Page 1

     

SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT  PLANNING   PROJECT     East African Coast and  the Rovuma Basin  Phase 2: Data Collection and  Preliminary Diagnosis  Dobbin International Inc dobbin.org

Prepared for:

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

AKDN

AGA

KHAN

DEVELOPMENT

NETWORK

1


2

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


Prepared for: 

SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT  PLANNING   PROJECT     East African Coast and  the Rovuma Basin  Phase 2: Data Collection and  Preliminary Diagnosis  Dobbin International Inc dobbin.org

Prepared for 

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

AKDN

AGA

KHAN

DEVELOPMENT

NETWORK

3


4

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


The Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN) is a group of development agencies with  mandates ranging from health and education to architecture, culture, microfinance, rural  development, disaster reduction, the promotion of private‐sector enterprise, and the  revitalisation of historic cities. AKDN agencies conduct their programs without regard to  faith, origin, or gender. 

Dobbin International—the first firm in the world to specialise in Integrated Coastal  Management (ICM) planning—is a global leader in land, coast, and ocean planning. Dobbin  International provides interdisciplinary expertise to create innovative development solutions  and integrated investment strategies. The firm has completed groundbreaking projects at  multinational, national, regional, and local levels in over 100 countries.   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

5


6

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


CONTENTS       FIGURES .......................................................................................................................................... 8  MAPS .............................................................................................................................................. 9  PHASE 2 REPORT ........................................................................................................................... 11  1.0 INTRODUCTION ....................................................................................................................... 13  1.1 PROJECT OBJECTIVES .................................................................................................................... 13  1.2 GEOGRAPHIC SCOPE ..................................................................................................................... 14  1.3 PHASING AND OUTPUTS ................................................................................................................ 16  2.0 PHASE 2 OBJECTIVES, STRATEGY, OUTPUTS ............................................................................. 17  2.1 PHASE 2 OBJECTIVES .................................................................................................................... 17  2.2 DATA ACQUISITION STRATEGY ........................................................................................................ 19  2.3 PHASE 2 OUTPUTS ....................................................................................................................... 29  3.0 DATA ACQUISITION AND PRELIMINARY DIAGNOSIS SUMMARY .............................................. 31  3.1 TANZANIA PROTECTED AREAS ........................................................................................................ 32  3.2 TANZANIA DISTRICT REGION .......................................................................................................... 44  3.3 TANZANIA TOWNS ....................................................................................................................... 56  3.4 MOZAMBIQUE PROTECTED AREAS ................................................................................................... 62  3.5 MOZAMBIQUE DISTRICT REGION .................................................................................................... 68  3.6 MOZAMBIQUE TOWNS ................................................................................................................. 82  4.0 CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS ............................................................................... 93  4.1 DATA COLLECTION STATUS ............................................................................................................ 93  4.2 PRELIMINARY DIAGNOSIS AND SPATIAL ANALYSIS ............................................................................... 95  4.3 NEXT STEPS ................................................................................................................................ 97  SOURCES ....................................................................................................................................... 99 

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

7


FIGURES

FIGURE 1: PROJECT REGION AREA CALCULATION .............................................................................................................. 14  FIGURE 2: PROJECT PHASING AND OUTPUTS .................................................................................................................... 16  FIGURE 3: DATA ACQUISITION AND PROCESSING .............................................................................................................. 20     

 

8

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


MAPS

NO TABLE OF FIGURES ENTRIES FOUND. 

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

9


10  

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


PHASE 2 REPORT

SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT  PLANNING   PROJECT     East African Coast and  the Rovuma Basin 

   

Phase 2: Data Collection and  Preliminary Diagnosis  Dobbin International Inc  dobbin.org 

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

11


12  

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


1.0 INTRODUCTION

1.1 Project Objectives  The Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin (SDPP) seeks to  create a coordinated and integrated multisector development framework that supports AKDN’s short‐,  medium‐, and long‐term investment strategies in areas of southern Tanzania and northern  Mozambique. The project will identify both potential investments for specific agencies—for example,  the Aga Khan Fund for Economic Development (AKFED), the Aga Khan Foundation (AKF), and the Aga  Khan Trust for Culture (AKTC)—as well as mutually reinforcing investments across the three AKDN  sectors. The development framework will span different time horizons, geographic locations, and scales  of intervention.  The specific objectives of the project are to:       

Develop comprehensive socioeconomic and biophysical, spatial databases of the districts and  the region as a foundation for the spatial development planning process  Prepare a series of socioeconomic and biophysical spatial analyses to identify key issues,  development opportunities, and constraints in each district and the region as a whole  Prepare a series of multisector thematic scenarios for each district and the region to illustrate  the spatial implications and potential for AKDN development in both geospatial and quantitative  terms  Combine these scenarios through spatial analyses to identify potential AKDN growth poles and  growth corridors in each district and the region  Prepare a comprehensive spatial development vision, draft strategy, and action plan for each  district and region for AKDN consideration 

This Phase 2 Data Collection and Preliminary Diagnosis Report provides an overview of the data  collection status, outlines preliminary diagnoses of key issues and opportunities, and discusses steps  involved to launch Phase 3.  

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

13


1.2 Geographic Scope   The project region includes approximately 750 linear km of land, coastal, and marine environments from  Kilwa, Tanzania, to Ilha da Moçambique, Mozambique. The area is approximately 125,000 km2—or three  times the size of Switzerland. See Figure 1.  SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT PLANNING PROJECT: EAST AFRICAN COAST AND THE ROVUMA BASIN  PROJECT REGION AND AREA CALCULATIONS   Area Type 

2

Tanzania

Area (km ) 

Mozambique

2

Area (km ) 

Protected Areas 

Ruaha National Park* 

22,200

Quirimbas National Park* 

 

Selous Game Reserve* 

54,600

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Region

Tanzania District Region 

 

 

Districts**  

Lindi

6,518

Palma

3,530

 

Mtwara

4,093

Mocimboa da Praia 

3,524

 

Tandahimba

1,822

Macomia

4,251

 

Newala

2,254

Meluco

5,799

 

Masasi

4,639

Quissanga

2,146

 

 

 

Ibo

 

 

 

Pemba – Metuge 

1,612

Towns  

Kilwa Town and Area 

1,047

Pemba Town***  

102

 

 

 

Ilha de Moçambique  

183

Subtotal  

 

96,126

 

 

19,326   

 

TOTAL       * Due to changing boundaries, park areas need to be confirmed ** District area calculations are included in the regional area calculations  *** Pemba Town area is included in Pemba‐Metuge area 

Mozambique District Region    

7,506

20,937   

75

 

28,728

 

 

 

124,824 km   

2

Figure 1: Project Region Area Calculation 

As shown in Map 1, the large and complex project region presents the opportunity to identify mutually  reinforcing national‐, regional‐, district‐, protected area‐, and town‐level investments, including cross‐ border investments, related to the three sectors of AKDN. The project region also includes opportunities  to address critical environmental issues that undermine economic and social opportunities and affect  quality of life.  

14   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


INSERT PROJECT REGION MAP  Map 1: Project Region 

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

15


1.3 Phasing and Outputs   Anticipated for completion by July 2010, the SDPP is organised into five phases with corresponding sets  of outputs over a 12‐month period. See Figure 2.  SPATIAL DEVELOPMENT PLANNING PROJECT: EAST AFRICAN COAST AND THE ROVUMA BASIN  PROJECT PHASING AND OUTPUTS  Phase 

Outputs*

Schedule

Phase 1  

• Comprehensive base map and context plan  • Formatted satellite images integrated with the base map  • Regional transportation analysis   • Inception Report  

1 July 2009–31 August 2009 

Phase 2 

• Spatial and numerical databases in GIS, Arc Explorer, and JPG formats for Project  Region and Districts  • An initial spatial analysis of the Ruaha National Park, Selous Game Reserve, and  Quirimbas National Park  • Initial spatial analyses of Ilha de Moçambique, Pemba, and Kilwa Area  • PowerPoint presentation summarising Phase 2 results 

1 Sept 2009–30 Nov 2009 

Phase 3 

• Socioeconomic and biophysical spatial analyses of districts and regions  • Separate analyses for the Ilha de Moçambique, Pemba, and Kilwa  • Separate analysis for Ruaha National Park, Selous Game Reserve, and Quirimbas  National Park  • Nine thematic scenarios for each district   • Nine thematic scenarios for the region   • Assessment of the implications of the scenarios 

1 Dec 2009–15 March 2010 

Phase 4 

Phase 5 

• Maps using GIS spatial integration techniques to identify nine thematic  scenarios and growth poles and growth corridors as a foundation for multi sector  and intersectoral growth strategies  • A spatial development project strategy for each of the 12 districts, the city of  Pemba, the Kilwa area, Ilha de Moçambique, plus Ruaha National Park, Selous  Game Reserve, and  Quirimbas National Park  • A spatial development strategy for the Tanzanian and Mozambican regions  (integrating districts, Kilwa, and Pemba areas)  • Final reports for each district and the region  • Overall project document with appropriate summary of issues, solutions, and  potential  • PowerPoint presentation for AKDN agencies and the AKDN Committee 

16 March 2010–15 June 2010 

16 June 2010–30 June 2010 

* See Project Terms of Reference for detailed outputs for each phase 

Figure 2: Project Phasing and Outputs 

16   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


2.0 PHASE 2 OBJECTIVES, STRATEGY, OUTPUTS

2.1 Phase 2 Objectives  The primary purpose of Phase 2 has been to compile and organize relevant data for the project regions  as a basis for further analysis for project implementation in Phase 3. To accomplish these goals, Phase 2  includes the following objectives:       Acquire the following socioeconomic and biophysical data:  ‐ Relevant GIS data and hard copy cartography from various agencies, institutions, NGOs, IFIs,  and private sector  ‐ Management plans, strategic plans, government and nongovernment reports  ‐ Statistical data from government and nongovernment agencies  ‐ Media and publications    Create the following socioeconomic and biophysical data:  ‐ Site surveys including interviews, meetings, and field observations  ‐ Point data compiled using GPS and photographic documentation  ‐ Interpretation of satellite and aircraft imagery   Undertake field surveys of all project sites, and compile relevant socioeconomic and biophysical  data using data acquisition and data creation techniques mentioned above, identifying data  gaps and developing further data acquisition strategies    Create data catalogue guiding the development of the GIS spatial database    Identify basic data gaps and assess further data needs   Assemble a reference library of relevant reports, management plans, sector strategies relevant  to the project area   Develop a preliminary diagnosis and strategy for Phase 3 spatial analyses given the acquired and  created data in the context of the overall objectives for each project region     

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

17


Based on the Phase 2 objectives mentioned above, the team mobilised and carried out detailed field  surveys for all eighteen (18) project areas and regions (12 districts, 3 parks, 3 towns). The data collected  during Phase 2 were compiled and organized into a comprehensive database comprising both spatial  (GIS) and nonspatial data (reports, field notes, publications, videos, and photographs). As a result, the  team has reviewed data quality and sources to identify gaps and prepare preliminary diagnosis of the  opportunities and constraints for each project area and region.     For purposes of this report, we have processed a series of thematic project maps to illustrate key data  layers collected at the following scales: (1) international—including both Tanzania and Mozambique; (2)  national—just Tanzania and just Mozambique; (3) protected area—Ruaha, Selous, and Quirimbas; (4)  district region—Tanzania and Mozambique; (5) district—five districts in Tanzania and seven districts in  Mozambique; and (6) town—Kilwa, Pemba, Ilha da Moçambique. These maps illustrate basic data for  each project region, some of the initial spatial relationships, and the general direction and implications  for implementing the next phases of the project. These maps can be found throughout the report. 

18   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


2.2 Data Acquisition Strategy   2.2.1 DATA ACQUISITION  In Phase 2, the SDPP team used advanced geospatial compilation and fieldwork techniques to create a  comprehensive socioeconomic and biophysical database that includes:          

GIS Data  Hard Copy Cartography  Management and Strategic Plans  Reports (Government and Nongovernment)  Statistical Data  Photography  Site Surveys  Meetings and Interviews  Media and Publications 

The data were strategically identified and compiled for each of the project areas, as required, to assess  development issues, analyze opportunities and constraints, and develop scenarios and options during  Phase 3 work. The overriding purpose of Phase 2 was to develop the spatial and nonspatial qualitative  and quantitative knowledge base to support the next phases of the project.   In Phase 3, a series of spatial analyses and multi‐AKDN agency scenarios for alternative futures will be  prepared based on this geospatial and nonspatial database. In Phase 4, through further discussions with  AKDN, the SDPP team will integrate these scenarios and identify synergies and potential AKDN  multiagency development clusters—AKDN growth poles and corridors. These growth poles may include  multiple sectors such as tourism, culture, conservation, restoration, agriculture, fisheries, forestry,  mining, energy, aviation, community development, health and education, and other relevant sectors.  The results will be evaluated and combined to create a proposed AKDN development framework to  enhance economic, social, cultural, and environmental value in the project regions and areas.  Definition of the Integrated Growth Poles Concept …“growth poles” are sub-regions (within a larger region) that inherently have the highest growth potential based on socioeconomic and natural resource assets; for example, national and provincial highways, good soils and hydrology, minerals, proximity to protected areas (as draws for ecotourists)…. By identifying growth poles, there is a “platform” or spatial framework for the delivery of integrated services (investments) across existing World Bank sector projects in the region to ensure better synergies and maximizing the development impact. The World Bank is one of the few donors with sufficient capacity and resources to take an integrated and multisectoral approach to stimulating economic growth in the region taking this growth poles approach. … The growth poles concept emphasizes an integrated regional approach (across multiple sectors) focusing on the delivery of the basics in high potential growth areas. It leverages private sector and public sector investments in specific sub-regions through partnerships. It applies the techniques of regional development planning, spatial analysis, and Spatial Development Strategies (SDS) to help focus investments and achieve intersectoral integration, synergies, and potential realignment of projects (as needed) to maximize the development impact. —————————————— Dobbin International Inc. (2006). Mozambique: Integrated Regional Development Planning—Applying the Growth Poles Concept in the Zambezi River Valley. World Bank Contract.

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

19


2.2.2 TECHNOLOGY INFRASTRUCTURE  The SDPP team is using the most advanced technology infrastructure available for both spatial and  nonspatial data organization, management, and communication. The CLOUD system allows all project  data to be saved in a central web‐based server for all team members to access from remote locations.  The CLOUD is constantly syncing data among team members’ hard drives and any changes in data are  reflected immediately on each person’s computer. This dynamic, flexible, and secure technology  infrastructure allows for wide collaboration and synchronisation while team members are dispersed  across the globe and ensures project data are always current and secure.   2.2.3 DATA COMPILATION AND PROCESSING  The data creation, acquisition, and processing for Phases 2 is shown in Figure 3. The SDPP team acquired  both spatial and nonspatial data through data creation and data acquisition approaches as follows: (1)  data was created by the SDPP team from fieldwork through observations, photography, Global  Positioning Systems (GPS) technology and derived from remote sensing images (also requiring field  verification); and (2) data was acquired by the SDPP team from AKDN agencies, international  institutions, private sector, and NGOs. All GIS spatial data acquired was processed to reflect correct  projection system in the GIS for each of the project regions and areas. The non‐GIS or hard copy  cartography was compiled and where possible scanned as PDF files and included on the CLOUD. 

Figure 3: Data Acquisition and Processing   

20   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


2.2.4 DATA AND INFORMATION ACQUISITION STATUS  All the data compiled for each project area and site have been summarized with details of the  name/title of the data referenced, year, source, description, scale, type, and status.   As mentioned in the Phase 1 Inception Report, the Tanzanian data have generally been more difficult to  obtain than Mozambican data because of bureaucratic procedures and more data protection (“data  represents power”) attitudes. Many institutions have not realized that sharing data is a means to  obtaining better results within their own ministry and collaboration with partners.  For Tanzania, we have obtained all the basic layers. The project would benefit immensely if we were  able to obtain the National Land Use Planning Commission electronic atlas and GIS database and the  Selous Game Reserve GIS database. The Ruaha National Park GIS database that we received contains  minimal useful layers, and we will contact the Director of the National Parks Commission to try to obtain  more layers. It has been difficult to acquire data in Tanzania, and we are hopeful we can eventually  obtain such reinforcement to our existing databases. It has been difficult to acquire some of (or the  entire) Naliendele GIS database, which would be of great use and interest for AKF CRSP (T). We are also  working with various experts in Tanzania to try to identify and acquire, if available, any agricultural or  land suitability assessment information and GIS databases.  For the Serena Safari Lodge work in Ruaha National Park and Selous Game Reserve, we have proposed  that the Serena guides assist in compiling regional and spatial information (attractions, proposed  circuits, and concentrations of animals). The combination of their knowledge and expertise and our GIS  maps and data will be a powerful approach to analyzing alternative lodge sites in Ruaha and developing  additional safari routes in Selous. Based on our fieldwork, it seems possible to provide a 360‐degree  series of different safari circuits to maximize the options and experience of Serena guests. The objective  would be to extend the length of stay and improve the Serena guests’ understanding, appreciation, and  enjoyment of the parks.  For Mozambique, we have excellent data at all levels because the country has been working in  establishing excellent electronic databases for a longer period of time than Tanzania and has made data  more accessible to facilitate various national and regional development programs.  The following table provides greater detail regarding the data we have acquired and created for each  project area and will be using in the Phase 3 spatial analysis.     

