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september / october 2012

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PA R E N T Post-Partum DEPRESSION pages 12

Discreet BREASTFEEDING page 23

EE

Four Fall

FAVES page 7

PHOTO CONTEST

MY KID ROCKS! page 28

HIGHER EDUCATION SUCCESS TIPS pages 13-15


The Warren County Attorney’s Office

Protecting Families, Seeking Justice The Warren County Attorney, Amy Hale Milliken, began her career with the office as Assistant County Attorney in 1995. She was appointed Warren County Attorney in 2004 and has served in that position ever since. The Warren County Attorney’s office has eight Assistant County Attorneys who prosecute traffic cases, misdemeanor criminal offenses, mental health cases, and juvenile public offenses in District Court. In Family Circuit Court, the office prosecutes juvenile status offenses, child support cases, and child neglect and abuse cases. The office also consists of a Child Support division, providing an array of services. Each member of her office acts each day to fulfill the mission of the office: to protect Warren County families and to seek justice. This mission could not be fulfilled without the hard work and dedication of the many agencies that work with the Warren County Attorney’s Office. Local law enforcement agencies collaborate with each Assistant to ensure that investigations are handled in a manner to achieve justice. Sometimes that means a conviction, sometimes that means a lesser disposition. Victims of criminal misdemeanor offenses are consulted by the Assistants to ensure that they are informed about the case and understand the nature of the proceedings.

Great effort is made to keep victims informed and involved in the criminal justice process. Local nonprofit agencies serve as partners with the office. The Assistants work closely with BRASS to ensure victims of assault cases are receiving the proper services to protect themselves and family members. Victims of domestic violence are also counseled by an attorney in the office regarding Amanda’s Law referrals, or referrals made by the Family Court to determine whether any criminal action should take place when a victim files for an Emergency Protective Order. The Family Enrichment Center is often used to refer parents in child abuse and neglect cases for parenting classes. The attorneys in the office each serve on various boards and teams in the community, such as the Elder Abuse Council, the Crisis Interdisciplinary Team, Hope Harbor, Green Dot, among several more, in order to keep up to date on issues facing families within Warren County and in order to provide input in policy development. Every day in the office brings a new challenge. But it also presents an opportunity to be of service to the citizens of Warren County, which is the ultimate mission of the Warren County Attorney’s Office.<

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Pictured: Kayla York, daughter of Tammy York.

About the Author: Jennifer L. Brinkley is an Assistant Warren County Attorney. She is a District Court Prosecutor, and her duties include prosecuting misdemeanor criminal offenses, mental health cases, traffic cases, and juvenile public offenses. More information about the office can be found on the website: www.warrencountyattorney.com.

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from the editor

in this issue

School is back in session and the fall issue of Bowling Green Parent Magazine is on the shelf. Welcome to a magazine filled with quality reading and local pictures for your enjoyment. Meet our cover Mom- Amy Milliken, Warren County’s Attorney, and find out what her office does for all of us. We’re glad she’s on the job! Everyone with kids needs to plan ahead for those college years coming up. Check out the article from the Honors College at WKU about intellectual preparation. Got that covered? Great! The Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority wants to help you with your money. Read their article explaining how your child can use KEES to finance a Kentucky education. Moms, we have information to help you with some of your greatest worries. A local mother shares her experience with Post Partum Depression. Then, learn about the HPV virus that can cause cervical cancer. We can tell you who to turn to for help. And, Dana Bennett, a doula at the Health Department, shares her knowledge about breastfeeding to help us with that difficult task of feeding while out in public. Be sure to check out the BG Parent Cover Kid Photo Contest. We’re looking for a child to be on the cover of our January cover with Ann Blair Thornton, Miss Kentucky 2011. You don’t want to miss this opportunity. The entry is on our website: www.bgparent.com. Happy Reading!

7 Four Fall Faves 9 Gatlinburg | Pigeon Forge 11 Farmer’s Markets 24-25 Event Calendar 27 TOPS Soccer Get Excited About Autumn

Fall Break Getaway Healthy Local Eats

Kid, Teen & Family Events Fun for All

health & safety

4 Halloween Safety 10 Post-Partum Depression 17 Cervical Cancer 22 Child Safety Seats Tips for Trick-or-Treating

Preventing the Disease

On the Cover: Warren County Attorney Amy Hale Milliken with daughters: Abby, Ruth E. and Chloe, and husband Wesley Milliken, BG Attorney. Photo courtesy of Lockett Studios, by Sherryl Lockett.

LIKE US...Contests, local happenings, ideas & more! A Proud Member of the

Buckle Them Properly

arts & crafts

5 Trick-or-Treats

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Give More than Candy

Bowling Green Parent is a quarterly publication for Bowling Green / Warren County and surrounding areas. We generate 10,000 free copies of this issue which can be picked up at over 200 local family-friendly businesses in six counties. For a list of locations: www.bgparent.com/about/distribution To inquire about advertising, call 270-792-7228 or email info@bgparent.com. Carolyn Cossey Pitchford, Editor-in-Chief

All material and information, which appears in Bowling Green Parent Magazine, is presented for informational purposes only. Always consult your physician or child care expert if you have any questions concerning you or your Family’s well being. Bowling Green Parent Magazine presents all data as is, without any warranty of any kind, express or implied, and is not liable for its accuracy, for mistakes, errors, or omissions of any kind, nor for any loss or damage caused by a user’s reliance on information obtained in the magazine. Bowling Green Parent Magazine takes no responsibility as to the accuracy of statements in any of our articles or segments. We rely on independent writers and reader responses to present us with ideas and informational material.

THANKS to our supporters & contributors! Without the advertisers in BG Parent, we would not be able to bring this FREE publication to you! Please thank them by visiting their business, and tell them you saw them in BG Parent! We are also thankful for our talented writers and contributors who volunteer their time to bring you fresh stories. If you are interested in contributing, please email your idea to info@bgparent.com. bowling green

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events

A Mom’s Story

Cara & Katie

Katie Frassinelli, Publisher and Creative Director

sept/oct 2012

education

13-15 College Preparedness 16 Mind Your Manners 20-21 Book Nook Financial Tips and More No Rude Kids Here!

Enjoy Reading

features

6 Community Spotlight 18-19 Yummy Mommy 23 Discreet Breastfeeding What’s Happening

Tips & MOMS Club

Making the Most of Limited Places page

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Make Halloween a Treat! Five Ways to Keep Your Kids Safe Halloween can be tricky because it poses dangers for children. But here are some guidelines parents can use to help make sure the holiday is a treat for all. 1) Make sure your children can see and be seen. When crowds of trick-or-treaters are walking through neighborhoods, visibility becomes a top concern. Children are four times more likely to be hit by a car on Halloween than any other night of the year. And since there is increasingly less daylight, parents and children need to remember that it will be darker a bit earlier on Halloween night and plan accordingly. • Light- and bright-colored costumes can help make children easier to see but may not be enough. Use reflectors or reflective tape to decorate costumes and sacks. Remember, a car traveling at 60 mph needs 260 feet to stop completely. Reflectors make your children visible at 500 feet. • Avoid masks as they can impair a child’s vision. Makeup or nontoxic face paint is a better alternative. • Ensure better visibility and decrease the risk of falling by providing trick-or-treaters with flashlights. • Make sure children understand and obey all traffic regulations, such as looking both ways before crossing streets. 2) Dress little ghosts and goblins for success. The most important part of the evening is picking out that justright costume. Parents and others can help by making sure costumes are safe too. • Check that costumes fit properly, avoiding those that drag on the ground. • Be careful of long flowing skirts, belts or loose ends that could catch fire or cause your child to trip or fall. • Reduce the risk of injury by making sure accessories such as knives, swords and other props are made of

flexible material or cardboard. • Attach contact information on children’s costumes in case children get separated, and make sure they know their phone number. Provide older children with a means of calling home. 3) Be careful around candles, and if possible use alternatives. Textile manufacturers are no longer required by law to make costumes flame-retardant, so it is up to you to help reduce the chance of fire-related injuries during Halloween. • Candle-lighted jack-o-lanterns are a great way to light your porch and welcome kids, but an open flame is a danger, especially with gauzy costumes. Try tap lights or glow sticks instead. • Don’t allow children to carry lanterns or candles with an open flame while trick-or-treating. Electric candles or a flashlight (with new batteries) are much safer choices. • Anyone hosting trick-or-treaters should make a point of clearing yards of debris and marking a well-lit path to reduce the risk of falling. Avoid using candles or other open flames to mark paths. 4) Superheroes need supervision. Even Batman had a reliable companion, and your little costumed character should have one, too, on Halloween especially. • Parents or other adults should always accompany children while they’re out and about. In particular, children under 10 should not go out without adult supervision. • Parents should only take children trick-or-treating at the homes of their neighbors and trusted friends. 5) Save the sweet tooth for later. There are a few things parents need to remember about the candy and other

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Pictured: Garrett Nealon (5) Noah Brown (13) Gracyn Nealon (5) submitted by Courtney Nealon.

treats that children collect on their route. • Parents should always inspect the candy before children are allowed to eat it. To keep kids from being tempted to snack before parents have a chance to inspect the loot, make sure they have something healthy to eat before going out. • Because candy can be a choking hazard for toddlers, be sure to remove inappropriate treats from their goody bags. • Since trick-or-treating is an evening activity, it’s a good idea to limit the amount of candy eaten before bed as excessive sugar intake could keep children awake well past bedtime. By following these Halloween safety tips, not only do you get to share in a fun night with your children, but you also can help make sure it’s safe too. <

About the Author: Rene Hopkins, RN, is Coordinator of Safe Kids East Central,led by Georgia Health Sciences Children’s Medical Center. Georgia Health Sciences University includes the Medical College of Georgia and the Colleges of Allied Health Sciences, Dental Medicine, Graduate Studies and Nursing.

