Page 1

Statistics on non-occupational accidents and the level of safety in Switzerland

STATUS 2013 olation p a r t x de data Revise w e n n o based

bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention


Statistics on non-occupational accidents and the level of safety in Switzerland

STATUS 2013 Road traffic, sports, home and leisure

bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention


Imprint

Published by bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention P.O. Box 8236 CH-3001 Berne Tel. +41 31 390 22 22 Fax +41 31 390 22 30 info@bfu.ch Individual statistics and the complete publication are available at www.bfu.ch Project team Steffen Niemann, M.A., Research Associate, bfu Yvonne Achermann Stürmer, lic. rer. pol., Research Associate, bfu Giannina Bianchi, MSc ETH Bew.-wiss., Research Associate, bfu Stefanie Fahrni, Project Assistant, Research, bfu Regula Hayoz, Project Assistant, Research, bfu Publications/Languages Dept., bfu Translation Anglia Translations AG, Matthofstrand 10, CH-6005 Lucerne © bfu 2013 All rights reserved; reproduction (e.g. photocopying), storage, processing and distribution are permitted if source is quoted (q.v. suggested source quotation below). Suggested source quotation bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention. STATUS 2013: Statistics on non-occupational accidents and the level of safety in Switzerland, Road traffic, sports, home and leisure. Berne: bfu; 2013. ISSN 1664–574X (PDF)

For reasons of legibility, this publication does not contain gender-specific references. Slight differences in table totals are possible due to rounding up/down. We trust this will not cause our readers any inconvenience.


Foreword

bfu accident figures – even more meaningful Dear Reader I think that the new figures contained in this year’s STATUS are of particular interest. In particular, we are now in a position to give you a more accurate picture of the accident situation among unemployed people in Switzerland. This will enable us to pinpoint any need for action following accidents involving children and the elderly. Approximately 1 million people injured in non-occupational accidents – the updated extrapolation thus confirms the previously reported extent of non-occupational accidents. The accident focal points also remain the same. For example, football and skiing in sports as well as falls in the home and leisure sector. The number of accidents among children is lower than previously assumed but is much higher among the elderly. The results of the updated extrapolation will be incorporated into future bfu programmes and will play a part in its prevention objectives for the years ahead. The coming year will also see an innovation with the new figures incorporated into the calculation of economic costs. As before, it can be stated: while the costs caused by leisure accidents are high, there is a major need for action. This is further confirmation of the need for the bfu’s commitment to keeping people safe.

Brigitte Buhmann Managing Director, bfu

Revised extrapolation based on new data Until now, the extrapolation of the figures for children’s and seniors’ accidents has essentially been based on two outdated surveys from the years 1991 and 1995. The bfu therefore felt it was important to create a new basis to replace these two studies. In 2011, we conducted a large-scale survey in which 15,000 households provided information about their accidents during the previous year. The results have now been incorporated into the STATUS extrapolations. Other important data sources for STATUS are accident insurance companies and the statistics on road traffic accidents recorded by the police.


Contents

Home and leisure

47

Accidents 8

Accidents

48

Accidents as a public health problem

8

Overview 48

Overview

9

Age / Gender

Non-occupational accidents

7

Age / Gender

11

Social burden

12

Road traffic

13

Accidents

14

Extrapolation road traffic

14

Long-term development

15

Pedestrians / Bicycle

19

Car / Motorcycle

20

Accident causes

21

49

Falls 52 Behaviour and attitudes

53

Self-reported modes of behaviour

53

Appendix

54

An interpretation guide

54

Index 57

Age 22 Location 25 Exposure / Risk

27

International comparison

28

Behaviour and attitudes

29

Safety indicators

29

Self-reported modes of behaviour

33

Sports

35

Accidents

36

Overview 36 Age / Gender

37

Sports fatalities: Accidents in Switzerland

38

Injury localisation

39

Drowning accidents

40

Mountain sports

41

Avalanche accidents

42

Transportation or people injured in winter sports

43

Snowsports 44 Behaviour and attitudes

45

Snowsports 45 Self-reported modes of behaviour

bfu – STATUS 2013

46

5


Non-occupational accidents Accidents are a challenge to public health. Around 1 million people are injured in non-occupational accidents in Switzerland every year, more than 2,000 fatally. Alongside the pain and suffering, these accidents result in material costs amounting to almost 12 billion Swiss francs. The bfu is doing its utmost to prevent severe and fatal accidents.


Non-occupational accidents

Accidents as a public health problem

Deaths, by age and cause, 2010 Cause <1

1–14

Circulatory system Cancer Respiratory organs Diabetes mellitus Infectious diseases Urinary organs Alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver Other diseases Total diseases

3 0 2 0 2 1 0 296 304

Accidents Suicide Other acts of violence1 Total accidents and acts of violence Total

3 0 0 3 307

1

15–44 Diseases 4 185 22 407 3 15 0 11 2 43 0 1 0 22 41 310 72 994 Accidents and acts of violence 20 345 2 315 3 35 25 695 97 1 689

Age 45–64

65–84

85+

Total

1 453 3 613 241 98 112 28 246 1 155 6 946

8 490 9 167 1 782 601 299 372 205 5 194 26 110

11 824 3 069 1 683 540 256 468 17 6 800 24 657

21 959 16 278 3 726 1 250 714 870 490 13 796 59 083

381 411 41 833 7 779

730 230 50 1 010 27 120

934 46 20 1 000 25 657

2 413 1 004 149 3 566 62 649

Mainly murder, manslaughter

Source: BFS, statistics on the causes of death

TKU.T.01

Age-standardized mortality rates1, by age and cause, 2010 Cause <1

1–14

Circulatory system Cancer Respiratory organs Diabetes mellitus Infectious diseases Urinary organs Alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver Other diseases Total diseases

4 0 3 0 3 1 0 375 386

Accidents Suicide Other acts of violence2 Total accidents and acts of violence Total

4 0 0 4 389

1 2

15–44 Diseases 0 6 2 13 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 4 10 7 31 Accidents and acts of violence 2 11 0 10 0 1 2 22 9 53

65–84

85+

Total

68 168 11 5 5 1 12 54 324

744 803 156 53 26 33 18 455 2 288

6 469 1 679 921 295 140 256 9 3 720 13 489

145 138 25 9 6 6 5 99 432

18 19 2 39 363

64 20 4 89 2 376

511 25 11 547 14 036

20 11 2 32 464

Age-standardized mortylity rates (per 10,000 inhabitants), standardized European population Mainly murder, manslaughter

Source: BFS, statistics on the causes of death

8

Age 45–64

Non-occupational accidents  Accidents as a public health problem

TKU.T.02

bfu – STATUS 2013


NBU, 9

Overview

Non-occupational accidents among the residential population in Switzerland, 2010 Sector Total Road traffic Sports Home and leisure Total

Slightly injured

87 060 407 970 553 990 1 049 020

70 430 363 260 499 670 933 360

Fatalities

Persons injured2 Moderately Severely injured severely injured 9 470 6 722 32 140 12 358 34 230 18 942 75 840 38 022

Case fatality

Disabled 438 212 1 148 1 798

3061 116 1 734 2 156

35 3 31 21

Fatalities on Swiss roads in 2010 (incl. tourists, occupational accidents, sports): 327 Injury severity: – Slightly injured: <30 working days lost – Moderately severely injured: 30–89 working days lost – Severely injured and disabled: 90+ working days lost or disability pension 1 2

Source: bfu, revised extrapolation

UNB.T.01

Non-occupational accidents among the residential population in Switzerland: severely injured (disabled included)1, 2010

Non-occupational accidents among the residential population in Switzerland: moderately severely injured1 2010 40 000

25 000

34 230 32 140

20 090

20 000

30 000

15 000

12 570

20 000

10 000 7 160

0

0 Road traffic 1

9 470

10 000

5 000

Sports

Road traffic

Home and leisure 1

Injury severity: q.v. Table UNB.T.01 above

Source: bfu, revised extrapolation

UNB.G.01.1

Non-occupational accidents among the residential population in Switzerland: fatalities 2010 2 000

Sports

Home and leisure

Injury severity: q.v. Table UNB.T.01 above

Source: bfu, revised extrapolation

UNB.G.01.2

Non-occupational accidents among the residential population in Switzerland: case fatality 2010 40 35

1 734

31

1 500

30

1 000

20

500

10

306

3

116

0 Road traffic Source: bfu, revised extrapolation

bfu – STATUS 2013

Sports

Home and leisure UNB.G.01.3

0 Road traffic

Sports

Home and leisure

Source: bfu, revised extrapolation

Non-occupational accidents  Overview

UNB.G.01.4

9


Non-occupational accidents

NBU, 10 / 11 / 12

Development of injured persons compulsorily insured (UVG), by sector, 1985–2011

Development of injured persons compulsorily insured (UVG), by sector, 1985–2011 Year

Persons injured Sports Home and leisure 135 474 183 823 141 702 208 690 153 285 210 687 145 476 211 839 148 762 236 483 188 675 246 299 189 360 244 533

Road traffic 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2011

67 883 71 603 57 846 58 099 56 284 50 707 54 613

Insurees Injured in 1,000s persons per 1,000 insurees

Total

387 180 421 995 421 818 415 414 441 529 485 681 488 506

3 028 3 420 3 228 3 567 3 760 3 916 4 027

140 130 120 110 100 90 80 70 1985 1987 1989 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011

128 123 131 116 117 124 121

Source: SSUV, UVG statistics

UNB.T.05

Cars Motorcycles Bicycles Pedestrians Other Total

Fatalities

Slightly injured

People injured1 Moderately severely injured

Severely injured

22 280 9 530 26 620 4 790 7 210 70 430

2 470 2 060 3 260 610 1 070 9 470

2 110 1 250 1 900 1 360 540 7 160

Case fatality

121 63 30 72 20 306

People injured per 100 000 1 000 900 inhabitants

45800 700 49600 9500 400 105300 23200 35100 0

Slightly injured 75 540 40 850 11 980 13 320 11 890 4 520 12 360

Pe

947

3

787

345 165 408 231 87 11375 1 118

3

2

2

1

1

Injury severity 92 24 30 working days lost – Slightly injured: – Moderately severely injured: 30–89 working days lost injured and disabled: 90+and working – Severely Sports Home leisuredays lost or disability pension Male Female 1

Road traffic USV.T.35

People injured and fatalities in sports, by selected types of sport, 2010

Soccer Downhill skiing (incl. touring) Snowboarding Cycling, biking (not in traffic) Bathing, swimming Mountaineering Rambling

UNB.G.02

Fatalities in non-occupational accidents, by gender, 2010

Source: bfu, revised extrapolation

Type of sport

Total

Home and leisure

Source: SSUV, UVG statistics

People injured and fatalities in road traffic, by travel mode, 2010 Travel mode

Sports

Road traffic

Source: BFS, stat. on causes of death; bfu, statistics on fatal sports accidents UNB.G.04.1

Fatalities Case People injured per 100,000 People injured1 fatality hours of sport (2008) Moderately severely injured Severely injured 6 480 1 840 0 0 180 6 820 3 630 20 4 46 1 600 340 4 3 68 570 290 0 0 17 Distribution 190 of tangible costs, 440 13 by sector, 10 2010 16 460 280 44 84 13 1 590 720 7 5 …

Source: bfu, revised extrapolation; Swiss Sports and Recreation Observatory

So

Di

USP.T.10

People injured and fatalities in the home and leisure sector, by selected accident circumstances, 2010 Accident circumstances Contact with object, animal Getting trapped, crushed Poisoning, acid burn Fall on level ground Fall from a height Fall on stairs, steps Other fall Total for falls

People injured1 41% Slightly injured Moderately severely injured Severely injured 44 420 1 020 80 12 900 590 70 10 710 600 290 Falls 143 520 16 250 9 850 44 640 3 270 4 270 41 620 5 930 2 300 5 870 0 0 235 650 25 450 16 420

Fatalities

Source: bfu, revised extrapolation

Source: Economic costs

10

Non-occupational accidents  Overview 

Case fatality rate

People injured per 43% 100,000 inhabitants

11 3 6

2 2 5

585 174 149

… … …

… … …

2 179 670 640 75 3 564

1 413

Road traffic

16% Sports

51

Home and leisure

1

– – – –

UHF.T.08.1

UNB.G.05

bfu – STATUS 2013

So


Age / Gender

Fatalities in non-occupational accidents, by age and gender, 2010

People injured and fatalities in non-occupational accidents, by gender, 2010

Age

Gender

0–16 17–64 65+ Total road traffic 0–16 17–64 65+ Total sports 0–16 17–64 65+ Total home and leisure Total

Male Road traffic 12 154 65 231 Sports 3 66 23 92 Home and leisure 9 162 616 787 1 110

Female

Total 4 42 29 75

16 196 94 306

2 17 5 24

5 83 28 116

3 63 881 947 1 046

12 225 1 497 1 734 2 156

Source: BFS, stat. on causes of death; bfu, stat. on fatal sports acc.

UNB.T.06

NBU, 10 10 / 11/ 11 / 12/ 12 NBU,

Road traffic

Home and leisure

Sports

Home and leisure

Total

Source: BFS, stat. on causes of death; bfu, stat. on fatal sports acc.

UNB.T.09.1

Fatalities in non-occupational accidents, by gender, 20102010 Fatalities in non-occupational accidents, by gender, 947 787

People injured 48 210 260 330 245 470 554 010 38 850 147 640 308 520 495 010 87 060 407 970 553 990 1 049 020 People injured per 10,000 inhabitants 126 680 641 1 447 98 373 780 1 251 112 524 712 1 348 Fatalities 231 92 787 1 110 75 24 947 1 046 306 116 1 734 2 156 Fatalities per 1m inhabitants 60 24 205 290 19 6 239 264 39 15 223 277

Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total Male Female Total

Age

Road traffic

Sports

People injured 10 560 124 240 142 140 14 250 85 420 47 020 28 380 105 160 109 150 24 270 72 910 137 590 9 600 20 240 118 090 87 060 407 970 553 990 People injured per 10,000 inhabitants 78 916 1 048 168 1 007 554 124 461 478 122 366 692 73 155 902 112 524 712

0–16 17–25 26–45 46–64 65+ Total 0–16 17–25 26–45 46–64 65+ Total

Source: bfu, extrapolation

947

787

231

350 000 350 000

Road Road traffictraffic

92

24

50 000 50 000

24

SportsSports

260 330260 330

HomeHome and leisure and leisure

0

0

Source: BFS, stat. causes of death; bfu, statistics on fatal accidents UNB.G.04.1 Source: BFS, on stat. on causes of death; bfu, statistics on sports fatal sports accidents UNB.G.04.1

245 470245 470

147 640147 640

48 210 48 38 210850

38 850

Road Road traffictraffic

Male MaleFemale Female

bfu – STATUS 2013

2 042 1 729 1 063 1 180 1 130 1 348

308 520308 520

300 000 300 000

100 000 100 000 92

276 940 146 690 242 690 234 770 147 930 1 049 020

People injured in non-occupational accidents, by gender, 20102010 People injured in non-occupational accidents, by gender,

150 000 150 000 75

Total

UNB.T.09.2

200 000 200 000

75

UNB.T.10

Home and leisure

250 000 250 000

231

Total

People injured in non-occupational accidents, by age, 2010

Development of injured persons compulsorily insured (UVG), by sector, Development of injured persons compulsorily insured (UVG), by sector, Fatalities 1985–2011 1985–2011 0–16 16 5 12 33 17–25 39 17 19 75 140 140 26–45 79 28 37 144 130 130 46–64 78 38 169 285 120 120 65+ 94 28 1 497 1 619 110 110 Total 306 116 1 734 2 156 100 100 Fatalities per 1m inhabitants 90 90 12 4 9 25 80 0–16 80 46 20 22 88 70 17–25 70 1985 1987 1987 1989 1989 1991 1991 199335 1995 1995 1997 1997 1999 1999 2001 2003 2003 2005 2005 2007 2007 2009 2011 2011 63 1985 1993 26–45 122001 16 2009 46–64 39 19 85 143 Total Total HomeHome and leisure Road Road traffictraffic SportsSports and leisure 65+ 72 21 1 144 1 237 Source: SSUV,SSUV, UVG statistics Source: UVG statistics UNB.G.02 Total 39 15 223UNB.G.02 277

1 0001 000 900 900 800 800 700 700 600 600 500 500 400 400 300 300 200 200 100 100 0 0

Sports

Source: BFS, stat. on causes of death; bfu, stat. on fatal sports acc., rev. extrap.

Fatalities in non-occupational accidents, by age, 2010 Age

Road traffic

SportsSports Male Male Female Female

HomeHome and leisure and leisure

Source: bfu, revised extrapolation Source: bfu, revised extrapolation

UNB.G.04.2 UNB.G.04.2

1 1 Distribution of tangible costs, by accident consequence, 20102010 Distribution of tangible costs, by accident consequence, Non-occupational accidents  Age / Gender

13% 13% 26% 26%

11


Nichtberufsunfälle Non-occupational – Unfallgeschehen accidents

Social burden

Development of injured persons compulsorily insured (UVG), by sector, Development of injured persons compulsorily insured (UVG), by sector, 1985–2011 1985–2011 140 140 130 130 120 120 110 110 Costs of non-occupational accidents, 20091 100 100 90 90 80 Material Persons injured4 80 Sector damage 70 70 Disabled Severely injured Moderately severely 1985 1985 1987 1987 1989 1989 1991 1991 1993 1993 1995 1995 1997 1997 1999 1999 2001 2001 2003 2003 2005 2005 2007 2007 2009 2009 2011 2011 injured

Fatalities Total Slightly injured Tangible costs of non-occupational accidents (in millions of CHF), 20091 and leisure Total Total SportsSports 2 HomeHome and leisure Road Road traffictraffic Road traffic 2 892 417 735 107 286 498 4 935 3 Source: UVG statistics UNB.G.02 472 Sports ... 114 UNB.G.02 351 684 217 1 838 Source: SSUV,SSUV, UVG statistics Home and leisure ...3 745 1 564 390 1 265 811 4 774 Total 2 892 1 276 2 771 848 2 234 1 526 11 547 1 Total economic burden according to pay approach (in of CHF), 2009 Fatalities in non-occupational accidents, by gender, 2010 to the willingnessPeople People injured in millions non-occupational accidents, by gender, Fatalities in non-occupational accidents, by gender, 2010 injured in non-occupational accidents, by gender, 20102010 Road traffic 2 8922 682 4 561 668 2 804 1 071 12 678 Sports ...3 307 3 600 2 521 6 372 454 13 253 947 350 000 3 390 1 000 and leisure ...3 1 187 947 10 395 14 161 1 522 350 000 1 000Home 520656 308 52030830 900 900Total 787 787 300 000 6 579 2 892 2 176 18 556 23260 337 3 047 56 586 300 000 330260 330 800 800 245 470245 470 1 250 000 are possible in the total in all tables due to rounding up/down. 250differences 000 700 those injuries are taken into account that required medical attention or insurance benefits. Slight 700 Only 2 Also and000 consequential legal costs. 600 600 contains material damage in accidents without any persons injured or fatalities as well as police200 200 000 147 640147 640 500basic principles exist to be able to calculate material damage as well as police and consequential legal costs for sports, home and leisure accidents. 5003 No These costs should amount to less 150 000 150 000 400 CHF 700 million. 400 than 231 231 3004 300 100 000 100 000 210 38 850 48 210 4838 200 severity: 75 75 850 200 Injury 92 92 50 000 50 000 24 24 Slightly injured: not hospitalized 100– 100 0 0 0– Moderately 0 severely injured: hospitalized for 1 to 6 days Road traffic and leisure and leisure traffic HomeHome and leisure Road Road traffictraffic SportsSports HomeHome and leisure – SeverelyRoad injured: hospitalized for 7 or Sports moreSports days Female Male Male Female – Disability: permanently partially fully disabled. Male Female Definition according to Art. 8, ATSG (General part of the social insurance law) Male or Female

Source: bfu, economic costs Source: BFS, on stat. on causes of death; bfu, statistics on sports fatal sports accidents UNB.G.04.1 Source: BFS, stat. causes of death; bfu, statistics on fatal accidents UNB.G.04.1

UNB.T.07/08 UNB.G.04.2 UNB.G.04.2

Source: bfu, revised extrapolation Source: bfu, revised extrapolation

1 1 Distribution of tangible costs, by accident consequence, Distribution of tangible costs, by accident consequence, 20102010

13% 13% 26% 26%

Distribution of tangible costs, by sector, Distribution of tangible costs, by sector, 20102010

19% 19%

11% 11% 41% 41%

7% 7%

43% 43%

24% 24% Material damage Material damage

Disabled Disabled

Moderately severely Slightly Moderately severely injuredinjured Slightly injuredinjured 1

– – – –

16% 16% and leisure Road Road traffictrafficSportsSportsHomeHome and leisure Source: Economic Source: Economic costs costs

12

UNB.G.05 UNB.G.05

Non-occupational accidents  Social burden

Severely Severely injuredinjured Fatalities Fatalities

1 Injury severity (definition of 2009): Injury severity (definition of 2009): – Slightly injured: not hospitalized Slightly injured: not hospitalized – Moderately severely injured: hospitalized for61days to 6 days Moderately severely injured: hospitalized for 1 to – Severely injured: hospitalized formore 7 or more Severely injured: hospitalized for 7 or days days – Disability: permanently partially fully disabled. Definition according 8, ATSG Disability: permanently partially or fullyordisabled. Definition according to Art.to8,Art. ATSG (General the social insurance (General part ofpart theofsocial insurance law) law)

Source: Economic Source: Economic costs costs

UNB.G.06 UNB.G.06

bfu – STATUS 2013


Road traffic Nearly 90,000 people are injured on Swiss roads annually and more than 300 die. Pedestrians and cyclists are particularly at risk in urban areas. The bfu pays special attention to the behaviour of young new drivers as well as to alcohol and excessive speed as the causes of accidents.