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

21


TABLE 1: COMPLETE GIS DATA CATALOG, BASIC INVENTORY  TANZANIA AND MOZAMBIQUE INTERNATIONAL DATA Name  International Boundaries 

Year 1997 

Source CENACARTA. National Center  of Cartography and Tele‐ detection, Mozambique 

Description International Boundaries  

Scale 1:250K 

Status Acquired

Digital Elevation Model  (DEM)  Regional Satellite Imagery 

2007

Topographic data    Satellite Image

90m

Acquired

2004

150m   30m 

Acquired

Landsat Image  

Watershed Boundaries 

2009

CD Data package. ArcGIS 9.2  (ESRI)  CD Data package ArcGIS 9.2  (ESRI)  Global Land Cover Project  Earth Science Data Interface  Enhanced USGS  Dobbin International GIS  Consultant Team 

90m

Created

Geology   Soils   Lights at Night   (nighttime lights of the  world)  Headcount 

2000 2000  2003 

1:1M 1:1M  172m 

Acquired Acquired Acquired

1:250K

Acquired

Infant Mortality 

2007

1:500K

Acquired

IUCN Protected Areas 

2002

International Union  Conservation Nature, Maputo  Workshop 

1:500K

Acquired

Life Expectancy 

2007

1:250K

Acquired

Population Settlements 

2007

UNDP Annual Report of Human  Development  UNDP Annual Report of Human  Development 

1:250K

Acquired

Rivers  

2000

1:1M

Acquired

Water Bodies  Mines  

2000 2006 

1:500K 1:250K 

Acquired Acquired

2007

2007

USGS Land Survey for Africa USGS Land Survey for Africa NOAA Satellite and Information  Service, National Geophysical  Data Center   UNDP Annual Report of Human  Development   UNDP Annual Report of Human  Development 

USGS Land Survey for Africa   USGS Land Survey for Africa Tanzania Institute of Resource  Assessment  

Seamless mosaic of 15 titles  composed by DI GIS Consultant  Team 2009  Derived from ESRI DEM  2007  corrected with local hydrology  network  Geological Era – 21 Classes 12 soil types and FAO soil types Satellite inventory of human  settlements using nocturnal  radiation emissions  Total population at postal level  by name  Average infant mortality rates  and indicators at national and  district levels   Type of protected area, local  designation, government  agency responsible, owner type  and source  Average life expectancy at  provincial level  Number and location of the  villages of Mozambique and  Tanzania   Major rivers of Africa derive  from models  Lakes and bodies of water  Mining, oil and gas concessions  with representatives  

Created

 

22   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


TANZANIA NATIONAL DATA   Name  Administrative Boundary   Includes: Population  

Year 2006 

Source Tanzania Institute of Resource  Assessment and Tanzania    Bureau of Statistics  FAO Africover System, Ministry  of Lands – Tanzania 

Land Use and Land Cover  (LULC) 

2006

Landform

2000

USGS Land Survey for Africa

Hydrological Network  Road Network  (Infrastructure)  Rail 

2009 2006  2006 

Power Transmission Lines  

2006

Dobbin International GIS Team ARDHI – Ministry of Public  Works  ARDHI – Ministry of Public  Works  ARDHI – Ministry of Public  Works 

Settlements  (urban center  and villages data)  Soils  

2006 2001 

Coral Reef 

2003

WWF International. Created by  WWF Mozambique Office 

Coastal Forest 

2005

Trading Centers  Topographic Contour Lines 

2005 2006 

FAO Africover, Ministry of  Lands – Tanzania  Bureau of Statistic of Tanzania FAO Africover System, Ministry  of Lands – Tanzania 

IRA – Institute of Resource  Assessment  USGS Land Survey for Africa

Description 3 population classes: region,  district, ward     42 classes of data derived via  remote sensing from Landsat at  30m    13 classes of landform types and  4 classes of lithology   3 classes created from IRA data  3 classes of roads

Scale 1:250K 

Status Acquired

1:250k

Acquired

1:1M

Acquired

1:250k 1:250k 

Created Acquired

1 class (only geometry nor  stations)  3 classes: public transmission  lines, telephone lines, above‐ ground pipelines  Unmerged data with different  categories  Soil Classification ‐ 30 main  classes by scientific name and  85 soil types (USGS codes)   Study from 1997‐03.  Attributes: bleaching location  name, field surveys, and sources  of information, mortality, and  recovery   Forest name and name of  location  Fields include names ‐

1:250k

Acquired

1:250k

Acquired

1:250k

Acquired

1:500K

Acquired

1:250k

Acquired

1:250k

Acquired

1:250k ‐ 

Acquired ‐

n/a

Acquired

n/a

Acquired

Mikindani Quickbird aerial  photograph  

0.6m

Acquired

Various GIS layers

To be  reviewed 

TANZANIA DISTRICT REGION AND KILWA DATA  District Building  Infrastructure  Kilwa Kivinje Aerial  Photography 

Aug– Nov 2009  1962 

Mikindani Aerial  Photography 

2006

Regional GIS database 

2009

Dobbin International Field  Team   Ministry of Lands, Housing and  Human Settlements  Development, Surveys and  Mapping Division  Ministry of Lands, Housing and  Human Settlements  Development, Surveys and  Mapping Division  World Bank  

Field Survey via GPS. Points for  markets, clinics, hotels, hostels,  post offices, open space  Aerial photography of Kilwa  Kivinje town and coast 

 

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

23


MOZAMBIQUE NATIONAL DATA  Name  Administrative  Boundary 

Year 1997 

Land Use and Land  Cover 

2007

Land Use and Land  Cover 

1997

National Elevation  Check and Reference  Points (altitude) 

Source National Cartography and Tele‐ detection Center, Mozambique  (CENACARTA)  Department of Forestry Inventory  of Mozambique 

Description 3 levels: provincial, district and  postal level 

Scale 1:250K 

Status Acquired

1:1M

Acquired

National Cartography and Tele‐ detection Center, Mozambique  (CENACARTA) 

19 classes of forestry, LU and  area per LU code, data derived  via remote sensing from  unknown Landsat data  26 classes, data derived via  remote sensing from unknown  Landsat data 

1:250K

Acquired

1997

National Cartography and Tele‐ detection Center, Mozambique  (CENACARTA) 

Location and elevation for check  and calibration with sea level  reference 

1:250K

Acquired

Road and Rail Network  

2007

3 road classes and 1 rail class

1:250K

Acquired

Stream Network 

1997

National Road Administration  Agency (ANE)  DINAPOT/MICOA

1:250K

Acquired

Major Rivers and Water  Bodies 

Acquired

Basins

1991

12 levels of streams and 0 as  water boundary  Name and type of the river – 3  classes    Name of each basin

1:1M

Acquired

Superficial Ground  Water  

1991

Rural Water Administration of  Mozambique (ARA Sul) 

1:1M

Acquired

Major Human  settlements 

1997

National Cartography and Tele‐ detection Center, Mozambique  (CENACARTA) 

25 classes of levels or adequacy  and availability for human  consumption and depth of  availability (0, 20, 100 meters),  well suitability  Name and location at provincial,  district, postal level, does not  include population counts  

1:250K

Acquired

Total population at village level,  does not include urban centers  Name of the reserve or park; 3  classes: national park, reserve,  and uncategorized  Names and 5 classes of heath  facilities (heath center, hospital,  post center and rural hospital)  11 classes but no codes  description. Get information  from MICOA  Soil Classification – FAO 37  classes, USDA 40 classes. Other  attributes: main use limitations,  vegetation type, acidity, salinity,  organic matter, depth, drainage,  topography, geomorphology  5 levels of suitability, crops:  banana, cotton, peanut, fluvial  rice, sugar cane, citrus, beans,  sunflower, cassava, corn,  sorghum, soy, wheat  Level of Poverty at District Level

1:250K

Acquired

1:250K

Acquired partially

1:250K

Acquired

1:1M

Acquired

1:1M

Acquired

1:1M

Acquired

1:250K

Acquired

1:1M

1:1M

Acquired

National Cartography and Tele‐ detection Center, Mozambique  (CENACARTA)  Rural Water Administration of  Mozambique (ARA Sul) 

Rural Village Population   1997 

National Institute of Statistics (INE)

Protected Areas 

2003

Department of Forestry Inventory

Health Facilities  Network 

2005

Ministry of Health

Agro‐Ecological Zones 

1991

Ministry of Environment (MICOA)

Soils

1991

National Research Institute of  Agronomy of Mozambique (INIA) 

Crops Suitability for 12  crop types 

1991

National Research Institute of  Agronomy (INIA) 

Poverty Levels 

2008

Agro Ecological Zones  

1991

Ministry of Planning and  Development (MPD)  Ministry of Environment (MICOA)

Agriculture Suitability 

1991

24   

National Research Institute of  Agronomy (INIA) 

Codes of agro ecological zones;  contact MICOA to get codes  Suitability for 11 crops

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


MOZAMBIQUE NATIONAL DATA (CONTINUED)  Erosion Zones 

1993

Ministry of Environment (MICOA)

Coral Reefs 

2006

WWF Mozambique

Coral Reefs  Mangroves 

2008 2007 

WWF Mozambique Department of Forestry Inventory

Areas of Endemism 

2003

Forestry Reserves  Fishing Centers  Fire Occurrence and  Distribution 2007 

2001 2007  2007 

University Eduardo Mondlane  (UEM), Department of Biology  Department of Forestry Inventory Ministry of Fishing and Agriculture MODIS USA Satellite Program,  South Africa 

Fire Occurrence and  Distribution 2008 

2008

MODIS USA Satellite. Program  South Africa 

Mining Concessions 

2007

Ministry of Natural Resources

Oil and Gas Concession  Areas 

2006

INP – Instituto Nacional do Petrolio

Oil and Gas Wells 

2006

INP – Instituto Nacional do Petrolio

Oil and Gas Concession  Plan  Bathymetry 

2006

INP – Instituto Nacional do Petrolio

1986

Ministry of Defense of  Mozambique 

Intensity of erosion, 3 classes:  low, medium, and high  Transects of coral reefs  occurrence   Most recent GPS survey Mangrove location and classes  including open and dense types  of coastal forest  Also temp. flooded areas  Names and declarations

1:1M

Acquired

1:250K

Acquired

1:250K 1:1M 

Pending Acquired

1:250K

Acquired

Names of 13 forestry reserves Names of fishing markets Time and date of recorded fire  location over 2007–2008 with   confidence levels and individual  point fires occurrence per day  and per month in 2007  Time and date of recorded fire  location over 2007–2008 with   confidence levels and individual  point fires occurrence per day  and per month in 2008   Type of the license, status, date,  issue, and expiration of license,  application date, license holder,  minerals, representative, type  of mineral, province, and district  Representative of the company  and polygons of concession  exploration  No description. Need to merge  data and ask for types of  extraction  JPG image of Oil and Gas  Concession Plan for 2006  Contour lines of deepness ‐ 5m  Z factor 

1:250K 1:250K  ‐ 

Acquired Acquired Acquired

Acquired

1:250K

Acquired

1:250K

Acquired

Acquired

‐ 1:250K 

Acquired Acquired

Field Survey via GPS. Points for  markets, clinics, hotels, hostels,  post offices 

Created

MOZAMBIQUE DISTRICT REGION DATA  District Facilities  Infrastructure 

Aug‐ Nov 2009 

Dobbin International Field Team

 

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

25


PEMBA DATA 

Name Administrative  Boundaries  Buildings and  Construction 

Year 1997 

Source Local Government Reform, Rapid  Mapping Project of Five Cities   Local Government Reform, Rapid  Mapping Project of Five Cities  

Construction Lines 

1997

Local Government Reform, Rapid  Mapping Project of Five Cities  

Construction Points 

1997

Local Government Reform, Rapid  Mapping Project of Five Cities  

Contour lines 

1997

Local Government Reform, Rapid  Mapping Project of Five Cities  

Contour Points 

1997

Land use  

1997

Local Government Reform, Rapid  Mapping Project of Five Cities   Local Government Reform, Rapid  Mapping Project of Five Cities  

Land use points 

1997

Local Government Reform, Rapid  Mapping Project of Five Cities  

Transport  

1997

Local Government Reform, Rapid  Mapping Project of Five Cities 

Water

1997

Local Government Reform, Rapid  Mapping Project of Five Cities  

Utility Lines 

1997

Utilities Points 

1997

Local Government Reform, Rapid  Mapping Project of Five Cities   Local Government Reform, Rapid  Mapping Project of Five Cities 

1997

Description 4006‐Limit of Ward Code 

Scale 1:5K 

5101‐Building outlines, 5131‐ Building under construction,  5132‐Ruins, 5191‐Swimming  pools,  5192‐Tank  Construction heights for some. Classes 6001‐ Supporting Wall,  6101‐ Fence, 6102‐ Hedge ,  6202‐ Sport centre, outline,  6301‐ Dock, Quay, 6303‐  Breakwater, 6999 – Undefined  object  Classes 6111– statue and  monument, 6201‐Sports  Centers  Classes: 2001– contour lines,  2002, Intermediate contour,  2003 – Depr. Contour Lines,  2202 – Cliff  2101: Contour Lines Height

1:5K

Status Acquired   Acquired  

1:5K

Acquired

1:5K

Acquired

1:5K

Acquired

1:5K

Acquired Acquired  

4200 – Scattered Cultivation  (Small holdings, not relevant for  project)  4201– Cultivated Area, 4202 – Scattered Cultiv, 4210 – Wood,  4211– Palms, 4413 – Bush and  scrub, 4232 –Sand or mud,  4241– Marsh and swamp, 4251– Rock outcrop, 4261– Cemetery,  4262 – Stone, 4401– Prominent  tree  Classes: 7001‐ Railway  centre  line, 7012 – Gravel road, edge,  7202 – Aerodrome runway,  7401– Track‐cl, 7403 –  Footpath, 7502 – bridge  Classes: 3000 – coast line, 3100 – lake borderline, 3201– river  ctr nat, 3202 – ditch ctr, 3211 – river edge nat 

1:5K

1:5K

Acquired

1:5K

Acquired

1:5K

Acquired

Class: 8001– High Tension Line

1:5K

Class: 8101– Pylon, High Tension  Lines, 8102 – Large pole, 8901–  Antenna tower 

1:5K

Acquired Acquired  

Note: For all layers for Pemba from the Rapid Mapping Project of Five Cities. Refer to Doc: “Joint Norway Mapping Mozambique, 1997.  Data Structured Detail Object Code List Version 1.5” (5.09.97) File dbcodes.doc Located under supporting documentation of the GIS folder.  National Cartography and Tele‐detection Center. Mozambique. This data set was obtained from CENACARTA, Mozambique. 