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Creative Trick-or-Treats Fun Snacks for Boos and Ghouls! Yes, I am that house that gives out trinkets, stickers, healthy snacks... pretty much anything except candy. My husband swears that our yard will get t-p’d for it, but I just like doing something different for the kids. For those of you like me, here are a few easy ideas to add to your Halloween distribution! Witches Brew Supplies: Juice Drinks (we used Little Hug Fruit Barrels); access to a printer; Zig-Zag scissors (we used torn paper scissors), hole punch, rubber bands i Download our Witches Brew template from our website (www.bgparent.com). i Print either the full color version, or the black and

white version on colored paper. i Use your special scissors (or create your own torn paper look by hand) to cut apart the labels. i Punch a hole in the corner of each label. i Run a rubberband (or use string) through the label to attach to the juice drink. You can also use spray adhesive and attach the label directly to the bottle. Ghost Cocoa Supplies: Individual packets of hot cocoa (usually 10 in a box), glue stick or spray adhesive, white paper, black marker (or download and print our ghost face templates from the website) i Cut apart the ghost template white rectangles (or if

you are making your own by hand, measure and cut 3” x 4” rectangles and draw your own ghost faces. i Glue or use spray adhesive to affix a ghost face to one side of the cocoa packet. Pumpkin Cups Supplies: Individual fruit cups (mandarin oranges and/ or peaches), black sharpie or paint marker i Simply draw a jack-o-lantern face on each fruit cup. For more crafts and scrumptious recipes, check out our website and follow our boards on Pinterest!<

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Find Frank online: www.bgparent.com www.pinterest.com/bgparent

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Community Spotlight Dinosaur World Offering Dollar Days Most of our readers will enjoy $1 County Admission for Dinosaur World on Saturday, September 22. Dollar Days includes Barren County and the counties that touch it: Allen, Edmonson, Hart, Metcalfe, Monroe and Warren. Simply present your drivers’ license or other proof of residency. For more information visit www.dinosaurworld.com or call 270-773-4345.

Where Were You September 11th? Few dates in history do most people remember exactly where they were and what they were doing... but September 11, 2001 is one such date. Now through October 28 the National Corvette Museum is hosting a special temporary exhibit, ‘A Global Moment,’ featuring artifacts from Ground Zero and the Pentagon, a timeline of events and personal accounts of the fateful day. The exhibit is included with regular museum admission: $10 adults, $5 youth age 6-16, $8 seniors, children 5 and under are free - or everyone in a household for only $25. Learn more at www.corvettemuseum.org or call 270-781-7973.

Just Kid’n Party & Play Place Located in the Ashley Center near Hobby Lobby, Just Kid’n is a new indoor recreational facility for open play and parties. The attraction features many inflatables and bounce houses plus an arcade room with loads of games - many of which offer redemption tickets. There is a separate space just for toddlers, and parents can watch the action from a lounge area. Hours are Monday - Thursday 10:00 am-7:00 pm, Friday - Saturday 10:00 am-9:00 pm and Sunday Noon-6:00 pm. Find them on Facebook, or their website www.jkpartynplay.com.

SKyPAC Offers School Day Performances There are few things as magical to a child as seeing a subject studied in the classroom come to life on the stage! SKyPAC makes this happen with five school day programs offering a one-of-a-kind experience for area students. Local director Carol Jordan is bringing Shakespeare’s The Tempest to life in August. Kids can learn all about the presidents as we elect a new one when Rock the Presidents hits the stage in October. Charlotte’s Web will once again “amaze” us in February. Animal Farm will make us wonder about society in March and Seussical will have us all laughing and singing in May. Tickets are only $5 for School Day performances. Check out the details at theskypac.files.wordpress.com/2012/01/schoolday_pdf_2012-20131.pdf

BG Parent Gives Back! Bowling Green Parent is a proud sponsor of Alex’s Lemonade Stand. Despite the100+ degree temperatures, our stand at the Bowling Green Area Convention & Visitors Bureau on Three Springs Road raised over $500 for the non-profit organization. Thanks to the fans who stopped by the booth and sampled some of our favorite dessert recipes from our Pinterest and supported the cause!

Warren Co.’s Jody Richards Elementary Opens Jody Richard Elementary School (JRES) opened August 9, serving approximately 600 students from preschool through sixth grade. The 14th elementary school in the Warren County school system, JRES draws students from Natcher and Rich Pond elementary schools, alleviating crowding. Like all Warren County Public Schools buildings opened in recent years, JRES incorporates many design elements that make it energy efficient. Daylighting, geothermal heating and cooling, and Insulated Concrete Form construction are among the features that put JRES on the forefront of the “green building” movement. It is considered a “Net Zero-ready” building that could include solar panels in the future to offset its energy use. The fledgling Leader in Me initiative in Warren County Public Schools has taken root from day one at JRES. Based on Stephen Covey’s book The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, Leader in Me has the potential to transform school culture and improve teaching and learning. The school’s namesake, Jody Richards, is a veteran state legislator and former Speaker of the House. He participated in the grand opening and received a ceremonial “key” to the school from Warren County Public Schools Superintendent Tim Murley. The school’s principal is Ms. Stephanie Martin.

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Four Faves for Fall Ahhh Fall... my favorite season! I don’t know if it is because of the relief from summer’s scorching heat, the beautiful colors of nature, apple cider slushes from Jackson’s Orchard or my October birthday, but it’s definitely the best. In our area, you might love it, too, due to the abundance of awesome things to do. Here are our top FOUR FAVES FOR FALL! Pick Your Own Pumpkin Patches It was a wonderful thing when many local family farms discovered the idea of ‘agritourism.’ They transformed from, well, a farm, into a place for the whole family offering loads of activities, great foods and of course pumpkins. Who doesn’t love Jackson’s Orchard’s Pumpkin Festival - the Cider Slider, hayrides and the delicious fried pies. Just Piddlin’ in South Union also offers many of the same families activities on their farm, plus corn hole, a corn sheller and corn box! For an abundance of decoratives and a wide variety of pumpkins, don’t miss The Garden Patch in Smiths Grove. Grab some Indian corn, mums and more! Lastly, Chaney’s Dairy Barn has spared some of the cow’s corn to create an annual corn maze, and your admission includes a scoop of ice cream! They also now offer home grown pumpkins.

Scarecrows Just like in the Wizard of Oz, scarecrows can be amusing and entertaining! A quick 20 minute drive south east of Bowling Green takes you to downtown Scottsville and the ‘Invasion of Scarecrows.’ Throughout the month of October the local merchants pull out all the stops to come up with the best of the best scarecrows. The highlight of the month is their annual 50s & 60s ‘Invasion of the Scarecrows’ event on October 6 with food booths, arts & crafts, car cruise-in, live music and more. New for 2012 is a Scarecrow Trail at Lost River Cave. Area businesses and nonprofits sponsored and designed these straw figures, and visitors can stroll the Valley trails free of charge to check out the display. Fall Festivals Who doesn’t like a good game of duck pond or toilet paper toss? Nearly all of the area elementary schools host a fall festival in September or October - offering games, cake walks, face painting, inflatables, food and more. What's even better? Your participation supports our children's education. Check out our website calendar of events for a complete list, and even if your child doesn't go to a particular school, they welcome anyone to attend!

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Pictured: Lillian Sales, daughter of Rebecca Sales Trick-or-Treating Who doesn't like free candy? While our website and Facebook will keep you informed of each community's trick-or-treat day and times, there are a few other events to rack up the loot! The National Corvette Museum is hosting a free Monster Mash on Saturday, October 27 from 1-3pm with a trunk-or-treat, costume contest, arts & crafts activities and carnival games for 25 cents a ticket. We hope you have a Spook-tacular fall!<

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Gatlinburg & Pigeon Forge Tennessee’s Smoky Mountain region offers adventure, heritage and nature plus loads of family fun. Whether it is a hike to the top of Clingman’s Dome, or shopping at one of the many outlets, a round of mini golf or a visit to one of their newer attractions – this destination will give your family plenty to do over fall break and beyond!

PigeonForgeFactoryOutlet.com

We asked our resident travel writer, Kathy Witt, for her recommendations on what to do and see.

• Smoky Mountain Gourmet Popcorn, SMPopcorn. com

Top Timeless Faves No trip to the Smokies would be complete without a visit to Dollywood. Ride a roller coaster, watch one of the many shows or simply enjoy a look into Dolly Parton’s life. Don’t miss the National Southern Gospel & Harvest Celebration throughout October. Billed as “the most fun place to eat in the Smokies,” Dixie Stampede features a four-course feast and a stunt-filled show for all ages. Ripley’s Aquarium of the Smokies offers 12 foot sharks, a giant sea turtle, thousands of exotic sea creatures and playful penguins. Pet horseshoe crabs and stingrays and watch dive and feeding shows. No vacation is complete without souvenirs – and there’s no shortage of outlets and specialty shops: • Pigeon Forge Factory Outlet Stores,

• Tanger® Outlet Sevierville, TangerOutlet.com/ Sevierville • Pigeon River Pottery, OldMillSquare.com/pottery. htm • Old Mill General Store, OldMillSquare.com where you can experience life on board the ship, just as it was 100 years ago. Walk the hallways, parlors, cabins The family will love a little friendly competition with a and grand staircase while being surrounded by more round of mini-golf and some go-carting at one of the than 400 rare artifacts. Touch a real iceberg, be seated many recreational facilities in the area. in a real Titanic lifeboat and listen to actual survivors Finally, be sure and grab a bite at Old Mill Restaurant tell their stories. where the mills is one of the most photographed spots WonderWorks offers more in Tennessee! than 100 interactive, A trio of new faves

For those who haven’t made the trip in years, there are three new attractions to add to your bucket list.