40

Road traffic – Accidents

20

Extrapolation road traffic

0

5 1987 1989 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011

.2

17

Severely injured

1965 1967 1969 1971 1973 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 19

Fatalities

Slightly injured USV.G.02

Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

Distribution of casualties in road traffic, 1965 People injured, by road usage (comparison bfu extrapolation/ASTRA), 2010

Distribution of casualties in road traffic, 2012 People injured, by age (comparison bfu/ASTRA), 2010

Road usage

Age

Cars Motorcycles Bicycles Pedestrians Other Total

4%

Revised bfu extrapolation

Road accidents registered by the police

26 860 12 840 31 780 6 760 8 820 87 060

12 673 4 292 3 165 2 449 1 658 24 237

49%

47%

Source: bfu, rev. extrapol.; ASTRA, acc. reg. by the police

USV.T.01.1

Severely inju

1%

Di

Revised 19% bfu extrapolation

Road accidents registered by the police

10 560 14 250 28 380 24 270 9 600 87 060

2 475 5 286 8 174 5 779 2 523 24 237

0–16 17–25 26–45 46–64 65+ Total

Source: bfu, rev. extrapol.; ASTRA, acc. reg. by the police

USV.T.01.2

80% Slightly injured

Severely injured

Fatalities

Slightly injured

Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

USV.G.03.1

Persons injured in road traffic by mode of transport: comparison bfu extrapolation/FEDRO, unreported cases, 2010

4 311

7 162

0

10 000

18 491

20 000

30 000

40 000

7 077

0

Pe ex

5 286

8 174

20 206

65+

1 658

5 779

2 523

10 000

20 000

30 000

40 000

No. of injured persons not registered, based on bfu extrapolation

No. of injured persons not registered, based on bfu extrapolation

Registered by the police

Registered by the police USV.G.16

Road traffic – Accidents  Extrapolation road traffic

So

2 475

8 964

46–64

2 449

Source: bfu, revised extrapolation

14

8 085

26–45

3 165

28 615

USV.G.03.2

Persons injured in road traffic by age: comparison bfu extrapolation/FEDRO, unreported cases, 2010

17–25

4 292

8 548

Fatalities

Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

0–16

12 673

14 187

Severely injured

Source: bfu, revised extrapolation

USV.G.17

bfu – STATUS 2013

So


60 40 20

Long-term development

SV, 14, 15

0

1965 1967 1969 1971 1973 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 Slightly injured

Severely injured

Development of casualties in road traffic (indexed), 1965–2012

Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

USV.G.02

Distribution of casualties road traffic, 2012 Development of roadintraffic accidents, 1965–2012

180 Distribution of casualties in road traffic, 1965

Year Accidents

People Fatalities Case 1% injured fatality 19%Slightly Severely Total 1965 55 311 14 487 15 051 29 538 1 304 423 1970 74 709 17 667 18 314 35 981 1 694 450 1975 66 182 15 382 14 569 29 951 1 243 398 1980 67 160 17 544 14 782 32 326 1 246 371 1985 72 030 17 004 12 823 29 827 908 295 1990 79 436 18 061 11 182 29 243 954 316 1995 89 098 21 826 6 933 28 759 692 235 1996 81 914 20 362 6 177 26 539 616 227 80%286 1997 79 178 21 120 6 166 27 587 211 1998 77 Slightly 945 injured 21 577 Severely 6 213 27 790 597 210 injured Fatalities 1999 79 787 23 228 6 299 29 527 583 194 Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police USV.G.03.2 2000 75 351 23 867 6 191 30 058 592 193 2001 75 304 23 966 6 194 30 160 544 177 2002injured72in449 23 843by age:5 931 29 774 513 169 Persons road traffic comparison bfu extrapolation/FEDRO, 2003 70 290 unreported 24 236 cases, 5 8622010 30 098 546 178 2004 67 680 23 218 5 528 28 746 510 174 2005 64 988 21 695 5 059 26 754 409 151 2 475 2006 8 08563 358 21 652 5 066 26 718 370 137 0–16 2007 63 245 21 897 5 235 27 132 384 140 2008 61 342 20 776 4 780 25 556 357 138 5 286 8 964 17–25 2009 60 625 20 422 4 708 25 130 349 137 2010 58 928 19 779 4 458 24 237 327 133 8 174 26–45 2011 54 26920 206 18 805 4 437 23 242 320 136 2012 54 171 18 016 4 202 22 218 339 150 Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by 5the police 779 18 491 46–64

65+

7 077

SV, 14, 15 0

Fatalities

160

4%

140 120 100 80

47%

60

49%

40 20 0

Severely injured Fatalities 1965 1967 Slightly 1969 injured 1971 1973 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 19

12 673

19% 4 292

8 548

4 311

2 449

80%

1 658

Slightly injured

30 000

40 000

Severely injured

0 FEDRO, accidents 10 000registered by20 Source: the000 police

Fatalities

30 000

40 000 USV.G.03.2

So

No. of injured persons not registered, based on bfu extrapolation

No. of injured persons not registered, based on bfu extrapolation Registered by the police

Development of casualties in road traffic (indexed), 1965–2012

Source: bfu, revised extrapolation

3 165

28 615

USV.T.02

Di

1%

14 187

7 162

20 000

Severely inju

Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

Persons injured in road traffic by mode of transport: comparison bfu extrapolation/FEDRO, unreported cases, 2010 Distribution of casualties in road traffic, 2012

2 523

10 000

Slightly injured USV.G.03.1

Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

USV.G.17

Persons injured in road traffic Registered by the police by age: comparison bfu extrapolation/FEDRO, unreported cases, 2010 Source: bfu, revised extrapolation 0–16

180

8 085

Pe ex USV.G.16

2 475

160 17–25

140 120

5 286

8 964

26–45

8 174

20 206

100 80

46–64

18 491

5 779

60 40

65+

20

7 077

0

2 523

10 000

20 000

30 000

40 000

0 No. 1995 of injured persons not registered, based on bfu2007 extrapolation 1965 1967 1969 1971 1973 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1991 1993 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2009 2011 Slightly injured Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

Distribution of casualties in road traffic, 2012

Severely injured

Registered by the police Fatalities USV.G.02 USV.G.17

Source: bfu, revised extrapolation

Distribution of casualties in road traffic, 1965

Road traffic – Accidents  Long-term development

bfu – STATUS 2013 1% 19%

4%

15

So


Road traffic – Accidents

SV 16 / 17 SV 16 / 17 SV 16 / 17

Development of personal injuries among car passengers (indexed), 1980–2012

Development of personal injuries among pedestrians (indexed), 1980–2012

Development of personal injuries among car passengers (indexed), 250

250 Development of personal injuries among pedestrians (indexed), 1980–2012 Development of of personal personalinjuries injuriesamong amongpedestrians car passengers, 1980–2012 Development (indexed), 200 1980–2012

1980–2012 Development of personal injuries among car passengers (indexed), 200 1980–2012 250

250

FatalitiesUSV.G.40

Year Slightly injured Severely injured Fatalities 150 250 1980 9 755 6 189 595 200 1985 8 507 4 732 410 100 200 1990 10 137 4 668 469 150 1995 13 100 2 807 335 50 150 2000 14 714 2 431 273 100 2005 12 736 1 721 178 1000 2006 12 642 1 721 156 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 501980 2007 12 594 1 641 162 Fatalities Slightly injured Severely injured 50 2008 11 830 1 599 156 0 1980 1985 1995 2010 2009 111990 489 by the 1 402 2005 136 Source: FEDRO, accidents registered police 2000 USV.G.43 0 2010 111990 392 1 281 2005 Fatalities 129 Severely injured Slightly injured 1980 1985 1995 2000 2010 2011 10 270 1 210 119 Fatalities Slightly injured Severely injured Source: USV.G.43 2012 FEDRO, accidents registered 10 036 by the police 1 100 104

Development of personal injuries Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the among police motorcyclists (indexed), USV.G.40

Development of personal injuries in accidents influenced by speed Source: FEDRO, FEDRO,accidents accidents registered the police USV.T.40 Source: registered bybythe police USV.G.43

250 Development of personal injuries among motorcyclists (indexed),

250 Development of accidents influenced by speed Development of personal personalinjuries injuriesinamong motorcyclists, 1980–2012 (indexed), 1980–2012 Development of personal injuries in accidents influenced by speed 200 (indexed), 1980–2012 Year Slightly injured Severely injured Fatalities 250 1980 2 022 2 186 139 150 250 1985 2 702 2 492 125 200 1990 2 612 2 072 160 100 200 1995 2 537 1 234 106 150 2000 3 136 1 364 92 50 150 2005 3 519 1 451 86 100 2006 3 451 1 482 69 1000 2007 3 559 1 599 82 501980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2008 3 320 1 374 83 Slightly injured Severely injured Fatalities 50 2009 3 371 1 466 78 0 2010 2 942 1 350 67 Source: FEDRO, accidents registered police 2000 USV.G.44 1980 1985 1990 by the 1995 2005 2010 0 2011 2 983 1 393 68 Slightly injured Severely injured Fatalities 1985 1995 2000 2010 20121980 21990 799 1 219 2005 74

150 250 200 100 200 150 50 150 100 1000 501980

1985

1990

Slightly injured

1995

2000

2005

50 0 1980FEDRO, 1985 1990 by the 1995 Source: accidents registered police 2000 0 1980 1985 1990 1995Severely2000 injured Slightly injured

2010 Fatalities

Severely injured 2005 2005

Slightly injured Severely injured Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

2010 USV.G.40 2010 Fatalities

1980–2012

1980–2012 Development of personal injuries among motorcyclists (indexed), 200 1980–2012 250 150 250 200 100 200 150 50 150 100 1000 501980

1985

1990

Slightly injured

1995

2000

2005

Severely injured

50 0 Source: accidents registered police 2000 1980FEDRO, 1985 1990 by the 1995 0 Slightly injured injured 1980 1985 1990 1995Severely2000

2010 Fatalities USV.G.41 2010

2005

2005 Fatalities 2010

Slightly injured Severely injured Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

FatalitiesUSV.G.41

Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

USV.G.41

Development of personal injuries among cyclists (indexed), 1980–2012

1980–2012 Development of personal injuries among cyclists (indexed), 200 1980–2012 250 250 150 200 200 100 150 150 50 100 1985

1990

1995

2000

Slightly injured Severely injured 50 0 Source: accidents registered police 2000 1980FEDRO, 1985 1990 by the 1995 0 Slightly injured injured 1980 1985 1990 1995Severely2000 Slightly injured Severely injured Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

16

2005

2010 Fatalities

2005

Slightly registered injured Severely Source: Source:FEDRO, FEDRO,accidents accidents registeredbybythe thepolice police injured

Fatalities USV.G.44 USV.T.41

Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

USV.G.44

Development of of personal personalinjuries injuriesinamong cyclists, 1980–2012 Development accidents influenced by alcohol (indexed), 1980–2012

250 Development of personal injuries among cyclists (indexed),

1000 501980

(indexed), 1980–2012

USV.G.42 2010

2005 Fatalities 2010 FatalitiesUSV.G.42 USV.G.42

Road traffic – Accidents  Long-term development

Year Slightly injured Severely injured Fatalities 250 Development of personal influenced by alcohol 1980 1 059injuries in accidents 1 247 (indexed), 1980–2012 Development of personal influenced by alcohol 1985 1 430injuries in accidents 1 430 200 (indexed), 1980–2012 1 641 1990 1 400 250 1995 2 346 1 006 250 150 2000 2 284 959 200 2005 2 322 815 200 100 2006 2 381 804 150 2007 2 488 802 150 50 2008 2 412 821 100 2009 2 434 858 1000 2010 2 344 821 50 1985 1995 2000 2010 20111980 21990 409 800 2005 Slightly injured Severely injured Fatalities 50 2012 2 193 840

0 Source: FEDRO, Source: FEDRO,accidents accidentsregistered registered thepolice police 2000 1980 1985 1990 bybythe 1995 0 Slightly injured Severely injured 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 Slightly injured Severely injured Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

2005 2005

77 60 60 53 48 37 35 30 27 54 33 37 28

USV.T.42 2010USV.G.45

Fatalities 2010 FatalitiesUSV.G.45 USV.G.45

bfu – STATUS 2013


SV 16 / 17 SV 16 / 17 SV 16 / 17

Development of personal injuries among car passengers (indexed), 1980–2012

Development of personal injuries among pedestrians (indexed), 1980–2012

250 Development of personal injuries among car passengers (indexed),

250 Development of personal injuries among pedestrians (indexed), 1980–2012 Development of personal injuries among pedestrians (indexed), 200 1980–2012

1980–2012 Development of passengers1980–2012 (indexed), Development of personal personalinjuries injuriesamong amongcar pedestrians, 200 1980–2012 250

Year Slightly injured Severely injured Fatalities 150 250 1980 1 604 2 474 262 200 1985 1 410 1 804 191 100 200 1990 1 426 1 662 172 150 1995 1 788 1 153 126 50 150 2000 1 882 901 130 100 2005 1 647 707 69 0 100 2006 1 721 733 76 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 501980 2007 1 690 793 79 50 Severely injured Fatalities Slightly injured 2008 1 717 638 59 0 1980 1985 1990 1995 2010 2009 1 756 by the 60 Source: police 2000 704 2005 USV.G.40 0 FEDRO, accidents registered 2010 1 743 706 2005 Fatalities 75 1980 1985 1990 1995Severely2000 2010 injured Slightly injured 2011 1 691 687 69 Fatalities Severely injured Slightly injured Source: USV.G.40 2012 FEDRO, accidents registered 1 616 by the police 691 75

250

150 250 200 100 200 150 150 50 100 1000 501980

1985

1990

1995

2000

50 Severely injured Slightly injured 0 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 Source: 0 FEDRO, accidents registered by the police 1980

1985 1990 Slightly injured

1995 2000 Severely injured

2005

2010 Fatalities

2005

2010 USV.G.43

2005 Fatalities 2010

Severely injured Slightly injured Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

Fatalities

USV.G.43

Source: registered bybythe police USV.G.40 Source: FEDRO, FEDRO,accidents accidents registered the police motorcyclists (indexed), USV.T.43 Development of personal injuries among

Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the in police USV.G.43 Development of personal injuries accidents influenced by speed

1980–2012

(indexed), 1980–2012

250 Development of motorcyclists (indexed), Development of personal personalinjuries injuriesamong in accidents influenced by speed,

250 Development of personal injuries in accidents influenced by speed (indexed), 1980–2012 Development of personal injuries in accidents influenced by speed (indexed), 1980–2012 200

1980–2012 Development of personal injuries among motorcyclists (indexed), 1980–2012 200 Year Slightly injured Severely injured Fatalities 250

250

250 150 1985 200

250 150 200

1980

4 549 4 316 505 4 572 3 634 391 1990 4 798 3 279 425 200 100 1995 5 004 1 788 254 150 2000 5 224 1 604 229 150 50 2005 4629 1248 178 100 2006 4310 1295 135 100 0 2007 4108 1223 134 1985 1990 1995 20001109 2005 2010 501980 2008 3960 147 50 Slightly injured Severely injured Fatalities 2009 3784 1139 118 0 2010 3920 1029 110 Source: FEDRO, 1985 accidents registered police 2000 USV.G.41 1990 by the 1995 2005 2010 01980 2011 2923 919 99 1980 1985 1990 1995Severely2000 2005 Fatalities 2010 Slightly injured injured 2012 3253 925 89 Slightly injured Severely injured Source: Source: FEDRO, FEDRO, accidents accidentsregistered registeredbybythe thepolice police Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

Fatalities USV.G.41 USV.T.44 USV.G.41

Development cyclistsinflunced (indexed), Development of of personal personalinjuries injuriesamong in accidents by alcohol, 1980–2012

Year Slightly injured Severely injured Fatalities 1980 1 850 2 033 Development 1980–2012 of personal injuries among cyclists (indexed), 1985 1 827 1 793 1980–2012 200 1990 1 849 1 564 250 1995 1 937 930 250 150 2000 2 303 864 200 2005 1 914 655 200 100 2006 2 135 737 150 2007 2 000 742 150 50 2008 1 971 647 100 2009 1 830 638 100 0 2010 1 771 568 501980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2010 2011 1 798 597 2005 50 Slightly injured Severely injured531 Fatalities 2012 1 682 250 Development of personal injuries among cyclists (indexed),

0 Source: accidents bybythe Source: FEDRO,1985 accidentsregistered registered thepolice police 2000 01980FEDRO, 1990 1995 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 Slightly injured Severely injured Slightly injured Severely injured Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

bfu – STATUS 2013

2005 2005

266 166 158 135 114 79 58 55 58 56 63 53 57

USV.G.42 2010USV.T.45 2010 Fatalities Fatalities USV.G.42 USV.G.42

200 100 150 150 50 100 1000

501980 50

1985

1990

Slightly injured

1995

2000

2005

Severely injured

0 Source: FEDRO, accidents registered police 2000 1985 1990 by the 1995 01980 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 Slightly injured Severely injured Slightly injured Severely injured Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

2010 Fatalities

2005 2005

USV.G.44 2010 2010 Fatalities Fatalities USV.G.44 USV.G.44

Development of personal injuries in accidents influenced by alcohol (indexed), 1980–2012 250 Development of personal injuries in accidents influenced by alcohol Development of personal injuries in accidents influenced by alcohol (indexed), 1980–2012 (indexed), 1980–2012 200 250 250 150 200 200 100 150 150 50 100 100 0 501980 50

1985

1990

Slightly injured

1995

2000

2005

Severely injured

0 Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police 01980 1985 1990 1995 2000 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 Slightly injured Severely injured Slightly injured Severely injured Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

2010 Fatalities

2005 2005

USV.G.45 2010 2010 Fatalities Fatalities USV.G.45 USV.G.45

Road traffic – Accidents  Long-term development

17


Road traffic – Accidents

Development of casualties, by mode of transport, 1980–2012 Year

Cars

Motorcycles

1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2011 2012

9 755 8 507 10 137 13 100 14 714 12 736 11 392 10 270 10 036

2 022 2 702 2 612 2 537 3 136 3 519 2 942 2 983 2 799

1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2011 2012

6 189 4 732 4 668 2 807 2 431 1 721 1 281 1 210 1 100

2 186 2 492 2 072 1 234 1 364 1 451 1 350 1 393 1 219

1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2011 2012

15 944 13 239 14 805 15 907 17 145 14 457 12 673 11 480 11 136

4 208 5 194 4 684 3 771 4 500 4 970 4 292 4 376 4 018

1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2011 2012

595 410 469 335 273 178 129 119 104

139 125 160 106 92 86 67 68 74

1

Mopeds

E-bikes

Slightly injured 2 409 ... 2 355 ... 1 486 ... 1 234 0 935 0 614 0 440 22 436 127 337 166 Severely injured 2 293 ... 2 008 ... 984 ... 504 0 305 0 190 0 119 14 105 67 103 78 Total number of people injured 4 702 ... 4 363 ... 2 470 ... 1 738 0 1 240 0 804 0 559 36 541 194 440 244 Fatalities 134 ... 90 ... 51 ... 29 0 19 0 6 0 4 1 4 2 3 8