 

26   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


ILHA DE MOÇAMBIQUE   Name  Administrative  Boundaries 

Year 1997 

Source Local Government Reform, Rapid  Mapping Project of Five Cities 

Description Class: 4005 – Township, 4006 – Ward 

Scale 1:5K 

Buildings  

1997

Local Government Reform, Rapid  Mapping Project of Five Cities 

5101– Building outlines, 5131– Building under construction,  5132 – Ruins, 5191– Swimming  pools,  5192 – Tank  5101– Building outlines, 5192 – Tank 

1:5K

Buildings  

1997

Local Government Reform, Rapid  Mapping Project of Five Cities 

Construction Lines 

1997

Local Government Reform, Rapid  Mapping Project of Five Cities 

Construction Points 

1997

Local Government Reform, Rapid  Mapping Project of Five Cities 

Contour Lines 

1997

Local Government Reform, Rapid  Mapping Project of Five Cities 

Classes 6001– Supporting Wall,  6101– Fence, 6102 – Hedge,  6202 – Sport centre, outline,  6303 – Breakwater, 6999 –  Undefined object  Classes 6111– Statue and  monument, 6201 – Sports  Centers  Contour Lines from 0 to 13 at  intervals of .5 meters 

Contour Points 

1997

Local Government Reform, Rapid  Mapping Project of Five Cities 

Land Use points 

1997

Local Government Reform, Rapid  Mapping Project of Five Cities 

Terrain Details 

1997

Local Government Reform, Rapid  Mapping Project of Five Cities 

Construction and  Transport   (mixed layer)   

1997

Local Government Reform, Rapid  Mapping Project of Five Cities  

Utility Points 

1997

Local Government Reform, Rapid  Mapping Project of Five Cities  

Water Lines 

1997

Local Government Reform, Rapid  Mapping Project of Five Cities  

Status Acquired

Acquired

1:5K 

Acquired

1:5K 

Acquired

1:5K

Acquired

1:5K

Acquired

Contour point from 0 to 16.51 at  irregular intervals  

1:5K

Acquired

Classes: 4210 – Wood, 4211– Palm, 4213 – bush and scrub,  4231 – Steppe, 4232 – sand and  mud, 4241– Marsh and swamp,  4261 – Cemetery  Classes: 4401 ‐ Prominent tree,  4411 – Stone rock 

1:5K

Acquired

1:5K

Acquired

Classes: 6001– Supporting wall,  6101 – Fence, 6102 – Hedge,  7011– Paved Rd, 7012 – Gravel  Rd, 7401 – Track‐cl, 7403 – Footpath, 7501 cut/  embankment, 7502 – Bridge  Class: 8101 – Pylon, High  Tension Lines, 8102 – Large pole 

1:5K

Acquired

1:5K

Acquired

1:5K

Acquired

Classes: 3000 – Coastline, 3100– lake borderline, 3201 – River  center natural, 3202– Ditch  center  

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

27


RUAHA NATIONAL PARK DATA  Name  Centers or towns in and  around park  Lodges 

Year ‐ 

Source Ruaha National Park Office

Ruaha National Park Office

Description Names of towns and villages  around or in park  Only Points

Cultural Points 

Ruaha National Park Office

Farms

Hills Control Post 

Scale ‐ 

Status Acquired

Acquired

Name and type

Acquired

Ruaha National Park Office

Names for 3 farms 

Acquired

Ruaha National Park Office

Names and elevation 

Acquired

Ruaha National Park Office

Acquired

Acquired

Names for 7 points (need  description)  Tourist Service or  ‐  Ruaha National Park Office Names of campsites, entrance  Reference Points   points, hunting camps, tourist  cottages  Note: For National Level GIS data for Ruaha National Park, please refer to Tanzania National data

SELOUS GAME RESERVE DATA  Name  Year  Source  Description Game Reserve GIS  ‐  Ministry of Natural Resources of  ‐ package  Tanzania  Note: For National Level GIS data for Selous Game Reserve, please refer to Tanzania National data

Scale ‐ 

Status Pending

QUIRIMBAS NATIONAL PARK DATA  Name  Year  Source  Description Scale  Status  National Park GIS  ‐  WWF Mozambique Various GIS layers, questionable  ‐  Pending database  quality  Note: Given the overlapping geography, please refer to Mozambique National Data for Quirimbas National Park GIS data 

 

28   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


2.3 Phase 2 Outputs  Phase 2 outputs include the following:   

    

Spatial and numerical socioeconomic and biophysical database in GIS format and JPEG format  for each project region and district, including the following:  ‐ Administrative data – International, provincial, district, and locality boundaries  ‐ Social and economic data – Population, poverty, market  ‐ Land cover and use data – Open and closed forests, mangroves, wetlands towns,  settlements, villages. Tourism, forestry, mining, fishing agriculture, and protected areas  ‐ Physical infrastructure data – roads, airports, landing strips, ports, railways, border  crossings, communications, and energy  ‐ Social infrastructure data – Schools, vocational training schools, colleges, universities,  clinics, rural and district hospitals  ‐ Cultural resources data – Archaeological, historical, cultural heritage, historical building  patterns, and historic settlements  ‐ Natural resources data – Digital Elevation Model (DEM), slope/elevation, water resources  (watersheds, rivers, lakes), areas of high biodiversity, forest cover, terrestrial habitats,  coastal habitats (beaches, sand dunes, mangroves, wetlands, marine habitats, coral reefs),  Environmentally Sensitive Areas (mangroves, wetlands, coral reefs, existing and proposed  protected areas)  A spatial analysis of the Ruaha National Park, Selous Game Reserve, and Quirimbas National  Park showing transport links to key cities in the region  A spatial analysis of Ilha de Moçambique and its links to the region   A spatial analysis of the Pemba Town and the Kilwa urban and island area   Power Point presentation with descriptions and drawings summarising Phase 2 results  A CD containing the GIS spatial database of all above items in appropriate file format   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

29


30  

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


3.0 DATA ACQUISITION AND PRELIMINARY DIAGNOSIS SUMMARY

The following section presents a general description, the AKDN context, observations, data tables,  preliminary diagnosis, and next steps for each geographic area of the project. The general description  provides an overview of each area, while the AKDN context details previous or existing work in the area.  The park‐ and town‐level observations are scale‐based, while the observations of the districts are  presented in a table and cover relevant sectors. The preliminary diagnoses do not reflect systematic  analyses but rather the framework for establishing the criteria for the analyses in Phase 3. The next  steps detail any remaining data compilation issues to complete in Phase 2 and how we plan to move  forward in Phase 3 issue identification, initial spatial analysis, and scenario planning.     

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

31


3.1 Tanzania Protected Areas   3.1.1 RUAHA NATIONAL PARK 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION  Ruaha National Park, at 22,200 km2, is Tanzania’s largest national park and is located in Central  Tanzania, 128 km west of Iringa. The name of the park is derived from the Great Ruaha River, which  flows along its south‐eastern margin and is the focus of safari routes and game‐viewing. The park is  accessed by car via Iringa and by scheduled or chartered flights, which land at various airstrips in the  park. Popular activities include safari game drives and hiking safaris through untouched bush  environments. The dry season in May through December is the best time to see predators and large  mammals, and the wet season in January through April is the best time for bird‐watching and viewing  lush scenery and wildflowers. Accommodation options include a riverside lodge, three dry‐season  tented camps, self‐catering bandas, and two campsites.      

32   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


INSERT RUAHA MAP   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

33


AKDN CONTEXT  One hotel site in Ruaha National Park has been allocated by park authorities for development by Serena  Hotels. There may be other sites available that are more suitable for a Serena Safari Lodge site.  SCALE‐BASED OBSERVATIONS   Regional Scale     The park is strategically situated to allow for regional tourism circuits that connect southern  parks to ocean and lake coastal destinations, “bush and beach” tourism     The park is part of an extensive ecosystem that includes Rungwa Game Reserve, Usangu Game  Reserve, and several other protected areas   The park’s authenticity and untapped attractions differentiate it from other parks in the region  Park Scale   The park has a unique variety of animals, birds, and vegetation because it represents a transition  zone where southern African and eastern African species of flora and fauna overlap   Park is expanding infrastructure to accommodate more safari routes and hotels    The progressive drying up of the Great Ruaha River presents grave long‐term challenges for the  park and wildlife  Lodge and Brand Scale   Current proposed Serena site is not close to river, and safari routes are restricted by physical  landforms and park boundaries   Other sites are available that may have better access to new safari routes and undercapitalized  resources and attractions   Opportunity to attract various and upscale demographics to the safari lodge based on  opportunities and attractions in the park, such as bird watchers     DATA ACQUISITION PROCESS   Executed fieldwork in reserve including game drives, mapping of current game drive routes and  hotel sites and attractions     Meetings with park management to acquire GIS database and gain other important information  about the General Management Plan    Worked with TPS Serena managers to acquire Ruaha General Management Plan        

34   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


Ruaha National Park landscape wildlife 

Ruaha River Lodge located along river 

Elephants in Ruaha National Park 

Lion and lioness along the road

Ruaha River Lodge chalets 

Baboons beside Ruaha River Lodge chalets 

Views of hippos from Ruaha River Lodge  

View from Ruaha River Lodge 

Elephants beside Ruaha River Lodge  

PRELIMINARY DIAGNOSIS     

Current proposed site for Serena Hotels has multiple constraints that were observed; need to  identify and evaluate other potential sites using existing Serena and proposed SDPP site  selection criteria  Safari routes are limited; need to explore greater safari route opportunities to attract and  accommodate diverse demographics and interests  Existing need to enhance guest understanding, appreciation, and enjoyment of the park 

NEXT STEPS | REQUIREMENTS       

Review and clean GIS database that was acquired, obtain any missing GIS data from National  Parks Headquarters in Arusha  Develop GIS maps with current data to send to Serena Guides to use for further fieldwork and  mapping of potential safari routes and attractions associated with options for safari lodge sites   Continue to analyze and inventory unique opportunities and resources in the park    

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

35


TABLE 2: RUAHA NATIONAL PARK DATA  GIS DATA  Name 

Date

Source

Description

All GIS data including name, year, source, description, scale, data type, and scale included in Table 1. 

HARD COPY CARTOGRAPHY  Topographic Maps 

1967

Ruaha National Park Map 

Undated

Ruaha National Park Road Map  

Undated

Government of United Republic of  Tanzania  Ruaha GIS Centre, Ruaha National  Park  Mdonya Old River Camp

1:50K 1:575K Graphic Scale 

MANAGEMENT AND STRATEGIC PLANS  Ruaha National Park General  Management Plan 2008 ‐ 2017 

Undated

Government of United Republic of  Tanzania 

Management of  ecosystem, tourism,  community outreach,  park operations  

REPORTS (GOVERNMENT AND NON‐GOVERNMENT) An Overview of the Usangu  Catchment, Ihefu Wetland and  Great Ruaha River Ecosystem  Environmental Disaster  Environmental Impact Assessment  for Proposed Serena Safari Lodge  Site 

2004

Bruce Fox

Qualitative report 

Unknown

TPS

Pending

 

Nov 2009 

SDPP Team

Photographs of lodges  and park  

Nov 2009 

SDPP Team 

Site survey  

Nov 2009 

SDPP Team 

Field survey and  mapping 

Nov. 2009 

SDPP Team 

None

Nov 2009  

SDPP Team

None

2005

The Gallery Publications

None

STATISTICAL DATA   In process  

PHOTOGRAPHY 500+ digital photographs of  proposed site, other sites, and  park attractions   

SITE SURVEY  Site survey of proposed Serena  Hotels site    Game Drive in Msembe and  surrounding area  

MEETINGS AND INTERVIEWS  Meetings with Ruaha National  Park administration and tourism  officials  Interview with Ruaha River Lodges  management  

MEDIA AND PUBLICATIONS  Ruaha National Park Book 

36   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

37


3.1.2 SELOUS GAME RESERVE 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION  The Selous Game Reserve (54,600km²) is located in southern Tanzania and is one of the largest fauna  reserves in the world. It is named after Sir Frederick Selous, an Englishman who was famous as a big  game hunter and early conservationist. The Selous is typically accessed by vehicle or scheduled and  chartered flights to the park. Primary attractions include photographic tourism north of the Rufiji River  and hunting tourism south of the river. The Selous was designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in  1982 because of the diversity of wildlife and undisturbed nature.     

38   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


INSERT SELOUS MAP     

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

39


AKDN CONTEXT  Serena Hotels currently owns and operates two new safari lodges in the park: the Mivumo River Lodge is  a world‐class lodge that extends dramatically along the bank of the Rufiji River, and the Selous Wildlife  Lodge is a luxury tented camp situated on the Simbazi River. Both lodges are located in close proximity  to the Stiegler’s Gorge airstrip. The lodges further extend and reinforce the presence and prestige of  Serena Hotels in the East Africa region.  SCALE‐BASED OBSERVATIONS  Regional Scale      The park is strategically situated to allow for regional tourism circuits that connect southern  parks to ocean and lake coastal destinations    The park contains over one third of all the protected area in Tanzania and also connects to  wildlife corridors and ecosystems outside of the park, including Niassa National Park in Northern  Mozambique     The park’s authenticity and undisturbed landscapes and wildlife differentiate it significantly from  other parks in the region   Park Scale   The park contains large numbers of elephants, black rhinoceroses, cheetahs, giraffes,  hippopotamuses, impalas, and crocodiles as well as a variety of vegetation zones that range  from dense thickets to open woodlands, wetlands, lakes, and rivers      Rufiji River is a primary and unique attraction of the park and could serve as the hub for safari  routes, especially if government decides to prohibit hunting in southern sector of park   Poor condition of physical infrastructure, presence of the Tsetse fly, and limited marketing  discourage visitation   Lodge and Brand Scale   Serena Hotels has two unique lodges that serve high‐end markets and seek to provide authentic  experience that is world‐class, unique, and unforgettable   Existing lodges contain individual identity and can be collectively leveraged and integrated into  park to enhance overall guest experience    Lodges have recently been acquired and opportunity exists to promote environmental  responsibility and sustainability of the lodges through green architecture and infrastructure   DATA ACQUISITION PROCESS   Executed fieldwork in reserve including river safari and several game drives   Mapped current game drive routes and circuits with Serena guide   Meetings with Mivumo River Lodge and Selous Wildlife Lodge management and guides    Worked with TPS Serena Management to acquire Selous General Management Plan; currently  working on acquisition of the Selous GIS database      

40   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


Selous Wildlife Lodge and Elephants 

Mivumo River Lodge on the Rufiji River 

Selous Game Drive 

Reception at Selous Wildlife Lodge

Rufiji River Elephant

Wildebeests in Selous 

Tent Camps at Selous Wildlife Lodge  

View from Mivumo River Lodge 

Mivumo River Lodge on the Rufiji 

PRELIMINARY DIAGNOSIS    

Immense potential to further program lodges and safari routes to enhance guests’  understanding, appreciation, enjoyment of the park   Opportunity exists to develop various and diverse safari routes for each lodge, especially if  southern portion of park is opened to photographic tourism  Need to better understand the implications of external influences such as oil, gas, and mining  concessions  

NEXT STEPS | REQUIREMENTS     

Continue to work with AKF and TPS to obtain Selous GIS database   Develop GIS maps with current data to send to Serena Guides to use for further fieldwork and  mapping of potential safari routes and attractions   Continue to identify and inventory unique opportunities and resources in the park  

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

41


TABLE 3: SELOUS GAME RESERVE DATA  GIS DATA  Name 

Date

Source

Description

All GIS data including name, year, source, description, scale, data type, and scale included in Table 1.

HARD COPY CARTOGRAPHY  Topographic Maps 

1967

Government of United  Republic of Tanzania 

1:50K

Government of United  Republic of Tanzania 

Ministry of Natural  Resources and  Tourism Wildlife  Division   

MANAGEMENT AND STRATEGIC PLANS  Selous Game Reserve General  Management Plan  

2005

REPORTS (GOVERNMENT AND NON‐GOVERNMENT) Annotated History of the  Selous Niassa Wildlife Corridor  

Feb 2008 

Selous Niassa Wildlife Corridor  Office  

-

Nov 2009 

Dobbin International Field  Team 

Photographs of  lodges and park  

Nov 2009 

Dobbin International Field  Team Dobbin International Field  Team

Field survey and  mapping  Field survey and  mapping 

Nov 2009 

Dobbin International Field  Team  

None   

2003 2005  

Tanzania Wildlife Division  The Gallery Publications  

Guide Book  Guide Book  

STATISTICAL DATA   In process 

PHOTOGRAPHY 500+ digital photographs of  Serena Safari lodges, game  drive, and river safari 

SITE SURVEY  Game Drive with documented  route  River Safari with photographic  documentation 

Nov 2009 

MEETINGS AND INTERVIEWS  Summary of meetings with  Mivumo River Lodge and  Selous Wildlife Lodge  Management  and Guides 

MEDIA AND PUBLICATIONS  Selous Book  Selous Game Reserve Book 

 

42   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

43


3.2 Tanzania District Region 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION  Until the mid‐ to late 19th century, the area that is now south east Tanzania enjoyed prosperity through  trade links that extended to Europe, North America, and the Far East, albeit mostly on the back of the  slave trade and with local wealth concentrated in the coastal towns. The smaller towns of Lindi and  Mikindani and several occasional ports contributed to the prosperity and influence of south eastern  Tanzania.  During the German and British colonial rule in Tanganyika, the southern regions were considered to be  of low economic potential, and infrastructure development was limited. Soon after independence, the  country was divided into regions rather than zones. The zonal headquarters in Lindi was closed in 1971,  and Mtwara, with the deep water harbor, gained prominence.   After a failed groundnut scheme investment during the British colonial period, both Mtwara and Lindi  Regions remained undeveloped and among the poorest in Tanzania until the regions took a turn for the  better following the major socioeconomic reforms initiated in the mid 1990s, primarily as a result of  market liberalization supporting an increase in cashew nut prices. With the growth of the national  tourism sector, both regions are beginning to attract investors in tourism. Recent efforts to develop the  region include the Mtwara Development Corridor initiative. The discovery and exploitation of gas  reserves for electricity generation have given a further boost to investment prospects.   