Rub elbows with current stars at the Hollywood Wax Museum, including Brad Pitt, Anne Hathaway and Start planning your trip Natalie Portman, plus classic entertainers like Elvis today at tnvacation.com, mypigeonforge.com and Presley and Marilyn Monroe. gatlinburg.com. < This is the centennial year of the great Titanic’s maiden voyage, so you won’t want to miss the Titanic Museum

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hands on exhibits where the unexplainable will come to life and the unusual will be the norm.

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EXCLUSIVE CONTESTS!

Facebook.com/BGParent

fan banter Q. What’s your child going to be for Halloween? Batman & Rapunzel - Susan L. Too far away to plan, lol! - Shelley L. The babies are going to be “3 little pigs” and we are trying to talk our oldest into being a wolf. - Allison T. Hmm she was a spider last year. Not sure about this year. I’d like to come up with something cute for Mom, Dad and baby. - Jamie J. We are thinking our daughter will be Pebbles and my husband and I will be Fred and Wilma. - Jessica H. Cute little elephant and Minnie Mouse. - Rachel M. I have a feeling we’re going as a dinosaur and the girl off Brave. - Spencer D.

Pictured: Daelyne Driver, son of Tisha Hines

What’s cookin’? If you are looking for tried and true recipes - casseroles, dinners, breakfast, delicious desserts - be sure to follow us on Pinterest at www.pinterest.com/bgparent. Below is a sample recipe... a perfect treat to get you in the mood for fall campfires! S’more Cookie Bars 1/2 cup butter, room temp. 1/4 cup brown sugar 1 tsp baking powder 1 large egg 1 tsp vanilla extract 1/4 tsp salt 1 1/3 cups all purpose flour 1/2 cup sugar 3/4 cup graham cracker crumbs (~7 full graham crackers) 2 super-sized (5 oz.) milk chocolate bars 1 1/2 cups marshmallow creme

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View the recipe instructions on our Pinterest or website, www.bgparent.com or scan the QR code!

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Connecting Kids to Local Food and Farmers Most parents want to encourage their kids to eat more fruits and vegetables, but it can be difficult. In a world where fast food, brightly colored packaging, and pizza are convenient and taste good, it can be a challenge to encourage kids to get equally excited about fresh foods. Community Farmers’ Market (CFM) vendors and volunteers recognize the issue because they face it themselves! With the slogan “More Than Just a Farmer’s Market,” they are committed to creating unique and creative ways to help families get connected to fresh, local foods. From hosting special Kids’ Markets, a summer canning program, and a multicultural day, CFM is interested in encouraging everyone to get connected to the local food system. Here are a few ways that you can become connected: Third Thursday Farm Days – Tour local farms, meet the animals, watch your food grow, and learn how to grow your own. Most farm events include local foods and fun activities for kids. Chef Table – Every other Saturday you will find a chef cooking up local food found at the Farmer’s Market. Back at the chef table, delicious and nutritious food is whipped up in no time and served to customers. This

is a great way to get your kids excited about taking fresh fruits and vegetables home and into your own kitchen. Pick 5 Challenge – Bring your kids to the market and encourage them to pick out five new fresh fruits and vegetables. When you get home you can use online tools like Pinterest or Google to find a good recipe for those items. Get connected to events at Community Farmers Market on Facebook, Twitter online at communityfarmersmarketbg.com!<

About the Author: Michelle Howell of Bowling Green is a doula, homeschooler, mother of four and member of BabyNet, a network of pregnancy, birth and childhood professionals serving the South Central Kentucky area. Their mission is to protect and support families through education about preconception, pregnancy, childbirth, postpartum, breastfeeding and parenting to ensure the best chance for a full-term pregnancy and healthy baby.

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Homemade Applesauce

Preparation: 20 min. Cook: 20 min. Yield: 6 cups For the best taste and texture, use a variety of apples—such as Granny Smith, Golden Delicious, and Gala—when making applesauce and pies. Ingredients: • 12 large apples, peeled and coarsely chopped • 1 cup sugar • 1/2 lemon, sliced Directions: 1. Cook all 3 ingredients in a Dutch oven over medium heat, stirring often, 20 minutes or until the apples are tender and the juices are thickened. 2. Remove and discard lemon slices. 3. Serve applesauce warm; or let cool, and store in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.<

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My Darkest Journey

Post-Partum Depression

Postpartum depression (PPD) is a subject that is rarely discussed and often misunderstood. I hope telling my story will help someone else in need of comfort. While my journey has been tough, it has made me so much stronger. The birth of a child is supposed to be the most joyous moment of your life. For me it turned quickly into an emotionally and physically draining ordeal. My daughter was born after 10 weeks on bed rest and a long labor with multiple complications. After leaving the hospital our baby was diagnosed with reflux and didn’t rest. Exhausted, with a baby that never slept, matters came to a head. I awoke one day with an unreasonable fear of my daughter. I can remember lying in the floor in tears. I begged my husband not to go to work because I couldn’t take care of my own infant. I was afraid I might harm her. I was surprised by my doctor’s immediate diagnosis of PPD which I thought meant being sad all the time. However, I learned that it can

present several ways, including my compulsive fears and anxieties. I began treatment immediately. My mom lived with me for 16 days. During this time, I had to re-learn how to take care of my daughter, control my compulsive thoughts and cope with my guilt. I couldn’t understand how I could love my daughter so much, but still be afraid of harming her. Looking back on the experience, I am thankful for modern medicine and for the power of prayer. They brought me through one of the darkest periods in my life. Experiencing postpartum depression has taught me many lessons. I don’t have to be perfect or put up a front that everything is okay. There are going to be bumps along the way and there is no reason to fear asking for help. Sometimes the laundry is going to pile up, the dishes are going to need to be done, and the floors cleaned. Do what you can do. There is always tomorrow! You may wonder why I am sharing my story. I am not

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ashamed that I had PPD. As a mom who has survived postpartum depression I understand like no one else can. I want all women in need to know there is help and hope for you. Don’t be afraid to ask. <

About the Author: Liz Fogle is host of WBKO’s Mom’s Everyday, airing on WBKOABC at 9:45 a.m. and 4:10 p.m., and on WBKO-FOX at 12:15 p.m. She also writes a weekly blog for Moms Everyday. Liz and husband Ben live in Bowling Green with their 4 year old daughter Lily.

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High School Plan Ahead for Success As an admission counselor, I get many calls from high school students and their parents with questions about the college application process. Applying to college has become increasingly complicated, both for the student balancing classes and extracurricular involvement with the application process, and for the supportive parent whose experience applying to college took place long before online applications and the overabundance of information now available on the internet. So, to ease the transition to college, here are some tips for you and your young scholars to take advantage of while they are still in high school.

semester. 2. Plan on studying abroad in college. Twenty-first century employers want employees with international experience, so encourage your scholar to start preparing to study abroad while still in high school. Having study abroad experiences in college will not only enhance your child’s education and cultural awareness but also make them more employable. A recent study for Global HR News stated that nearly 75% of employers prefer applicants with international experience. Additionally, the independence and self-confidence gained from studying or interning abroad will be invaluable.

3. Prep for standardized tests and be familiar with scholarship Pictured: Middle schoolers prepare Take advantage of as many dual for college with SCATS, Summer requirements. credit and Advanced Placement Camp for Academically Talented Although only one part of a students’ application, standardized tests play Program classes as you can. Your Middle School Students at The child can earn up to thirty-three Center for Gifted Students at WKU. a large role in many scholarship decisions. Take advantage of study hours of college credit before graduating high school. Coming into college with sessions for these tests. Help your scholar make credits opens up many great opportunities, such as informed decisions on scholarship opportunities by completing a double major or studying abroad for a using available resources on university financial aid web 1. Earn college credit in high school.

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sites. 4. Get to know your admissions counselor. Every university will have admissions counselors to help students navigate the application process. Make sure your child contacts one for each school of interest and introduces him or herself. The role of the admissions counselor is even more important when applying to highly selective colleges. Encourage your child to follow the admissions office on Twitter or “like” the counselor’s professional Facebook page to be informed of upcoming events and deadlines. Remember that the counselor will probably be on your admissions committee, so it is important to build a professional relationship with them.<

About the Author: Eileen Ryan is the admissions counselor for the Honors College at Western Kentucky University. During her time as a student in the Honors College, she studied English and journalism and spent an amazing semester at Harlaxton College in Grantham, England, living in a 19th century manor house and reading British poetry. After graduation in 2010, she taught ESL for a year in Cheonan, Korea with a Fulbright grant. Eileen enjoys yoga, hiking, and spending time with her sweetheart schipperke mix, Reba.