Bicycles

Pedestrians

Total (incl. other1)

1 059 1 430 1 641 2 346 2 284 2 322 2 344 2 409 2 193

1 604 1 410 1 426 1 788 1 882 1 647 1 743 1 691 1 616

17 545 17 004 18 061 21 826 23 867 21 695 19 779 18 805 18 016

1 247 1 430 1 400 1 006 959 815 821 800 840

2 472 1 804 1 662 1 153 901 707 706 687 691

14 782 12 823 11 182 6 933 6 191 5 059 4 458 4 437 4 202

2 306 2 860 3 041 3 352 3 243 3 137 3 165 3 209 3 033

4 076 3 214 3 088 2 941 2 783 2 354 2 449 2 378 2 307

32 327 29 827 29 243 28 759 30 058 26 754 24 237 23 242 22 218

77 60 60 53 48 37 33 37 28

262 191 172 126 130 69 75 69 75

1 246 908 954 692 592 409 327 320 339

Mainly goods transport vehicles such as delivery vans, trucks, articulated trucks, bus

Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

18

Road traffic – Accidents  Long-term development

USV.T.03

bfu – STATUS 2013


Pedestrians / Bicycle

Casualties among pedestrians, by age and accident location, 2012 Age

People injured Slightly Severely Total

0–6 7–14 15–17 18–24 25–44 45–64 65–74 75+ Total

43 140 52 107 167 113 53 52 727

0–6 7–14 15–17 18–24 25–44 45–64 65–74 75+ Total Total

80 136 51 98 180 178 48 118 889 1 616

Fatalities

Case fatality Ø 2008– 2012

Fatalities and severely injured people per 100,000 inhabitants

On pedestrian crossings 9 52 1 106 46 186 0 55 11 63 0 55 30 137 1 16 51 218 2 126 57 170 3 193 23 76 5 443 57 109 8 1 015 284 1 011 20 238 Not on pedestrian crossings 35 115 4 279 52 188 1 48 21 72 2 152 41 139 3 223 66 246 7 185 73 251 11 355 40 88 8 460 79 197 19 688 407 1 296 55 302 691 2 307 75 275

Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

People injured Slightly Severely

1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

641 478 545 738 818 734 716 738 718 685 763 769 722 762 694 677 727

929 625 644 451 377 405 367 271 284 301 305 368 278 290 287 292 284

Total

1 570 1 103 1 189 1 189 1 195 1 139 1 083 1 009 1 002 986 1 068 1 137 1 000 1 052 981 969 1 011

Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

69 59 51 48 50 39 37 28 38 23 21 21 29 25 20 28 20

421 508 411 388 402 331 330 270 365 228 193 181 282 232 200 281 194

People injured Slightly Severely Total

0–6 7–14 15–17 18–24 25–44 45–64 65–74 75+ Total

9 163 71 106 337 330 72 39 1 127

7.1 8.3 8.8 6.5 3.2 3.8 6.6 15.3 5.8 9.6

0–6 7–14 15–17 18–24 25–44 45–64 65–74 75+ Total Total

9 134 78 113 338 287 74 33 1 066 2 193

USV.T.27

Fatali- Case ties fatality

Age

1.8 7.2 4.2 4.6 2.4 2.7 3.9 10.1 3.8

Development of casualties among pedestrians on pedestrian crossings, 1980–2012 Year

Casualties among cyclists, by age and accident location, 2012 Fatalities

Case fatality Ø 2008– 2012

Fatalities and severely injured people per 100,000 inhabitants

0 37 62 69 64 161 260 716 134

0.4 6.2 7.2 4.0 7.1 8.4 8.3 5.5 6.6

0 69 41 53 46 77 164 535 86 111

0.2 3.4 2.7 4.1 4.6 5.1 5.9 3.6 4.3 10.9

On open roads 2 11 0 40 203 0 19 90 0 27 133 0 159 496 1 175 505 10 55 127 5 30 69 5 507 1 634 21 At junctions 1 10 0 21 155 1 7 85 0 28 141 0 102 440 1 110 397 3 43 117 0 21 54 2 333 1 399 7 840 3 033 28

Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

USV.T.28

SV 19 / 20 / 21

Fatalities and severely injured people per 100,000 inhabitants 15.8 10.6 10.4 7.1 6.0 6.2 5.6 4.1 4.4 4.4 4.4 5.2 4.0 4.1 3.9 4.1 3.8 USV.T.33

Severe casualties among cyclists per 100m kilometres cycled, by age and gender, 2010

Speed

300

Speed of fall:

250 200 150

80 kph 100 50

50 kph

0

30 kph

6–9 10–14 15–17 18–19 20–24 25–29 30–39 40–49 50–59 60–69 70–79 80–89 Male

Female

Source: ARE/BFS, Mobility in Switzerland; FEDRO, acc. registered by the police USV.G.14

Source:

Blood

Road traffic – Accidents  Pedestrians / Bicycle

19

8 cident

bfu – STATUS 2013

7

6


300 Casualties among motorcyclists, by age and motorcycle category, 2012

Speed and hight

of fall: Age

Up to 125 ccs 0–6 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 100 7–14 9 2 11 0 152 0.3 15–17 347 94 441 0 35 35.8 50 18–24 324 70 394 3 79 10.8 25–44 341 116 457 2 49 5.2 0 45–64 299 135 434 6 87 6–9 10–14 15–17 18–19 20–24 25–29 30–39 40–49 50–59 60–69 70–79 80–896.4 65–74 34 24 58 2 258 3.6 Female Male 75+ 14 5 19 0 583 0.8 Total 1 368 446 1 814 13 71 5.8 Source: ARE/BFS, Mobility in Switzerland; FEDRO, acc. registered by the police USV.G.14 Over 125 ccs 0–6 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 7–14 9 1 10 0 164 0.2 15–17 38 10 48 0 59 3.8 18–24 245 98 343 13 260 16.4 25–44 585 300 885 19 221 14.2 45–64 494 330 824 25 272 16.1 65–74 48 30 78 4 451 4.7 75+ 12 4 16 0 694 0.6 Total 1 431 773 2 204 61 253 10.5 Total 2 799 1 219 4 018 74 164 16.3 Injuries and fatalities per 100m kilometres driven 153 67 220 4.0 … …

0 0.2 0.4 0.5 Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

SV.G.15

0.6

0.8

1 USV.T.29

250 Age

People injured Slightly Severely Total

Fatalities

200 150

Case Fatalities and fatality severely injured Ø 2008– people per 2012 100,000 inhabitants

Speed of fall:

80 kph

50 kph

30 kph

Source:

Blood

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

0

USV.T.30

Blood alcohol concentration Source: Various studies

Source:

USV.G.09

Stopping distance at different speeds on dry road surfaces

Stopp

Development of severe casualties, by motorcycle category, 1995–2012 1000

30

16

40

5

3

900

22

800

8

4

700 50

28

60

13

600

34

500

19

400 70

38

80

6

7

26

44

0

20

40

60

Reaction distance

8

200

34

80

100

Braking distance*

Over 125 ccs

* In wet conditions, the braking distance is around 25% longer than on dry roads. Source: bfu

USV.G.12

Road traffic – Accidents  Car / Motorcycle

100 0 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012

Stopping distance (m)

20

5

300

2012

es

Corresponds to a fall

the: Fatali- from Case Fatalities and ties fatality severely injured Ø 2008– people per 2012 100,000 inhabitants Drivers 80 kph  25.2 m 9th floor 0–6 1 0 1 0 0 0.0 7–14 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 15–17 13 6 19 0 120 2.3 18–24 1 458 164 1 622 14 91 26.3 50 kph  9.83m112 25–44 279 3 391 20 3rd floor 77 13.3 45–64 1 976 226 2 202 33 113 11.8 30 kph  3.5 m 1st floor 65–74 387 78 465 7 224 11.7 75+ 256 60 316 10 403 10.9 Total bfu 7 203 813 8 016 84 111 11.3 Source: USV.G.10 Passengers 0–6 124 5 129 0 39 0.9 Blood concentration the risk of0 a road accident 7–14 alcohol233 17 and250 36 2.6 15–17 205 18 223 4 173 8.4 18–24 668 97 765 4 85 14.9 8 7 25–44 746 60 806 5 45 2.9 7 45–64 560 45 605 4 94 2.2 6 65–745 177 17 194 2 130 2.6 4 75+ 4 120 28 148 1 216 4.5 Total3 2 833 287 3 120 20 85 3.9 2 Total2 10 036 1 100 11 136 104 103 15.1 1 1 1 1 Injuries and fatalities per 100m kilometres driven 1 19 2 21 0.2 … … 0

People injured Slightly Severely Total

Relative risk of accident

Casualties among car occupants, by age and type of occupant, 2012

Speed

Speed (kph)

SV.G.14

Severe casualties among cyclists per 100m kilometres cycled, by age and gender, 2010

Relative risk of accident

0–89

Speed and height of fall

Speed (kph)

Road traffic – Accidents

age

SV 19 / 20 / 21

Car / motorcycle

Up to 125 ccs

Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

Light motorcycles USV.G.15

bfu – STATUS 2013

* In wet

Source:


SV.G.14

Casualties in accidents influenced by alcohol – by age and day of the week, 2012

Age

Age

People injured Slightly Severely Total

Fatalities

Case fatality Ø 2008– 2012

Fatalities and severely injured people per 100,000 inhabitants

Urban roads 6 20 0 83 1.1 23 85 0 93 3.6 29 139 1 64 11.4 65 386 3 137 10.0 106 427 5 146 4.9 80 337 4 158 3.8 23 68 1 417 3.3 16 46 6 619 3.4 348 1 508 20 158 4.6 Rural roads 0–6 10 2 12 0 247 0.4 7–14 38 7 45 0 110 1.1 15–17 86 20 106 4 442 9.1 18–24 488 111 599 15 233 18.6 Speed and height of fall 25–44 511 176 687 13 289 8.4 45–64 297 122 419 18 409 6.4 65–74 67 28 95 3 434 4.3 75+ 31 20 51 3 898 3.6 Speed and hight Corresponds to a fall Total 1 528 486 2 014 56 from the: 319 6.8 of fall: Motorways 0–6 13 0 13 0 0 0 7–14 6 1 7 0 0 0 15–17 14 1 15 0 0 0 18–24 140 17 157 1 180 3 80 kph  25.2 m 9th floor 25–44 247 42 289 3 144 2 45–64 120 24 144 8 262 1 SV 19 / 20 / 21 65–74 15 4 19 0 91 1 75+ 10 2 12 1 370 0 50 kph  9.8 m Total 565 91 656 13 3rd floor171 1.3 Total 3 m253 925 4 178 89 1st floor239 12.7 30 kph  3.5 Severe casualties among cyclists per 100m kilometres cycled, by age Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police USV.T.31 and gender, 2010 0–6 7–14 15–17 18–24 25–44 45–64 65–74 75+ Total

14 62 110 321 321 257 45 30 1 160

Source: bfu 300

150 100 50 0

8 15 36 156 371 234 48 14 882

0–6 7–14 15–17 18–24 25–44 45–64 65–74 75+ Total Total

4 11 39 238 321 155 27 5 800 1 682

Fatalities

Case fatality Ø 2008– 2012

Weekdays (Mon.–Fri.) 0 8 0 4 19 0 13 49 1 46 202 6 114 485 7 89 323 12 9 57 1 11 25 1 286 1 168 28 Weekends (Sat.–Sun.) 0 4 0 0 11 0 19 58 3 70 308 7 96 417 9 46 201 6 10 37 2 4 9 2 245 1 045 29 531 2 213 57

Fatalities and severely injured people per 100,000 inhabitants

0 182 238 186 186 305 489 657 245

0.0 0.6 5.3 7.7 5.4 4.6 1.4 1.9 3.9

0 0 250 177 214 242 395 972 220 233

0.0 0.0 8.4 11.4 4.7 2.4 1.7 0.9 3.4 7.4

Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

USV.T.32

Speed and height of fall

USV.G.10

250 alcohol concentration and the risk of a road accident Blood 200

People injured Slightly Severely Total

0–6 7–14 15–17 18–24 25–44 45–64 65–74 75+ Total

8

Speed and hight of fall:

Corresponds to a fall from the:

80 kph  25.2 m

9th floor

50 kph  9.8 m

3rd floor

30 kph  3.5 m

1st floor

7

7 6 5

4

4 3 2

2 1

1

1

1

1

0 6–9 10–14 15–17 18–19 20–24 25–29 30–39 40–49 50–59 60–69 70–79 80–89 0 0.2 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.8 1 Female Male Blood alcohol concentration

Source: Various studies USV.G.09 Source: ARE/BFS, Mobility in Switzerland; FEDRO, acc. registered by the police USV.G.14

Stopping distance at different speeds on dry road surfaces bfu – STATUS 2013

Source: bfu

8 30

16

5

USV.G.10

Blood alcohol concentration and the risk of a road accident Road traffic – Accidents  Accident causes

dent

80–89

Casualties in accidents influenced by speed – by age and location, 2012

Relative risk of accident

y age

Accident causes

7 6

21 7


0–4 80 5–9 142 10–14 158 15–17 242 18–19 697 20–24 1 690 25–29 1 236 30–39 1 980 40–49 1 937 50–59 1 370 60–69 855 70–79 497 80+ 252 Total 11 136 0–4 5–9 10–14 15–17 18–19 20–24 25–29 30–39 40–49 50–59 60–69 70–79 80+ Total 1

20 37 38 92 376 344 234 180 150 127 98 87 66 140

Absolute figures 0 1 0 7 81 12 5 0 1 68 253 9 16 78 3 304 207 54 489 157 5 175 135 21 322 18 2 87 92 26 415 17 4 187 184 111 375 6 8 240 133 97 609 19 23 438 229 177 806 36 55 541 231 185 668 36 50 472 226 171 230 33 45 293 137 76 75 19 31 166 181 52 8 20 17 55 218 49 4 018 440 244 3 033 2 307 1 040 People injured per 100,000 inhabitants 0 0 0 2 20 3 1 0 0 18 66 2 4 19 1 74 50 13 186 60 2 67 51 8 174 10 1 47 50 14 84 3 1 38 37 23 71 1 2 45 25 18 55 2 2 40 21 16 63 3 4 42 18 14 62 3 5 44 21 16 26 4 5 34 16 9 13 3 5 29 32 9 2 5 4 14 57 13 51 6 3 38 29 13

181 478 820 1 224 1 244 2 608 2 095 3 475 3 791 2 993 1 669 1 021 619 22 218

0–4 5–9 10–14 15–17 18–19 20–24 25–29 30–39 40–49 50–59 60–69 70–79 80+ Total

0 0 0 4 8 10 10 9 20 19 9 7 8 104

45 124 200 466 671 531 397 316 294 277 192 179 162 279

0–4 5–9 10–14 15–17 18–19 20–24 25–29 30–39 40–49 50–59 60–69 70–79 80+ Total

0 0 0 15 43 20 19 8 16 18 10 12 21 13

Mainly goods transport vehicles such as delivery vans, trucks, articulated trucks, bus

Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

22

Road traffic – Accidents  Age

USV.T.19

1

Absolute figures 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 12 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 14 0 0 2 14 0 1 3 18 0 0 6 8 1 2 7 2 1 4 6 0 1 1 3 74 3 8 28 Fatalities per 1m inhabitants 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 22 0 0 0 24 0 0 0 4 0 0 0 13 0 0 2 11 0 1 2 17 0 0 6 9 1 2 8 3 2 7 10 0 3 3 8 9 0 1 4

Total

Other1

Pedestrians

Bicycles

E-bikes

Mopeds

Motorcycles

Cars

Total

Other1

Pedestrians

Bicycles

Age

E-bikes

Age

Mopeds

Fatalities, by age and travel mode, 2012

Motorcycles

Persons injured, by age and travel mode, 2012

Cars

Road traffic – Accidents

Age

4 1 1 2 0 4 2 7 1 10 10 12 21 75

0 1 23 0 0 1 0 4 3 7 2 5 1 47

4 2 25 6 12 27 14 36 42 60 39 37 35 339

10 3 2 8 0 8 4 6 1 9 12 21 55 9

0 3 56 0 0 2 0 4 2 6 2 9 3 6

10 5 61 23 65 55 27 33 33 55 45 65 92 43

Mainly goods transport vehicles such as delivery vans, trucks, articulated trucks, bus

Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

USV.T.20

bfu – STATUS 2013


Development of casualties among children (aged 0–14), 1980–2012

Development of casualties among young adults (aged 18–24), 1980–2012

Year

Case fatality rate

Year

246 218 207 249 141 170 170 142 145 122 169 163 107 92 90 100 107 72 82 74 58 120 49 64 205

1980 1985 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

1980 1985 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

Children injured Fatalities Slightly Severely Total 1 428 1 670 3 098 78 1 256 1 169 2 425 54 1 289 980 2 269 48 1 297 892 2 189 56 1 804 709 2 513 36 1 812 730 2 542 44 1 989 665 2 654 46 1 993 705 2 698 39 1 836 605 2 441 36 1 914 606 2 520 31 1 887 550 2 437 42 1 943 587 2 530 42 2 048 541 2 589 28 1 848 524 2 372 22 1 826 479 2 305 21 1 817 453 2 270 23 1 710 418 2 128 23 1 584 343 1 927 14 1 605 326 1 931 16 1 559 310 1 869 14 1 437 274 1 711 10 1 424 309 1 733 21 1 371 262 1 633 8 1 288 257 1 545 10 1 200 279 1 479 31

Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

USV.T.09

Young people injured Fatalities Slightly Severely Total 5 048 4 267 9 315 290 5 390 3 910 9 300 219 5 050 2 967 8 017 221 4 954 2 558 7 512 193 5 307 1 856 7 163 179 4 932 1 501 6 433 152 4 978 1 398 6 376 120 4 516 1 295 5 811 132 4 092 1 098 5 190 118 4 147 1 135 5 282 102 4 253 1 108 5 361 97 4 575 1 110 5 685 89 4 794 1 111 5 905 91 4 801 1 129 5 930 88 4 922 1 038 5 960 104 4 886 1 024 5 910 107 4 622 996 5 618 109 4 338 858 5 196 77 4 170 879 5 049 62 4 191 834 5 025 61 3 997 777 4 774 44 3 815 760 4 575 64 3 566 631 4 197 36 3 406 617 4 023 41 3 262 590 3 852 39

Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

Case fatality rate 302 230 268 250 244 231 185 222 222 189 178 154 152 146 172 178 190 146 121 120 91 138 85 101 100 USV.T.11

Casualties among children (aged 0–14), by mode of transport, 2012

Casualties among young adults (aged 18–24), by travel mode, 2012

Travel mode

Travel mode

Case fatality rate Ø 2008–2012 Active participants (riders/drivers/pedestrians) Mopeds 58 18 76 0 51 Bicycles 306 64 370 1 49 Pedestrians 399 142 541 6 103 Other1 7 4 11 1 279 Total active 770 228 998 8 84 participants Cars Other2 Total passive participants Total

Children injured Slightly Severely Total

Fatalities

Passive participants (passengers) 357 22 379 0 73 29 102 23 430 51 481 23 1 200

279

1 479

37 580 128

31

98

1

Mainly cars, goods transport vehicles such as delivery vans, trucks, articulated trucks, bus and motorcycles

2

Mainly goods transport vehicles such as delivery vans, trucks, articulated trucks, bus and motorcycles

Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

bfu – STATUS 2013

USV.T.10

Case fatality rate Ø 2008–2012 Active participants (riders/drivers/pedestrians) Cars 1 458 164 1 622 14 91 Motorcycles 531 156 687 14 155 Mopeds 24 10 34 0 43 Bicycles 219 55 274 0 61 Pedestrians 205 71 276 4 130 Other1 70 20 90 1 127 Total active 2 507 476 2 983 33 107 participants Cars Motorcycles Other1 Total passive participants Total 1

Young people injured Slightly Severely Total

Fatalities

Passive participants (passengers) 668 97 765 38 12 50 49 5 54 755 114 869 3 262

590

3 852

4 2 0 6

85 143 132 91

39

103

Mainly goods transport vehicles such as delivery vans, trucks, articulated trucks, bus

Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

USV.T.12

Road traffic – Accidents  Age 23


Road traffic – Accidents

Development of casualties among senior citizens (aged 65+), 1980–2012 Year 1980 1985 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