44   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


INSERT TANZ DISTRICT REGION MAP   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

45


AKDN CONTEXT  Imamat institutions have been working in Tanzania since the time of His Highness the Aga Khan’s  grandfather, Sir Sultan Mahomed Shah, before the establishment of the AKDN and the Aga Khan  Foundation. More recently, the AKDN has expanded agency work to include the Aga Khan Agency for  Microfinance (AKAM) operations, as well as the AKF Coastal Rural Support Program (CRSP) and CREATE  education project in Mtwara and Lindi Rural and Urban Districts.     REGIONAL‐SCALE OBSERVATIONS    

   

    

Tourist, cultural attractions, fisheries, vast agricultural expanses, and improved infrastructure  characterize the coastal districts of Lindi and Mtwara   Oil and gas exploration is active off the coast of Mtwara, which is also home to one of East  Africa’s deepest ports. Based on strong natural assets and massive projected growth rates,  Mtwara has become a “World Bank Strategic City”     Mtwara Urban, including Mikindani town, is the hub of development in the region and is  experiencing growth across many sectors including:  ‐ Tourism: Unspoiled beaches, a marine park and restoration of key buildings in the nearby  town of Mikindani (including German and Ismaili historical buildings) continue to propel this  industry  ‐ Industry and Commerce: reliable and stable infrastructure (24‐hour electricity, paved roads,  access to port and airport) is beginning to attract foreign investment. Plans are under way to  expand the electricity grid to the inland districts along the Rovuma  Coastal areas south of Dar es Salaam offer picturesque bays and beaches along significant  coastal and marine resources, including mangroves and sea grass beds   The risk of environmental damage from offshore oil and gas exploration is partially mitigated  through the creation of a marine protected area Mnazi Bay near Mtwara    Bank, microfinance institution, credit union presence is increasing in district headquarters to  service increasing commercial activity   Lack of transportation infrastructure to link the Districts of Mtwara and Palma (northern  Mozambique) across the Rovuma River is one the major “binding constraints” to development in  the region both north and south of the border. However, the Mtwara Development Corridor  aims to address this restriction through strategic infrastructure investments  Coastal areas and some inland areas have rich cultural resources, many of which are in ruins or  deteriorating rapidly   Cashew production dominates the districts of Tandahimba, Newala, and Masasi. Cashew  processing plants operate in Masasi, Newala, and Mtwara and employ thousands of workers in  the region  With multiple river valleys and some irrigation systems, the Lindi region produces a variety of  crops including rice, maize, and coconuts     Subsistence fishing is practiced throughout the coast; the absence of fish processing centers,  cooling stations, and storage facilities limit the expansion and reach of this industry  Key physical infrastructure projects are under way throughout the region including:  - The paving and/or widening of existing roads—Dar es Salaam to Kilwa and a 100 km‐stretch  of road from the Unity Bridge to Masasi  - Buildout of electricity grid from Mtwara to Masasi—capital costs may require the  combination of multiple investment partners to reach end users and maximize connections 

46   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


DATA ACQUISITION PROCESS           

Conducted town survey of Masasi to identify banks, markets, transportation hubs, and local points  of interest, as well as field survey of Unity Bridge, performed general survey of District, including  visits to two border crossings along the Rovuma River  Performed town survey of Lindi town, Masasi, Mtwara, and Mikindani to obtain information of  tourist class hotels, banks tourist, tourist areas, points of interest relevant for the project and  recorded market related information   Met with government employees in Mtwara, and Masasi to discuss key activities and growth  opportunities for the area. Discussed urban planning, income revenue streams, tourism, existing  economy and future economic potential, and the Mtwara Development Corridor initiative   Met with members of the CRSP(T) team to discuss existing and future plans to work with the rural  population in the Lindi, Kilwa, and Mtwara regions  Conducted a visit to existing CRSP (T) project sites and future potential sites in Lindi as well as other  points of interests including lakes   Met with Zonal Director of Naliendele Agricultural Research Institute and found excellent GIS  databases on agricultural suitability but still working on making this data available to us  Met with the Centre for African Development through Economics and the Arts (ADEA), a local NGO  working with artisans to promote crafts as an income generating activity  Conducted interviews with TradeAid, ECO2, Artumas Gas and Power Company, and a local priest in  Mikindani   Obtained the Mtwara‐Mikindani Urban Plan Quickbird high‐resolution satellite imagery for  Mikindani and Mtwara 

Mtwara Jamatkhana 

Tandahimba

Masasi Bus Station 

Cashew fruit and nut 

Newala 

Road to Unity Bridge 

View from the Makonde Plateau 

Masasi

Unity Bridge 

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

47


PRELIMINARY DIAGNOSIS  

 

 

 

 

Observed potential in Mtwara for coordination between cultural and social investment  programs for poverty alleviation through development of sustainable fishing practices,  environmental conservation, cultural heritage preservation (including dhow culture), urban  restoration and revitalization, and small‐scale agriculture  Mikindani presents an attractive opportunity for urban restoration, small scale business  development, hotel development, and agricultural and fisheries investment in an area with links  to recent Ismaili history  The Mchinga Bay area, with its long white sand beaches, proximity to lime stone hills, offshore  fishing and coral reefs, and lack of social and physical infrastructure presents the opportunities  for multi‐sector interventions.  Investments in tourism, industrial activities and socio‐economic  projects could all contribute to the development of the area and improve the quality of life of  area residents   Interest has been expressed by organizations in the rural areas of Mtwara for additional  microfinance and banking services including start‐up loans for small businesses and for people  wishing to connect to the new electricity grid.    The potential for a stronger road connection between Masasi – Mtwara in the next decade may  increase Tandahimba’s importance in the production, processing and/or distribution of cashews.  As the district works to build capacity, there may be opportunity for multiple agencies to either  offer services or insert themselves in the value chain  Opportunity to partner with local NGOs   ADEA is a local NGO working with artisans to promote a higher quality of craftsmanship and  develop the arts and crafts as a reliable income‐generating vocation. Their work is very similar to  EDI’s work within AKF and the organization is a potential resource and partner for future AKF  activities  Opportunity to partner with a local NGO (ADEA) in Mtwara, that promotes the development of   arts and crafts as a reliable income generating  activity, through capacity building (art and  entrepreneurial skills development) and market linkages.   The work is similar to AKF‐ Mozambique’s enterprise development initiative which also works with the artisan community  in Cabo Delgado  Agriculture is the main source of income in rural areas of Mtwara region where incomes are still  very low.  Many opportunities exist to assist farmers through capacity building and education as  well as investments to further develop the agricultural value chain  Agricultural potential in the Lindi region seems to be promising with vast areas of land suitable  for crops such as, rice, and citrus fruits. Lead time to establish consistent fruit production farms  will take 8 to 10 years and require diligent quality control if they are to be exported to  international markets.  This will likely require large‐scale investment and local farmers are  currently ill‐equipped to develop this level of farming.  The Mtwara urban and rural region, given its strategic importance presents opportunities for  multi‐sector investments that can satisfy the service and infrastructure demands for this  growing area.  The Mtwara Development Corridor plan identifies private sector investment  opportunities and infrastructure projects across the southern Tanzania region    

48   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


NEXT STEPS | REQUIREMENTS       

Obtain MACEMP Reports for the project region  Obtain in GIS format energy transmission plan from Artumas   Obtain tourism strategy from UDEM   Investigate plans for infrastructure improvements in all districts including, availability of drinking  water, sanitary waste disposal and solid waste management  Follow‐up with Tanzania Investment Center in Dar es Salaam to obtain information on land  banks and investment potential in different sectors  Obtained the Mtwara‐Mikindani Urban Plan Quickbird high‐resolution satellite imagery for  Mikindani and Mtwara 

Rice in the Lukuledi Valley 

River Washing 

Lindi Urban 

 

Lake Lutambu 

Lindi Bay 

Old Aga Khan building in Mikindani 

Taking water uphill 

Salt farm near Lindi 

Mtwara Port 

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

49


SUMMARY OF TANZANIA DISTRICT OBSERVATIONS Tourism and Culture   

Social Infrastructure

Physical Infrastructure 

LINDI DISTRICT  Bay is picturesque and has long stretches of  pristine beaches (FO)    Few hotels in Lindi; most cater to business  clientele; one new tourism hotel but not well  managed or maintained (FO)  Many of the buildings in Ndanda have been  built by monks. The architecture is German‐ inspired and well maintained (FO) 

Ndanda has a hospital and schools run by a  Catholic order of monks. The hospital’s  reputation has made it a magnet for cases  across southern Tanzania and even northern  Mozambique  (FO, PI) 

The 2 main roads linking Lindi Urban to  Mtwara in the south and Masasi in the west  are tarmac; road improvements were noted  between Mtwara and Masasi  (FO) 

MTWARA – MIKINDANI  Historical port on the Swahili coast (FO)  Historical buildings in varying conditions,  representing multiple traditions (German,  Indian, Ismaili) are present in the town of  Mikindani (FO) 

Two universities, one vocational school,  dispensary, provincial hospital, library, post  office (FO)  AKAM office recently opened (AK) 

Four (4) fueling stations (FO)  Natural gas electricity generation facility for  all Mtwara and expansion of distribution  network to inland areas (PI) 

TradeAid (a UK‐based organization) is actively  working to promote tourism through a  combination of community involvement,  restoration, and conversion of historical  buildings into museums and hotels (NG)   Tourist‐caliber beaches in the area (FO) 

MTWARA RURAL  Minimal tourism potential observed (FO) 

Pending further fieldwork 

Pending further fieldwork 

TANDAHIMBA Minimal tourism potential observed (FO) 

Basic government infrastructure (FO) 

District roads connecting tandahimba to  Masasi in the west and Mtwara to the east  are not tarmac 

Legend    GO  Government Official  NG  Nongovernment Organization 

CM FO 

PI AK

50   

Community Member Field Survey Observation

Private Interest  AKF Employee 

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


SUMMARY OF TANZANIA DISTRICT OBSERVATIONS Agriculture and Fisheries 

Resource Extraction (Mining,  Oil, Gas, Forestry) 

Industry and Commerce

Environment and  Conservation 

Pending further fieldwork 

Ndanda has a natural spring  water bottling facility (FO) 

long stretch of beautiful  beach in Lindi town (FO) 

Artumas Gas and Power Co. is  extracting natural gas,  processing the gas, and then  generating and transmitting  power. Electricity is provided to  the urban area and expansion of  the distribution grid is taking  place. Region will soon have  consistent supply of power (PI) 

Cashew Nut Board is located  in the town (FO)  Main urban centre in  southern coastal Tanzania  with many wholesale/retail  businesses, banks, and a  large commercial area 

Mnazi Bay and Rovuma  Estuary Marine Park has been  established by the WWF (NG) 

Pending further fieldwork 

Pending further fieldwork 

None observed 

Cashew storage facility (FO) 

Pending further fieldwork 

LINDI DISTRICT  Rice is used as the entry point for both  agricultural and other AKF work (AK)  AKF is promoting conservation  agricultural methods to maintain soil  nutrients and discourage “slash and  burn” practices (AK)  Lake Kitere area is fertile with a shallow  water table leading to a significant  amount of agricultural activity (mainly  rice) (FO)  Some areas have the potential for  coconut farms. There are individuals  gathering coconuts to transport to Dar  to extract coconut oil (CM, FO)  Mtama has irrigated fields used for  growing rice and maize. Cashews are  also grown, and there is a cashew  processing plant (FO)  Fresh fish farming ponds are located in  the Lukuledi valley. These fish are then  sold in markets along the main road in  the valley (AK)  Ndanda is near good agricultural fields,  and there are cattle cared for by the  monks (FO)  No coastal fish cleaning or storage  facility (AK) 

MTWARA – MIKINDANI  Interview to discuss criteria for research  and initiatives at the Naliendele  Agricultural Research Institute (GO)  Naliendele is working with private  businesses to evaluate cash crops in  southern Tanzania (GO)  Toured Mikindani Estates, an old sisal  estate (12,000 acres), and distributed  memo to AKDN IPS  

Cashew processing facility  employs 3,000–4,000 people  (GO) 

MTWARA RURAL  Cashew is the main cash crop (GO)  There is foreign interest in large‐scale  eucalyptus farming (GO) 

TANDAHIMBA Agriculture seems to be the main  activity, particularly cashews (FO)    Legend   GO  Government Official  NG  Nongovernment Organization 

Pending further fieldwork 

No  bank observed (FO) 

CM FO 

Community Member Field Survey Observation

PI AK

Private Interest  AKF Employee 

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

51


SUMMARY OF TANZANIA DISTRICT OBSERVATIONS Tourism and Culture   

Social Infrastructure

Physical Infrastructure 

District hospital, secondary school, post  office, and police station (FO) 

Infrastructure has been built to support the  cashew industry 

NEWALA Newala town’s cool climate, impressive  views, an interesting town arrangement (red  dirt roads lined with trees), German history,  and vibrant market could attract curious  tourists interested in day trips from larger  centers (FO) 

An extensive road network linking Newala  town with many villages to the south has  elevated it into a regional commercial hub  (FO) 

5–10 guesthouses/lodges/hotels (FO) 

MASASI Little tourism potential in the rural areas; it is  very dry with little to no cultural or historical  attractions for local and/or international  tourists(GO) 

As a district capital, Masasi town has a  district hospital, secondary school, post  office, and police station (FO) 

Unity Bridge infrastructure improvements  will lead to improved infrastructure in Masasi  (airport, roads) (FO)  Large bus station (FO) 

However, there is a hunting reserve south of  Masasi (GO) 

Anticipate being connected to the Artumas/  Tanesco electricity grid by January 2010 (GO) 

There is a group of Makonde wood carvers in  Masasi town and a few shops in the area  where artists sell their crafts (NG, FO) 

Masasi does not have any drinking water  connection in the town(GO)  Road to Masasi from Newala is undergoing  rehabilitation (FO) 

Multitude of guest houses (50+)(FO) 

SOUTHERN TANZANIA REGION  Tourism in southern Tanzania is not as well  developed as in regions to the north; the area  is still considered an off‐the‐beaten‐path  destination (FO) 

Based on the rural statistics available, there is  much room for improvement of literacy and  access to education and healthcare (FO) 

As the road infrastructure improves so to will  market linkages for other sectors (AK)  Once road improvements are made on either  side of the Unity bridge, it is expected that  trade traffic will steadily increase in southern  Tanzania (FO, GO)  The potential for a stronger road connection  between Masasi and Mtwara in the next  decade may increase Newala’s importance  (FO)  Unity Bridge is still under construction;  however, lots of activity (FO)  Roads also being built (GO) 

Legend    GO  Government Official  NG  Nongovernment Organization 

52   

CM FO 

Community Member Field Survey Observation

PI AK

Private Interest  AKF Employee 

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


SUMMARY OF TANZANIA DISTRICT OBSERVATIONS Agriculture and Fisheries 

Resource Extraction  (Mining, Oil, Gas, Forestry) 

Industry and Commerce

Environment And Conservation

Pending further fieldwork 

Cashew processing is the main  industry (FO) 

Pending further fieldwork 

NEWALA Cashew is the main cash crop,  followed by maize, cassava, and  futa (jetropha) (FO) 

NMB Branch with ATM (FO)  Commercial hub for district   residents (FO) 

MASASI Cashew farming is the largest  economic activity, other crops  include sisal, maize, and jetropha  (GO) 

Pending further fieldwork 

Two banks and a number of  credit unions provide services in  the town (FO) 

Pending further fieldwork 

Masasi town is the closest major  settlement to the Unity Bridge  and as such has seen significant  growth as a result of the  additional traffic along the main  road (GO) 

A Dutch organization is currently  working with over a thousand  farmers  to promote organic  farming practices and plans to  set up processing factories to  export cashews to Europe (GO) 

SOUTHERN TANZANIA REGION  In addition to cashew, sesame  and groundnuts are also grown  as cash crops (GO, AK) 

Oil and gas exploration is taking  place offshore of Mtwara (PI) 

Covered in individual district  observations 

Food crops include cassava, rice,  sorghum, and grains/beans (AK)  Soils along the coast are  relatively fertile, and a crop is  always in season (AK) 

“Slash and burn” practices for  agriculture are contributing to  degradation of the natural  environment. AKF‐CRSP is  teaching conservation farming to  help minimise this practice (AK) 

Soil and weather conditions are  good for citrus fruits and  pineapples. Lead time to  establish consistent production  farms will take 8 to 10 years and  require diligent quality control if  they are to be exported (AK)  Fruit farming requires long‐term  investment and inputs that are  not within the capacity of the  local population (AK)  CRSP will facilitate exposure  visits for local farmers to help  them understand their role in  the value chain and understand  the broader market (AK)  Farmers are generally poor and  cannot afford new and/or  improved technology (GO)  Legend    GO  Government Official  NG  Nongovernment Organization 

CM FO 

Community Member Field Survey Observation

PI AK

Private Interest  AKF Employee 

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

53


TABLE 4: TANZANIA DISTRICT REGION DATA  GIS DATA  Name 

Date

Source

Description

All GIS data including name, year, source, description, scale, data type, and scale included in Table 1.