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The Key to KEES Earn Money for College Kentucky students can earn money for college through the Kentucky Educational Excellence Scholarship (KEES) program, administered by the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority (KHEAA). The program rewards students for making good grades in high school and doing well on the ACT or SAT. The awards may be used upon graduation from a Kentucky high school. No application is necessary. KHEAA will send the funds to the eligible college once the school verifies the student’s enrollment. Students may use their KEES awards at any public college or university in Kentucky, at most private colleges and universities in the state and at many of the state’s trade schools. If a major isn’t offered in Kentucky, students may be able to use their KEES awards at outof-state schools that offer that major and belong to the Academic Common Market. These majors must be approved by Kentucky’s Council on Postsecondary Education. Illinois, Indiana and Ohio schools are not eligible because those states do not participate in the Academic Common Market. Students earn a KEES base award for each year they achieve at least a 2.5 grade point average (GPA) at a certified Kentucky high school. The base award amount increases as the GPA increases, ranging from $125 to $500 per year. Students who earn at least one

base award can also earn a bonus award for scoring 15 or higher on the ACT or 710 or higher on the SAT. The ACT bonus ranges from $36 to $500 and is based on the student’s highest ACT or SAT score achieved by high school graduation. Students who qualify for the free or reduced lunch program during any year of high school may also earn bonus awards for scoring at least a three on any Advanced Placement (AP) exam or at least a five on International Baccalaureate (IB) exams. AP and IB bonus awards range from $200 to $300 per qualifying score, and there is no limit to the number of AP and IB awards students can earn. After their first year of college, students must meet renewal GPA requirements and make progress toward college graduation to remain eligible for their KEES awards. For more information about renewal requirements, visit www.kheaa.com. To find links to other useful education websites, go to www.gotocollege.ky.gov. Read about The Kentucky Education Savings Plan Trust on the Bowling Green Parent website under Education. For more information about Kentucky scholarships and grants, visit www. kheaa.com; write KHEAA, P.O. Box 798, Frankfort, Ky. 40602; or call (800) 928-8926, ext. 6-7372. <

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Pictured: The Center for Gifted Studies at WKU hosts the award program for Duke TIP, an opportunity for 7th graders to prepare to get ahead by working on the ACT/SAT in advance.

About the Author: Erin Klarer has been with KHEAA and KHESLC for eight years and now serves as Vice President of Government Relations. She received a BA from EKU and a Masters of Public Administration from UofL. She lives in Louisville with her husband, Jon, 8 month old son William, Dax the ferret and Wendy the dog.

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FREE TIPS

Financial Planning for College

For Finding Money for College If you’re planning on going to college, following these tips from the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority (KHEAA) may give you an edge in the yearly race for scholarship dollars. • Complete your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) as soon as possible after January 1. The FAFSA is used to apply for state and federal student aid. File online at www.fafsa.gov. • Look for local scholarships in your newspaper. Community organizations and businesses may have scholarships reserved for local students. • Talk with your school counselor, who is an excellent resource and can tell you about financial aid in general and where to find it. • Talk with a financial aid officer at the school you plan to attend. He or she can tell you about any aid the school has available. • Find out how to reduce student loan

costs. Most financial aid packages include student loans. Take out loans only after you have received all the free aid — grants, scholarships and work-study — for which you qualify. Federal student loans are generally better deals than private loans, but compare interest rates and repayment terms carefully. • Visit websites with free information about college, financial aid and careers. • Be a neat freak. Neat and complete counts when you’re filling out applications. • Apply, apply, apply. The more financial aid for which you apply, the better your chances of getting enough aid to pay for college. Make sure you meet all deadlines. To find links to other useful education websites, go to www.gotocollege.ky.gov. For more information about Kentucky scholarships and grants, visit www.kheaa. com; write KHEAA, P.O. Box 798, Frankfort, KY 40602; or call 800-9288926, ext. 6-7372.<

Planning for College? KESPT Can Help! The Kentucky Education Savings Plan Trust (KESPT) is designed to help families save money for college with tax advantages. Simply open an account for your loved one (or yourself !) and any earnings are free from federal and state Kentucky income taxes when you use the proceeds for higher education expenses. Qualified expenses include tuition, room, board and any other required charges for enrollment. Plus, you can use the money at any accredited higher education institution in the country and some abroad, as well as at community colleges, trade schools and graduate schools. Get started with just $25 ($15 by payroll deduction). For more information, visit kysaves.com or call 877-598-7878. You can get there. We can help! Consider the investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses before investing in the Kentucky Education Savings Plan Trust. Please visit kysaves.com for a Plan Disclosure Booklet with this and more information. Read it carefully. Investments in the Plan are neither insured nor guaranteed and there is the risk of investment loss. The tax information contained herein neither written nor intended to be used for the purpose of avoiding tax penalties. Taxpayers should seek tax advice from an independent tax advisor based on their own particular circumstances. Non-qualified withdrawals may be subject to federal and state taxes and the additional federal 10% tax.<

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HOW RUDE! Teaching Your Children Social Graces Introducing your children to the complex world of social interaction may seem a daunting task. But the basic principle for raising a thoughtful, courteous child is easy to remember: consider The Golden Rule of Parenting. Always be the person you want your child to be. So, if you want your kids to be respectful, considerate and honest, you have to be that person yourself. Observing this golden rule every day is the simplest way to incorporate manners into your family life. When most of today parent’s were children, they were taught to say “please” and “thank you,” keep their elbows off the table, write thank-you notes and speak respectfully to adults. Somewhere along the way culture changed and parents forgot about good etiquette. But are manners ancient history and no longer apply to today’s world? Consideration of others, the key to manners, will always be important. When we instill a code of good conduct in our children, we will help them deal with social situations for the rest of their lives, making them more self-confident. Some of the most basic manners parents should instill in their children are:

At Dinner • Teach kids the proper use of utensils and when they may eat with their fingers. • Wait to begin eating until everyone has their food and the host and hostess start. • Keep elbows off the table and the napkin on the lap. • Children should ask to be excused when finished at the table and be appreciative of the meal. • No talking with the mouth full, noisy sipping, loud talking, nose blowing or belching at the table. Basic Social Graces • Teach children the importance of and the basics of introductions • “Please,” “thank you” and “excuse me” haven’t gone out of style. Neither has “Yes, Ma’am” or “No, Sir.” • Children show respect for adults and elders by referring to them as Mr. or Mrs., and also by opening doors, offering chairs, etc. • Children can show respect for others by knocking before entering a room and respecting the privacy of others. • Kids need to learn the art of conversation. General rules include turning off the TV when a guest arrives,

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Pictured: Rycken Sales, submitted by Rebecca Sales. establishing eye contact with each person, including everyone in the conversation, not interrupting or monopolizing a conversation. • Kids should watch their body language. No slouching, yawning or involving themselves in another activity when conversation is taking place at the table. Do you feel that your children need some extra help with their manners? Riverview at Hobson Grove offers a winter course on manners that covers a wide range of topics including how to address elders, introductions, place settings, table manners, difficult foods, how to handle the unexpected, party manners, how to RSVP, thank you notes and telephone manners. <

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According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), genital human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI). There are more than 40 HPV types that can infect the genital areas of males and females. These HPV types can also infect the mouth and throat. Most people who become infected with HPV do not even know they have it. HPV is not the same as herpes or HIV (the virus that causes AIDS). HPV is passed on through genital contact or oral sex. HPV can be passed on between straight and same-sex partnersâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;even when the infected partner has no signs or symptoms. There are several ways that people can lower their chances of getting HPV. Vaccines can protect males and females against some of the most common types of HPV. HPV vaccines are given in three doses over six months. It is important to get all three doses to get the best protection. The CDC recommends two vaccines, Cervarix and Gardasil, to protect against the types of HPV that cause most cervical cancers. Gardasil also protects against most genital warts, anal, vaginal and vulvar cancers. Both Cervarix and Gardasil are recommended for

females 11 through 26 years of age. One vaccine (Gardasil) protects males against most genital warts and anal cancers. This vaccine is recommended for males aged 11 through 26 years of age. Vaccinations are available through your health care provider and your local health department. According to the Warren County Health Department, at their facility the cost of each of the three doses of Gardasil is $153. They also said that many insurances cover the vaccination series. For those who choose to be sexually active, condoms may lower the risk of HPV infection. To be most effective, they should be used with every sex act, from start to finish. Condoms may also lower the risk of developing HPV-related diseases, such as genital warts and cervical cancer. But HPV can infect areas that are not covered by a condom - so condoms may not fully protect against HPV.

Pictured: Mikayla Duvall, daughter of Kenneth and Kathleen Duvall

People can also lower their chances of getting HPV by being in a faithful relationship with one partner; limiting their number of sex partners; and being with a partner who has had no or few prior sex partners. But even people with only one lifetime sex partner can

get HPV. And it may not be possible to determine if a partner who has been sexually active in the past is currently infected. Not having sex is the only sure way to avoid HPV. <

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Photography by Christian

Cervical Cancer Awareness

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Junk Drawer

REHAB

Matches, birthday candles, keys, batteries, small tools, writing utensils, rubber bands, paper clips, stray candy, glue, loose change, and ketchup packages. What do all these items have in common? They are all items you might find in a junk drawer! Go ahead and confess…we all have a junk drawer. You know… the one you can’t open or close. Everything that doesn’t have a home is welcomed in by the “junk drawer.” If your junk drawer is a mess, it doesn’t have to stay that way. Begin by clearing out the drawer. Remove everything and spread it out onto the counter. Clean the inside of the drawer while it is empty. Purge. You will be surprised at how much trash accumulates in your junk drawer. Also, remove items that have a home somewhere else, but were dropped in the drawer for convenience. Set them aside to put away after you have finished working on the junk drawer. Don’t start putting them away now or you will never make it back to the junk drawer! Sort and group the items that go back into the drawer. Put all the paper clips together and match books in a pile. Condense items like birthday candles into one box. Test items such as batteries and ink pens before returning them to the drawer. Divide and conquer. Use small baskets, jewelry boxes, small cups, ice cube trays, or other divided trays to split the drawer into sections and keep items from becoming a jumbled mess. Avoid using containers with lids. You should be able to see everything in the drawer at a glance. Another way to contain bulky items such as cords is to place them in a zip-loc bag. Clip paperwork together. If you or your family needs labels as a reminder of where things go, label each section of the drawer with a marker, printed label or picture. A junk drawer will always be a little random and unruly…that’s its nature. However, keeping it somewhat organized should enable you to locate your “junk” more quickly.<