Senior citizens injured Fatalities Slightly Severely Total 1 310 1 494 2 804 302 1 164 1 300 2 464 207 1 309 1 249 2 558 204 1 442 1 131 2 573 199 1 616 932 2 548 190 1 749 945 2 694 168 1 866 837 2 703 184 1 754 829 2 583 165 1 718 801 2 519 158 1 737 800 2 537 137 1 762 775 2 537 150 1 791 726 2 517 133 1 822 718 2 540 161 1 930 753 2 683 127 1 847 700 2 547 106 1 844 646 2 490 125 1 866 659 2 525 122 1 715 595 2 310 108 1 868 587 2 455 101 1 823 701 2 524 117 1 724 641 2 365 100 1 877 618 2 495 88 1 839 684 2 523 101 1 791 701 2 492 118 1 729 660 2 389 93

Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

Case fatality rate 972 775 739 718 694 587 637 600 590 512 558 502 596 452 400 478 461 447 395 443 406 341 385 452 375 USV.T.13

Casualties among senior citizens (aged 65+), by travel mode, 2012 Travel mode

Case fatality rate Ø 2008–2012 Active participants (riders/drivers/pedestrians) Cars 643 138 781 17 297 Motorcycles 106 61 167 6 411 Mopeds 41 18 59 3 392 E-bikes 47 22 69 6 682 Bicycles 218 149 367 12 359 Pedestrians 271 199 470 40 677 Other1 20 10 30 4 1 137 Total active 1 346 597 1 943 88 440 participants Cars Other1 Total passive participants Total 1

Senior citizens injured Slightly Severely Total

Fatalities

Passive participants (passengers) 297 45 342 3 86 18 104 2 383 63 446 5

169 212 178

1 729

392

660

2 389

93

Mainly goods transport vehicles such as delivery vans, trucks, articulated trucks, bus

Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

24

Road traffic – Accidents  Age

USV.T.14

bfu – STATUS 2013


Location

Casualties, by type of accident and location, 2012 Type of accident

People injured Slightly Severely

Pedestrian accident Skid/single-vehicle collision Head-on collision Overtaking accident, changing lanes

1 543 2 208

Total

Urban roads 605 2 148 767 2 975

Casualties, by type of road and location, 2012

Fatalities

Case fatality Ø 2008– 2012

53 37

201 140

436 331

98 94

534 425

6 4

87 81

Rear-end collision Accident when turning

2 708 2 618

179 545

2 887 3 163

3 15

9 41

Crossing accident Accident involving an animal

761 19

154 11

915 30

3 0

47 0

Other accident Total on urban roads

268 10 892

78 2 531

346 13 423

4 125

181 86

Rural roads 40 104 715 2 555

13 77

959 305

Pedestrian accident Skid/single-vehicle collision

64 1 840

Head-on collision Overtaking accident, changing lanes

482 245

134 91

616 336

23 15

401 308

Rear-end collision Accident when turning

946 883

110 202

1 056 1 085

4 9

41 135

Crossing accident Accident involving an animal

211 51

56 16

267 67

6 1

221 173

24 4 746

16 1 380

40 6 126

3 151

885 259

986

46

203

Other accident Total on rural roads

Motorways 165

Skid/single-vehicle collision

821

Head-on collision Overtaking accident, changing lanes

8 224

5 19

13 243

3 2

673 52

1 308 17 2 378

99 3 291

1 407 20 2 669

8 4 63

49 1 064 129

Rear-end collision Other accident Total on motorways

Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

bfu – STATUS 2013

Type of road

People injured Slightly Severely Total

Fatalities

Case fatality Ø 2008– 2012

Main road Side road Other road Total on urban roads

6 319 4 237 336 10 892

Urban Roads 1 216 7 535 1 187 5 424 128 464 2 531 13 423

61 59 5 125

78 91 165 86

Dual carriage-way Main road Side road Other road Total on rural roads

176 3 211 1 285 74 4 746

Rural Roads 46 222 821 4 032 467 1 752 46 120 1 380 6 126

10 93 47 1 151

458 228 301 305 259

Total on motorways

2 378

Motorways 291 2 669

63

129

Motorway Dual carriage-way Main road Side road Other road Total for locations

2 378 176 9 530 5 522 410 18 016

Total all locations 291 2 669 46 222 2 037 11 567 1 654 7 176 174 584 4 202 22 218

63 10 154 106 6 339

129 458 131 139 195 139

Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

USV.T.22

USV.T.21

Road traffic – Accidents  Location 25


Road traffic – Accidents

Persons injured, by location, 2012

Casualties, by travel mode and location, 2012

SV, 26 / 29

Travel mode

Cars Motorcycles Mopeds E-bikes Bicycles Pedestrians Other1 Total on urban roads

People injured Slightly Severely Total

4 686 1 880 270 137 1 889 1 546 484 10 892

Urban roads 346 5 032 691 2 571 77 347 60 197 643 2 532 642 2 188 72 556 2 531 13 423

13 423

Cars Motorcycles 12 000 Mopeds Bicycles 10 000 Pedestrians Other1 8 000 Total on motorways

Case fatality rate Ø 2008–2012

19 15 3 7 18 57 6 125

50 57 74 229 84 216 79 86

2 146 91 0 1 2 138 2 378

Motorways 188 2 334 52 143 0 0 0 1 4 6 47 185 291 2 669

62 56 0 1 10 13 9 151

23 3 0 0 5 32 63

193 369 184 217 250 976 369 259

76 354 0 0 3 281 467 129

6 126

6 000

All locations Cars 10 036 1 100 11 136 4 000 Motorcycles 2 799 1 219 4 018 Mopeds 337 103 440 2 000 E-bikes 166 78 244 Bicycles 2 193 840 3 033 0 Pedestrians 1 616 691 2 307 Urban roads 869 Rural roads 1 040 Other1 171 Total 18 016 by the 4police 202 22 218 Source: FEDRO, accidents registered for locations 1

14 000

13 423

12 000 10 000 8 000 6 126

6 000 4 000 2 669

Rural roads Cars 3 204 566 3 770 Motorcycles 828 476 1 304 Mopeds 67 26 93 E-bikes 29 18 47 Bicycles 303 197 500 Pedestrians 68 45 113 Other1 247 52 299 Persons injured, by location, 2012 Total on 4 746 1 380 6 126 rural roads 14 000

Fatalities

Ca

2 000 0 Urban roads

Rural roads

Motorways

Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

USV.G.11.1

Development of seatbelt-wearing rates among car drivers, front-seat Case fatality, by location, Ø 2008–2012 and rear-seat passengers, 1991–2013

De 19

100% 300

10 259

80% 250

8

60% 200

6

40% 150

4 129

20%

104 74 2 669 3 8 28 75 Motorways 47 339 USV.G.11.1

Mainly goods transport vehicles such as delivery vans, trucks, articulated trucks, bus

103 164 94 227 111 275 227 139

100

2

86

0% 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 2013 50 Car drivers Front-seat passengers Rear-seat passengers People recorded in vehicles (sample) 2013: 0 Car drivers 29,716, front-seat passengers 14,580, rear-seat passengers 2,128 Urban roads Rural roads Motorways Source: bfu, surveys VSV.G.04 Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police USV.G.11.2

Development of seatbelt-wearing rates among car drivers, front-seat FEDRO, accidents registered by the police USV.T.23 and Source: rear-seat passengers, 1991–2013

Development of helmet-wearing rates among motorised cyclists, 1998–2013

100%

100%

80%

80%

60%

60%

40%

40%

20%

20%

0% 1995 1997 1999– Accidents  2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 2013 26 1991 1993 Road traffic Location Car drivers

Front-seat passengers

Rear-seat passengers

People recorded in vehicles (sample) 2013: Car drivers 29,716, front-seat passengers 14,580, rear-seat passengers 2,128

So

0% 1998

2000

2002

2004 Mopeds

People recorded (sample) 2013: 2241

2006

2008 Motorcycles

bfu – STATUS 2013 2010

2012

Peo

So


Exposure / Risk

Development of kilometres driven in millions of kilometres, by type of vehicle, 1970–2012

Development of kilometres driven in millions of kilometres, by location1, 1970–2012

Year 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2011 2012

Year 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2011 2012

1 2

Cars 23 387 27 744 32 071 36 468 42 649 41 324 45 613 48 040 50 949 51 575 52 0162

GTVs1 2 991 2 944 3 768 4 297 4 592 4 853 5 251 5 420 5 871 6 063 6 1362

Motorcycles 707 548 684 959 1 163 1 209 1 463 1 654 1 720 1 759 1 8282

Mopeds 1 825 2 303 2 350 1 725 862 354 237 131 132 135 1362

Delivery vans, trucks, articulated trucks bfu estimate

Source: BFS, kilometres driven by private motorized vehicles

1

Urban roads 10 853 12 935 14 996 15 886 16 675 15 750 16 926 17 121 18 164 18 421 18 600

Rural roads 15 501 15 366 15 303 15 678 17 372 16 733 18 228 18 617 19 766 20 055 20 254

Motorways 2 743 5 644 8 817 12 177 15 558 15 616 17 764 19 895 21 160 21 487 21 694

Total 29 097 33 945 39 116 43 741 49 604 48 098 52 919 55 634 59 090 59 963 60 548

bfu estimate

Source: BFS, kilometres driven on roads by private motorized vehicles

USV.T.07

USV.T.05

Development of casualties per 100m kilometres driven, by type of vehicle, 1970–2012 Year Cars 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2011 2012 1

75 52 50 36 35 38 38 30 25 22 21

People injured GTVs1 Motorcycles … 543 … 609 19 615 14 542 17 403 13 312 14 308 11 300 9 250 9 249 9 220

Mopeds

Cars 247 195 200 253 287 491 523 614 423 401 324

GTVs1 2.9 1.8 1.9 1.1 1.1 0.8 0.6 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.2

Fatalities Motorcycles ... 23.3 ... 26.1 0.5 20.3 0.3 13.0 0.4 13.8 0.4 8.8 0.3 6.3 0.2 5.2 0.1 3.9 0.1 3.9 0.1 4.0

Mopeds 7.8 5.8 5.7 5.2 5.9 8.2 8.0 4.6 3.0 3.0 2.2

Delivery vans, trucks, articulated trucks

Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police; BFS, kilometres driven by private motorized vehicles

USV.T.06

Development of casualties per 100m kilometres driven, by location, 1970–2012 Year 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2011 2012

Urban roads 206 144 135 118 104 109 107 96 81 78 72

People injured Rural roads Motorways 83 25 68 16 71 14 61 13 55 15 52 19 47 19 41 13 34 13 32 11 30 12

Total 124 88 83 68 59 60 57 48 41 39 37

Urban roads 6.6 3.9 3.5 2.3 2.1 1.5 1.3 0.8 0.6 0.7 0.7

Fatalities Rural roads Motorways 6.1 1.1 4.6 0.6 4.2 0.8 3.0 0.5 3.0 0.5 2.2 0.6 1.8 0.2 1.3 0.1 0.9 0.2 0.9 0.1 0.8 0.1

Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police; BFS, kilometres driven on roads by private motorized vehicles

bfu – STATUS 2013

Total 5.8 3.7 3.2 2.1 1.9 1.4 1.1 0.7 0.6 0.5 0.5 USV.T.08

Road traffic – Accidents  Exposure / Risk

27


Road traffic – Accidents

International comparison

Fatalities in road traffic in an international comparison, by year of accident and travel mode, 1980–2011 Country 1980 A AUS B CDN CH CZ D DK E F FIN GB GR H I IRL IS ISR J KOR L N NIRL NL NZ P PL S SLO USA

Fatalities total (absolute)1 1990 2000 2011

2 003 3 274 2 369 5 461 1 209 1 261 15 050 690 6 522 13 672 551 6 010 1 446 1 630 9 220 564 25 … 11 388 6 449 98 362 229 1 996 597 2 579 6 002 848 558 51 091

1 558 2 331 1 976 3 960 925 1 291 11 046 634 9 032 11 215 649 5 217 2 050 2 432 7 151 478 24 … 14 595 14 174 70 332 185 1 376 729 2 646 7 333 772 517 44 529

976 1 824 1 470 2 927 592 1 486 7 503 498 5 776 8 079 396 3 409 2 037 1 200 6 410 415 32 … 10 403 10 236 76 341 171 1 082 462 1 860 6 294 591 314 41 821

523 1 277 858 2 2072 320 773 4 009 220 2 060 3 963 292 1 901 1 141 638 3 860 186 12 341 5 450 5 229 33 168 59 546 284 891 4 189 319 141 32 8852

Fatalities per 1m inhabitants1 1980 1990 2000 2011 265 223 243 227 192 122 193 135 176 254 115 110 150 152 164 166 110 … 97 172 270 89 149 142 189 277 168 102 292 225

203 136 199 149 139 125 140 123 232 199 130 93 202 234 124 136 94 … 118 334 185 78 116 92 215 283 192 91 259 179

120 95 144 95 83 145 91 93 146 136 77 59 193 120 111 110 113 … 82 218 175 76 101 68 121 181 163 67 158 152

62 57 78 652 41 73 49 40 45 61 54 31 101 64 64 42 38 44 43 105 65 34 33 33 65 84 110 34 69 1072

A

Austria

FIN

Finland

L

Luxembourg

AUS

Australia

GB

Great Britain

N

Norway

B

Belgien

GR

Greece

NIRL

Northern Ireland

CDN

Canada

H

Hungary

NL

Netherlands

CH

Switzerland

I

Italy

NZ

New Zealand

CZ

Czech Republic

IRL

Ireland

P

Portugal

D

Germany

IS

Island

PL

Poland

DK

Denmark

ISR

Israel

S

Sweden

E

Spain

J

Japan

SLO

Slovenia

F

France

KOR

Korea

USA

United States of America

1

Died within 30 days of the accident

2

2009: Canada, 2010: USA

Source: IRTAD, registered road traffic accidents

28

Road traffic – Accidents  International comparison

Fatalities per 1m inhabitants, by travel mode, 20111,2 Cars MotorBicycles PedesOther cycles trians 35 38 42 31 15 38 24 20 21 32 32 14 … 27 27 21 22 … 8 24 41 20 19 13 45 31 50 17 34 40

8 … 12 6 9 8 9 4 8 12 5 6 27 5 15 … 0 5 5 12 6 3 3 3 7 11 8 5 14 15

5 2 6 1 5 6 5 5 1 2 4 2 1 9 5 … 0 2 7 6 4 2 1 9 2 4 8 2 7 2

10 8 10 9 9 17 8 6 8 8 8 7 20 12 10 … 13 15 15 41 12 4 7 4 7 19 37 6 10 14

4 … 9 18 3 5 4 4 7 7 6 2 … 11 7 … 3 … 8 23 2 6 2 5 3 19 7 4 4 36

USV.T.24/25

bfu – STATUS 2013


4 000 2 669

Safety indicators

2 000 0 Urban roads

Rural roads

Motorways

Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

Development of seatbelt-wearing rates among car drivers, by location and region, in percent, 1980–2013 Year

German-speaking Switzerland

1980 1990 2000 2005 2010 2011 2012 2013

28 64 73 79 86 88 92 89

1980 1990 2000 2005 2010 2011 2012 2013

40 77 80 86 91 92 94 94

1980 1990 2000 2005 2010 2011 2012 2013

59 83 90 91 94 93 96 98

1980 1990 2000 2005 2010 2011 2012 2013

40 74 81 85 90 91 93 92

French-speaking Switzerland

Ticino

Total

USV.G.11.1

So

Development of seatbelt-wearing rates among car drivers, front-seat and rear-seat passengers, 1991–2013

D 19

100%

1

Urban roads 7 34 48 64 76 77 79 85

11 44 37 44 66 70 72 69

23 53 66 74 83 85 90 88

24 55 70 78 81 82 88 88

12 55 50 50 78 75 79 80

35 71 76 82 88 89 93 93

33 72 89 88 93 89 92 97

40 75 78 70 86 92 92 94

52 80 89 90 93 92 95 97

20 52 69 77 83 83 86 89

19 56 55 55 77 79 81 81

35 67 77 82 88 89 92 92

80%

60%

40%

20%

Rural roads

Motorways

All locations

Seatbelt wearing compulsory since 01.07.1981 People recorded in vehicles (sample) 2013: 29 716 Source: bfu, surveys

0% 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 2011 2013 Car drivers

Front-seat passengers

Rear-seat passengers

People recorded in vehicles (sample) 2013: Car drivers 29,716, front-seat passengers 14,580, rear-seat passengers 2,128

Peo

Source: bfu, surveys

VSV.G.04

Development of seatbelt-wearing rates among car drivers, front-seat and rear-seat passengers, in percent, 1995–2013 Year

Car drivers

1995 2000 2005 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

Front-seat passengers 69 77 82 88 87 88 89 92 92

Rear-seat passengers ... ... ... 89 88 89 88 92 91

32 32 53 65 68 74 79 77 72

Seatbelt wearing compulsory: For drivers and front-seat passengers since 01.07.1981, for rear-seat passengers since 01.10.1994 People recorded in vehicles (random sample) 2013: Car drivers 29 716, front-seat passengers 14 580, rear-seat passengers 2128 Source: bfu, surveys

VSV.T.11

VSV.T.01

Development of seatbelt-wearing rates among front-seat car passengers, by location, in percent, 2006–2013 Seatbelt wearing rates among front-seat passengers in cars, by location and region, in percent, 2013 Region Urban roads Rural roads Motorways German-speaking 88 91 96 Switzerland

Total 91

French-speaking Switzerland

85

90

97

90

Ticino Total

71 87

72 91

79 96

74 91

bfu – STATUS 2013

Urban roads 80 80 83 82 83 82 89 87

Rural roads 86 88 90 91 91 90 94 91

Motorways 90 87 92 91 93 92 95 96

Total 85 85 89 88 89 88 92 91

Seatbelt wearing compulsory since 01.07.1981 People recorded in vehicles (sample) 2013: 14 580

Seatbelt wearing compulsory since 01.07.1981 Persons recorded in vehicles (sample) 2013: 14 580 Source: bfu, surveys

Year 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

VSV.T.10.2

Source: bfu, surveys

VSV.T.10.1

Road traffic – Behaviour and attitudes  Safety indicators 29

So


Development of helmet-wearing rates among cyclists in road traffic, by age, in percent, 1998–20131

Development of helmet-wearing rates among cyclists in road traffic, by travel purpose, in percent, 1998–20131

Year 0–14 15–29 34–44 45–59 60+ Total 1998 30 9 13 10 6 14 2000 32 15 18 17 17 20 2005 49 27 40 30 23 34 2006 56 30 43 42 24 39 2007 53 31 41 36 34 38 2008 50 32 42 39 35 38 2009 70 30 43 36 34 38 2010 69 25 35 38 33 37 2011 67 25 46 39 30 40 SV, 30 / 31 /of68 32helmet-wearing 2012 26 46 among cyclists, 46 43 Development rates by 37 age, 1998–2013 63 2013 25 55 46 46 46 There are little differences in the so far published helmet wearing rates because e-bikes are retroactively excluded until 2010. 80% People recorded (sample) 2013: 6384 70% Source: bfu, surveys VSV.T.04.1 60% 1

Year Work School Shopping Leisure Total 1998 12 10 9 17 14 2000 11 15 9 26 20 2005 25 28 16 43 34 2006 23 30 17 51 39 2007 25 26 17 50 38 2008 29 29 15 48 38 2009 29 28 17 48 38 2010 25 35 16 46 37 2011 30 35 21 48 40 2012 27 for car daytime 37 19 lights in fine 49 weather143 Development of rates running , 2013 30 32 14 54 46 by region, 2001–2013 There are little differences in the so far published helmet wearing rates because e-bikes are retroactively excluded until 2010. 80% People recorded (sample) 2013: 6384 70% Source: bfu, surveys VSV.T.09.1 60% 1

50%

50%

Helmet wearing rates among cyclists in road traffic, by age and 40% region, in percent, 2013

Helmet wearing rates among cyclists in road traffic, by travel 40% purpose and region, in percent, 2013