HARD COPY CARTOGRAPHY  Map showing cultural and historical sites 

2009

Department of Antiquities

Partner with annotated list (book), see  publication below 

Mtwara Mikindani Municipal Strategy for  Growth and Reduction of Poverty   Tourism Master Plan for Tanzania 

May 2006  Draft 1  April 2002

Mnazi Bay – Strategic Tourism Development  Plan  Agricultural Sector Development Strategy 

July 2008

PMO, Regional Administration and  Local Government, Mtwara Region  CHL Consulting for the  Government of Tanzania  World Wildlife Fund

Oct 2001

Government of Tanzania

Mtwara – Mikindani Urban Plan 

None  

Unknown

Urban plan created by Town Council

Mtwara Mikindani Integrated Coastal  Management Action Plan  

2009

Municipal Director, Mtwara  Mikindani Municipal Council 

Feb 2008

Ministry of Infrastructure  Development  Ministry of Infrastructure  Development  AIDS Commission and National  Bureau of Statistics  Aga Khan Foundation

May 2008

MEDA (PML Division) for AKF

2007

Mpingo Conservation Project for  NLUPC  Government or Tanzania

MANAGEMENT AND STRATEGIC PLANS  Final Summary Update  Phase 1 (soft copy), Phase 2 (component 1  and 2 in both hard and soft copy)  National strategy for the sector

REPORTS (GOVERNMENT AND NONGOVERNMENT) 10‐Year Transport Sector Investment Program 

April 2008

Transport, Construction, and Meteorology  Sector Statistics and Information  HIV/AIDS and Malaria Indicator Survey and Key  Findings  Preliminary Report on Enterprise Development  Potential in Mtwara and Lindi  Assessment of Enterprise Development  Opportunities in Mtwara and Lindi Regions, TZ  Land Suitability Mapping – Lindi Rural District 

June 2008

Agricultural Sector Development Program  Document  Annual Report – Agriculture 

2005–2006

Financial Statement Audit – Masasi 

March 2008

Minister of Agriculture, Food  Security and Cooperatives  National Audit Office

Capital Building Report 

Undated

Planning Department, Masasi

Financial Statement 

June 2009

Masasi District Council

Revenue Potential Study – Hotel Levy 

July 2009

German Development Service

Mtwara Energy Project Phase II Activities: Final  Environmental Impact Statement, Vol. 1 Main  Report   Sub‐Projects for Financing Under the Proposed  Tanzania Strategic Cities Project   Mtwara Mikindani Municipal Environmental  Profile  

Oct 2005

Artumas Group Inc

Feb 2009

The World Bank 

July 2008

Mtwara Mikindani Municipal  Council Director’s Office 

Lindi Region Summary of Statistical Data  

Undated

Lindi Regional Office

Mainly based on 2002 Census

Lindi Regional and District Projections 

Dec 2006

National Bureau of Statistics

Mtwara Regional and District Projections 

Dec 2006

National Bureau of Statistics

Various Statistical reports 

2002–2007

National Bureau of Statistics

Statistical projections based on 2002  Population and Housing Census  Statistical projections based on 2002  Population & Housing Census  Available on the website regarding child  labor, health and commerce 

Oct 2009

Dobbin International Field Team

Nov 2008

2007–2008

‐ Two (2) documents  Short report with summary of subsector  findings  Focus on agriculture  Land suitability for agriculture, livestock,  forestry, and tourism development  Supporting document for the Agricultural  Sector Development Strategy  Ministry Statement  ‐

STATISTICAL DATA 

PHOTOGRAPHY 500+ photos of southern Tanzania districts 

 

  54 

Including landscapes, buildings and people

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


SITE SURVEYS  Survey of Kilwa Kivinje town and historical  buildings  Brief surveys of the towns of Newala,  Tandahimba, Ndanda, and Masasi 

Oct 2009

Dobbin International Field Team

Includes all historical buildings as identified  on a guided tour  Includes major features pertaining to all  sectors   

Oct 2009

Dobbin International Field Team

AKF – CRSP(T) Lindi Staff (William Creighton,  Phillip, Richard Busingye)  

Oct 2009

Dobbin International Field Team

DED staff working for municipal offices in  Mtwara and Masasi 

Oct 2009

Dobbin International Field Team

Shamte H. Shomari, PhD – Zonal Director of  Naliendele Agricultural Research Institute 

Oct 2009

Dobbin International Field Team

Guidelines on Tourism Licenses 

Feb 2004

Cashew Nut Production Handbook 

2000

An Annotated List of Cultural Heritage Resources  of Tanzania  Mapping LED potentials and value chain and  market analysis of priority crops in Mtwara and  Lindi region  Projects Profile under the National Development  Corporation  International Investors Forum for Mtwara and  Central Development Corridors  SDI Update and OYE! Newsletter 

Undated

Ministry of Natural Resources and  Tourism  Naliendele Agricultural Research  Institute  Department of Antiquities

Mar 2008

Mads Sorensen and Lameck Kikoka

Presentation on agriculture

National Development Corporation

Oct 2002

National Development Corporation

Summary of projects available for  investment  Agenda and presentation slides

March 2007  and Sept 2008 

Artumas Group

MEETINGS AND INTERVIEWS  Discussions regarding current and future  activities as well as existing  conditions/situations  Discussions regarding local economy,  government revenue sources, and  infrastructure investments  Discussion regarding work of the institute  and local agricultural conditions and  challenges 

MEDIA AND PUBLICATIONS  To educate farmers on improved farming  techniques  ‐

Sustainable Development Initiative and Artumas Africa Foundation publications 

 

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

55


3.3 Tanzania Towns  3.3.1 KILWA TOWN AND AREA 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION  The area of “Kilwa” lies 240 km south of Dar es Salaam along the southern Tanzanian coast and consists  primarily of Kilwa Kivinje, Kilwa Masoko, Mtandura to the south, and the islands of Kilwa Kisiwani and Songo  Mnara. Historically, Kilwa Kisiwani was one of the most ancient and eminent of the Swahili towns along the East  African coast and served as the capital of the Swahili coast, anchoring Arab activity from Zanzibar in the north, to  Sofala, Mozambique, in the south.   Various parts of Kilwa developed their own unique characteristics through a mix of cultural influences brought  upon by coastal trade and the colonialist era. Kilwa Kivinje became a significant German administrative post with  visible Indian and Arab influences. Portuguese influences can also be found on Kisiwani as Arabs and Portuguese  struggled for control. The islands of Kisiwani and Songo Mnara have been raised to global attention as they were  inscribed on the World Heritage List and more recently were inscribed on the World Heritage in Danger List. A  picturesque bay, a landing strip with daily flights from Dar es Salaam and some built infrastructure characterize  Kilwa Masoko, which serves as the accommodation hub and gateway to Kivinje, Kisiwani, and Songo Mnara.        

  56 

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


INSERT KILWA MAP     

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

57


AKDN CONTEXT  Kilwa town and area lie approximately 1 hour north of Lindi town where many of AKF‐Tanzania’s Coastal Rural  Support Program’s (CRSP) activities in 2009 and 2010 will focus in agriculture and civil society components. CRSP  activity expansion is planned for the Kilwa District in 2011 and 2012. Outside of CRSP, no other AKDN agencies  have active interventions in the Kilwa town area.   SCALE‐BASED OBSERVATIONS  Regional Scale   Designation as a UNESCO World Heritage Site and World Heritage in Danger site has attracted  international attention and tourists to the Kilwa area    Recent oil exploration along the Swahili coast offers both opportunities and threats to this  environmentally sensitive area (pristine coral reefs can be found off the coast)    The creation of a Marine Protected Area has been rejected by the community partially due to poor  experience of locals and influence from people from Mafia Island   Road improvements scheduled to be completed in 2010 will reduce drive time to Kilwa (from Dar es  Salaam) from 5 to 3 hours   Subsistence fishing is the primary source of food for locals residing in the area  Town Scale   Stone Town in Kilwa Kivinje includes buildings built by Germans, including a German BOMA, a street  once built and occupied by Indian immigrants; Arab traders with interesting mix of architecture and  ruins of at least one Ismaili building and the coral stone buildings in Kilwa Kivinje are deteriorating  rapidly   Kilwa Masoko serves as the administrative center for the Kilwa area; it has several resorts geared toward  ecotourists with access to good beaches of the airport and the port for tourists to travel to Kisiwani and  Songo Mnara    Kilwa Kisiwani is a 20‐minute motor boat ride from Kilwa Masoko, while Songo Mnara is a 1‐hour ride on  a small boat    DATA ACQUISITION PROCESS        

Conducted site visits to Kilwa Kivinje, Kilwa Kisiwani, Kilwa Masoko, and Songo Mnara  Conducted field surveys in Kilwa Kivinje to identify and classify cultural origin of historical buildings using  UNESCO inventory of Kilwa Kivinje stone town as a guide  Obtained inventory of buildings for Kilwa Kisiwani and Kilwa Kivinje through Ministry of Antiquities  Obtained land use plans, strategic development plans, conservation plans through various governmental  and nongovernmental sources  Acquired relevant media and publications providing a historical context of the region and conservation  efforts  Conducted interviews with relevant personnel to obtain an understanding key government and  nongovernmental activities across all sectors 

58   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


Arabic Calligraphy, Kilwa Kisiwani  

Small Domed Mosque, Kilwa Kisiwani  

Ruins of the Great Mosque, Kilwa Kisiwani 

India Street in Kilwa Kivinje 

Coral Stone Building in Kilwa Kivinje  

Old German Residence in Kilwa Kivinje 

Kilwa Kivinje Dhow Port  

Kilwa Masoko 

Ruins in Songo Mnara 

NEXT STEPS | REQUIREMENTS      

Conduct a site survey for the Mtandura (south side of the project region)  Meet with Kilwa Municipality and obtain information on buildings undergoing rehabilitation in Kilwa  Kivinje  Obtain GIS shape files for Kilwa  Collect information on beaches, coral reefs, mangroves, Kilwa Bay, water currents, and land zoning  information 

PRELIMINARY OBSERVATIONS      

Opportunity to link the towns of Kilwa with other destinations along the Swahili Coast and inland to  Selous Game Reserve and possibly Ruaha National Park  Opportunity to partner with organizations (governmental and nongovernmental) for restoration and  revitalization projects in Kivinje to promote its multicultural heritage  Increased access, infrastructure improvements, and proximity to Dar es Salaam could accelerate  economic and real estate development (second homes) activities  A mix of Islamic history and cultural heritage, beaches, and biologically diverse marine environments  could translate to a diverse tourist offering appealing to a wide demographic range     

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

59


TABLE 5: KILWA DATA  GIS DATA  Name 

Date

Source

Description

All GIS data including name, year, source, description, scale, data type, and scale included in Table 1

HARD COPY CARTOGRAPHY   Hard and soft copy map of Kilwa 

Undated

Department of  Mapping and  Surveys 

1:250K

Kilwa Town  Planning Office  National Land Use  Planning  Commission 

MANAGEMENT AND STRATEGIC PLANS  Strategic Urban Development Plan for Kilwa  Masoko  Kilwa District Plan 

2007 Undated

REPORTS (GOVERNMENT AND NONGOVERNMENT) Investment in Cultural Heritage and Tourism 

Nov 2007

Architectural Conservation 

2004

Workshop Summary  

Undated

State of Conservation of the Ruins of Kilwa Kisiwani  and Song Mnara 

April 2009

Situational Analysis: Kilwa Kisiwani World Heritage  Site 

Feb 2009

Land Capability Assessment in Kilwa District 

June 2007

Cultural Heritage Inventory Final Report 

May 2008

Antiquities Department and  National  Museums  DMK Kamamba et  al   Antiquities  Department and  National  Museums of TZ  Ministry of  Natural Resources  and Tourism   Development  Bank of Southern  Africa   National Land Use  Planning  Commission  Karen Moon

Current state and investment opportunities for  Tanzania cultural heritage sites 

Survey and Inventory of Stone Town of Kilwa Kivinje 

July 2008

UNESCO

Oct 2009

Kilwa District  Fisheries Officer  

Quantities and revenue from fishing industry 

Aerial Photograph of Kilwa Kivinje 

1962

Field Photographs 

Aug–Nov 2009  

TZ Department of  Mapping and  Surveys   Dobbin Int Field  Team   

Oct 2009

Dobbin Int Field  Team   

Interview with Department of Fisheries 

Oct 2009

Discussion of fisheries in Kilwa area 

Interview with Pierre Blanchard 

Sept 2009

Idd Kassim  Ramadhan  Pierre Blanchard

2005

Karen Moon

History, architecture, and conservation principles of  Kilwa Kisiwani and Song Mnara Ruins   Discusses strategy to remove Kilwa Kisiwani and  Songo Mnara from list of endangered World Heritage  Sites  Status report of the UNESCO endangered site

Situational Analysis and Recommendations

Description, history, architecture, and condition of  buildings in Kisiwani  Description, history, architecture, and condition of  buildings in Kivinje 

STATISTICAL DATA  2006–2009 Fisheries Data  

PHOTOGRAPHY

Field photographs of Kilwa Kivinje, Kisiwani, Kilwa  Masoko, and Songo Mnara 

SITE SURVEYS  Field Survey of Kilwa Kivinje and Kilwa Kisiwani 

MEETINGS AND INTERVIEWS  Archaeologist working on restoring parts of Kilwa  Kisiwani 

MEDIA AND PUBLICATIONS  Kilwa Kisiwani  

60   

Glossy publication on the History, Architecture and  Culture of Kilwa 

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

61


3.4 Mozambique Protected Areas  3.4.1 QUIRIMBAS NATIONAL PARK 

Photo by Lucas Mauro 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION  The Quirimbas National Park includes the 11 southernmost islands of the Quirimbas Archipelago and a vast  expanse of mainland in northern Mozambique. The park, established in 2002, covers a total area of 8,283 km2,  25–30 percent of which is marine area. Access to the park is typically through Pemba, and popular tourism  activities include cultural tours, world‐class diving, and sailing. The park’s islands illustrate the historical  interweaving of various cultures from Africa, the Arab region, India, and Europe for more than a millennium.  However, today many of the islands are uninhabited. The Quirimbas Archipelago is currently being considered as  a UNESCO World Heritage Site because of its cultural and natural value.      