YUMMY MOMMY Extending the Beauty of Your HAIR

BEFORE

AFTER

BEFORE

AFTER

Many of us have realized that our inner hottie has longer, thicker hair than we were actually graced with. That’s why hair extensions are so popular - and not just in Hollywood! Girls everywhere love that it is possible to take their current look, give it a lift and have any style they desire... well, for a few months, anyhow. Hair extensions can change your life BUT before making a decision to pursue this choice, why do you want them? (Bad haircut, new look, special occasion) A visit to a beautician always takes time, but adding extensions can require four (or more) hours of careful work by a skilled stylist with specialized training. Additionally, this new hair will require careful and patient grooming to keep it looking good. Is your hair in bad shape or thinning? Your stylist will need to consider the health of your natural hair. Be sure to select a hair stylist with training in hair extensions. The experience of your stylist is the biggest factor in positive results. If he or she does not have proper training many things can go wrong, including some of your natural hair falling out or being ruined. A well trained stylist will give you good advice on the health of your hair. A trained hair dresser will also discuss with you the many different methods to attach hair extensions. They include string, mini links, mini locs, bonding About the author: Tammy York is materials, braids, adhesives (fusion), heat seal, a hairdresser at Ohana’s with 11 sewing and even clip- ins. years experience. She is a Redken After you have reviewed all of these very important color specialist, certified in Platinum issues, you need to determine if you can afford hair Seamless Extensions. In her quest to extensions. The price can range depending on the become the best hairstylist she can method used, type of hair and the experience of be, she has traveled to Chicago, New the stylist. Quality hair is not cheap and neither is York, Orlando, and Ft. Lauderdale to your stylist. You can expect this to be a significant further her education and learn the latest in cutting edge styles. investment. <

About the Author: Originally from Scottsville, Kendra Husk is a professional organizer, writer and motivational speaker. For more information on how Kendra can help you or your business needs e-mail her at kendrahusk@yahoo.com or call (502) 322-7170. bowling green

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SAFETY TIPS For Cars, Parking Lots and More 1. The elbow is the strongest point on your body. If you’re close enough to use it, do! 2. If a robber asks for your wallet and/or purse, DO NOT HAND IT TO HIM. Toss it away from you. Chances are that he is more interested in your wallet and/or purse than you, and he will go for the wallet/purse. Run like mad in the other direction. 3. If you are ever thrown into the trunk of a car, kick out the back tail lights and stick your arm out the hole and start waving like crazy. The driver won’t see you, but everybody else will. 4. Women have a tendency to get into their cars and just sit (making a list, checking email, etc.). Don’t do this. The predator will be watching you, and this is the perfect opportunity for him to get in on the passenger side, put a gun to your head, and tell you where to go. As soon as you get in your car, lock the doors and leave. If someone is in the car with a gun to your head DO NOT DRIVE OFF! Instead gun the engine and speed into anything, wrecking the car. Your airbag will save you. If the person is in the back seat they will get the worst of it. As soon as the car crashes bail out and run. It is better than having them find your body in a remote location. 5. A few notes about getting into your car in a parking lot, or parking garage: A.) Be aware: look around you, look into your car, at the passenger side floor, and in the back seat.

side. If a male is sitting alone in the seat nearest your car, you may want to walk back into the mall, or work, and get a guard/policeman to walk you back out. IT IS ALWAYS BETTER TO BE SAFE THAN SORRY. (And better paranoid than dead.) 6. ALWAYS take the elevator instead of the stairs. Stairwells are horrible places to be alone and the perfect crime spot. This is especially true at night. 7. If the predator has a gun and you are not under his control, ALWAYS RUN! The predator will only hit you (a running target) 4 in 100 times; and even then, it most likely WILL NOT be a vital organ. RUN, Preferably in a zig -zag pattern! 8. As women, we are always trying to be sympathetic: STOP. It may get you killed. Ted Bundy, the serial killer, was a good-looking, well educated man, who ALWAYS played on the sympathies of unsuspecting women. He walked with a cane, or a limp, and often asked ‘for help’ into his vehicle or with his vehicle, which is when he abducted his next victim.

B.) If you are parked next to a big van, enter your car from the passenger door. Most serial killers attack their victims by pulling them into their vans while the women are attempting to get into their cars.

9. If you wake up in the middle of the night to hear all your taps outside running or what you think is a burst pipe, DO NOT GO OUT TO INVESTIGATE! These people turn on all your outside taps full blast so that you will go out to investigate and then attack. A similar ploy is the sound of a crying baby outside your window or door. It is best to call police and ask them to check it out.

C.) Look at the car parked on the driver’s side of your vehicle, and the passenger

Stay alert, keep safe, and look out for your neighbors!<

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100 Picture Books to Read Before Kindergarten Experts say that children need to hear at least 1,000 stories before they begin to learn to read. This is a list of 100 exceptional picture books which will entertain, educate and inspire young children again and again. Make time to snuggle up and share these books with the children in your life. Abuela by Arthur Dorros Actual Size by Steve Jenkins Bark, George by Jules Feiffer Bear Snores On by Karma Wilson The Best Pet of All by David Larochelle Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? by Bill Martin Jr. Bunny Cakes by Rosemary Wells Caps for Sale by Esphyr Slobodkina Caramba by Marie-Louise Gay The Carrot Seed by Ruth Krauss Charlie Cook’s Favourite Book by Julia Donaldson Chester by Mélanie Watt Chicka Chicka Boom Boom by Bill Martin Jr. Chicken Little by Ed Emberley Click, Clack, Moo: Cows That Type by Doreen Cronin The Complete Adventures of the Mole Sisters by Roslyn Schwartz Corduroy by Don Freeman Diary of a Wombat by Jackie French Don’t Let the Pigeon Drive the Bus! by Mo Willems Duck on a Bike by David Shannon Eddie’s Garden: And How to Make Things Grow by Sarah Garland Elmer by David McKee The End by David LaRochelle Epossumondas by Coleen Salley Fancy Nancy by Jane O’Connor Fire Truck by Peter Sís Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed by Eileen Christelow Froggy Gets Dressed by Jonathan London

George and Martha by James Marshall Go Away, Big Green Monster! by Ed Emberley Good Night, Gorilla by Peggy Rathmann Goodnight Moon by Margaret Wise Brown The Gruffalo’s Child by Julia Donaldson Grumpy Bird by Jeremy Tankard Guji Guji by Chih-Yuan Chen Harold and the Purple Crayon by Crockett Johnson Harry the Dirty Dog by Gene Zion The Hello, Goodbye Window by Norton Juster The Hoppameleon by Paul Geraghty How I Became a Pirate by Melinda Long I Will Never Not Ever Eat a Tomato by Lauren Child If You Give a Mouse a Cookie by Laura Joffe Numeroff If You’re Hoppy by April Pulley Sayre I’m Not Cute! by Jonathan Allen The Imaginary Garden by Andrew Larsen In My Backyard by Margriet Ruurs It’s a Secret! by John Burningham The King’s Taster by Kenneth Oppel The Kissing Hand by Audrey Penn Kitten’s First Full Moon by Kevin Henkes Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Tale by Mo Willems Ladybug Girl by Jacky Davis; David Soman Lemons Are Not Red by Laura Vaccaro Seeger Lilly’s Purple Plastic Purse by Kevin Henkes Llama, Llama Red Pajama by Anna Dewdney Madeline by Ludwig Bemelmans Madlenka by Peter Sís The Mightiest by Keiko Kasza Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel by Virginia Lee Burton Moose Tracks! by Karma Wilson Mr. Gumpy’s Outing by John Burningham Muncha! Muncha! Muncha! by Candace Fleming My Friend Rabbit by Eric Rohmann My Garden by Kevin Henkes No Sleep for the Sheep! by Karen Beaumont

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No, David! by David Shannon Olivia by Ian Falconer One Some Many by Marthe Jocelyn Owl Babies by Martin Waddell Pancakes for Supper! by Anne Isaacs Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me by Eric Carle The Paper Bag Princess by Robert Munsch The Perfect Nest by Catherine Friend Pete the Cat: I Love My White Shoes by Eric Litwin Princess Pigsty by Cornelia Funke Rain by Manya Stojic Rosie’s Walk by Pat Hutchins Scaredy Squirrel by Mélanie Watt Silly Suzy Goose by Petr Horácek Skippyjon Jones by Judy Schachner The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats Some Dogs Do by Jez Alborough Stanley’s Party by Linda Bailey Stella, Star of the Sea by Marie-Louise Gay The Story of Ferdinand by Munro Leaf Strega Nona: Her Story by Tomie dePaola Sylvester and the Magic Pebble by William Steig Tacky the Penguin by Helen Lester The Tale of Peter Rabbit by Beatrix Potter The Three Pigs by David Wiesner The True Story of the 3 Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka There Was an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly by Pam Adams Tuesday by David Wiesner The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle A Visitor for Bear by Bonny Becker Wheels on the Bus: A Book with Parts That Move by Paul O. Zelinsky Where Is the Green Sheep? by Mem Fox Where the Wild Things Are by Maurice Sendak Where’s Spot? by Eric Hill Yoko by Rosemary Wells

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the

book nook

Happy spooky season! BGP invited award winning WKU Folk Studies professor Erica Brady to share some of her favorite books for older kids and those of us parents who are still kids at heart. First off, a couple of confessions. I know this is Bowling Green Parent Magazine, but I found out I couldn’t write this column for parents. I’ve never been one. Kid-who-loves-to-read out there, I’m writing this for you. Second confession: I hate books written just for kids. Always have. So every single book I’m going to recommend to you is one I first read as a kid, but still reread, mostly every year, and they only get better. I’m not going to send you to the old favorites. I’m guessing that if you’re a reader, you’ve already discovered Harry Potter, A Wrinkle in Time, the Narnia books, and the other biggies. If you liked the Lord of the Rings films, I hope you will read the books on which they are based, and then maybe Philip Pullman’s amazing trilogy called “His Dark Materials.” These books of mine are harder to find. For sheer scariness, nothing beats Edward Gorey’s Haunted Looking Glass. I can’t even look at the dustcover for long. It’s flat out the best collection of classic ghost stories ever, and believe me, I’m an expert.