Region 30% German-speaking 20% Switzerland

30% Region

0–14 15–29 34–44 45–59 65 24 54 45

60+ 46

Total 46

33 46

57 46

2001

2000

1999

1998

0–14 15–29 Persons recorded (sample) 2013: 6384

30–44

2013

64 46

2012

69 55

2011

40 25

2010

45 63

0%

2009

Ticino Total

2008

48

2007

44

2006

55

2005

61

2004

33 2003

40 2002

10% French-speaking Switzerland

60+

45–59

People recorded (sample) 2013: 6384 Source: bfu, surveys

VSV.T.04.2

Source: bfu, surveys

VSV.G.06

Average speed (Vm) and speed complied with by 85 % of drivers Development of helmet-wearing rates among cyclists, by age, (V85), by location, 2010 1998–2013

60% 100

34

Leisure

13

Total

53

46

French-speaking 25 10 18 57 48 0% Switzerland 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 German-speaking Switzerland 10 13 Ticino 30 32 Bright and sunny or slightly overcast Persons recorded (sample) (sample)2013: 2013: 31 6384 People recorded 625

French-speaking 20 72Switzerland 57 Total

Ticino Total 1

14

54

Source: bfu, surveys Source: bfu, surveys

46

VSV.T.09.2 VSV.G.03

40% 50%

84 76

40% 30%

60 30%

30% 20% 20%

50 44

20% 40

10% 10%

15–29

People recorded (sample) 2013: 6384

Motorways 60+ 45–59

IVT at the ETH Zurich, speed measurements Source: bfu, surveys

VSV.G.05 VSV.G.06

Average speed (Vm) and speed complied with by 85 % of drivers (V85), by location, 2010

Source: bfu, bfu, surveys surveys Source:

Shopping

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

2006

German-speaking Switzerland Ticino Work School 1 Bright and sunny or slightly overcast People recorded recorded (sample) (sample) 2013: 2013: 31 6384 People 625

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

2000

1999

0% 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 1998

2013

2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

Rural roads 30–44 Vm V85

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

Urban roads 0–14

2002

2001

2000

1999

10% 20 0% 0

31

Shopping

70% 50% 60%

108

50% 80 40%

20%

German-speaking 10% Switzerland

Work

80% 60%

121

70% 120

School

helmet-wearing ratesrunning among cyclists, travel pur-1, Development of rates for car daytime lights in by fine weather pose, 1998–2013 by region, 2001–2013

140 80%

1998

Road traffic – Behaviour and attitudes

SV, 30 / 31 / 32

French-speaking Switzerland Total Leisure Total

VSV.G.08 VSV.G.03

Development of helmet-wearing rates among cyclists, by travel purpose, 1998–2013

140

30

120

121 Road traffic – Behaviour and attitudes  Safety indicators  108

100 84

60% 50% 40%

bfu – STATUS 2013


04

Daytime running lights, rates for cars in fine weather1, by region and location, in percent, 2013

Motorcycles 89 73 94 92 85 82 86 89 91 96 94

Cars 99 98 99 100 99 99 100 100 100 100 100

259

People recorded (sample) 2013: 2241 250 Source: bfu, surveys

VSV.T.03.1

German-speaking Switzerland French-speaking Switzerland Ticino In built-up areas Outside built-up areas Motorways Total

Region 70 52 67 Location 64 69 76 68

Trucks/ buses

Motorcycles

Total

84 58 91

96 94 99

70 52 68

85 80 78 81

96 96 95 96

64 69 76 68

Bright and sunny or slightly overcast Motor vehicles recorded 2013: 31 625 1

Source: bfu, surveys

VSV.T.08

200

Helmet wearing rates among riders of motorized two-wheeled vehicles, by region, in percent, 2013 150

Region German-speaking 100 86 Switzerland

129 Motorcycles

Mopeds 95

100

86

99

100 94

100 100

French-speaking Switzerland 50

Ticino Total

0 recorded (sample) 2013: 2241 Persons Urban roads Rural roads Source: bfu, surveys Source: FEDRO, accidents registered by the police

Motorways

VSV.T.03.2 USV.G.11.2

cyclists, bycyclists, age, Development of helmet-wearing rates among motorised 1998–2013

Development of rates for car daytime running lights in fine weather1, by region, 2001–2013

80% 100%

80%

70%

70%

80% 60%

60%

50% 60% 40%

50%

30% 40%

30%

20%

20%

20% 10%

10%

15–29 Mopeds People recorded (sample) 2013: 6384 People recorded (sample) 2013: 2241

30–44

2012

2013

2012

2010

2011

2010

2008

2009

2008

2006

2007

2004

0–14

2006

2005

2004

2002

2003

2002

2000

2001

2000

0% 0% 1998

40%

1999

t

Year Mopeds 1998 2000 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 SV, / 31 /by32 Case fatality, location, Ø 2008–2012 201030 2011 2012 300 2013

1998

1.1

Development of helmet-wearing rates among motorised cyclists, in percent, 1998–2013

60+

45–59 Motorcycles

Source: bfu, surveys

VSV.G.06 VSV.G.07

Average speed (Vm) and speed complied with by 85 % of drivers (V85), by location, 2010

0% 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 German-speaking Switzerland Ticino 1 Bright and sunny or slightly overcast People recorded (sample) 2013: 31 625 Source: bfu, surveys

French-speaking Switzerland Total

VSV.G.03

Development of helmet-wearing rates among cyclists, by travel purpose, 1998–2013

140 121

120

108

50%

Road traffic – Behaviour and attitudes  Safety indicators 31

bfu100 – STATUS 2013 84

80

60%

40%

76

30%


Year

Speeds (average) in kph Urban roads Rural roads Motorways V851 Vm2 V>VL3 V851 Vm2 V>VL3 V851 Vm2 V>VL3 1975 … … … … … … … … … 1980 4 55 49 42 … … … 133 113 22 1985 … … … 92 81 49 126 110 28 1990 … … … 88 77 35 129 113 35 1995 … … … 92 82 56 127 112 33 2000 … … … … … … 129 112 35 Development of helmet-wearing rates Development of rates35 for car daytime in fine weather134 , 2001 … …among cyclists, …by age, 85 78 127running lights112 1998–2013 by region, 2002 … … … 83 76 2001–201327 129 114 38 2003 50 43 21 83 75 24 128 114 38 80% 80% 2004 49 43 19 81 73 19 125 111 30 2005 49 43 18 83 26 125 111 29 70% 70% 75 2006 47 41 13 79 72 16 123 110 26 60% 60% 2007 47 41 12 83 75 24 121 107 21 50% 75 50% 2008 49 42 16 82 30 122 109 22 2009 51 44 25 84 30 122 109 24 40% 75 40% 2010 50 44 23 84 76 31 121 108 18 20% 10%

2013

2012 60+

People recorded (sample) 2013: 6384 VSV.G.06

Average speed (Vm) and speed complied with by 85 % of drivers (V85), by location, 2010 140

Urban roads

Rural roads Vm

V85

Source: IVT at the ETH Zurich, speed measurements

32

Motorways

VSV.G.05

Road traffic – Behaviour and attitudes  Safety indicators 

Source: Source:bfu, bfu,surveys surveys

2007

2012

95 92 94

89 96 91

94 97 Leisure 95 94

2013

91 99 93

2011

93 91 93

2010

2008

0

2007

1998

20

2006

40

2005

50 44

2004

84 76

2003

1997 2002 Urban roads 40% 0–6 74 88 7–12 66 66 30% Total on urban roads 72 84 Rural roads 20% 0–6 69 82 7–12 53 80 10% Total on rural roads 62 81 0% Motorways 0–6 82 87 7–12 71 94 Work School Shopping Total on motorways 78 95 People recorded (sample) 2013: 6384 70 Total 85

2012

50% Age

100

60

Development of helmet-wearing rates among cyclists, by travel purpose, 1998–2013

2009

108

80

VSV.G.03

Children secured in cars, by age and location (special survey) 60% in percent, 1997–2012

121

120

French-speaking Switzerland VSV.T.05 Total

Source: bfu, surveys

2002

Source: bfu, surveys

German-speaking Switzerland Ticino Bright and sunny or slightly overcast People recorded (sample) 2013: 31 625

1

2001

45–59

0% 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

2000

2011

2010

2009

2008

30%

1999

Source: IVT at0–14 the ETH Zurich,15–29 speed measurements 30–44

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003

2002

2001

2000

1999

30% In built-up areas: Speed limit of 50 kph since 01.01.1984 Outside built-up areas: Speed limit of 80 kph since 01.01.1985 20% Motorways: Speed limit of 120 kph since 01.01.1985 1 Speed complied with by 85% of drivers 10% 2 Average speed 3 Share 0% in percent of vehicles above the posted speed limit (VL) 4 Highest permissible speed of 50 kph at the measurement points on urban roads

1998

Road traffic – Behaviour and attitudes

Development of speed behaviour, 1975–2010

94 99 Total 96 93

VSV.G.08 VSV.T.06

bfu – STATUS 2013


0%

ESV.G.43

Source: bfu, population survey

89

84

80

80%

76

71

88

82

Source: bfu, population survey

ESV.G.44

HaveHave little effect on safety 30 30little effect on safety

2005 4 2005

4

69 69

CauseCause increased costscosts increased

94 94

2008 7 7 2008 ThereThere are already too many traffictraffic are already too many regulations regulations 11 11 2011 2011 OtherOther road road usersusers are noticed less/tend to to are noticed less/tend be overlooked 14 14 overlooked 2013 be 2013

87 87

23

8

76 76

11

11

* Small Base People interviewed (sample): 742 (only car drivers)

Ticino

Source: bfu, population survey

*S Pe

ESV.G.24

Male 11 11 Male CauseCause increased 17 costs costs 17increased Female Female

76 76

11 11

41

44 41

61 44 11 11

83 83 26 26 21 21 67 67 21 21

16 traffic 18–29* 18–29* ThereThere are already too 16 many are already too many traffic 30–44 14 14 30–44 regulations regulations 45–59 10 10 45–59 15 15 60–74 60–74 OtherOther road road users are noticed less/tend to to users are noticed less/tend 20 20 75+75+ be overlooked be overlooked

6

9

9

17

2

13

8

25

24

19

Have little effect on safety Have little on safety 14 14 effect Total Total

6 13

25

47 1 1 47

2

23

26

Naming reasons against "daytime running lights", by age, 20132013 Naming reasons against "daytime running lights", by age, Naming currently applicable blood-alcohol level, 2013 Naming thethe currently applicable blood-alcohol level, 2013

Naming reasons against "daytime running lights", 20132013 Naming reasons against "daytime running lights", Naming currently applicable blood-alcohol limit, 2003–2013 Naming thethe currently applicable blood-alcohol limit, 2003–2013

2003 2003

38 34

24

Total

High level of education

Low level of education

Medium level of education

German-sp. Switzerland

60+

Female

Total

* Small Base People interviewed (sample): 742 (only car drivers)

Ticino

0% French-sp. Switzerland

0% 45–59

10% 30–44

20% 18–29*

20%

Male

40%

38

29

30%

SV,SV, S. 34 S. 34 SV,SV, S. S. 3333

45+ 42

38

40%

60%

30–44

1

50%

78

76

3

3

8 8

Ger.-sp. Switzerland 14 14 Ger.-sp. Switzerland 13 road 13other Fr.-sp. Switzerland Fr.-sp. Switzerland Dazzle other road usersusers Dazzle 21 21 Ticino Ticino

3

5

61

7

7 16 16

77 77 741874 18 16 16 79 79

6

6 11 11 11 11

76 76 8 588 58 15 15

9

9 22 22

76 76 3 5 77 77 10 10 68 68

11 11 11 11

20% 40% 60% 100% 0%0% Dazzle 20% 40% 80%80% 100% 7 60% other road road users 7 Dazzle other users Stated (<0.5ml or <0.8ml) Stated too too lowlow (<0.5ml or <0.8ml) Stated correctly (0.5ml or 0.8 ml alcohol level) Stated correctly (0.5ml or 0.8 ml alcohol level) 0% 0%10% 10%20% 20%30% 30%40% 40%50% 50% Stated (>0.5ml or >0.8ml) Stated too too highhigh (>0.5ml or >0.8ml) People interviewed (sample): 315 (only opponents of DRL People interviewed (sample): 315 (only opponents of legislation) DRL legislation) 2003: 0.8ml; 2005: 0.5ml 2003: 0.8ml; fromfrom 2005: 0.5ml

40% 60% 80% 100%70% 0%0% 20%20% 40% 60% 100% 0% 0% 10% 20% 20% 30% 40%80% 50% 60% 70% 10% 30% 40% 50% 60% 45+ 15–29 Stated (< 0.5ml) Stated Stated correctly (0.5ml) 30–44 Stated (>0.5ml) Stated too too lowlow (< 0.5ml) correctly (0.5ml) Stated too too highhigh (>0.5ml) 45+ 15–29 30–44 People interviewed (sample): 315 (only opponents of DRL *Small *Small BaseBase People interviewed (sample): 315 (only opponents of legislation) DRL legislation)

People (sample): drivers) People interviewed (sample): 742742 (only(only car car drivers) Source: bfu,interviewed population survey Source: bfu, population survey Source: population survey Source: bfu,bfu, population survey

People (sample): 742 drivers) People interviewed (sample): 742 (only(only car car drivers) Source: bfu,interviewed population survey Source: bfu, population survey

ESV.G.53 ESV.G.53

Source: population survey Source: bfu,bfu, population survey

ESV.G.46 ESV.G.46

19 19

5

3

10%10%

15–29 30–44 German-sp. Switzerland German-sp. Switzerland French-sp. 30–44Switzerland 45+ French-sp. Switzerland Ticino 45+ Ticino

People interviewed (sample): 10131013 People interviewed (sample): People interviewed (sample): 1013 People interviewed (sample): 1013 Source: bfu, population survey Source: bfu, population survey Source: population survey Source: bfu,bfu, population survey

15–29

15–29 15–29 30–44 30–44 45–59 45–59 60+ 60+ Female

Male

Male Female

0% 0%

Male Male Female Female

Total Total

0%0%

ESV.G.51 ESV.G.51 ESV.G.47 ESV.G.47

VisionVision test every ten years for people over 50 test every ten years for people over 50 HigherHigher insurance premiums for risky insurance premiums for drivers risky drivers

People interviewed (sample): 10131013 People interviewed (sample): People interviewed (sample): 1013 People interviewed (sample): 1013 Source: bfu, population survey Source: bfu, population survey Source: population survey Source: bfu,bfu, population survey

18 18 82

7

Psychological character test for Psychological character test for speeding/serious traffictraffic offenders speeding/serious offenders

Compulsory helmet-wearing for allfor cyclists Compulsory helmet-wearing all cyclists

94 90

24 24 88

88

21 21

Ban on alcohol sales at motorway services Ban on alcohol sales at motorway services

12 12 3

0%0% 2% 2%

cyclistscyclists

20%20%

82

7 76

Low level of education Low level level of of education education Medium Medium level of of education High level education

4

5

5

90

32 32

pedestrian crossings pedestrian crossings

27 27 30%30% Compulsory helmet-wearing for e-bike Compulsory helmet-wearing for e-bike

6

Ticino

4

33 33 6 25 25

44 9444 38 38

German-sp. Switzerland German-sp. Switzerland French-sp. Switzerland

5

5

4% 4% 10%10%

7

24 24

60+

7

26 26

30–44 45–59 45–59 60+

5

6

50 50 44 44

Speedy or relocating of dangerous 40% 40% Speedy updating or relocating of dangerous 33 33

15–29 15–29 30–44

6

37 37 updating

Male Male Female Female

31 31

6

39 39

Total Total

30%30% 6 6% 6% 20%20%

34

41 41

38 38

for41road 41 safety for road safety

Low level of education German-sp. Low level of of education education Medium level Switzerland German-sp. Medium level of of education education High level French-sp. Switzerland Switzerland High level of education French-sp. Switzerland Ticino Drivers Drivers Non-drivers Ticino Non-drivers

8% 8% 34 40%40%

39 39 34 34 35 35

37 37

Income from traffic fines to be to used from traffic fines be44partly used partly 50%Income 50% 44 44 44

French-sp. Switzerland Ticino

10% 10% 50%50%

Share of people whowho tendtend to be of the following measures, Share of people toinbefavour in favour of the following measures, Share people who heard term "living street", 2013 Share of of people who hadhad heard of of thethe term "living street", 2013 2013 2013

76

74

68 68

Drivers Drivers Non-drivers Non-drivers

Share of people whowho rideride an e-bike at least onceonce a year, 20132013 Share of people an e-bike at least a year, Share people who correctly named maximum speed permissible Share of of people who correctly named thethe maximum speed permissible in living streets kph, 2013 in living streets as as 20 20 kph, 2013

11 11

High level of education

ESV.G.52 ESV.G.52 ESV.G.45 ESV.G.45

74

68 68

0% 0%20% 20% 40% 40% 60% 60% 80% 80% 100%100% ESV.G.43 ESV.G.43 ESV.G.48 ESV.G.48

bfu – STATUS 2013 Road traffic – Behaviour and Self-reported of behaviour 33 Share of car who,who, on their ownown admission, occasionally drive Share of car drivers who, on their ownmodes admission, occasionally drive Share of drivers car drivers on their admission, occasionally drive Share ofattitudes  car drivers who, on their own admission, occasionally drive Share of people who ride a motorcycle at least once a year, 2013 Share of motorcyclists who drive with increased risk, 2013 Share of people who ride a motorcycle at least once a year, 2013 Share of motorcyclists who drive with increased risk, 2013 while under the influence of alcohol (2 glasses or more), 2013 too fast, 2013 while under the influence of alcohol (2 glasses or more), 2013 too fast, 2013 50% 50% 20%20%

42

100%100% 1842 18

So

Sh to

High level of education

82

Low level of education

82

Medium level of education

91 82

Share of car drivers who, on their own admission, occasionally drive while under the influence of alcohol (2 glasses or more), 2013

Ticino

100%

Pe ESV.G.51

French-sp. Switzerland

Share of car drivers who, on their own admission, occasionally drive too fast, 2013

German-sp. Switzerland French-sp. Switzerland

People interviewed (sample): 1013

German-sp. Switzerland

Source: bfu, population survey

100%

60+

80%

45–59

60%

30–44

40%

18–29*

20%

Male

0%

People interviewed (sample): 1013

15–29

68

Female

Higher insurance premiums for risky drivers

Female

Male

Vis

Total

68

Self-reported modes of behaviour

Total

24

2%

74

Vision test every ten years for people over 50

Total

51

Compulsory helmet-wearing for all cyclists

82

91 82

82

82 82

82

91 89

89 80

84

84

82

88 82

88

So


SV, SV, S. S. 3333 S. 34 SV, SV, S. 34 Naming the currently applicable blood-alcohol limit,limit, 2003–2013 Naming the currently applicable blood-alcohol 2003–2013

Naming the currently applicable blood-alcohol level,level, 20132013 Naming the currently applicable blood-alcohol

Naming currently applicable blood-alcohol limit, 2003–2013 Naming thethe currently applicable blood-alcohol limit, 2003–2013 Naming reasons against "daytime running lights", Naming reasons against "daytime running lights", 20132013

Haveeffect little effect on safety Have little on safety

2005 2005 2008 200874 2008 2008 2011 2011

94

47

7

47 47 2 62

6

87 8 87 8

239

23

Male Male11

21

2 1

94 87 94 87

Cause increased costs costs 11 Cause 11 increased

7

69 69

94

Total Total 14

1

6

6

9

9 9 11 11 11 too many traffic 76 8 76 8 2011 2011 11 14 2013 2013 There are already There 14 are already too many traffic 13 13 regulations regulations 0% 0%14 14 20% 20% 40% 40% 76 60% 80% 80% 100% 60% 76 11 11100% 2013 2013 road are users are noticed Other Other road users noticed less/tend to(<0.5ml Stated too less/tend low or <0.8ml) Stated too lowto(<0.5ml or11<0.8ml) 11 be overlooked be overlooked Stated correctly (0.5ml or 0.8orml alcohol level) 80% Stated correctly 0.8 ml alcohol level) 20% 40%(0.5ml 60% 80% 100% 0%0% 20% 40% 60% 100% Stated tootoo high oror>0.8ml) Stated too high (>0.5ml >0.8ml) low (<0.5ml oror<0.8ml) Stated low(>0.5ml (<0.5ml <0.8ml) 2003:2003: 0.8ml;0.8ml; from Dazzle 2005: 0.5ml from 2005: 0.5ml Stated correctly (0.5ml or 0.8 ml alcohol level) Stated correctly (0.5ml or 70.8 ml7 alcohol level) Dazzle other road users other road users PeoplePeople interviewed (sample): 742 (only car drivers) interviewed (sample): 742 (only car(>0.5ml drivers) Stated high or >0.8ml) Stated too too high (>0.5ml or >0.8ml) 2003: 2005: 0.5ml 2003: 0.8ml; fromfrom 2005: 0.5ml Source: bfu,0.8ml; population survey ESV.G.45 Source: bfu, population survey 50% 0% 0% 10% 10% 20% 20% 30% 30% 40% 40% 50%ESV.G.45 People interviewed (sample): (only drivers) People interviewed (sample): 742742 (only car car drivers) interviewed (sample): 315 opponents (only opponents DRL legislation) PeoplePeople interviewed (sample): 315 (only of DRLoflegislation) Source: population survey ESV.G.45 Source: bfu,bfu, population survey ESV.G.45 Source: bfu, population ESV.G.52 Source: bfu, population surveysurvey ESV.G.52