62   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


INSERT QUIRIMBAS NATIONAL PARK   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

63


AKDN CONTEXT  At this time, AKF is working in most areas of Quirimbas National Park (Macomia, Ibo, Meluco, Quissanga,  Pemba–Metuge districts), and we understand that TPS is assessing tourism potential in the region.   SCALE‐BASED OBSERVATIONS   Regional Scale     Park contains biodiversity sites of global importance in the East African Marine Ecoregion as well as  authentically preserved historical and cultural sites    Park spans an area that fits within a larger regional “beach and bush tourism” circuit   Regional issues in park related to wildlife poaching, illegal lumbering, human wildlife conflicts, and  overall unconstrained resource extraction  Park Scale   Park has three zones in the marine area; namely: total protection or “sanctuaries,” special use zones,  and community use and development zone   Park contains extensive complex of reefs with high coral diversity, diverse range of habitats including  mangroves, sea grasses, sandy and rocky shores   Resource protection, livelihood support to communities, ecotourism development, and habitat  management are key issues currently affecting the park  Lodge and Brand Scale   Multiple options for high‐end barefoot luxury tourism in the park   Development opportunities on islands are limited by existing and planned lodges   There may be opportunities to acquire existing lodges and/or islands  DATA ACQUISITION PROCESS      

Fieldwork in the park to identify important cultural and natural components of park  Meetings with WWF and park management to obtain GIS database and various reports on the park  Aerial flight over coastal portion of the park   

64   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


Pangane

Pangane

Lake Bilibiza 

Quissanga Sede Beach 

Macomia

Monkey in Pangane 

Macomia Market 

Road to Tandanhague 

Meluco Inselberg 

PRELIMINARY DIAGNOSIS     

Park requires intensive planning and branding, opportunities for gateways to the park and a park  headquarters in a central location such as Pemba  Large potential for various types of marine tourism that fits within a larger regional circuit   Complex social development issues will increase inland and require attention, including relocation issues  and human animal conflict issues 

NEXT STEPS | REQUIREMENTS         

Work with WWF to fill any gaps in GIS data   Continue fieldwork in coastal and inland areas to identify opportunities and attractions  Define criteria for spatial analysis, initiate spatial analysis     

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

65


TABLE 6: QUIRIMBAS NATIONAL PARK DATA  GIS DATA  Name 

Date

Source

Description

All GIS data including name, year, source, description, scale, data type, and scale included in Table 1.  

HARD COPY CARTOGRAPHY  Ilha Medjumbe a Baia do Rovuma  Nautical Chart  

1986

Baia do Lurio a Ilha Medjumbe  Nautical Chart  

1986

Ilha do Ibo a Ilha Macaloe Nautical  Chart 

1986

Dirreccao Principal de Nevegacao e  Oceanografia do Ministerio da  Defesa de U.R.S.S.   Dirreccao Principal de Nevegacao e  Oceanografia do Ministerio da  Defesa de U.R.S.S.   Dirreccao Principal de Nevegacao e  Oceanografia do Ministerio da  Defesa de U.R.S.S. 

1:200K

1:200K

1:50K

MANAGEMENT AND STRATEGIC PLANS  Quirimbas National Park General  Management Plan 2004–2008 

Feb 2004 

Ministry of Tourism, Mozambique

Tourism Development Plan for the  Parque Nacional das Quirimbas 

Unpublished DRAFT 

Parque Nacional das Quirimbas  (WWF) 

Plan to guide the  establishment,  management, and  development of the  park ‐

REPORTS (GOVERNMENT AND NONGOVERNMENT) Economic Growth and Natural  Resources Management of the  Mtwara and Nacala Development  Corridors, Tanzania, and  Mozambique  Frontier Mozambique  Environmental Research, Reports  2–5 

July 2009 

WWF and CARE

Report on joint  initiative to target  Mtwara and Nacala  Development  Corridors  Marine Biological and  Resource Use Surveys 

1998

Frontier Mozambique

 

 

Nov 2009 

Dobbin International Field Team  

Photographs of lodges  and park  

Nov 2009 

Dobbin International Field Team  

Site survey 

Meeting with WWF and park  management  

Sept 2009 

Dobbin International Field Team  

Meeting with owners of Guludo  Lodge   Meeting with owner of Maraje  ecolodge    

Sept 2009 

Dobbin International Field Team  

Oct 2009 

Dobbin International Field Team  

Meeting to acquire GIS  data and other  information  Meeting to understand  coastal ecotourism  Meeting to understand  inland ecotourism 

Oct 2009 

Indico Magazine  

STATISTICAL DATA   None 

PHOTOGRAPHY Digital Photographs 

SITE SURVEY  Site survey of proposed Serena  Hotels site 

MEETINGS AND INTERVIEWS 

MEDIA AND PUBLICATIONS  Inselberg Article 

Tourism article 

 

66   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

67


3.5 Mozambique District Region 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION  Mozambique’s unique geographic position made it a natural trade route between Europe and Asia and cross‐ roads for Arab, Portuguese, and African cultures. Mozambique became an official colony of Portugal in the 18th  century. In the 19th century, the Portuguese directly administered the province from Ilha da Moçambique, which  was later moved to the more favorable port of Maputo several decades later. The struggle for independence  dominated much of the latter half of the 20th century with the establishment of the Mozambique Liberation  Front (Frelimo), which conducted its first operations from Cabo Delgado Province. Decades of civil war and  conflict after independence in 1975 left the country bereft of social or physical infrastructure needed to create  or maintain livelihoods and social well‐being.   Cabo Delgado, the northernmost province in the country, suffers the highest rates of poverty, and it is estimated  that Cabo Delgado has a per capita Gross National Product (GNP) less than half of that of the national average.  Nevertheless, Mozambique has risen to become one of Africa’s best examples of post‐conflict reconstruction  and economic development, enjoying high growth rates estimated at 9.8 percent in 2006 (CRSP annual report).  Multinational companies are beginning to invest in Mozambique with its abundance of natural resources  combined with political and economic stability. Government and nongovernmental organizations continue to  work in the region, and international tourists continue to arrive in increasing numbers, having taken notice of  Mozambique’s natural beauty and unique cultural heritage.     

  68 

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


INSERT MOZ DISTRICT MAP   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

69


AKDN CONTEXT  Multiple agencies within the AKDN have a presence in Mozambique. Industrial and tourism promotion services  (IPS and TPS, respectively) actively work in the capital city of Maputo (and nearby Matola), which will also be  home to an Aga Khan Academy.   Maputo also serves as the administrative headquarters of the Aga Khan Foundation Mozambique. The  foundation’s implementation arm—the Coastal Rural Support Program (CRSP‐M)—seeks to strengthen the  capacity of communities to create new economic opportunities and secure livelihoods. CRSP‐M implements  social programs in the Province of Cabo Delgado, over 3,500 km north of Maputo. Agriculture, water sanitation,  enterprise development, education, health, and Habitat and Bridges to the Future programs make up CRSP‐M,  which was first established in 2001. CRSP‐M’s scope spans five districts (predominantly coastal) in Cabo Delgado,  including Pemba‐Metuge, Quissanga, Macomia, Meluco, and Ibo. Operations for CRSP‐M are managed from the  City of Pemba, the capital of Cabo Delgado Province.   The AKAM also has operations in the City of Pemba and has recently opened the first microfinance bank in the  city.   REGIONAL OBSERVATIONS    

      

Coastal areas in Cabo Delgado and the Quirimbas Archipelago serve as primary tourism cultural  attractions in the region; however, lack of Infrastructure and basic services, reliable road and air access,  strategic direction, and promotion remain inhibitors to tourism in the region infrastructure   A north‐south connection across the Rovuma between Mtwara and Palma near the mouth of the  Rovuma is one of the most important binding constraints for district and regional development; the  Unity Bridge is too far west of the region to have a major impact even when all the connector roads are  upgraded and the bridge complete   Subsistence agriculture is widely practiced throughout the region, although large‐scale agriculture (rice,  bananas, cashews) were once prominent during the colonial period    Stretches of fertile land are suitable for growing citrus fruits, sesame, maize, rice, and other crops  throughout the region, while food security issues, human‐animal conflict, and market linkages limit the  scale of agricultural output   Fishing is widely practiced along the coast with pockets of interprovincial trade between Cabo Delgado  and Nampula province. Lack of cooling centers and processing facilities limit shelf life of fish  Oil and gas exploration is active off the coast of the Districts of Palma and Mocimboa da Praia  Only two banking/microfinance institutions exist outside the City of Pemba in the project region   Illegal logging, soil erosion, climate change, and poaching continue to be the greatest threats to  sustainable economic development of the region  It is apparent that Pemba Bay, Pemba port, and Pemba airport will continue to make Pemba the hub of  multisectoral activity in the region      

70   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


DATA ACQUISITION PROCESS       

Obtained and compiled GIS data at the international, national, and regional scales   Met with government officials at district and provincial levels to discuss opportunities and constraints  across all sectors and obtain district balance reporting on district progress and 5‐year strategic plans   Obtained and referenced publications from a variety of sources (private, government, and  nongovernment) to provide context to the project area and help focus field efforts  Met with AKDN representatives to better understand activities of the various agencies in the project  districts   Conducted site visits to each of the project districts and documented the team’s observations and data  related to market, lodging, infrastructure, tourist, historical, and cultural sites 

Lighthouse in Cabo Delgado, Palma District              Quiuia Beach, Palma District                

Dhow Port, Mocimboa da Praia 

Portuguese Cemetery, Mocimboa da Praia               Main Market, Mocimboa da Praia 

Fertile land north of Macomia‐Sede, Macomia         Water tank in the town of Chai, Macomia 

 

 

Mat weaving, Palma District* 

Pangane, Macomia 

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

71


PRELIMINARY DIAGNOSIS  Tourism    The mix of marine environment, white beaches, and secluded settings continue to attract international  tourists to the islands off the coast of Cabo Delgado   Opportunities may exist to take over existing resorts or establish new resorts on islands; can be the  entry point to the tourism sector  Infrastructure   Both international and regional access to these areas continue to be unreliable   As access and infrastructure improve in Cabo Delgado, lodging and other services will be needed to  accommodate increased traffic and trade resulting from better connection with Tanzania   Numerous opportunities exist in the tourism sector; multisector approach may best address the current  inhibitors to tourism   International and regional access continues to be unreliable through national airline (LAM) and regional  airlines  Culture   Opportunity to leverage and preserve dhow culture and transport   Cultural heritage can be the unifying link along the coast and may serve as the impetus to convert  “point” island visits into regional tourist circuits celebrating the heritage of the Swahili coast   Cultural heritage can be promoted through the arts, dhow culture, and revitalization of structures   Banking and microfinance   Pension disbursements to war veterans (of colonial war) and increasing commercial activity in the  northern districts have created demand for financial institution services (savings and credit)  Agriculture and Fisheries   During colonial times, stretches of land in the project area were used for large‐scale agriculture  production of rice, bananas, and cashews. Potential still exists for larger‐scale production of these crops  as well as citrus fruits. The port in Pemba can serve as the gateway to the international market   Absence of fish processing, cooling facilities, and other value‐added services limit the growth and larger‐ scale development of this industry  Social Infrastructure    Social infrastructure (water points, community spaces) continues to be priority for district governments  and can continue to be addressed through social interventions  Environmental Restoration for Economic Development   Environmental leadership is required to balance natural resource extraction with conservation of  environmentally sensitive areas    Poaching, deforestation, soil erosion, and poor sanitation all contribute to the degradation of  environmental assets (e.g., Pemba Bay) and therefore the economic development opportunities       

72   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


Bilibiza, Quissanga 

Fort Sao Joao, Ibo* 

Lake

Bandari Beach, Pemba‐Metuge 

Quissanga Praia, Quissanga 

Ibo

Near Bandari Beach, Pemba‐Metuge 

  

Papayas growing in Village, Quissanga 

View from Ibo Lodge 

Crossing near Metuge‐Sede, Pemba‐Metuge 

NEXT STEPS | REQUIREMENTS       

Review and refine GIS data and maps  Conduct a meeting with District Administrator for Mocimboa da Praia and Ibo Districts  Conduct field visit to the eastern part of Pemba‐Metuge District to collect relevant data   Update market, lodging, and other social infrastructure data with relevant attributes and import into GIS  Begin to conduct spatial analysis to better identify opportunities for region   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

73


SUMMARY OF MOZAMBIQUE DISTRICT OBSERVATIONS Tourism and Culture 

Social infrastructure

Physical Infrastructure   

Pending further fieldwork 

Binding constraints to growth (FO): 

PALMA Presence of cultural and historical attractions  including the ruins of a sultan’s palace near  the village of Quiuia, pristine beaches near  Mbuizi, a lighthouse in the village of Cabo  Delgado, and the marine ecosystem (FO, GO) 

Diesel generators are main source of energy     Lack of a bridge across the Rovuma connecting  Mozambique to Tanzania results in reduced  cross‐border travel and trade 

Very little existing infrastructure to support  growth of the industry (FO)  An overall regional tourism and land use  strategy has not been defined (GO)  No international tourist–caliber hotels or  guest houses to support this industry on the  main land; however, there is a resort on the  island of Vamizi and one planned for the island  of Tecomaji (FO) 

MOCIMBOA DA PRAIA  A limited selection of accommodations in  Mocimboa da Praia (FO) 

Pending further fieldwork 

Mocimboa da Praia is one of the few places in  northern Cabo Delgado to have electricity in  the town centre (FO) 

Pending further fieldwork 

Electricity coverage will be expanded in 2010  in and around Meluco‐Sede area (GO) 

MACOMIA Coastal locations of Pangane,  Guludo, and  offshore islands are primary tourist  destination (GO)  Tourist lodge development in village of  Messano on the coast (FO) 

Recent local investments in the form of  restaurants and accommodation are under  development in the Macomia‐Sede area (GO,  FO) 

Reliable access (international and regional) is a  big inhibitor to sector (PI) 

Legend    GO  Government Official  NG  Nongovernment Organization     

 

Community Member Field Survey Observation

PI AK

Private Interest  AKF Employee   

  74 

CM FO  

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


SUMMARY OF MOZAMBIQUE DISTRICT OBSERVATIONS Agriculture and Fisheries 

Resource Extraction (Mining, Oil,  Gas, Forestry) 

Industry and Commerce

Environment and Conservation

Oil exploration activity is  increasing along the coast and  inland (GO) 

Increased employment, skills, and  income as a result of job creation  from oil industry (GO) 

Cross‐border marine  conservation area being  proposed (NG) 

LINDI DISTRICT  Agriculturally promising areas for  growing bananas, pineapple,  mangos, and jatropha (GO)  Main economic driver is a mix of  subsistence and income‐generating  fishing (GO) 

No cooling facilities to  complement the fishing industry  (GO)  Despite the presence of  multinational oil companies and  increased wages, there are no  financial institutions in the district  (GO)  The town of Palma is awaiting  connection to the national energy  grid as part of a project that will  begin in 2010 (GO) 

MOCIMBOA DA PRAIA  District was once home to large‐ scale rice production (GO) 

Lumber industry is active in the  region (FO, PI) 

Fishing industry is very active, and  Mocimboa de Praia town had one  of the largest fishing markets in the  project region (FO) 

Ships continue to participate in oil  exploration efforts (FO, PI) 

Lumber processing plant near the  Mocimboa de Praia waterfront  readies lumber for trade and/or  export (FO) 

It is unclear how the government  intends to balance oil  exploration with marine  conservation (FO) 

Commercial district in Mocimboa  de Praia town is one of the most  developed outside of Pemba City.  It is home to one bank, Internet  café, and other services (FO) 

MACOMIA Cashews, rice, and bananas were  previously grown in the area in  large scales (GO)  Fertile land north of the village of  Chai  (FO)  Moderate climate is suited for the  growth of many fruits and  vegetables (GO)  Healthy fishing industry  experiencing interprovincial trade  between Nampula (Nacala port)  and Macomia (GO)  Cleaning stations present in   villages of Quiterajo, Pangane, and  Ingane (GO)  The absence of other services (e.g.,  refrigeration) to increase the “shelf  life” of fish limits the expansion of  fishing industry (GO) 

Lumber industry is active in the  region (FO, PI) 

Legend    GO  Government Official  NG  Nongovernment Organization 

CM FO

Macomia‐Sede will be the power  station hub for the electricity grid  being built through the Cabo  Delgado province in 2010 (GO)  Geographically positioned to  receive traffic from Tanzania with  the completion of the Unity Bridge  (GO, FO)  Over $3 million US are disbursed  every month (by Department of  Planning and Finance) as pensions  to residents in Macomia and  northern districts to war veterans  (GO)  There are no banks or  microfinance institutions in the  district (GO, FO) 

Community Member Field Survey Observation

PI AK

PNQ presence (GO) 

Private Interest  AKF Employee 

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

 

75


SUMMARY OF MOZAMBIQUE DISTRICT OBSERVATIONS Tourism and Culture 

Social infrastructure

Physical Infrastructure   

District government is working with CRSP‐ MOZ for creation of Water Points in Meluco  District (GO) 

A new petrol station and pension are  currently being built (FO) 

MELUCO Inselbergs (large conical‐shaped rock formations)  can attract some niche tourist groups  (ecotourists, hikers, climbers) (FO)  Distance, accessibility, lack of publicity and  tourism infrastructure/services are all inhibitors  to tourism (GO) 

Electricity coverage will also be expanded in  the next year in and around Meluco‐sede  area. (GO)  PNQ presence (GO) 

More research on areas of high animal  concentration (elephants, etc.) will need to be  conducted to better evaluate tourist potential  (FO) 

IBO Presence of one high‐end luxury and some mid‐ range budget offerings (FO) 