Don’t neglect the Grimm Brothers – but forget about the wussy Disney-fied versions and find a good straightforward translation. They were stories adults told for adults by the fireside 200 years ago, and the same things still make the shadows creep in the corners, even with a happy ending thrown in. It’s too funny that their last name was actually “Grimm.” I like books that look at evil vs. good in a supernatural way, so I offer a couple of British books that are as much about Christmas as Halloween. John Masefield’s The Box of Delights is a wild ride, funny, but also a serious fantasy. And L.M. Boston’s The Children of Green Knowe taught me a way to think about life after death that I still carry with me, as well as having one of the scariest passages (not a ghost, exactly) in any book I own. Ray Bradbury could make “booo-riing” American small-town life wondrous, and sometimes very, very frightening. Dandelion Wine , some loosely connected stories about twelve-year-old Douglas Spaulding, takes situations you think you know, and with a touch of magic blasts them into something entirely new. So enjoy, kid-out-there! And let me know if you find something here you like. erika.brady@wku.edu

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About the author: Erika Brady teaches in the Department of Folk Studies and Anthropology at WKU, and is the senior producer/ host of the radio program Barren River Breakdown on WKU Public Radio.

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Child Safety Seats Your Kids are Counting on You Keeping your little one safe is all important. Sorting through the car seat maze is important. A properly installed car seat reduces fatal injuries by 69 percent for infants (under age 1) and by 47 percent for toddlers (ages 1 through 4), according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). But nobody said it was easy.

inches tall, must be in a booster seat.

Toddlers. Children over one year, between 20 and • Children over seven and over 50 inches must be in a 40 pounds and roughly 26 to 40 inches tall need a forward-facing car seat. In general, a five-point harness seat belt. Your child’s age, weight and height determine the type may be best.

of car seat you’ll need. From birth to at least 1 year old • Harness straps should be snug and come through the (regardless of weight) and until they weigh at least 20 uppermost slots in the back of the seat. pounds (regardless of age), infants need a rear-facing car We checked in with Kentucky State Police seat installed in the back seat, preferably in the middle. • Adjust car seat to upright position. • Booster seats with shields are never recommended. Commissioner Rodney Brewer Infant Seat Rear-Facing Convertible Remove the shield and follow the manufacturer’s who pointed us to the KSP website can be used for babies, birth to 20- directions. where you will not only find what 22 pounds and less than 26 inches. the Kentucky law says, but the best NEVER place a rear-facing car seat in Toddler Car Seat/Belt Positioning Booster Seat are for practices for installation of your children over 40 pounds: front of an air bag. child’s car seat. Here’s the law and tips One of the most common mistakes made is to place a from that site and the NHTSA. Visit • Seat faces rear of vehicle. child in a vehicle seat belt too early. Your child needs the Bowling Green Parent website • Harness straps come through the a booster seat if: at bgparent.com/car-seat-safety/ for slots in back of the seat below the • The shoulder belt crosses your child’s face or neck. links to the complete information level of baby’s shoulders. and videos about children’s car seats. • Seat should be reclined no more • If the lap belt rides up your child’s stomach (this can What are Kentucky’s Child Seat than 45-degrees. Carrying handle cause serious stomach and spinal injuries in the event of a crash). Laws? Broady, son of Kelly Lee, is strapped should be locked. • Children under 40 inches must be in a child and/or infant seat. • Children under seven and 40-50

tight in his Graco.

• Keep harness straps snug. Fasten • If your child’s legs do not bend over the seat naturally at the knee. Booster seats raise your child to a safe level harness clip at armpit level. so the lap and shoulder belt fits correctly. <

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Photo by Mandy Garvin

Let’s Eat Out!

A Guide to Discreet Breastfeeding

Where would you like to eat? This is not a complicated question if you are 1) an adult 2) have options widely available to you. When will you be hungry? This is not a complicated question if you 1) are independently mobile and 2) can tell time. For a breastfeeding mom and her baby, eating can be tricky. It shouldn’t be, but because society does not agree on the function and purpose of the female breast, it’s complicated. In the privacy and security of home, it’s a no brainer. For the breastfed infant, food is always right there, warmly attached to mom, in the perfect serving size, container, and at the right temperature. But what about those times when the adults want to leave the home and eat in public? Ahh, we’re back to the baby who 1) can’t walk 2) can’t fix his own food and 3) doesn’t really care what time it is. A big deterrent to breastfeeding is the fear for mom of nursing in public. Never mind that it’s legal AND protected by law. Those facts are insignificant to her after a lifetime of learning to identify and protect her ‘private’ parts. There ARE options, and workable ones, while society gets

over its issues with breasts. Here are a few: * Nursing tops. These are clothes (and attractive ones!) that allow mom to let baby latch on, then cover any skin she doesn’t want exposed. These can be made specifically for nursing with slits and double layers on front, or simply a shirt that buttons up the front, which she can unbutton from the bottom only as far as she needs. * Receiving blanket. Practice in front of a mirror and drape it over your shoulder, covering baby’s head. And when baby gets old enough to pull it back, offer it to the prude who can then put it over their head. * Booth in a restaurant. Ask for a seat near the back and face the back of the restaurant and enjoy your meal while baby enjoys his. * Fitting rooms. There’s a curtain AND a bench. * NOT THE BATHROOM. I sure as heck don’t want to eat in there. * Nursing Room. There is one at the Greenwood Mall, situated near the bathrooms but not in one. The door

latches and locks, and there’s a comfy chair. You’ll notice it by the sign of the baby on the front…holding a BOTTLE, but that’s fodder for another article.< About the author: Dana O’Meallie Bennett is a Registered Dietitian and Lactation Counselor at the Allen County Health Department. Dana says she “was born on my due date making up for it ever since.” She and husband Jim moved to Bowling Green in 1996, and have embraced the beautiful area since the drive eastward on I-64. Dana says she loves food, and loves when people breastfeed. Photo by Samantha Wilson, Sam’s Studio | www.samsstudio.net

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area events & activities Music & The Arts

Sept. 15 Symphony Day at Jackson’s Orchard, 10am, free concert. Bring your family and a picnic blanket to enjoy fall favorites like apple cider, caramel apples, hayrides and pumpkin picking while hearing The Symphony and area Strings students playing some of your favorites. This year’s music will include “A Spoonful of Sugar” from Mary Poppins and other children’s movie classics! 270-745-7681, bgwso.org/ index.htm Sept. 15 Music in the Barn, South Union Shaker Village, 2-5pm, $15 per person, $25 per couple, $5 children 6-12, 800-811-8379, shakermuseum.com 17 Orchestra Kentucky Opening Night at SKyPAC, featuring Kentucky Capriccio by Neil Sedaka, VIP Series, SKyPAC, 7:30pm, 270-846-2426, orchestrakentucky.com Sept. 22 Capitol Steps, SKyPAC, 7:30 pm, 270-9041880, theskypac.com Sept. 27 The Intergalactic Nemesis: Book One Target Earth, SKyPAC, 7:30 pm, 270-904-1880, theskypac.com Sept. 27 88.1 FM presents Secret Keeper Girl Live: The Pajama Party, Living Hope Baptist Church, 6:30 pm, 888-339-2936, wayd.wayfm.com/on-theway/147-secret-keeper-girl.html Sept. 28 Russian Romance, The Symphony at WKU, Van Meter Hall, 7:30 pm, 270-745-7681, bgwso.org/ index.htm Sept. 28 Gordon Lightfoot, SKyPAC, folk-rock music, 7:30pm, 270-904-1880 Sept. 28-29 Starry Nights Music Festival, Ballance Farms, Oakland, www.starrynightsfestival.com Oct. 12 Bowling Green Gallery Hop, 5-8pm, various studios & galleries around town, thebowlinggreengalleryhop.com Oct. 13 Arts in the Park, Covington Woods Park, 9am-3pm, sites.google.com/site/bgartsinthepark Oct. 13 Pam Tillis & Lorrie Morgan: Grits & Glamour Tour, SKyPAC, 7:30 pm, 270-904-1880, theskypac.com Oct. 15, Ballet Fantasy Workshop “Cinderella”, Dance Arts, 2pm, Corvette Museum, 270- 842-6811 Oct. 15 Death on the Downbeat: An Orchestra Kentucky Whodunit, VIP Series, SKyPAC, 7:30pm, 270-846-2426, orchestrakentucky.com Oct. 18- Nov. 14 Blood Money, PTK Mainstage Theater, Phoenix Theater, Thurs 7pm, Fri/Sat 8 pm, Sun 3 pm, 270-781-6233, ptkbg.org/ Oct. 20 Get the Led Out “The American Led Zeppelin”, SKyPAC, 7:30 pm, 270-904-1880,