Share of people whowho correctly named the maximum speed permissible Share of people correctly named the maximum speed permissible in living streets as 20askph, 20132013 in living streets 20 kph, Share people who correctly named maximum speed permissible Share of of people who correctly named thethe maximum speed permissible Share of streets people who ride an e-bike at least a year, Share of people who ride an e-bike at least onceonce a year, 20132013 in living 20 kph, 2013 in living streets as as 20 kph, 2013 50% 50% 40% 40% 34 50% 50% 10% 10% 30% 30% 40% 34 40%

34

37

34

39

37 31

31

31 31

38

35

39 39 26 34 34 35 35

37 37

20% 20% 30% 30% 8% 8%

39 34 35

34

38 33

26

38 38 24

26 26

10% 10% 20%6 20% 6% 6% 0% 10% 0% 10%

6

5

12 7

41

39

33 41 41

39

39 39

25 33 33

19

19

25 25 6

6

12 12

19 19 5

5

4

4

4% 4%0%0%

3

3

2% 2%

Total

0% 0% PeoplePeople interviewed (sample): 1013 1013 interviewed (sample):

Source: bfu, population surveysurvey Source: bfu, population People interviewed (sample): 1013 People interviewed (sample): 1013 People interviewed (sample): 1013 People interviewed (sample): 1013 Source: population survey Source: bfu,bfu, population survey Source: bfu, population survey Source: bfu, population survey

ESV.G.47 ESV.G.47

ESV.G.47 ESV.G.47 ESV.G.51 ESV.G.51

11

76

83 83 76 76 67 67

11

7 7 11 11 16 16 61 44 7 7 41 6 6 16 16 11 11

Total Total Female Female 61 Have little effect on safety 44 Have little on safety 11 11 83 83 Maleeffect Male 16 77 16 77 41 18–29* 18–29* 67 67 Female 17 17 Female 74 74 30–4430–44 14 14 26 10 79 10 11 79 26 11 45–59 45–59Cause 16 costs costs 16 increased 77 6 6 21 77 21 18–29* Cause increased 18–29* 15 76 2176 21 15 9 9 60–7460–74 74 74 11 11 30–44 14 14 30–44 58 22 58 22 75+45–59 75+ 1020 10 20 79 79 11 11 45–59 3 are already too many There There are60–74 already traffic traffic 3 15 15 76 9 9 60–74too many 18 76 18 14 7616 76 16 14 11 11 Ger.-sp. Switzerland Ger.-sp. Switzerland regulations regulations 20 20 58 58 22 22 75+75+ 77 11 77 11 Fr.-sp.Fr.-sp. Switzerland Switzerland 13 13 8 8 21 68 21 11 68 11 Ticino Ticino Other road users are noticed less/tend Other road Switzerland users are noticed less/tend to to 14 14 76 11 11 Ger.-sp. Switzerland Ger.-sp. 8 76 8 be overlooked beSwitzerland overlooked 7715 60% 80% 80% 100% 13 1320% 20% 40% 40%15 7760% 11 11100% Fr.-sp. Fr.-sp. Switzerland 0% 0% 21 21 68 68 11 11 Ticino Ticino 3 (0.5ml) StatedStated too low 0.5ml) StatedStated correctly (0.5ml) StatedStated too high too(<low (< 0.5ml) too (>0.5ml) high (>0.5ml) 3correctly 5 Dazzle other20% road users 40% 5 40% Dazzle0% other users 0% road 20% 60% 80% 100% 100% 80% *Small*Small Base Base 10 60% 10 Stated (<742 0.5ml) Stated (0.5ml) Stated Stated (>0.5ml) Stated too too lowlow (< 0.5ml) correctly (0.5ml) too too highhigh (>0.5ml) PeoplePeople interviewed (sample): (only car drivers) interviewed (sample): 742Stated (only car correctly drivers) 0% 0% 10% 10% 20% 20% 30% 30% 40% 40% 50% 50% 60% 60% 70% 70% *Small *Small BaseBase Source: bfu, population surveysurvey ESV.G.46 Source: bfu, population ESV.G.46 15–29 45+ 45+ 15–29 30–4430–44 People interviewed (sample): (only drivers) People interviewed (sample): 742742 (only car car drivers) interviewed (sample): 315 opponents (only opponents DRL legislation) PeoplePeople interviewed (sample): 315 (only of DRLoflegislation) Source: population survey ESV.G.46 Source: bfu,bfu, population survey ESV.G.46 Source: bfu, population ESV.G.53 Source: bfu, population surveysurvey ESV.G.53

Share of people whowho had had heard of the "living street", 20132013 Share of people heard of term the term "living street", Share people who heard term "living street", 2013 Share of of people who hadhad heard of of thethe term "living street", 2013 50

50

Share of people in44favour offollowing the following measures, 50% 50% Share of people who who tend44tend to44be in favour of measures, 44 44 to 44be 44 the 44 20132013

37 40% 40% 50% 50%

Total Total Total Total Total Male Male Female Male Male Female Male Female Female Male 15–29 Female 15–29 30–44 15–29 15–29 30–44 Female 45–59 30–44 30–44 45–59 60+ 45–59 15–29 60+ 45–59 60+ 60+ 15–29 German-sp. Switzerland 30–44 German-sp. Switzerland French-sp. Switzerland German-sp. German-sp. Switzerland Switzerland French-sp. Switzerland 30–44 45+ Ticino French-sp. French-sp. Switzerland Switzerland Ticino 45+ Ticino Ticino Low level of education Low level of education German-sp. Medium level of education Low level level Low of level education of education Switzerland Medium of education High level of education German-sp. Medium level of of level education of education French-sp. HighMedium level education Switzerland Switzerland High level High of level education of education French-sp. Drivers Ticino Drivers Switzerland Non-drivers Drivers Drivers Non-drivers Ticino Non-drivers Non-drivers

5

25

24

24 1224 7

6

6 5

5

41

76

14

11 14 14 17 17

41

41

38

37 33 41 41

33

44 44 44 3244

27 27 30% 30% 37 37 from fines traffictofines to bepartly used partly 40%Income 40% Income from traffic be used 33 33

44 44 38 38

21

32 32

forsafety road safety for road

20% 20% 27 27 30% 30% Speedy updating or relocating of dangerous Speedy updating or relocating of dangerous pedestrian crossings

pedestrian crossings 10% 10% 20% 20% Compulsory helmet-wearing for e-bike Compulsory helmet-wearing for e-bike

21

18

21 21 7

7

7

7

24 94

18

90

24 24 90

18 18

on alcohol at motorway Ban onBan alcohol sales atsales motorway servicesservices

0%0%

24 94

88

88

cyclistscyclists

0% 0% 10% 10%

38 50 50

44 44

32

82

82

Psychological character Psychological character test fortest for speeding/serious traffic offenders speeding/serious traffic offenders

76

76

Compulsory helmet-wearing for all cyclists Compulsory helmet-wearing for all cyclists

74

74

Non-drivers Non-drivers

30 30

4

1

69

60+ 60+ German-sp. Switzerland German-sp. Switzerland French-sp. Switzerland German-sp. German-sp. Switzerland Switzerland French-sp. Switzerland Ticino French-sp. French-sp. Switzerland Switzerland Ticino Ticino Ticino Low level of education Low level of education level of LowMedium level Low of level education of education education Medium level of education High level of education education Medium level of of level education of HighMedium level education High level High of level education of education Drivers Drivers Non-drivers Drivers Drivers Non-drivers

2003 2003 4 2005 2005

69

30

Female Female 15–29 15–29 30–44 15–29 15–29 30–44 45–59 30–44 30–44 45–59 60+ 45–59 60+ 45–59

30

Naming currently applicable blood-alcohol level, 2013 Naming thethe currently applicable blood-alcohol level, 2013 Naming reasons against "daytime running lights", by age, Naming reasons against "daytime running lights", by age, 20132013

Total Total Total Total Male Male Female Male Male Female

2003 2003

testten every tenfor years for people Vision Vision test every years people over 50over 50

68

68

insurance premiums risky drivers HigherHigher insurance premiums for riskyfordrivers

68

ESV.G.48 ESV.G.48

PeoplePeople interviewed (sample): 1013 1013 interviewed (sample): Source: bfu, population surveysurvey Source: bfu, population People interviewed (sample): 1013 People interviewed (sample): 1013

People interviewed (sample): People interviewed (sample): 1013 1013 Source: population survey Source: bfu,bfu, population survey Source: bfu, population Source: bfu, population surveysurvey

68

0% 0% 20% 20% 40% 40% 60% 60% 80% 80% 100%100% ESV.G.48 ESV.G.48 ESV.G.43 ESV.G.43

Share of people whowho ride ride a motorcycle at least onceonce a year, 20132013 Share of people a motorcycle at least a year,

Share of motorcyclists whowho drivedrive withwith increased risk,risk, 20132013 Share of motorcyclists increased

Share people who ride a motorcycle least once a year, 2013 Share of of people who ride a motorcycle at at least once a year, 2013 ofdrivers car drivers on their admission, occasionally Share of car who,who, on their own own admission, occasionally drivedrive 20%Share 20% 18 18 under the16influence of alcohol (2 glasses or more), whilewhile under the16influence of alcohol (2 glasses or more), 20132013

Share motorcyclists who drive with increased risk, 2013 Share of of motorcyclists who drive with increased risk, 2013 ofdrivers car drivers on their admission, occasionally ShareShare of car who,who, on their own own admission, occasionally drivedrive too fast, 2013 too fast, 2013 73 73 Driving faster than the speedspeed Driving faster thanpermissible the permissible

9 25

25

17

PeoplePeople interviewed (sample): 988 988 interviewed (sample):

Source: bfu, population surveysurvey Source: bfu, population People interviewed (sample): People interviewed 988988 * Small Base (sample): * Small Base interviewed (sample): 742 car (only car drivers) PeoplePeople interviewed (sample): 742 (only drivers) Source: population survey Source: bfu,bfu, population survey Source: bfu, population survey Source: bfu, population survey

34

ESV.G.49 ESV.G.49

ESV.G.49 ESV.G.49 ESV.G.24 ESV.G.24

Driving without full protective clothing Driving without full protective clothing Driving faster than the permissible speed Driving faster than the permissible 91 speed 100% 100% 89 8991 82

82 82

8282

82

80

80% 80% Driving faster than conditions permit Driving faster thanprotective conditions permit Driving without clothing Driving without full full protective clothing

47 84

80 71

71

84 82 76 76

60% 60% Driving Driving when overtired or unfit Driving when overtired orpermit unfit Driving faster than conditions faster than conditions permit Tailgating Driving when overtired or unfit Driving when overtired orTailgating unfit 20% 20%Driving whenwhen underunder the influence of of Driving the influence Tailgating Tailgating alcohol (2 glasses or more) alcohol (2 glasses or more) 0% 0% Driving when under the of Driving when under theblind influence Overtaking at spotsof Overtaking atinfluence blind spots alcohol (2 glasses or more) alcohol (2 glasses or more)

76 45 47 4547

39

40% 40%

32 12 8

7876

73 73 88 88 78

39 45 45

32 39 39

12

32 32

128 12

47

82

High level of education

17

38 38 11 1111 11

Medium Low level level of of education education High level Medium level of of education education

9

11

Ticino Low level of education

19 5 19 5

34

11 11

French-sp. Switzerland German-sp. Switzerland Ticino French-sp. Switzerland

2624

34 9 9 25 24 24

9

60+ German-sp. Switzerland

24

9 9 26 25

9

60+ 45–59

5

11

15 15 42 9 42

30–44 18–29* 45–59 30–44

5

9

9 38

Female 18–29*

9 13 13 38 12 12

38

15 18 18

Female Male

20% 20% 5%5% 0% 0% 10% 10% 0%0% 0% 0%

38

12

Total Male

10% 10% 30% 5% 5% 30%

16 16

10

10 10 29

13 12

Total

29

15

13

Male Male Male Female Male Female Male Male Female Female Female Female 18–29* 16–29 16–29 30–44 30–44 18–29* 16–29 16–29 30–44 45–59 30–44 45+ 30–44 30–44 45+ 60+ 45–59 45+ 45+ 60+ German-sp. Switzerland German-sp. Switzerland German-sp. Switzerland French-sp. German-sp. German-sp. Switzerland Switzerland French-sp. Switzerland French-sp. Switzerland German-sp. Switzerland Ticino French-sp. French-sp. Switzerland Switzerland Ticino Ticino French-sp. Switzerland Ticino Ticino Ticino Low level of education Low level of of education Low level education Medium of education Low level Low of level education Medium level of education Medium level of education Low level of education High level of education Medium Medium level of education High level of education High level education Medium level ofof education High level High of level education of education High level of education

20% 20% 15% 15% 50% 50% 10 15% 15% 10% 10% 40% 40%

Total Total Total Total Total Total

Road Strassenverkehr traffic – Behaviour – Unfallgeschehen and attitudes

SV,SV, S. 33 S. 33

0% 0% 20% 8 8 20% 40% 40% 60% 60% 80% 80% Overtaking at blind spots Overtaking at blind spots PeoplePeople interviewed (sample): 117 (only interviewed (sample): 117 motorcyclists) (only motorcyclists) 20% 40% 40% 60% 60% 80% 80% 0%0% 20% Source: bfu, population surveysurvey ESV.G.50 Source: bfu, population ESV.G.50 * Small Base *People Small Base interviewed (sample): (only motorcyclists) People interviewed (sample): 117117 (only motorcyclists) interviewed (sample): 742 car (only car drivers) PeoplePeople interviewed (sample): 742 (only drivers) Source: population survey ESV.G.50 Source: bfu,bfu, population survey ESV.G.50 Source: bfu, population ESV.G.44 Source: bfu, population surveysurvey ESV.G.44

Road traffic – Behaviour and attitudes  Self-reported modes of behaviour

bfu – STATUS 2013


Sports Every year, around 400,000 people resident in Switzerland are injured in sports accidents at home and abroad. 129 were killed, including 14 abroad. An average of 59 more fatalities must be added to these in Switzerland â&#x20AC;&#x201C; victims from abroad who suffer fatal sporting accidents in Switzerland.


Sports – Accidents

Overview

Development of injured people, by type of sport, 2006–2010 Sports group/type of sport Football Other ball games Total for ball games

2006 74 450 50 110 124 560

Boating Bathing, swimming Other water sports Total for water sports

2 680 11 740 3 620 18 040

Downhill skiing (incl. touring) Snowboarding Cross-country skiing Tobogganing Ice-hockey Other winter sports Total for winter sports

50 270 14 980 4 740 8 310 5 530 8 500 92 330

Total for gymnastics, athletics

18 500

Hiking Rambling Total for hiking, rambling

5 900 13 040 18 940

Mountain biking Cycling (not in traffic) Total for cycling

6 680 5 400 12 080

Skating (scooter, in-line skates, skateboard) Equestrian sports Remaining types of sports Total for other types of sports Total Source: bfu, revised extrapolation

36

Sports – Accidents  Overview

16 440 7 560 76 760 100 760 385 210

2007 Ball games 74 850 51 900 126 750 Water sports 2 700 11 610 3 480 17 790 Winter sports 45 500 15 060 4 340 6 350 4 900 8 750 84 900 Gymnastics, athletics 20 920 Hiking, rambling 6 010 12 480 18 490 Cycling 7 370 6 230 13 600 Other types of sports 17 120 7 860 79 550 104 530 386 980

2008

2009

2010

79 900 52 380 132 280

81 090 53 360 134 450

83 860 53 730 137 590

2 820 11 890 3 270 17 980

2 790 12 130 3 590 18 510

2 720 12 520 3 800 19 040

53 400 15 060 4 740 7 570 4 850 8 640 94 260

54 040 15 550 4 530 8 050 5 120 8 610 95 900

51 300 13 920 4 370 7 710 5 400 8 600 91 300

21 230

21 020

19 240

5 750 12 430 18 180

6 130 13 370 19 500

5 260 14 670 19 930

7 040 5 620 12 660

8 320 5 690 14 010

8 310 5 870 14 180

16 370 8 080 82 420 106 870 403 460

16 820 7 870 81 730 106 420 409 810

15 690 8 410 82 590 106 690 407 970 USP.T.01

bfu – STATUS 2010


Age / Gender

Persons injured by type of sport and age, 2010 Sports group/type of sport

0–16 17–64 Ball games Football 26 120 57 300 Other ball games 14 270 39 150 Total for ball games 40 390 96 450 Water sports Boating 710 1 880 Bathing, swimming 5 610 6 600 Other water sports 280 3 390 Total for water sports 6 600 11 870 Winter sports Downhill skiing (incl. touring) 10 600 37 640 Snowboarding 5 390 8 020 Cross-country skiing 420 2 950 Tobogganing 1 390 6 200 Ice-hockey 1 560 3 790 Other winter sports 470 7 570 Total for winter sports 19 830 66 170 Gymnastics, athletics Total for gymnastics, athletics 13 730 5 210 Hiking, rambling Hiking 480 3 890 Rambling 430 8 170 Total for hiking, rambling 910 3 890 Cycling Mountain biking 910 7 160 Cycling (not in traffic) 2 670 2 620 Total for cycling 3 580 9 780 Other types of sports Skating (scooter, in-line skates, 9 680 5 820 skateboard)

Persons injured by type of sport and gender, 2010 65+

Total

440 310 750

83 860 53 730 137 590

130 310 130 570

2 720 12 520 3 800 19 040

3 060 510 1 000 120 50 560 5 300

51 300 13 920 4 370 7 710 5 400 8 600 91 300

300

19 240

890 6 070 890

5 260 14 670 5 260

240 580 820

8 310 5 870 14 180

190

15 690

Equestrian sports 3 480 4 800 130 Remaining types of sports 26 040 51 330 5 220 Total for other types of sports 39 200 61 950 5 540 Total 124 240 263 490 20 240

8 410 82 590 106 690 407 970

Source: bfu, revised extrapolation

bfu – STATUS 2010

USP.T.02

Sports group/type of sport

Male Female Ball games Football 70 210 13 650 Other ball games 36 390 17 340 Total for ball games 106 600 30 990 Water sports Boating 1 560 1 160 Bathing, swimming 4 710 7 810 Other water sports 3 520 280 Total for water sports 9 790 9 250 Winter sports Downhill skiing (incl. touring) 28 050 23 250 Snowboarding 9 490 4 430 Cross-country skiing 2 350 2 020 Tobogganing 4 280 3 430 Ice-hockey 5 350 50 Other winter sports 7 570 1 030 Total for winter sports 57 090 34 210 Gymnastics, athletics Total for gymnastics, athletics 5 710 13 530 Hiking, rambling Hiking 1 870 3 390 Rambling 6 040 8 630 Total for hiking, rambling 7 910 12 020 Cycling Mountain biking 7 050 1 260 Cycling (not in traffic) 4 080 1 790 Total for cycling 11 130 3 050 Other types of sports Skating (scooter, in-line skates, 7 190 8 500 skateboard) Equestrian sports Remaining types of sports Total for other types of sports Total

2 260 52 650 62 100 260 330

6 150 29 940 44 590 147 640

Source: bfu, revised extrapolation

Sports – Accidents  Age / Gender

Total 83 860 53 730 137 590 2 720 12 520 3 800 19 040 51 300 13 920 4 370 7 710 5 400 8 600 91 300 19 240 5 260 14 670 19 930 8 310 5 870 14 180 15 690 8 410 82 590 106 690 407 970 USP.T.40

37


Sports – Accidents

Sports fatalities: Accidents in Switzerland

Fatalities by type of sport and residential location (location of accident: Switzerland), Ø 2008–2012 Type of sport