Social infrastructure constraints such as water  and sanitation are becoming priority areas for  the community (AK) 

Accessible by air and sea via Pemba but links are  not always reliable (FO, PI)  Most tourists stay for short trips and experience  diving, dhow (traditional vessel) sailing, and tours  of cultural and historical monuments (FO, PI) 

Diesel power generator is main source of  electricity on the island (FO)  Infrastructure constraints and accessibility  issues increase cost to do business on the  Island (FO)  PNQ presence (GO) 

Unique cultural heritage expressed through  architecture, art, and local traditions (FO)  There is an active artisan community preserving  traditions in crafts and jewelry‐making, while  learning new techniques in floral crafts (FO, AK)  Beautification, restoration, and promotion  activities will be required to attract more tourists  to the area (FO) 

QUISSANGA Two priority areas have been identified by the  district for investment in social infrastructure:  education and access to water (GO) 

Lack of electricity and transportation  infrastructure are inhibitors to tourism (FO)  Lake Bilibiza may offer ecotourism potential but  require investment in transportation  infrastructure and conservation to maintain and  develop the site (FO, GO) 

Part of Quissanga district will be connected to  the electricity grid in 2010 (GO)  Infrastructure  around Tandanhague  (embarkation point to the island of Ibo) is  undergoing improvement to facilitate easy  access and upgrade tourist experience (FO)  PNQ presence (GO) 

Only two guest houses, none of which are tourist  caliber, exist in the entire district  (FO) 

PEMBA‐METUGE Proximity to Pemba City, a varying topography, a  coastline that extends along the bay, and parts of  Quirimbas National Park that lie within the  district boundaries are all assets that may  translate to tourist potential (FO)  Most cultural and tourist interests in the district  center on the area of Londo, which is situated  across the bay from Pemba City (GO, FO)  Legend    GO  Government Official  NG  Nongovernment Organization 

76   

Escola Agraria in Bilibiza, a unique agricultural  school (FO) 

CM FO 

Community Member Field Survey Observation

PNQ presence (GO) 

PI AK

Private Interest  AKF Employee 

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


SUMMARY OF MOZAMBIQUE DISTRICT OBSERVATIONS Agriculture and Fisheries 

Resource extraction (Mining, Oil  and Gas, Forestry) 

Industry and Commerce

Environment and Conservation

A “Kulima” microfinance institution  is situated in Meluco‐Sede (FO) 

Almost 80% of Meluco lies within  the Quirimbas National Park  terrestrial area (GO) 

MELUCO Agriculture is the main economic  driver in Meluco (GO)  Land is suited for bananas,  mango, pineapple, orange,  papaya, passion fruit (GO) 

Inselberg may (large conical‐ shaped rock formation) hold  opportunity for mining and  semiprecious stones (GO)  Timber industry seems to be  active in the area (GO) 

IBO Available land and marine park  places constraints on fisheries  and agriculture for the local  population (AK) 

None observed 

No banking or financial  institutions on or near the island  (FO)  CRSP‐Moz making efforts to link  Ibo artisan community with  regional and international  markets through brands such as  “Ibo Silver” (AK) 

Important marine and natural  resources in the area (NG)  No take zones have been   established  to preserve  Biodiversity in the area (AK) 

QUISSANGA Subsistence farming is primarily  practiced. Soil is suited for large  scale production of bananas,  mangos and citrus fruits (GO, AK)  Subsistence fishing is a major  source of income. There are no  fish processing or storage  facilities in the district (GO) 

Logging industry is active in the  district. (PI) 

No financial institutions exist in the  district (GO, FO) 

Part of Quissanga  is covered by  Quirimbas National Park. (PI) 

Wholesale fish companies are  transporting fish to inland markets  (FO, PI) 

PEMBA‐METUGE Agriculture land is well suited for   Bananas, pineapple, mangos,  passion fruit (GO, AK) 

A part of Pemba‐Metuge is  covered by Quirimbas National  Park. Logging industry is active in  the district. (PI) 

Legend    GO  Government Official  NG  Non‐government Organization 

CM FO

Agricultural outputs in Pemba‐ Metuge supply much of Pemba city  (GO, AK)  No financial institutions exist in  Pemba‐Metuge (outside the city of  Pemba) (GO, FO) 

Community Member Field survey observation

PI AK

Larger scale and focused  environmental interventions may  address and/or alleviate  poaching, deforestation and soil  erosion (PI)  Soil erosion in Pemba‐Metuge is  having negative effects in land  and in Pemba Bay (PI, FO) 

Private Interest  AKF Employee 

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

77


TABLE 7: MOZAMBIQUE DISTRICT REGION DATA  GIS DATA  Name 

Date

Source

Description

All GIS data including name, year, source, description, scale, data type, and scale included in Table 1. 

MANAGEMENT AND STRATEGIC PLANS  5‐year strategic plan for District of Pemba‐Metuge,  2008‐23012 

Undated

Palma Balance Report 

Undated

5‐year strategic plan for District of Meluco 

Undated

Cabo Delgado Strategic Development Plan 2001 to 2005 

Feb 2001

National Transportation and Communication Strategic  Plan 

Aug 2009

Strategic Plan for the Development of Tourism in  Mozambique  Preliminary Integrated Tourism Development Plan  (2007–2013) 

Feb 2004 2007

District Administrator  Pemba‐Metuge  District  Administrator  Meluco District  Permanent  Secretary   Government of  Cabo Delgado  Province  Ministry of  Transport and  Communication  Ministry of  Tourism  Nathan Consulting

Strategic plan addressing development  and rehabilitation of the sector  ‐ ‐

REPORTS (GOVERNMENT AND NONGOVERNMENT) Dobbin International Spatial Planning Reports for Palma  and Mocimboa da Praia  CRSP Strategic Plan Proposal Draft 

2007 Aug 2009

District Profile Reports 

2005

Cabo Delgado Conceptual Land Use Planning and Design 

Mar 2008

Assessment of Land Resources for Rainfed Crop  Production in Mozambique 

May 1982

Ibo Urban Plan 

May 2008

Cultural and Tourist Profiles 

Unknown

Draft of National Development Rice Strategy  

Feb 2009

Chiquita Africa Presentation on Africa Banana  Production 

Unknown

Dobbin International  Director of  Programs  Ministerio da  Administracao  Estatal  USAID Food and  Agriculture  Organization of  UN  MICOA Cabo  Delgado  Department of  Education and  Culture  Ministry of  Agriculture  Chiquita

Spatial Plans for MICOA  Focuses on enhancing food security and  incomes  Profiles documented in Portuguese for  each district in project region  Framework for tourism development in  northern Mozambique  Land utilization types, climatic data  bank, climatic resource inventory in  Mozambique  ‐ List of cultural heritage sites and  activities as identified by the  department   ‐ Presentation for potential investors and  partners 

STATISTICAL DATA  Preliminary statistical data for 2007 census 

Jul 2009

Institute Nacional  de Statistica  

Some high‐level statistical data  presented in PowerPoint  

Jul – Nov 2009

Dobbin International Field  Team  

PHOTOGRAPHY 1,000 + images from Mozambique 

SITE SURVEYS  None  

78 Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


MEETINGS AND INTERVIEWS 

Provincial Director of Tourism 

‐Sept 2009

Director of Culture and Education 

Sept 2009

Director of Transport and Communications 

Oct 2009

USAID

Aug – Oct 2009

Director of Culture and Education in Palma 

Sept 2009

District Administrator for Palma 

Sept 2009

District Administrator for Macomia 

Sept 2009

PNQ and WWF Management 

Sept 2009

Spanish Aid Cooperation 

Sept 2009

CRSP Mozambique Director of Agriculture  

Sept 2009

Director of Department of Planning and Finance 

Oct 2009

AKAM Pemba 

Oct 2009

Permanent Secretary and District Administrator of  Quissanga 

Oct 2009

Meluco District officials 

Oct 2009

Monitoring and Evaluation Unit in CRSP 

Sept 2009

Swahili coast sailboat charter company 

Oct 2009

Tour of IPS facility in Matola 

Nov 2009

AKF and AKDN Maputo 

Sept and Nov  2009 

Director of EDI CRSP (M) 

Sept 2009

Pemba‐Metuge District officials 

Sept 2009

Dobbin International Field  Team  Dobbin  International Field  Team  Dobbin  International Field  Team  Dobbin  International Field  Team  Dobbin  International Field  Team  Dobbin  International Field  Team  Dobbin  International Field  Team  Dobbin  International Field  Team  Dobbin  International Field  Team  Dobbin  International Field  Team  Dobbin  International Field  Team  Dobbin  International Field  Team  Dobbin  International Field  Team  Dobbin  International Field  Team  Dobbin  International Field  Team  Dobbin  International Field  Team  Dobbin  International Field  Team  Dobbin  International Field  Team  Dobbin  International Field  Team  Dobbin  International Field  Team 

Francisco Lapido Louriero 

Esmeralda Arone 

Joaquim Lucas Namae and others

Jose Diaz, David Reynolds 

Paula Gonzalez, Renato Uane, Isabel  Filiberto  Jose Dambiro 

Paulo Risco

Roberto CiFuentes  

Luis Napa, Luis Alset, Jorge de Felix

Geoff Borne, Captain of Lo Entropy  (Monsoon Safaris)  Tour of textile operations in Matola

Johnny Colon 

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

79


MEDIA AND PUBLICATIONS  Geotourism Map Guide for Northern Mozambique 

USAID

Map documenting locations of cultural  heritage and tourist locations in  Northern Mozambique 

Indico Magazine article on Quirimbas 

July 2009

Indico Magazine

Article

Collateral for tourist caliber resorts and hotels in Cabo  Delgado   Mozambique Travel Guides 

n/a

Various Resorts 

Rani Resorts (4), Ibo Island, Quilalea

1997 to 2008

Five travel guides and maps of  Mozambique 

The Sultan Palace Ruins  

2009

Lonely Planet,  GlobeTrotter,  Phillip Brigs  Indico Magazine

Culture and history of ruins near the  village of Quiuia in Palma 

 

80 Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

81


3.6 Mozambique Towns   3.6.1 PEMBA TOWN 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION  Pemba was established in 1904 by the Niassa Company as an administrative headquarters and remained under  Portuguese rule until 1974. Today, it is the capital of Cabo Delgado province and the gateway to the Quirimbas  Archipelago.   The Pemba Bay area includes Pemba‐Metuge and Pemba Bay area. Pemba Town is the official boundary and  includes the Pemba Baixa and Paquitequete. Pemba Bay is one of the world’s largest natural harbors and  maintains an operational port. The bay is rich in marine resources and presents a major resource and attraction  for the town. The watershed draining into Pemba Bay has been radically changed through agriculture and  deforestation upstream.  Pemba Town occupies 19 km2 and has a population of about 121,000 people. It is connected to the south and  north by a national highway from Nampula, making this the “gateway” to the northern Mozambique and Cabo  Delgado. Wimbe Beach area has an international reputation for tourism; however, it suffers from serious  coastal, beach, and water quality deterioration because of poor planning and infrastructure.   

82 Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


INSERT PEMBA TOWN MAP   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

83


AKDN CONTEXT  AKDN has established a branch of the Coastal Rural Support Program in Cabo Delgado and currently there are  two programs in Pemba. The first is AKAM, and the second is a handicrafts shop at the airport developed by the  Economic Development Initiative (EDI) program within CRSP (M). The CRSP (M) office overlooks Pemba Bay and,  including all field staff, employs some 100 people.   SCALE‐BASED OBSERVATIONS  Pemba Bay and Region    Watershed destruction through deforestation and inappropriate agriculture practices has led to erosion,  which negatively affects water quality and local fisheries    Boats sailing across Pemba Bay is a means for transporting people and cargo to and from Pemba City  and the surrounding coastal areas of Pemba‐Metuge district   The few beaches lining Pemba Bay are primarily used for fishing and infrequently visited by tourists  Pemba Town   Pemba International Airport is the regional hub for air traffic (cargo and passenger) in Cabo Delgado,  with direct flights to and from South Africa, Tanzania, and Kenya. The airport is small and processing  times can be long for international arrivals   The Pemba Bay port is located in the Baixa and is limited in the size and number of ships and containers  it can handle based on the existing port and road infrastructure   Major roads in Pemba town are paved; however, secondary roads are dirt. There is a national highway  that connects Pemba to Nampula in the south and the Tanzanian border in the north. This highway is  only paved as far north as Macomia Sede, making travel to the districts of Mocimboa de Praia and Palma  difficult   Water is supplied to the municipality by FIPAG (a public water supply agency); however, reliability is  poor, and some areas of the town are inadequately serviced   A wastewater treatment facility does not exist and there is no public sanitary waste collection system;  therefore, defecation on the beach is prevalent. General practice for homeowners and hotel operators is  to install a septic tank to collect sanitary waste   Pemba’s landfill site is located near the airport and is an unsightly welcome to visitors as they travel into  the city. There is also a significant amount of trash strewn around town    As the capital of Cabo Delgado, Pemba is home to a number of government offices and services,  including the provincial hospital and several health clinics, naval and military bases, and the provincial  police headquarters   Each “bairro” in the town has a dispensary or health clinic, community police station, primary school,  and administrative office   There are eight secondary/vocational schools and four postsecondary institutions   The population of Pemba is mostly Muslim with a visible Catholic presence; as a result, there are many  religious buildings throughout the city   

84 Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


Pemba Baixa and Paquitequete   The Pemba “Baixa” or downtown area is located at the northeastern tip of the peninsula, with views of  Pemba Bay and the Indian Ocean   Many buildings in the Baixa are designed in the modern architecture style   Buildings in varying conditions—from ruins to those having been recently rehabilitated—appear on the  three main streets of the Baixa and are occupied by a mix of government, wholesale/retail businesses,  restaurants and microbars, and private housing   Pemba’s port is located at the southern edge of the Baixa, and transport vehicles must cross the city and  travel through the Baixa to access the port   There is no marina or embarkation point for private boats, yachts, or other marine‐going vessels   Adjacent to the Baixa is the bairro of “Paquitequete,” which is the original settlement in Pemba, serving  as its historic and cultural center. Paquitequete is the launching point for numerous dhows used by  locals for fishing activities around Pemba Bay   Numerous environmental and social issues are present in Paquitequete as a result of dense population  distribution and low‐lying area   Poor sanitation (wastewater and solid waste) and flooding due to storm surges and/or sea level rise  continue to threaten the quality of life of the population  DATA ACQUISITION PROCESS    Met with Provincial Director of Transportation and Communication to discuss transportation challenges  in Pemba City and within Cabo Delgado   Conducted survey of Pemba City at the Baixa and City scales and each of the bairros; survey included  waterfront areas and buildings of architectural interest in the Baixa   Conducted meetings with USAID to better understand tourism, economic development strategies, and  investment opportunities   Obtained and reviewed USAID’s tourism development strategy for Pemba and Cabo Delgado   Obtained copy of 1971 promotional video of Pemba   Obtained a series of urban master planning documents from Eduardo Mondlane University School of  Architecture  PRELIMINARY DIAGNOSIS    Identify existing open space system and develop strategy to expand and improve the system such as      

 

waterfront renewal between Wimbe Beach and the Baixa  Identify least expensive waste management systems to improve waste water management, solid waste  management, recycling, and water retention systems  Develop context for strategic urban plan (like Vilankulos Urban Plan prepared by James Dobbin), include  feasibility of urban focal points throughout the town   Identify strategy and partners to renovate the Baixa urban areas and urban waterfront and create small  business opportunities  Develop realistic proposals for a marina in Pemba Bay and assess potential for marine tourism; the  USAID proposals propose marina on an exposed point beside the port, likely not a good location  Consider site selection study of new industrial port with better land access, based on limited space to  expand current port and the long term impact of the port in the redevelopment of the Baixa   Clean up the inputs in the Bay and work to clean up Wimbe Beach and establish stronger planning  guidelines to reduce future impacts   Link economic and tourist activity in Baixa and other tourist nodes with social development in Bairros  (neighborhoods)     

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

85


Low tide and pollution on Wimbe Beach 

Cathedral in Pemba 

Paquitequete

Wimbe Beach, Pemba Beach Hotel 

Renovated building in Baixa  

Paquitequete and river pollution 

Cruise ship in Pemba port 

View of Pemba Bay 

Pemba Beach Hotel 

NEXT STEPS | REQUIREMENTS    Follow up with Municipality and obtain information on buildings undergoing rehabilitation, plans for  Baixa redevelopment and understanding of other urban strategy and planning projects   Develop coastal and marine resources data on location of coral reefs, seagrass beds, mangroves, sand  beach and sand dunes and other coastal and marine resources   Identify all point and non‐point sources of pollution as well as drainage channels and other issues of  environmental concern   Expand GIS database with additional relevant data       

86 Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

87


3.6.2   ILHA DE MOÇAMBIQUE AND AREA 

GENERAL DESCRIPTION  Ilha de Moçambique is located off the coast of northern Mozambique in the district of Lumbo and the province  of Nampula. The island was a major Arab port and boat‐building center before the Portuguese established a port  and naval base there in 1507. The island served as the capital of Portuguese East Africa until 1898, and by the  middle of the 20th century, the port of Nacala had taken most of the remaining business from the island.   Today, the island is divided into two distinctive areas: Stone Town on the north and Macuti town on the south.  Stone Town consists mainly of Portuguese colonial buildings, while Macuti town consists mainly of homes and  structures built in the traditional fashion using local materials. The island is inhabited by approximately 14,000  people, the majority of whom practice Islam. In 1991, the island was designated as an UNESCO World Heritage  Site, and work is currently under way to restore the Sao Sebastian Fortress. Ilha de Moçambique is part of group  of islands that includes Ilha de Goa and Ilha de Sena.     