theskypac.com Oct. 25 Fiddler On the Roof, Broadway Series, SKyPAC, 7:30 pm, 270-904-1880, theskypac.com Oct. 26-27 KMEA State High School Band Competition, Houchens-Smith Stadium Oct. 27, Jim Gill’s Family Room Tour, Capitol Arts Center, free concert, 10:30am. Tickets at WCPL. FESTIVALS & MAJOR EVENTS Sept. 6-8 US Bank Balloons, Tunes & BBQ, BGWC Regional Airport, live music, food vendors, carnival and inflatables, tethered hot air balloon rides, 270745-7532, balloonstunesbbq.com Sept. 13-16 Parade of Homes, various home tours, $10 tickets, 270-781-3375, bascky.com Sept. 14 Harvest Dinner and Fall Festival, Riverview at Hobson Grove, 270-843-5565, bgky.org/riverview Sept. 14 Festival of Sand, fundraiser for Kids on the Block, grass lot behind Chamber of Commerce, 10am-4:30pm followed by awards ceremony, 270842-2259, kykob.org Sept. 24 Great Teddy Bear Run, benefit ride for Barren River Area Child Advocacy Center, home of Buster & Jan Stewart, 270-783-4357 Sept. 29 Bowling Green International Festival, Circus Square Park, demonstrations, music, dance, food, and more, 9am- 7pm, 270-904-6339, bginternationalfest.com Oct. 6 50s & 60s On The Square, Scottsville Square, 4pm-?, live music, antique car cruise-in, cake walk, food & craft booths, costume contest, inflatables Oct. 6 Twilight Thunder Cruise, fundraiser for Kids on the Block, Harley-Davidson to downtown Circus Square Park, 5:30pm, 270-842-2259, kykob.org Educational Sept. 1, 15, 29 Boyz Kool, Graham Library, 2pm, boys of all ages welcome. Activities include building, sculpting, Legos, team building and more. Sept. 6, Oct. 4 International Cesarean Awareness Network Support Group, 6pm, ALIVE Center, 270904-1366, icanofbowlinggreen.webs.com Sept. 10, 17, 24, Oct. 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, Martha Speaks Read Aloud Book Club, Main Library, 4pm, K-2nd grade. Registration required Stephanie 270781-4882 x212 or stephaniew@warrenpl.org Sept. 12, 19, 26, Oct. 10, 17, 24 Learn Chinese with Me, Main Library, 10:30am, preschool. Registration required Stephanie 270-781-4882 x212 or stephanie@ warrenpl.org

Sept. 13 Kreative Kids Collage Workshop, Main Library, 4pm, grades 3-6 Sept. 20 From Place to Place (experiences of youth in foster care, call to action to improve the system), First Christian Church, 6-8pm, RSVP by Sept. 19, free childcare (first 15 kids), Denise Lambrianou, 270781-6714 x3 Sept. 22, Illustrating Workshop with Mark Wayne Adams, all ages, pre-registration required: 10am @ Graham Library, Tish 270-781-1441 or tishr@ warrenpl.org. 1pm at Smiths Grove Library, Jessica 270-563-6651 or jessicam@warrenpl.org Oct. 16 Victorian Skills For Young Ladies and Gentlemen Workshop: Knit a Scarf, Riverview at Hobson Grove, 3:30pm, reservations required, 270843-5565 Oct. 18 Letters to a Bullied Girl (Performance), Main Library, 6pm, all ages Oct. 18 Bullying: Help for You and Your Child, First Christian Church, 6-8pm, RSVP by Oct. 17, free childcare (first 15 kids), Denise Lambrianou, 270781-6714 x3 Oct. 27 All Aboard Series: Railroad Folklore/ Ghost Stories, Stephanie Baker speaker, Historic Railpark and Train Museum, 8:30am, 270-745-7317, historicrailpark.com Oct. 27 Girls Day Out, Sloan Convention Center, 10am-4pm Family Fun Sept. 1-3 Apple Festival, Jackson’s Orchard, 8am6pm, 270-781-5303, jacksonsorchard.com/ Sept. 1-Oct. 31 Chaney’s Corn Maze, open during regular business hours, $7 includes a scoop of ice cream, 270-843-5567 Sept. 7-8 Ice Cream & A Moovie, Chaney’s Dairy Barn, Happy Feet 2, movies start at dusk, free, no outside drink or beverage, 270-843-5567, chaneysdairybarn.com Sept. 7-9 48th Annual Antique Show & Sale, Knights of Columbus Hall, sponsored by Alpha Theta Chapter of Epsilon Sigma Alpha, 5:30-8:30pm Fri, 9am-5:30pm Sat, 12-4pm Sun, 3-day admission $5, 270-842-5991, bgantiqueshow.com Sept. 8 5th Annual Delafield Homecoming Festival, Sugar Maple Square, 10am-7pm, celebrate the community of Delafield, car show, food, live music, dancers, yard sale, crafts, Free event, 270-784-4325 Sept. 8 Second Saturdays Street Fair, Fountain Square Park, 10am- 5pm, kids’ activities, vendors, art, music, 270-782-0222, downtownbg.org bowling green

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Note: While every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of this information, all information is subject to change. Please call ahead to verify dates, times and schedules!

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Sept. 8 SOKY Kids Expo, Jackson’s Orchard, 10am4pm, vendors, exhibits, area information, activities, free, 270-842-0420, sokykidsexpo.com Sept. 9 Grandparent’s Day, National Corvette Museum, grandparents get in free when accompanied by their grandchildren, 270-781-7973, corvettemuseum.org Sept. 11 Tween Minute to Win It Party, Kirby Library, 6pm, (6th-8th grade), trivia night Sept. 13 It’s Roald Dahl’s Birthday! Kirby Branch, 5pm, all ages, movie & crafts Sept. 14-16 Friends of the Library Used Book Sale, Historic Railpark and Train Museum, $1 admission with book purchase, 270-745-7317 Sept. 15 Cumberland Presbyterian Church’s Kuntry Store, 7 am-1 pm, craft items, baked goods, rummage sale items, breakfast and lunch served, silent auction and door prizes, 270-781-3295, bgcp.com Sept. 15 10th Annual Fall Festival, Potter Children’s Home & Family Ministries, 9:30am, children’s activities, food, auction, yard sale, 270-843-3038, potterministries.org Sept. 15 Junior Naturalist Program, Lost River Cave, 2-4pm, ages 6-12, $50 for all 6 programs, $10 individual session, 270-393-0077, lostrivercave.com/ kidsactivities.html Sept. 18 Apple Celebration Party, Main Library, 6pm, ages 5 and up, stories, apple taste test, apple prints. Reg. reqd’, Stephanie 270-781-4882 x212 Sept. 21 Jody Richards Elementary Fall Festival, 5:30-8:30pm, inflatables, face painting, games, food, cake walk, silent auction and more. Sept. 22 Smithsonian Museum Day, National Corvette Museum, free admission when you register on Smithsonian website, 270-781-7973 Sept. 22 Dollar Day, Dinosaur World, Kentucky Action Park, Mammoth Cave Wildlife Museum & Cave Country Go Carts, residents of Allen, Barren, Edmonson, Hart, Metcalfe, Monroe & Warren counties receive $1 admission, 8:30am-6pm, 270773-4345, dinosaurworld.com Sept. 28-30, Oct. 5-7, 12-14, 19-21, 26-28, 31 Skeleton’s Lair Scream Park, Cemetery Road to 48 Locketts Dream, opens at dusk, 270-622-8171, skeletonslair.com Sept. 30- Nov. 3 Scarecrow Trail, Lost River Cave, walk the trails to view displayed scarecrows, 270-3930077, lostrivercave.com Sept. 28-29, Oct. 6-7, 13-14, 20-21, 27-28 Pumpkin Festival, Jackson’s Orchard, 8am- 6pm Sat., 1pm6pm Sun., 270-781-5303, jacksonsorchard.com Oct. 13 Great American Campout, Lost River Cave, 3pm- 10am Sunday, $15 per family, outdoor activities, dinner included 270-393-0077, lostrivercave.com

Oct. 27 Museum Monster Mash, Corvette Museum, 1-3pm, 270-781-7973, corvettemuseum.org Nov. 1 – Jan. 15 Country Music Stars and Cars Exhibit, National Corvette Museum, 8 am- 5 pm, Corvettes & Camaros owned by Country music stars and memorabilia to go with them!, 270-781-7973 SportS & FITNESS Sept. 10, 17, 24, Oct. 1, 8, 15 Preschool Yoga, Kirby Library, 11:30am, registration required, Tamara 270782-0252, tamarad@warrenpl.org Sept. 20 Kids Yoga, Main Library, 4pm, grades K-2 Sept. 22 Spooktacular Strides for Cystic Fibrosis, Allen County Primary Center, 1-5pm, Great Strides walk, live auction, live entertainment, cake walk, antique car show, corn hole tournament, food, and lots of kids activities.

7:50am 1.5 Mile Fun Walk; 8:25am 10k Wheelchair Race; 8:30am 10k Race; 10:15am Children’s Classic Race, www.themedicalcenter10kclassic.com

Sept. 29-30 Warbird Alley, SKYMAC Stahl Field, skymacrc.com

Oct. 19-21 Bluegrass World Cup, SKYMAC Stahl Field, 8am-6pm, skymacrc.com

Oct. 13 The Medical Center 10k Classic, WKU Houchens LT Smith Stadium, 7:30am 5k Run/Walk;