Switzerland Women

Men Hiking Mountaineering Climbing Other mountain sport Total for mountaineering

28 6 3 1 38

10 1 1 0 12

Skiing tours Off-piste skiing Alpine skiing Off-piste snowboarding Snowshoeing Snowboarding Sledding Other winter sports Total for winter sports

9 3 3 1 1 1 1 1 20

2 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 4

Bathing/swimming Boating Diving Other water sports Total for water sports

8 3 3 2 16

3 0 1 0 4

5 1 2 1 9

0 0 0 0 0

2 3 2 1 1 1 10 93

1 0 0 0 0 1 2 22

Paragliding Base jumping Gliding Other form of aviation Total for aviation Rambling, walking Hunting Fishing Horseriding Mountainbiking Other types of sport Total for other types of sports Total

Total Men Mountaineering 38 10 7 15 4 1 1 0 50 26 Winter sports 11 5 3 3 4 2 1 2 2 1 1 0 1 0 1 0 24 13 Water sports 11 3 3 1 4 1 2 0 20 5 Aviation 5 0 1 4 2 1 1 0 9 5 Other types of sports 3 1 3 0 2 0 1 0 1 0 2 0 12 1 115 50

Abroad Women

Total

Total Women

Men

Total

1 2 1 0 4

11 17 2 0 30

38 21 4 1 64

11 3 2 0 16

49 24 6 1 80

1 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 4

6 4 2 2 2 1 0 0 17

14 6 5 3 2 1 1 1 33

3 1 1 0 2 1 0 0 8

17 7 6 3 4 2 1 1 41

0 1 0 0 1

3 2 1 0 6

11 4 4 2 21

3 1 1 0 5

14 5 5 2 26

0 0 0 0 0

0 4 1 0 5

5 5 3 1 14

0 0 0 0 0

5 5 3 1 14

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 9

1 0 0 0 0 0 1 59

3 3 2 1 1 1 11 143

1 0 0 0 0 1 2 31

4 3 2 1 1 2 13 174

Source: bfu, fatal sports accidents statistics

USP.T.16

Fatalities, by type of sports group and age (location of accident: Switzerland), Ø 2008–2012

Fatalities, by type of sports group and place of residence (location of accident: Switzerland), 2012 / Ø 2008–2012

Type of sports group

Type of sports group

Mountain sports Winter sports Water sports Aviation sports Other types of sport Total

0–16 17–25 26–45 46–64 65+ Unknown Total 2 2 2 0 1 7

7 4 5 1 1 18

24 17 9 7 3 60

29 12 5 4 5 55

18 4 5 2 4 33

0 1 0 0 0 1

80 40 26 14 14 174

2012 Ø 2008–2012 Resident Resident Total Resident Resident Total in CH outside CH in CH outside CH

Fatalities Ø 2008–2012: 174 (resident in Switzerland: 115, resident outside Switzerland: 58)

Mountain sports Winter sports Water sports Aviation sports Other Total

Source: bfu, statistics on fatal sports accidents

Source: bfu, statistics on fatal sports accidents

38

USP.T.36

Sports – Accidents  Sports fatalities: Accidents in Switzerland

31 21 29 10 13 104

28 15 5 7 3 58

59 36 34 17 16 162

50 24 20 9 12 115

30 17 6 5 1 59

80 41 26 14 13 174

USP.T.37

bfu – STATUS 2010


Injury localisation

4 4

1 2

3 3

1 2

Boating Bathing, swimming Other water sports

1 2 1

7 6 8

1 1 1

8 11 10

4 5 6

Downhill skiing (incl. touring) Snowboarding Cross-country skiing Tobogganing Ice-hockey Other winter sports

3 5 0 2 3 4

3 2 2 3 9 6

1 0 1 1 1 2

5 7 4 4 8 8

5 9 6 6 3 5

Gymnastics, athletics

1

3

1

3

3

Hinking Rambling

1 1

3 2

1 3

4 4

2 2

Mountain biking Cycling (not in traffic)

3 4

5 1

2 2

7 3

5 1

Skating (scooter, in-lineskates, skateboard)

2

6

1

9

4

Equestrian sports Remaining types of sports Total

7 1 2

4 4 4

1 2 1

9 6 5

11 4 4

1

28 13 11

12 10 11

5 5 4

13 17 12

8 8

0 0

0 0

1 1 1

2 1 1

0 1 2

12 5 9

7 5 7

15 28 12

5 6 7

2 1 2

1 9 7

0 1 0 0 1 1

2 1 4 1 2 2

2 1 4 2 4 2

26 11 13 22 14 17

9 6 3 15 6 7

2 5 3 10 6 5

6 4 4 7 4 3

1 1 0 1 1 1

1 0 0 0 1 0

1

3

3

14

16

22

13

1

2

2 1

1 1

1 1

17 10

17 14

16 16

13 12

2 1

2 5

3 0

2 6

2 2

9 13

9 10

4 4

8 10

3 3

2 0

3

2

3

12

8

3

7

1

0

1 1 1

3 2 2

3 3 3

6 12 15

9 10 12

10 15 15

4 6 8

2 1 1

1 1 1

Lower extremities1

22 18

Foot/toes

15 15

Calf/ankle

17 13

Knee

4 2

Thigh

3 2

Hip

0 0

Upper extremities1

Wrist/hand/finger

Lower arm/elbow

Shoulder girdle/upper arm

Ball games 8 5 2 9 5 6 2 18 Water sports 13 16 5 13 10 8 3 7 14 9 3 11 Winter sports 14 24 3 12 22 20 8 11 23 21 3 18 19 8 2 11 13 17 4 11 18 12 9 14 Gymnastics, athletics 7 7 3 7 Hinking, rambling 9 8 3 11 12 9 5 13 Cycling 17 22 11 19 17 26 12 17 Other types of sports 16 11 11 20

Entire body (systemic effects)

1 1

Remaining and several parts of the body1

Football Other ball games

Trunk

Head/face/neck1

Eyes

Face

Skull/brain

Types of sport

Spinal column/spinal cord

Injury localisation among people compulsorily insured, by types of sport (per 100 people injured), Ø 2006–2010

Not specified in greater detail

Source: SSUV, UVG statistics

bfu – STATUS 2010

USP.T.05

Sports – Accidents  Injury localisation

39


Sports – Accidents

t

13

oeing

e

USP.G.25

dent in

SP.G.20

um-

Drowning accidents

Development of drowning accidents, by location (location of accident: Switzerland), 2000–20121 Year

Lake

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Total 1

River

25 17 19 38 21 24 16 16 7 20 15 19 24 261

Stream

7 25 7 24 10 16 14 19 17 12 22 16 21 210

Indoor swimming Pond, pool, pool, public biotope

1 4 4 6 3 4 11 5 3 5 4 2 5 57

5 4 5 2 1 3 0 3 0 0 0 0 1 24

Lido

1 0 4 0 1 1 1 0 3 0 0 1 1 13

Open-air pool, public 0 0 1 2 0 1 1 1 0 2 0 0 1 9

Swimming Other accipool, private dent location

0 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 0 1 0 1 1 7

1 0 1 3 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6

Total

3 2 1 1 1 1 3 0 1 2 1 1 1 18

43 52 42 76 38 51 47 46 31 42 42 40 55 605

These figures are based on the Swiss population and foreign visitors.

Source: bfu, statistics on fatal sports accidents

USP.T.27

Drowning accidents by accident circumstances and age (location of accident: Switzerland), ∑ 2000–20121 Accident circumstances Suddenly sinking Falling into water Capsizing Swept away by the water Diving Other accident circumstances Unknown Total

0–4

5–9

10–14

6 22 0 1 0 0 1 30

15 9 0 0 0 0 1 25

15–24 10 5 0 1 0 1 2 19

25–44

49 17 11 13 0 3 7 100

63 33 19 11 2 4 35 167

45–64

65+

25 44 9 9 1 5 34 127

Unknown 7 11 4 1 0 0 8 31

29 43 3 1 0 2 28 106

Total 204 184 46 37 3 15 116 605

1 These figures refer to the Swiss population and foreign visitors. Source: bfu, statistics on fatal sports accidents

USP.T.39

Development of drowning accidents, by country of residence (location of accident: Switzerland), 2000–2012 80 70

15

60 50 40

8

8

8 9

4

5

6

6

5

30 20

10

61

39

3

44 36

7

42 33

47 38

10

38 28

30

36

33

0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Resident in Switzerland Source: bfu, statistics on fatal sports accidents

Resident outside Switzerland

Activity Bathing/swimming in open water Boating Underwater diving Walking/hiking/strolling Bathing/swimming in a swimming pool Fishing Diving (platform/springboard) Canyoning Surfing Other type of sport Game/leisuretime activity Travelling by motor vehicle Unknown/remainder Total 1

USP.G.15

40 Sports – Accidents  Drowning accidents Fatal mountain sports accidents, by type of sport and organisation (accident location: Switzerland), ∑ 2000–20121 600

Drowning accidents, by activity and gender (accident in Switzerland), ∑ 2000–20121 Male Female Unknown 154 32 1 58 8 0 37 6 0 27 13 1 26 9 1 15 14 5 6 12 59 27 45 485

0 1 3 0 2 15 13 13 115

0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 5

Total 187 66 43 41 36 15 15 8 6 14 75 40 59 605

These figures are based on the Swiss population and foreign visitors.

Source: bfu, statistics on fatal sports accidents

USP.T.38

bfu – STATUS 2013


SP, S. 40, 41, 42

Mountain sports Fatalities in off-piste snowsports, by type of sport and accident circumstances, ∑ 2000–20121 2

200

9 23 24

150

Development of fatal mountain sports accidents, by type of sport (location of accident: Switzerland), 2000–20121 3 100

143

Year 50

Hiking

11 9 19 73

3 Mountaineering 59

Climbing

9 23 22

Ice climbing

Canyoning

2 2 13 21

0 2000 40 28 2 Ski touring Off-piste skiing Off-piste snowSnow-shoeing 2005 37 26 8 boarding 2006 45 32 Fall into a crevasse 7 Avalanche/ snow slab Fall Other accident circumstance Unknown 2007 51 41 5 1 These figures are based on the Swiss visitors. 2008 44 population and foreign21 3 2009 48 accidents 24 6 Source: bfu, statistics on fatal sports USP.G.25 2010 53 18 8 2011 66 36 7 2012 29 23 4 1

0 2 1 0 2 0 1 1 0

Other mountain sport 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 3

Total

1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

71 73 86 97 71 78 80 110 59

These figures are based on the Swiss population and foreign visitors.

Source: bfu, statistics on fatal sports accidents

USP.T.30

Share of fatalities in avalanche accidents by type of sport (accident in Development of drowning accidents, by country of residence (location 1 Fatal mountain sports accidents, by type of sport, age, gender and (locationof ofaccident: accident:Switzerland), Switzerland),2000–2012 ∑ 2000–2012 Switzerland), Ø 2000–2012

Age7%

5%

Hiking

Mountaineering

Climbing

Ski touring

7%

0–9 10–19 7% 20–29 30–39 40–49 50–59

3 22 48% 43 59 70 103

25%

60–69

127

Off-piste0 skiing

12 Off-piste snowboarding 107 Snowshoeing 83 84 Mountaineering 77 Other type of sport

32

Fatalities Ø 2000–2012: 23 149 4 1 70+ These figures are based on the Swiss population and foreign visitors.

Unknown

1 4 13 14 15 13

11

12

Male Female

455 132

361 50

Switzerland Foreign country

454 133

139 272

Total

587

411

Source: bfu, statistics on fatal sports accidents

Ice 80 climbing Age 70 60 50 4

40 30

Canyoning 15

0 2 1 58 2 0

6 5

Other mountain sport 0 1 3 28 2 1

9

61

5 10

Total

0 0 0 1 06 0

8

7

3

4 0 0 0 163 47 1 044 042 0 154 20 39 38 38 36 36 33 33 0 0 0 1 24 30 28 USP.G.20 Gender 10 53 8 6 2 885 0 12 2 2002 2003 2004 2005 3 2006 2007 2008 2009 02010 2011 2012 199 2000 2001 Provenance Resident outside Switzerland 46 6 Resident in Switzerland 6 2 653 19 4 3 0 431 Source: bfu, statistics on fatal sports accidents

65

10

USP.G.15

9

2

1 084

Source: bfu, statistics on fatal sports accidents

USP.T.31

Distribution of fatal mountain sports accidents, by accident circumstances (location of accident: Switzerland), Ø 2000–20121

2% 3% 3%

5%

Fatal mountain sports accidents, by type of sport and organisation (accident location: Switzerland), ∑ 2000–20121

5%

600 500

Fall Avalanche/snow slab

400

Rockfall

300

47 22

29 27

518

Fall into a crevasse

200

Other accident circumstances

355

100

Unknown

2

0 Mountain hiking

82% Fatalities Ø 2000–2012: 83 These figures are based on the Swiss population and foreign visitors.

1

1

Source: bfu, statistics on fatal sports accidents

bfu – STATUS 2013

4 41 167 164 173 194

USP.G.21

Mountaineering

4 2 6 13

59

Climbing

Not institutionally organised Institutionally organised These figures are based on the Swiss population and foreign visitors.

Other mountain sport Unknown

Source: bfu, statistics on fatal sports accidents

Sports – Accidents  Mountain sports

USP.G.24

41


Sports– Accidents Sport

Avalanche accidents

Development of fatal avalanche accidents, by type of sport (accident location: Switzerland), 2000–20121 Year

Ski touring

2000 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

4 12 5 10 3 10 25 18 11

1

Off-piste skiing

Off-piste Snowshoeing snowboarding

8 3 11 6 4 7 1 3 4

0 3 5 0 2 1 2 0 1

Mountaineering

Mountain hiking

2 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 1

0 0 1 1 1 0 1 2 0

0 2 2 0 2 5 1 5 0

Ice Downhill climbing skiing 0 2 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

Snowboard Angling touring

1 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 0

0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

Total

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

15 22 24 23 15 23 30 29 17

These figures refer to the Swiss population and foreign visitors.

Source: bfu, statistics on fatal sports accidents

USP.T.41

Fatalities in avalanche accidents, by types of sport, age, gender and provenance, (accident location: Switzerland) ∑ 2000–2012 Ski touring SP, S. 40, 41, 42

Off-piste skiing

Off-piste snowboarding

Snowshoeing

Mountaineering

Hiking

Age 0 0 12 5 4 0 0 0 0 2 13 22 21 Gender 0 Male 19 13 20 Ski touring 120 Off-piste62 skiing Off-piste snowSnow-shoeing boarding3 Female 23 10 8 1 Avalanche/ snow slab Fall Fall into a crevasse Unknown 0 1 0 0 0 Other accident circumstance Unknown 1 Provenance These figures are based on the Swiss population and foreign visitors. Switzerland 96 41 14 9 14 Source: bfu, statistics on fatal sports accidents USP.G.25 Foreign 47 32 8 12 7 Country 0–9 0 1 0 1 Fatalities in off-piste1 snowsports, 10–19 11 by type of sport 5 and accident 0 circumstances, ∑ 2000–20121 20–29 16 17 11 2 2 30–39 29 21 6 6 200 9 23 40–49 50 12 0 6 24 150 50–59 32 8 0 2 3 60–69 11 0 4 11 1 100 9 19 70+ 2 0 0 0 143 3 59 50 Unknown 2 02 73 2 23 0

Total

143

73

22

21

21

Share of fatalities in avalanche accidents by type of sport (accident in Switzerland), Ø 2000–20121

7%

48%

Ski touring

150 70

Off-piste skiing

100 60

Off-piste snowboarding

0 40

Mountaineering Other type of sport

Total

0 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0

1 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0

0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0

3 20 61 70 73 43 17 5 4

4 2 0

3 1 0

3 0 0

2 0 0

1 0 0

247 48 1

3 3

1 3

1 2

1 1

1 0

181 115

6

4

3

2

1

296 USP.T.28

9 23 24 15

3 11 9 19

143 8 4

3 59 23

73 8

Ski touring6

Off-piste skiing

9

5

8 2 2 13 21

22

5 6 Snow-shoeing Off-piste snow7 boarding 10 3 Fall into a crevasse

30Avalanche/ snow slab 61 Fall Other accident circumstance Unknown 44 42 1 20 39 38 and 38 These figures are based foreign visitors. 36 on the Swiss population

Fatalities Ø 2000–2012: 23 1 These figures are based on the Swiss population and foreign visitors. Source: bfu, statistics on fatal sports accidents

Angling

0 1 2 0 0 1 0 2 0

2

50 50

Snowshoeing

25%

Snowboarding tours

Development of drowning accidents, by country ofand residence (location Fatalities in off-piste snowsports, by type of sport accident 1 of accident: Switzerland), 2000–2012 circumstances, ∑ 2000–2012 200 80

5%

7%

Alpine skiing

SP, S. 40, 41, 42

Source: bfu, statistics on fatal sports accidents

7%

Ice climbing

33

USP.G.20

Source: bfu, statistics on fatal sports accidents 10

28

30

47 36

33

USP.G.25

0 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012

42

Sports  Avalanche accidents 

Resident in Switzerland Source: bfu, statistics on fatal sports accidents

bfu – STATUS 2013

Resident outside Switzerland

USP.G.15

Share of fatalities in avalanche accidents by type of sport (accident in Switzerland), Ø 2000–20121

Develo of acci


Transportation of people injured in winter sports

Share of persons injured when snowboarding, by accident location and cause (loc. of accident: Switzerland), winter season 2012/131

Share of persons injured when skiing, by accident location and cause (loc. of accident: Switzerland), winter season 2012/131 Cause of accident

Piste

Accident after a jump (not involving others) Accident without jump (not involving others) Collision with a person Collision with an object Total 1

Offpiste

Snowpark

Other accident location

Total

8

22

73

8

12

83

73

24

80

79

8

2

2

5

7

1

3

1

7

2

100

100

100

100

100

These figures are based on the Swiss population and foreign visitors.

Cause of accident

USP.T.18

7

45

Other accident location 79 5

89

40

18

87

76

3

9

1

3

3

1

6

2

5

1

100

100

100

100

100

Accident after a jump (not involving others) Accident without jump (not involving others) Collision with a person Collision with an object Total 1

Source: bfu, statistics on the transportation of people injured in winter sports

Piste

Off-piste

Snowpark

Total

20

These figures are based on the Swiss population and foreign visitors.

Source: bfu, statistics on the transportation of people injured in winter sports

USP.T.19

Share of persons injured when skiing and snowboarding, by age and gender (loc. of accident: Switzerland), winter season 2012/131

Share of persons injured in winter sports, by type of rescue transport1 (loc. of accident: Switzerland), winter season 2012/132

Age

Means of transport

Male 0–9 10–14 15–19 20–29 30+ Total 1

4 8 4 5 28 49

Skiing Female 3 7 4 5 32 51

Total

Snowboarding Female Total 1 0 1 17 14 31 15 12 27 13 10 23 12 6 18 58 42 100

7 15 8 10 60 100

These figures are based on the Swiss population and foreign visitors.

Source: bfu, statistics on the transportation of people injured in winter sports

USP.T.20

Rescue sled Motor sled Ambulance Cablecar Helicopter Snow groomer Other means of transport No transport Total 1

Share of people injured in snowsports, by accident location and type of sport (loc. of accident: Switzerland), winter season 2009–20131,2 Piste

Off-piste

Snowpark

Other accident location

83 84 82 84

2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13

77 73 71 74

2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13

22 20 20 22

55 26 26 21 18 0 8 2 156

46 31 26 25 14 0 8 3 153

3 4 3 5 3 6 3 5 Snowboarding 3 13 3 18 3 19 3 16 Other type of snowsport 2 1 2 2 2 1 2 2

2

Other type of winter sport 45 19 34 17 18 1 10 4 148

Total 53 27 26 21 17 0 8 2 155

Several means of transport possible per injured person These figures are based on the Swiss population and foreign visitors.

Source: bfu, statistics on the transportation of people injured in winter sports USP.T.21

Development of share of injured people in snowsports, by types of sport, (loc. of accident: Switzerland), winter seasons, 1990–20131

10 8 9 8

100 100 100 100

7 6 7 7

100 100 100 100

75 76 77 74

100 100 100 100

1

People recorded: skiing 20,167, snowboarding 5,717, other type of snowsport 1,679

2

These figures refer to the Swiss population and foreign visitors.