88 Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


INSERT ILHA MAP   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

89


AKDN CONTEXT  There are currently no ADKN projects or programs on Ilha de Moçambique or in the Province of Nampula.  However, it was mentioned during numerous conversations that there has been a long‐standing interest in Ilha  de Moçambique because of its historical and cultural significance along the Swahili Coast.  SCALE‐BASED OBSERVATIONS  Ilha de Moçambique Scale   The number of tourists visiting the island has stagnated over the past few years; however, NGOs  including UNESCO and Technoserve are actively working to develop the tourism industry as a source of  income for the local population and to promote Ilha de Moçambique as an international tourist  destination   Subsistence fishing is the main economic activity; there is no agriculture on the island    Lack of clean water and sanitation infrastructure on the island represents a challenge for development,  and the high population density adds to the strain on existing infrastructure   The field survey revealed a few buildings demonstrating Ismaili heritage on the island and an Ismaili  cemetery  Coastal Mainland and Lumbo Scale   There is little agriculture being practiced along the coast. However, the area is known for its high yield of  mangoes, and some small‐scale agriculture is taking place along the river basins. Fishing remains the  main economic activity   The Nacala airport is being redeveloped for use as an international passenger airport, which would make  Ilha de Moçambique a 30‐minute drive from the airport as opposed to the current 2.5 hour‐drive from  Nampula   The colonial era railway that terminated in Lumbo is no longer in use, yet a rehabilitated rail link to  Nacala is being constructed that will connect the port with the interior of Mozambique  Ilha de Goa and Ilha de Sena   The two islands are a short boat ride from Ilha de Moçambique and offer further tourism attractions   Plans are being developed to preserve the marine environment surrounding all the islands through the  protection of the underwater cultural heritage (i.e., sunken ships and dhows)  DATA ACQUISITION PROCESS        

Met with mayor and discussed development constraints, challenges, and the strategic plan  Conducted survey of project region including the islands of Goa and Sena and the mainland around  Lumbo  Conducted meetings with Technoserve to better understand tourism and economic development  strategies and investment opportunities through the newly established community foundation  Met with Gabinete de Conservacao da Ilha de Moçambique (GACIM) to better understand their efforts  to preserve and promote the island’s heritage through the built environment   

90 Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


Lighthouse on Ilha de Goa 

Ismaili Cemetery 

Old French Consulate 

Fishing around Ilha 

Main Sunni Mosque 

Museum and Sao Paulo Palace 

Macuti Town 

Waterside Walkway 

Primary School and Historic Aga Khan Building 

PRELIMINARY DIAGNOSIS      

Potential to help create framework for an integrated multisectoral framework plan that can be used by  multiple partners to collaborate on long‐term investment and development opportunities on the island  Given the historical significance and continuation of the predominantly Muslim population on the island,  there is great opportunity to highlight Islamic history and culture on the island and in the region   Potential hotel sites in the region would serve as a southern anchor for a coastal tourism strategy and  would connect to Pemba and Zanzibar; could be a boutique hotel on the island or a resort facility on a  mainland beach   Tourism investment holds the potential to support the local economy through promotion of the diverse  activities available; however, any significant tourism investment would necessitate further investment in  local and regional infrastructure  

NEXT STEPS | REQUIREMENTS   Review documents, plans, and reports; obtain tourism strategy commissioned by Technoserve    Meet with UNESCO and IPAD to gain a better understanding of the work they are conducting and the  potential for collaboration   Develop list of organisations working in the area and create a more comprehensive picture of  development work   Hold interview with Historian Luis Filipe of Eduardo Mondlane University to discuss historical context  and perspective on the future on the island       

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

91


TABLE 8: ILHA DE MOÇAMBIQUE DATA  GIS DATA  Name 

Date

Source/Author

Description

All GIS data including name, year, source, description, scale, data type, and scale included in Table 1.

`HARD COPY CARTOGRAPHY  GIS Map of streets and buildings 

Undated

SDPP GIS data

Soft copy (.jpg)

Nautical Charts of the Mozambican coast 

1986

USSR Ministry of  Defense 

1:20K, 1:50K, 1:200K

Master Plan – Draft 

Dec 2008

Written in Portuguese

Municipal 5‐year Strategic Plan 

June 2009

CESO CI  International for  the government  Mayor’s Office

Written in Portuguese

Tourism Strategy  

Draft

Technoserve

Technoserve Strategic Plan 

Nov 2006

Technoserve

PowerPoint presentation 

MANAGEMENT AND STRATEGIC PLANS 

REPORTS (GOVERNMENT AND NON‐GOVERNMENT) Ilha de Moçambique 1982‐1985  Cities without Slums, Slum Upgrading in Ilha da  Moçambique 

1985

Arkitektskolen i  Aartius 

Excellent urban and architectural inventory 

June 2008 

Yoland Leyel 

Bachelor Thesis  

Islanders of Yesterday and Today  Mission Report 

Feb 2008  May 2006

Technoserve Unkown

Technoserve‐GACIM Funding Proposal   Summary of IPAD workshop on proposed  work and collaboration 

National Census Summary 

2007

500+ pictures of Ilha de Moçambique and  Surrounding Area 

Nov 2009

National Institute  of Statistics  Dobbin  International Field  Team 

Preview of data compiled during the most  recent census – final data pending  Photographs of buildings and landscape 

Nov 2009

Dobbin International Field  Team 

Includes buildings available for purchase  and public infrastructure 

GACIM

Nov 2009

Dobbin International Field  Team  

Met with Director

Mayor of Ilha de Moçambique 

Nov 2009

Discussions regarding current situation and  future potential 

Technoserve

Nov 2009

Dobbin International Field  Team  Dobbin  International Field  Team 

STATISTICAL DATA 

SITE SURVEYS  Survey of town and historical buildings

MEETINGS AND INTERVIEWS 

Met with country director and local  representative 

MEDIA AND PUBLICATIONS AND PUBLICATIONS Island of the Spirits 

Nov  2009

Technoserve

Cultural documentary video 

Island of Mozambique Omuhipiti 

Undated

Ministry of Culture

Cultural and historical guide map 

Third Network Meeting OWHC Eastern Africa 

Feb 2005

Ilha de Moçambique Cluster 

May 2006

Presentation of top 13 buildings for potential  investment  UNESCO World Heritage List web information 

Oct 2009

Technoserve

Presentation about previous meetings and  activities  Presentation made by IPAD regarding  coordination of work in Ilha  Shows pictures and locations 

Nov 2009

Dobbin International Field  Team  

Review of information available on website

92 Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


4.0 CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

4.1 Data Collection Status     We have completed the initial data collection for each project area and have minimal outstanding data  remaining to be acquired. Field surveys have been performed in each project area, and the team has conducted  extensive interviews, meetings, data collection, and investigation in each area. Furthermore, we have initiated  the process of revisiting project areas and executing further fieldwork to reach more stakeholders, refine  databases, and initiate spatial analysis.  For Mozambique, the GIS database is in good shape with several areas requiring reinforcement through further  field work to fill data gaps. For Tanzania, the gathering of data has been more problematic with several  databases still outstanding (Selous Game Reserve GIS database, the National Land Use Plan GIS database  prepared by the National Land Use Planning Commission, and the Naliendele GIS Database). We are also trying  to obtain agricultural suitability assessments and maps for Tanzania and anticipate these databases will be made  available shortly. We appreciate the assistance of numerous AKDN and AKF professionals in assisting us in  obtaining these databases.  In addition to the required data collection processes, we have been collaborating with AKDN agencies and  partners to better understand internal criteria and priorities. To enable the SDPP team to better understand the  current investment status and priorities of AKDN agencies, we met with the heads of TPS, IPS, and AKF in Nairobi  on 30 September to 1 October 2009 in a mini‐work session to discuss Phase 1 and 2 work and the various  programmes and activities of these key agencies. This work session helped us shape and refine data  requirements and gave us an indication of future spatial analyses that would serve each of the agency needs.  We also initiated some discussions about areas where we perceived potential AKDN multiagency growth  opportunities—such as the Kilwa Kivinje area, Mikindani and Mtwara area, and the Ibo‐Pemba‐Quirimbas‐ Matemo‐Medjumbe‐Macaloe areas.   During Phase 2, we collaborated with TPS on Ruaha and Selous to set up additional fieldwork with the Serena  Guides to map key areas to create a more robust database for the protected areas. Furthermore, we are  working with them to undertake field surveys in both protected areas to develop additional circuits,  assess the  resources and attractions around existing and proposed sites, and develop preliminary circuits for each site to  help us maximize the development potential and experience for Serena guests for the Serena Safari Lodges  (existing and proposed) in each protected area. We gratefully acknowledge the outstanding support of the safari  lodge managers, rangers, and TPS professionals in helping us achieve an excellent perspective on the resources  and opportunities in each of the Serena Safari Lodges and sites, as well as the overall protected areas.  Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

93


We also had the opportunity to undertake a brief assessment of the Mikindani Estate as a proposed TPS site and  have identified an island for sale off the coast from Mocimboa da Praia as an option for TPS. We have also  conducted site visits of AKTC and IPS projects outside the project region to gain a better understanding of  agency operations and precedents.   As a result of the above summarized data collection processes, the following work completed in Phase 2  includes:   ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐  

Extensive field survey and documentation of all 18 project areas   Socioeconomic and biophysical spatial data inventories   Comprehensive set of interviews and meetings with key stakeholders in project region   Kickoff workshop and initiation of collaborative efforts with AKDN agencies   Revisions and enhancement of Phase 1 cartographic efforts   Development of preliminary criteria for Phase 3 spatial analysis   Development of preliminary criteria for identification of potential AKDN agency growth poles   AKDN growth pole initial investigation and assessment    

94 Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


4.2 Preliminary Diagnosis and Spatial Analysis  The Phase 3 spatial analyses will be based on the data compiled during Phase 1 and 2 and the criteria that have  been developed and derived from the opportunities and constraints observed during the first two phases of the  project. During the early stages of Phase 3, we will address any data gaps required for detailed scenario planning  and analysis and also initiate the spatial analyses and scenario planning to address the issues identified. To best  guide the spatial analyses, it will be important to incorporate broader AKDN agency priorities and mandates.  While the identification of the criteria necessary to identify the growth poles is still in development, the  following reflects the framework we are developing for the spatial analysis:   RUAHA NATIONAL PARK  After initial field survey and review of maps and the General Management Plan, we agree that the current  proposed site has a variety of constraints. We believe we will need to evaluate the site and undertake a site  suitability assessment for the entire park to evaluate other site options.  SELOUS GAME RESERVE  After a brief field survey and meetings with TPS Mozambique General Manager and Serena Hotels management  and guides, we see many opportunities to enhance guests’ understanding, appreciation, and enjoyment of the  park by expanding the number of circuits and assessing other attractions near the two lodge sites.  KILWA  After multiple field visits, including those with some AKDN and AKF representatives to the broader Kilwa Region,  there appear to be numerous opportunities for AKDN involvement, especially given its proximity to Dar es  Salaam and Zanzibar. Areas of interest include urban renewal and revitalization, marine resources, agriculture  and fisheries, and restoration of Ismaili sites of importance.   TANZANIA DISTRICT REGION  The SDPP team executed extensive fieldwork in all districts with AKF representatives to conduct meetings with  appropriate officials and key stakeholders. Based on this fieldwork and other collected data, we see  development opportunities in energy, tourism, culture, agriculture, and small and medium enterprise  businesses. With the Mtwara Development Corridor initiative, ongoing Artumas gas and power activities in  Mtwara, and the identification of Mtwara as a World Bank Strategic City, there appear to be very interesting  opportunities in Mtwara town and neighboring Mikindani town. Mikindani town in particular presents a unique  combination of sensitive marine area, historical urban renovation, small and medium enterprise development,  tourism potential, large‐scale agriculture, and Ismaili building and mosque restoration. While the Unity Bridge  may hold long‐term benefit for the region, it will have minimal impact on coastal districts, and the binding  constraint for development in the region appears to be the lack of a north‐south connection across the Rovuma  between Mtwara and Palma, as reaffirmed by the World Bank transportation expert.  MOZAMBIQUE DISTRICT REGION  After detailed field surveys and review of databases and satellite imagery, we have found that northern  Mozambique districts offer high potential for agricultural development and tourism development related to  offshore islands and historical sites of architectural and cultural significance. Pemba town appears to be the  gateway for access to the coastal districts, but careful planning and investment will be required to improve  overall access and experience.  

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

95


QUIRIMBAS NATIONAL PARK  After review of the General Management Plan, tourism strategies, and GIS database, the current state of the  park seems to focus on individual management issues, and there is a lack of strategic direction and vision for  conservation and development. It seems difficult to see the park providing tangible benefit for the region until  such issues have been addressed. While the inland sector of the park faces substantial challenges, the coastal  and marine sector of the park contains a nexus of islands, areas of historical and cultural significance, and  globally recognized marine resources, which present striking opportunities for cultural and tourism  development.   PEMBA TOWN AND AREA   Given the complexity of the Pemba analysis, we plan to approach the town from three scales: Pemba Bay and  watershed, Pemba town, Pemba Baixa. At the bay scale, environmental issues seem to present broad  implications on the marine resources and health of the bay. At the town scale, there are several strategic  planning issues confronting the development of the town. We will map the natural and cultural resources, open‐ space systems, and historic sites to gain a better perspective of these issues. Within the Baixa, there are many  interesting components of development including social development, marina potential, economic and urban  revitalization, and cultural development. The port has been identified as a significant issue since its current  location on the end of the peninsula forces all transportation to travel through the urban fabric. A more strategic  location for the port would allow for more integrated redevelopment of the Baixa and surrounding area.  ILHA DE MOCAMBIQUE  Through field survey we have developed an inventory of Islamic sites and see opportunity to highlight and  reinforce Islamic history and culture into the town. We have also reviewed past urban plans and current urban  development strategies, and it seems that any development initiatives should consider Lumbo to balance  development in both the town and the remainder of the district. It also seems that Ilha de Moçambique will  become even more important because the Nacala airport is being converted into a public terminal, which will  make the island more accessible to and integrated into the surrounding area and country.    

96 Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


4.3 Next Steps  The SDPP team travelled to Pemba, Mozambique, at the end of November for a work session that focused on  finalizing the databases required for the initial spatial analysis, developing a framework for scale and sector‐ based criteria in the spatial analysis, and identifying the intricacies emerging from the data collection phase.  These processes resulted in the following key steps to launch Phase 3:       

Perform any remaining data acquisition to address gap conditions  Undertake focused field investigations to gather additional data and test initial spatial analyses   Identify evaluation criteria to guide the spatial analysis   Finalize the criteria by which the spatial analysis will be supported and confirmed  Initiate the spatial analysis and reevaluate data and evaluation criteria as necessary 

Based on the success of the previous AKDN multiagency workshop, we are in the process of arranging a similar  work session in mid‐January 2010 with TPS, IPS, AKTC, and AKF to discuss progress to date, obtain agency  review, discuss the kinds of spatial analyses anticipated in Phase 3, and discuss special followup activities with  each agency.   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

97


98 Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report  


SOURCES

1. All photos by SDPP team members, unless otherwise noted with asterisk (*), these photos by Lucas Mauro  2. All reference materials for Mozambique and Tanzania located on SDPP web‐based server   

Spatial Development Planning Project—East African Coast and the Rovuma Basin | Phase 2 Report 

99

sdpp phase 2 test  

this is a test only a test