied Lodging type offering 1-5 bedrooms, permitted to serve breakfast in the morning to guests. Block: the aggregate of private Lots, and Rear Alleys, circumscribed by thoroughfares. By Right: characterizing a proposal or component of a proposal that complies with the code and is permitted and processed administratively, without public hearing. By Special Approval (Warrant): characterizing a proposal or component of a proposal that does not directly comply with code and must be approved through a special process, usually public hearing. Civic Building: a building operated by not-for-profit organizations dedicated to arts, culture, education, recreation, government, transit, and municipal parking. Commercial: the term collectively defining workplace, Office, Retail, and Lodging functions. Commercial Overlay: designation on the zoning map that requires or recommends the provision of commercial use for ground floor occupancy.

APPENDIX

Configuration: the form of a building, based on its massing, Private Frontage, and height. Design Speed: the velocity at which a Thoroughfare tends to be driven without the constraints of signage or enforcement. There are five ranges of speed: Very Low (below 20 mph), Low (20-25 mph), Moderate (25-35 mph), High (35-45mph), and Very High (above 45 mph). Disposition: the placement of a building on its Lot. Effective Parking: the amount of parking required for Mixed Use after adjustment by the Shared Parking Factor. HAGOOD ARCHITECT January 2011

62

Elevation: an exterior wall of a building. Encroachment: to break the plane of a vertical or horizontal regulatory limit with a structural element, so that it extends into a Setback, into the Public Frontage, or above a height limit. Expression Line: a line prescribed at a certain level of a building for the major part of the width of a Facade, expressed by a variation in material or by a limited projection such as a molding or balcony. Extension Line: a line prescribed at a certain level of a building for the major part of the width of a Facade, regulating the maximum height for an Encroachment by an Arcade Frontage. Facade: the exterior wall of a building. See Elevation . Forecourt: a Private Frontage wherein a portion of the Facade is close to the Frontage Line and the central portion is set back. Frontage: the area between a building Facade and the vehicular lanes, inclusive of its built and planted components. Frontage is divided into Private Frontage and Public Frontage . Function: the use or uses accommodated by a building and its Lot, categorized as Restricted, Limited, or Open, according to the intensity of the use. Also Use . Gallery: a Private Frontage conventional for Retail use wherein the Facade is aligned close to the Frontage Line with an attached cantilevered shed or lightweight colonnade overlapping the sidewalk. Green: a Civic Space for unstructured recreation, spatially defined by landscaping rather than building features. Home Occupation: non-Retail Commercial enterprises. The work quarters should be invisible from the Frontage, located either within the house or in an Outbuilding. Permitted activities are defined by the Restricted Office category. Infill: development on land that had been previously developed. Inn: a Lodging type, owner occupied, offering 6 to 12 bedrooms, permitted to serve breakfast in the morning to guests. Live-Work: a Mixed-Use unit consisting of a Commercial and Residential Function. The Commercial Function may be anywhere in the unit. It is intended to be occupied by a business operator who lives in the same structure that contains the Commercial activity. Lodging: premises available for daily and weekly renting of bedrooms.


Lot: a parcel of land accommodating a building or buildings of unified design. Lot Line: the boundary that legally and geometrically demarcates a Lot.

Rear Alley: a vehicular way located to the rear of Lots providing access to service areas, parking, and Outbuildings and containing utility easements. Rear Lanes may be paved lightly to driveway standards.

Lot Width: the length of the Principal Frontage Line of a Lot.

Residential: characterizing premises available for long-term human dwelling.

Manufacturing: premises available for the creation, assemblage and/or repair of artifacts, using table-mounted electrical machinery or artisanal equipment, and including their Retail sale.

Townhouse: a single-family dwelling that shares a party wall with another of the same type and occupies the full Frontage Line.

Mixed Use: multiple Functions within the same building through superimposition or adjacency, or in multiple buildings by adjacency, or at a proximity determined By Warrant. Office: premises available for the transaction of general business but excluding Retail, artisanal, and Manufacturing uses. Open Space: land intended to remain undeveloped; it may be for Civic Space. Outbuilding: an Accessory Building, usually located toward the rear of the same Lot as a Principal Building, and sometimes connected to the Principal Building by a Backbuilding. Park: a Civic Space type that is a natural preserve available for unstructured recreation. Planter: the element of the Public Frontage which accommodates street trees, whether continuous or individual.

Secondary Frontage: on corner Lots, the Private Frontage that is not the Principal Frontage. Setback: the area of a Lot measured from the Lot Line to a building Facade or Elevation that is maintained clear of permanent structures, with the exception of allowable Encroachments. Shopfront: a Private Frontage conventional for Retail use, with substantial glazing and an awning, wherein the Facade is aligned close to the Frontage Line with the building entrance at sidewalk grade. Square: a Civic Space type designed for unstructured recreation and Civic purposes, spatially defined by building Frontages and consisting of paths, lawns, and trees, formally disposed. Stoop: a Private Frontage wherein the Facade is aligned close to the Frontage Line with the first Story elevated from the sidewalk for privacy, with an exterior stair and landing at the entrance. Story: a habitable level within a building, excluding an attic or raised basement.

Principal Building: the main building on a Lot, usually located toward the Frontage. Principal Entrance: the main point of access for pedestrians into a building. Principal Frontage: on corner lots, the Private Frontage designated to bear the address and Principal Entrance to the building, and the measure of minimum Lot width. Private Frontage: the privately held Layer between the Frontage line and the Principal Building Facade.

Transect: a cross-section of the environment showing a range of different habitats. The rural-urban Transect of the human environment used in the proposed code is divided into six Transect Zones. The zones describe the physical form and character of a place, according to the Density and intensity of its land use. Urbanism: collective term for the condition of a compact, Mixed Use settlement, including the physical form of its development and its environmental, functional, economic, and sociocultural aspects. Variance: a ruling that would permit a practice that is not consistent with either a specific provision of the code, but that is justified by its intent. Zoning Map: the official map or maps that are part of the zoning ordinance and delineate the boundaries of individual zones and districts.

Public Frontage: the area between the Curb of the vehicular lanes and the Frontage Line.

COPPERAS COVE, TX Downtown Proposal

63

APPENDIX

Plaza: a Civic Space type designed for Civic purposes and Commercial activities in the more urban Transect Zones, generally paved and spatially defined by building Frontages.


HAGOOD ARCHITECT January 2011

64

Copperas Cove Master Plan  

Copperas Cove would greatly benefit from a revitalized downtown. Downtown offers qualities and opportunities unique to its location. It can...

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