Oct. 27-28 Kick or Treat, Lovers Lane Soccer Complex, sokysoccer.org

Educational Offerings

Preparing and Caring for Baby, Classes offered by The Medical Center. Info and registration at 270-7962495 or themedicalcenter.org A New Baby’s Coming Class (Oct. 4) 6-8pm (A siblings class for kids age 3 and up. Bring doll or stuffed animal. Includes tour of OB unit, view of nursery, refreshments Free Activities at Warren Co. Public Library and a video) Breast is Best (Sept. 27) 6-8pm Smiths Grove Branch C-Section Class (Sept. 18) 6-8pm Too Cool Activity Hour (grades K-5) Tue. 3pm Fatherhood 101 (Sept. 18) 7pm, Classroom 2 Preschool Storytime (age 3-5) Wed. 10:30am Teen Library Club (grades 6-12), 9/13 & 20, 6pm, 9/27, Grandparents Class (Oct. 16) 6-8pm 4pm Newborn Care & Safety Class Sept. 4, 27, Oct. 11 or 25, Tucker, 6-8pm; Sept. 28 or Oct. 26, Fairview, 2-4pm Graham Drive Nutrition During Pregnancy (Oct. 30) 6-7pm, Tucker Afterschool Activities (all ages) Mac Lab Tues. 3-5pm Prepared Childbirth Classes Graham Troopers (School-Age) Wed. 3:30pm Teen Tuesdays (grades 6-12) Tues. 5pm Option 1: Six Week Series (Meets every Tues. Aug. 28Oct. 16) 6pm Main Library Option 2: One-Night Refresher (Sept. 11) 6pm Toddler Time (18-36mos.) Mon. 10:30am, Tue. 9:30am Option 3: One-Day (Sept. 15, Oct. 20) 9am-1pm Preschool Storytime (age 3-5) Thur. & Fri. 10:30am Ready, Set, Go! (Sept. 6, Oct. 18) 6-8pm Preschool Spanish (age 3-5) Tue. 10:30am Spanish Explorers (grades K-6) Tue. 4pm NICU Reunion Party, Sept. 9, 1-3pm, food, games Peek-a-Boo Babies (6-18mos.) Fri. 9:30am Basic Yoga Class, Mondays, Oct. 15-Nov. 19, 5:30High Five Kids Club (grades K-5) Thur. 4pm 6:30pm, $60, Tucker Way, 270-745-0942 Lego Club (age 5+) First two Tue. each month, 6pm Grocery Store Tour, Oct. 10, 8-9:30am, Kroger (ScottsTerrific Tuesdays Bookclub, Sept. 25, 6:30pm (age 7+), ville Road), $10, make healthier food choices book discussion of Among the Hidden by Haddix Kirby Branch Toddler Time (18-36mos.) Mon. 10am Kirby Kids (grades K-6) Mon. 3:30pm Kirby Babies (6-18mos.) Wed. 10am Preschool Storytime (age 3-5) Wed. & Fri. 11am Preschool Spanish (age 3-5) Fri. 10am Lego Club (ages 5+) Sept. 13 & 27, 6pm

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EXPECTANT PARENT FAIR, Sun., Oct. 28, 1-3 pm The Medical Center Auditorium. If you are expecting or considering having a baby, learn helpful info on healthy pregnancies, baby care and safety. Staff from The Medical Center OB unit will be on hand to answer questions and provide tours. Local organizations & businesses that cater to expectant parents and babies will also provide information about their services. 270-745-1543. page

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2012 U.S. Bank

WKU Football Home Opener

Balloons, Tunes and BBQ Benefiting United Way of Southern Kentucky It is time for U.S. Bank’s Balloons, Tunes and BBQ! U.S. Bank has teamed up with Presenting Sponsor Houchens Industries, and Supporting Sponsors – J.B. Distributors, Fruit of the Loom, Miller’s Bottled Gas, Atmos Energy, Hampton Inn, RC Cola, WBKO, 100.7 SAM FM, WGGC 95.1 and WBVR 96.7 to make this event possible. Gates open at 5 p.m. on Thursday with Kid’s Night sponsored by WBVR 96.7 and 3 p.m. on Friday with Family Night sponsored by Fruit of the Loom. Sam 100.7 will provide live musical entertainment on stage. WGGC 95.1 will sponsor the 5:30 pm concert Saturday featuring live bands, coheaded by Chuck Wicks and The Farm. Other bands performing include Chris Cavanaugh and Floord.

Hot air balloons will be on display Friday evening for the Balloon Glow - with competitive events kicking off Saturday morning. Tether rides will available through out the weekend – wind and weather permitting. This year’s proceeds will benefit United Way of Southern Kentucky. United Way fulfills a vital role in our region and the proceeds of this event will serve to improve the lives of thousands. Organizers couldn’t be more appreciative to all sponsors for their support. Fees will only apply for carnival rides, the inflatable fair, food, souvenirs, balloon rides and tethered balloon rides. For more information or to volunteer, visit balloonstunesbbq.com or facebook.com/BalloonsTunesBBQ or call the Hotline at 270.745.7532. <

LIVE UNITED WHITE OUT Game

It’s FOOTBALL SEASON! And with Coach Willie Taggart at the reins, it couldn’t be a more exciting time to come out and cheer on the WKU Football team! See this stellar team in action and join WKU Athletics, United Way of Southern Kentucky, Fruit of the Loom and U.S. Bank for LIVE UNITED Night on September 1st at the home opening WKU vs. Austin Peay football game! The game will kick off at 6 p.m. at Houchens Industries-L.T. Smith Stadium. The first 4,000 fans through the gates will get a free white LIVE UNITED t-shirt to “white-out” the stadium! Announcements will be made throughout the game and at halftime about how you can LIVE UNITED in Southern Kentucky through United Way. Support our community and cheer on the Hilltoppers at the same time by purchasing group tickets for this community event! Tickets for the LIVE UNITED game, as well as season tickets for the six home games can be purchased through the WKU Ticket Office by calling 1-800-5-BIG RED or visiting www.wkusports.com . More information on how you can make the choice to LIVE UNITED through giving, advocating and volunteering can be found on the United Way website at www.liveunitedtoday.com. <

About the author: Mandy Hicks Baker has been the Director of Volunteering & Brand Mgmt. for United Way of So. KY since March 2008. Mandy is a proud WKU alumni and has a true passion for the community. When she is not watching UK dominate in basketball, she can be found with good friends or playing fetch with her Humane Society mutt, Jacey.

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GOAL! These Kids are the TOPS The usual signs and sounds of soccer can be found at Lovers Lane Soccer Complex – eager players on the field, supportive families and friends in the stands, sweaty faces, high-fives, and loud cheers of congratulations. But at this game, everyone goes home a winner and feeling good about their time on the field. This is TOPSoccer, a program that provides soccer opportunities for young athletes with physical and/or mental disabilities. TOPSoccer was established in Bowling Green the fall of 2006, growing from four players to almost 30 (including the original four players.) The nationwide activity is part of the U.S. Youth Soccer program. Locally, TOPSoccer (TOP stands for The Outreach Program) is run through the SKY Soccer Club. Alex Embry and Clay Hall were two of the first TOPSoccer players and have become unofficial senior leaders on the field. Alex says, “My best soccer is TOPSoccer. I love it and can play soccer with my friends.” “I am always happy on soccer days,” says Clay. Ginna Greer joined two years ago, but quickly became the group’s most enthusiastic player – and according to her mother, the Greer family’s activities are planned around TOPSoccer. One of the TOPSoccer organizers says, “Most of the players like being on a team - others prefer to just hang out one on one with a buddy off to the side – and that is just fine. I call it organized chaos, but somehow it all works. We start each session with some group stretching and we have a participation/ awards ceremony the last game, so the team concept is always

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there. The parents love to watch their child on the soccer field. There is a lot of bonding that takes place.” That bonding comes from the help of on-field buddies. TOPSoccer players are paired with a volunteer buddy to work on skills and play the game. Buddies are local high school and college soccer players. Once the buddies participate, they want to stay involved. In fact, the buddies look forward to TOPSoccer days just as much if not more than the TOPSoccer players. The TOPSoccer athletes range in age from 4 to 19, with a wide scope in abilities. The sport begins again in late September. For more information and to be added to the contact list email the SKY Soccer office at office@skysoccer.org or call 270.846.1010. There is also a TOPSoccer Facebook page for the SouthCentral Kentucky area – just look for TOPSoccer Bowling Green KY on Facebook.<

About the author: Gail Hiles works for the Kentucky Association for Gifted Education within The Center for Gifted Studies at WKU. She loves sports, art, her dog Sally and most of all, her sons Scott and Ryan.

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Your KID Our COVER with Ann Blair Thornton Parents or legal guardians may upload one photo per child until September 28, 2012. Twins/triplets will be considered one entry. The only group photos

permissible are multiples. Photos must be taken within the past year, should be .jpeg or .bmp image formats and cannot exceed 3 MB. There is a $10 entry fee (non-

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refundable). Deadlines are subject to change. There are rules and contacts on the website. All pictures that are submitted will be put into a photo contest on the Bowling Green Parent Facebook page for public voting during October. At the end of the public voting period, the 10-15 children who receive the most votes will be judged by our local celebrities- Lauren Hansen, WBKO News Producer; Tony Lindsey, Tony Lindsey Salon and Institute and Regina Webb, Regina Webb Salon & Spa. Read about our judges on BGP’s website. BGP reserves the right to choose both a boy and girl winner. The child (or children) selected by the judges will be photographed by local studio photographer Rina Marie for the January 2012 Bowling Green Parent Magazine cover with Ann Blair Thornton, Miss Kentucky 2011. There will be other prizes awarded including photography valued at $100 from Rina Marie, luxury items from Regina Webb and age appropriate gifts for the child. We just can’t wait to put your kid on our cover! It’s going to make us famous! Photo collage by Lindsey Boler, Red Elephant Studio

You have the best looking, happiest, most photogenic youngster in the region and we know it! Enter your kid in the BGP photo contest and prove it! Ann Blair Thornton, Miss Kentucky 2011, will grace the cover of Bowling Green Parent Magazine in January and we are looking for a child (or two) to join her! Parents, here is your opportunity to put your little beauty next to Bowling Green’s pride. Who doesn’t want their child to grow-up to be like Ann Blair? Enter your youngster in our contest to win that cover shot! It’s easy to do! Go to our websitewww.bgparent.com. When you arrive at our website, there is an upload form asking for basic information about you and your child. That information is secure and will not be shared. The contest is open to male or female children newborn to age 12 living in our distribution area- the BRADD region (Warren, Allen, Barren, Butler, Edmonson, Hart, Logan or Simpson County, Kentucky).

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September/October 2012 Bowling Green Parent