Source: bfu, statistics on the transport of people injured in snowsports

bfu – STATUS 2013

Snowboarding

Total

Skiing 2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13

Skiing

Male

Year

5 20 27 30 23 21 20

Other type of winter sport 4 4 8 9 7 6 6

Source: bfu, statitics on the transp. of people injured in winter sports

USP.T.42

1990/91 1995/96 2000/01 2005/06 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13 1

Skiing

Snowboarding

92 76 65 60 70 74 74

These figures are based on the Swiss population and foreign visitors

USP.T.43

Sports – Accidents  Transportation of people injured in winter sports

43


Sports – Accidents

Snowsports

Injury localisation in skiing (per 100 people injured), by age (location of accident: Switzerland), winter season Ø 2002–20131,2

Injury localisation in snowboarding (per 100 people injured), by age (location of accident: Switzerland), winter season Ø 2002–20131,2

Injury localisation Head/face/neck Trunk/spinal column Shoulder/upper arm Elbow/lower arm Wrist/hand Hip/thigh Knee Calf/ankle/foot Total

Injury localisation Head/face/neck Trunk/spinal column Shoulder/upper arm Elbow/lower arm Wrist/hand Hip/thigh Knee Calf/ankle/foot Total

1

0–9 10–14 15–19 20–29 12 15 20 14 8 14 13 12 6 13 16 19 3 4 4 2 4 8 7 4 8 6 6 4 23 27 31 41 42 23 14 13 106 110 111 109

30+ 15 11 23 1 3 7 38 13 111

Total 15 11 19 2 4 7 35 17 110

People recorded: skiing 20,167

refer to the Swiss population and foreign visitors. SP,These S. figures 44, 45 2

SP, S. 44, 45

Source: bfu, statistics on the transportation of people injured in winter sports

USP.T.06

Development in the share of head injuries in winter sports (per 100 people inj.), by type of sport (loc. of acc.: CH), winter season 2005–20131,2 Season

Skiing

2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13

Snowboarding 13 17 16 13 16 15 13 14

Other winter sport 16 15 18 17 17 19 16 17

Total 11 14 15 10 12 15 16 14

1

People recorded: skiing 20,167, snowboarding 5,171, other winter sport 1,679

2

These figures refer to the Swiss population and foreign visitors.

14 16 16 14 16 16 14 14

30+ 18 16 31 7 15 3 9 13 112

Total 18 15 25 11 20 3 10 10 112

Source: bfu, statistics on the transportation of people injured in winter sports

USP.T.07

1

People recorded: snowboarding 5,717

2

These figures refer to the Swiss population and foreign visitors.

Develop. in the share of collisions with people in winter sports (per 100 people inj.), by type of sport (loc. of acc.: CH), winter season 2005–20131,2 Season

Skiing 7 7 7 7 6 9 7 8

2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2012/13 1,2

Snowboarding

Other winter sport 4 3 6 4 4 4 4 4

Total 5 1 3 7 6 6 3 5

6 5 7 7 6 7 6 7

People recorded and reference to figures: q.v. table USP.T.08 above

Source: bfu, stat. on the transportation of people injured in winter sports

Source: bfu, stat. on the transportation of people injured in winter sports

USP.T.09

USP.T.08

Shareof offatalities fatalitiesin inwinter wintersports, sports,by bycause causeof ofaccident accident(location (locationof of Share accident:Switzerland), Switzerland),ØØ2008–2012 2008–2012 accident: 6% 6%

0–9 10–14 15–19 20–29 15 14 21 20 20 13 17 15 14 17 24 33 15 16 9 9 18 30 19 11 1 3 4 4 17 8 11 11 10 9 8 9 110 110 113 112

Shareof offatalities fatalitiesin inwinter wintersports, sports,by bytype typeof ofsport sport(location (locationof of Share accident:Switzerland), Switzerland),ØØ2008–2012 2008–2012 accident:

4% 3% 4% 3%

16% 16%

9% 9% 9% 9%

41% 41%

54% 54% 15% 15%

24% 24%

Avalanche Avalanche Collisionwith withobject object Collision

Fallfrom fromaaheight height Fall Collisionwith withperson person Collision

Fallon onlevel levelground ground Fall Other Other

FatalitiesØØ2008–2012: 2008–2012:41 41(Resident (ResidentininSwitzerland Switzerlandand andoutside outsideSwitzerland) Switzerland) Fatalities Source:bfu, bfu,statistics statisticson onfatal fatalsports sportsaccidents accidents Source:

19% 19% Off-pisteskiing skiing Off-piste Otherwinter wintersports sports Other

Alpineskiing skiing Alpine

FatalitiesØØ2008–2012: 2008–2012:41 41(Resident (ResidentininSwitzerland Switzerlandand andoutside outsideSwitzerland) Switzerland) Fatalities USP.G.07.1 USP.G.07.1

44 Sports – Accidents  Snowsports Developmentof ofhelmet-wearing helmet-wearingrates ratesin inwinter wintersports sportsin inGermanGermanDevelopment speakingSwitzerland, Switzerland,by byage, age,2002–2013 2002–2013 speaking 100% 100%

Skiingtours tours Skiing Off-pistesnowboarding snowboarding Off-piste

Source:bfu, bfu,statistics statisticson onfatal fatalsports sportsaccidents accidents Source:

USP.G.07.2 USP.G.07.2

bfu – STATUS 2013 Helmet-wearingrates rateswhen whentobogganing, tobogganing,by byage, age,2013 2013 Helmet-wearing

80% 80%

75 75


SP, S. 44, 45

Development of protective equipment behaviour in winter sports, in percent, 2002–2013

Development of helmet-wearing rates in winter sports, by age, in percent, 2002–2013 Season 2002/03 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11 2011/12 2012/131

0–17 44 62 73 79 87 90 95 96 97 98

18–25 14 25 39 45 57 60 76 72 84 89

26–45 6 16 29 39 49 57 67 76 77 82

46–64 1 11 20 31 44 54 69 74 81 82

65+

Total 16 30 42 52 58 65 76 81 84 87

0 11 15 27 31 53 66 69 76 84

Season

Standard spectacles, safety or snowsports goggles

Back protection/ protective jacket

Test and binding adjustment by an expert

Wrist protection

2006/07

52

51

55

40

49

62

Skiing 2002/03 … 2 52 2004/05 95 3 47 2006/07 96 7 50 2007/08 93 6 47 2008/09 97 13 … 2009/10 97 13 59 2010/11 … 12 … 2011/12 … 14 … 2012/13* … 11 … Share of fatalities in winter sports, by type of sport (location of Snowboarding accident: 2002/03 Switzerland), Ø…2008–2012 7 … 2004/05 93 21 … 16% 2006/07 90 38 … 2007/08 90 41 … 2008/09 98 38 … 9% 41%… 2009/10 99 49 2010/11 … 40 … 2011/12 … 44 … 2012/13* … 39 … *People recorded15% (sample) 2013: 5,381

2007/08

58

59

63

45

55

70

Source: bfu, Survey on personal protective equipment in winter sports

2008/09

63

68

72

46

63

71

1

People recorded (sample) 2013: 5,381

Source: bfu, survey on personal protective equipment in winter sports

VSP.T.10.1

Share of fatalities in winter sports, by cause of accident (location of accident: Switzerland), Ø 2008–2012 3%

4%

6% Development of helmet-wearing rates in winter sports, by gender, region and type of sport, in percent, 2002–2013

Season

Male9%Female German-sp.

French-sp. Skiing Switzerland Switzerland

Snowboarding

2002/03

17

14

17

13

14

20

2004/05

32

27

32

2005/06

43

40

42

24 54% 28 40 40

49

24%

2009/10Avalanche74

78 Fall from a height 81

Avalanche

37

75 Fall 56 on level ground

79

2010/11Collision with 79 object 83 Collision with85 67 80 person Other 2011/12 83 87 89 71 84 Fatalities Ø 2008–2012: 41 (Resident in Switzerland and outside Switzerland)

84

Fatalities Ø 2008–2012: 41 (Resident in Switzerland and outside Switzerland)

2012/13*

87

88

91

76

87

Source: statistics on fatal sports accidents *Peoplebfu, recorded (sample) 2013: 5,381

89 USP.G.07.1

Source: bfu, survey on personal protective equipment in winter sports

Skiing tours Off-piste snowboarding

82

19% Off-piste skiing Other winter sports

Source: bfu, statistics on fatal sports accidents

USP.G.07.2

VSP.T.10.2

100%

80%

80%

70%

60%

60%

40%

50%

20%

40%

75 64 57 50 38

2012/13**

2011/12

2010/11

2009/10

2008/09

2007/08

2006/07

2005/06

2004/05

2003/04*

2002/03

bfu – STATUS 2013

26–45 Total

35

38

29

28

13–17 18–25 26–30 31–45 46–64

65+

30%

Source: bfu, Survey on personal protective equipment in winter sports

VSP.T.11

Fatalities Ø 2008–2012: 41 (Resident in Switzerland and outside Switzerland)

Helmet-wearing rates when tobogganing, by age, 2013

0–17 18–25 65+ 46–64 *No data available. Mean value from adjacent seasons used. ** People interviewed (sample) 2013: 5381

37 40 42 39 36 27 … 33 31

Alpine skiing

Development of helmet-wearing rates in winter sports in Germanspeaking Switzerland, by age, 2002–2013

0%

… … … … … … … … …

20% 10% 0%

Total

0–6

7–12

People interviewed (sample) 2013: 2657 VSP.G.12

Source: bfu, Survey on personal protective equipment in winter sports

VSP.G.13

Sports – Behaviour and attitudes  Snowsports 45


Sports – Behaviour and attitudes Sport

G.18

.20

%

.22

3

Do not attach toboggans to each other

3 2 2 3

Look behind you before entering the piste and setting off Use the walkways at the edge to ascend and descend

SP, S. 46

aning

%

Do not attach toboggans to each other Look behind you before entering the piste and setting off Use the walkways at the edge to ascend and descend

0%

20%

40%

60%

Self-reported modes of behaviour

People SP,interviewed S. 46 (sample): 1013

Goes tobogganing at least occasionally

Never goes tobogganing

Source: bfu, population survey

ESP.G.18

Spontaneous mention of tobogganing rules, by frequency of going tobogganing, 2013 Spontaneous mention of tobogganing rules, by frequency of going Assessment of people's tobogganing skills, 2013 50 tobogganing, Match speed and2013 method to skill level 34 Spontaneous mention of tobogganing rules, 2013 Wear a helmet Match speed and method to skill level

39

23

50

34

29 Show consideration others 39 Weartoa helmet 2223 13 35 Total Match speed and method 8to skill level 32 4013 13 Observe markings and signs 29 Show consideration to others 13 22 Wear a helmet 30 12 Overtake at aand distance 13 Observe markings 8 4 38 435 7 signs 15–29 13 Show consideration to others 25 9 Respect the trackOvertake of the person in9 front 7 13 39 32 5 7 12 at a distance 30–44 Observe markings and signs 13 not 14 14 32 32 6 89 7 front 45–59 Respect the trackDo of the travel personheadfirst in 7 a distance 8 Stop at the edge, do notOvertake linger in at narrow 5 27 20 26 18 9 Do75–85 travel headfirst 3 68 spots without anot clear view Respect the track of the person in front 8 55 Stop edge,toboggans do not linger in narrow Do at notthe attach to each other 33 spots without a clear view Do not travel headfirst 6 22 18 46 32 Often Look goes behindtobogganing you before entering the piste 35 Do not attach toboggans to each other 2 and setting off Stop at the edge, do not linger in narrow 3 3 8 37 44 8 Occasionally goes tobogganing 4 Use behind the walkways at the edge tothe ascend 2 Look you before entering piste spots without a clear view 33 andsetting descend 2 and off 21 17 35 23 5 Never goes tobogganing Do not attach toboggans to each other 4 Use the walkways at the edge to ascend 2

20% 40% 60% andyou descend Look behind before entering the 0% piste 3 0% 20% 60% 80% 100% 240% setting off at least occasionally Never goes tobogganing People interviewedand (sample): 1013 0% Goes tobogganing 20% 40% 60% Use the walkways at the edge to ascend Highly skilled Skilled Average skills 2 Not very skilled Not skilled at all and descend Goes tobogganing at least occasionally Never goes tobogganing Source: bfu, population survey ESP.G.18

SP, S. 46

People interviewed (sample): 1013 People Source: interviewed 1013 bfu,(sample): population survey People Source: bfu,interviewed population (sample): survey 1013

0%

20%

40%

60% ESP.G.18 ESP.G.20 ESP.G.19

Source: bfu, population survey

Spontaneous mention of tobogganing rules, by frequency of going Assessment of people's tobogganing skills, 2013 tobogganing, 2013 Assessment of people's tobogganing skills, 2013by age, 2013 Importance of wearing a helmet when tobogganing, 50 Match speed and method to skill level

Total

Show consideration to others

15–29

Total

8

30 Observe markings and15–29 signs

7

Total

30–44 Overtake at a distance 15–29

44 45–59 30–44 Respect the track of the person in30–44 front 15–29 75–85 45–59 Do not travel headfirst 30–44 42 in narrow 45–59 Stop at the edge, do not linger 75–85 spots without a clear view 45–59 Often goes tobogganing 60–74 Do not attach toboggans to each other 43 60–74Occasionally goestobogganing tobogganing goes Look behindOften you before entering the75–85 piste and setting Never goesofftobogganing tobogganing Occasionally goes

Use the walkways at the edge to ascend and descend Never Often goes35tobogganing

75–85

32 22 1349 43 13

19 79 5

29

39

41 32 39 3232 9 7 20 55 26 18 8 32 20 32 620 56 40 20 26 18 9 5 49 3 20 46 32 5 15 48 3 44 42 8 46 32 43 3 19 35 23 528 44 2 3 23 31 0%5 20% 48 40%35 41 60%

79

79

2 13 14 7 24 2 27 14 14 22 2 15 4 27 29 3 22 18 37 1 418 8 232 37 11 33 5

21 8 3 9 2821

ESP.G.21

Assessment of people's tobogganing skills, tobogganing, 2013 Importance of wearing a helmet when by age, 2013 Importance of wearing a helmet when tobogganing, by age, 2013

Importance of wearing a helmet when tobogganing, by frequency and 13 13 35 32 8 Total language area, 2013 30 49 14 6 15–29 30 15–29

30–44

30–44

30–44

45–59 44 7

44

9

49

43

7

Total

32 26 39

Never goes43tobogganing 60–74goes tobogganing 32 Often 8

44

32 41

45–59 18 75–8542 9 Goes tobogganing at least occasionally 42 45–59 60–74goes tobogganing43 Occasionally

41 39

39

32

39

40

13

27

20 43 44

46 42

13 7 13

18

4 14

4 4

11 22 12 45 8 113

37

42 2

15 15

4

9 35 75–85 219 17 35 48 23 5 Never goes tobogganing 12 5 42 41 German-speaking Switzerland 48 9 9 35 75–85 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 0%French-speaking 20% Switzerland 40% 60% 2 18 100% 49 80% 31 Highly skilled Skilled Average skills Not very skilled Not skilled at all 0% important 20% 40% Fairly unimportant 60% 80%important at 100% Very Fairly important Not all 7 36 57 Ticino Very important Fairly unimportant Not important at all interviewed (sample): 1013Fairly PeoplePeople interviewed (sample): 1013important 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Source: bfu,interviewed population surveysurvey ESP.G.20 People (sample): 1013 Source: bfu, population ESP.G.22 Very important Fairly important Fairly unimportant Not important at all Source: bfu, population survey ESP.G.22 People interviewed (sample): 1013

Source: bfu, population survey

25

30 50 28

Sp

2

25 39 24

2

22

2

29

3

37

1

33

5

28

-

26

2

29

3

40% 60% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% People interviewed (sample): Use the walkways at the edge to ascend1013 2 20% 40% 60% 3 0% and descend Very high Fairly high Fairly low Very low Source:interviewed bfu, population survey ESP.G.19 People (sample): 1013 0% 20% 40% 60% PeopleSource: interviewed 1013 bfu, (sample): population survey Goes tobogganing at least occasionally Never goes tobogganing ESP.G.19 People interviewed (sample): 1013 Source: bfu, population survey ESP.G.21 Source: bfu, population survey ESP.G.18

Spontaneous mention of tobogganing rules, 2013 Assessment of the risk of injury while tobogganing, 2013

19

Total Total

8 Total30–44

ESP.G.23

19

20 2032 20

51

25 51

39

55

13

2

28 4

2

24

2

13 22 24

2 2

13

44 13

3556 55

8

28

20 49 29 3 45–59 20 56 43 2 30–44 14 224 39 Goes tobogganing at least Respect the track of the occasionally person in front 8 8 4 38 43 7 15 48 37 1 15–2945–59 60–74 20 49 29 3 12 5 44 Never goes Do nottobogganing travel headfirst 6 39 19 43 39 5 133337 7 75–859 30–44 15 32 48 1 60–74 Stop at the edge, do not linger in narrow 4 14 7 1932 43 32 3314 5 spots without a45–59 clear view 75–85 41 28 Often tobogganing 27 20 26 18 431 9 Do not attachgoes toboggans to each other 75–85 12 5 42 41 German-speaking Switzerland 18 55 26 2 Occasionally goes tobogganing Look behind beforetobogganing entering the piste 41 28 Oftenyougoes 2 31 and setting off 1829 2 49 French-speaking Switzerland 18 31 50 32 Never goesat tobogganing tobogganing 55 Occasionally goes Use the walkways the edge to ascend 32 18 18 2622 46 Often goes tobogganing 2 and descend 18 50 29 3 Never goes tobogganing 57 40% 20% 60% 100% 8 73 37 36 80% 44 8 0% Occasionally goes tobogganing Ticino 0% 20% 40% 60% 21 17Fairly low 3540% Never goes tobogganing 5 0%23 Very high Fairly high 60% Very100% low 20% 80% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% People interviewed (sample): 1013 Very high unimportant Fairly high Fairly low 100% Very low 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% Very important Fairly important Fairly Not important at all People interviewed (sample): 1013 Source: bfu, population survey ESP.G.19 Source: bfu, population survey PeoplePeople interviewed (sample): 1013 Highly skilled Skilled Average skills Not very skilled Not skilled at all ESP.G.21 interviewed (sample): 1013 Source: bfu, population surveysurvey ESP.G.23 Source: bfu, population ESP.G.21 People interviewed (sample): 1013

Source: bfu, population survey

ESP.G.20

Assessment of the of injury whilewhen tobogganing, 2013 by frequency and Importance of risk wearing a helmet tobogganing, language area, 2013 a helmet when tobogganing, by frequency and Importance of wearing

language area, 2013 Importance of wearing a helmet when tobogganing, by age, 2013

6

4

14 13

14

40

42

44

14 8

38

Show consideration others Weartoa helmet 51 Match speed and method toTotal skill level 19 34 Observe markings and signs 13 Show consideration to others Wear a helmet 23 Overtake at aand distance 8 55 13 20 15–29 Observe markings signs 29 Show consideration to others 22 20in front 30–44 Respect the track of the person 88 56 Overtake at a distance 13 Observe markings and signs 13 49 45–59not travel 20 68 Respect the trackDo of the personheadfirst in front 12 Overtake 60–74 at a distance 15 5 48 Stop at the edge, do not linger in narrow 4 6 Do anot travel headfirst 9 without clear view Respect the track ofspots the person in front 19 43 75–85 7 Stop edge,toboggans do not linger in narrow Do at notthe attach to each other 8 44 Dospots not travel headfirst without a clear view 6 Look behind you before entering the piste 31 5 41 24 goes tobogganing Stop Often at the edge, not linger in narrow Dodo not attach andtoboggans setting off to each other 3 spots without awalkways clear viewat the edge to ascend Use behind the 55 Occasionally Look goes tobogganing you before entering18 the piste 2 2 5 andeach descend Do not attach toboggansand to other setting off 3 18 50 Never goes tobogganing Usebefore the walkways at the edge to ascend Look behind you entering the piste 3 0% 2 20% 2 and setting off and descend

Overtake at15–29 a distance

80% 100% 0% 20% 60%26 18 5540% 2 Occasionally goes tobogganing Highly skilled Skilled 0%Average20% skills 40% Not very skilled Not skilled 100% at all 60% 80% 0% Never (sample): 40% 60% 80%Never goes 29 100% 3 Goes tobogganing at least occasionally tobogganing 18 50 People interviewed 1013 goes20% tobogganing Highly skilled Skilled Average skills Not very skilled Not skilled at all 1013 People Very important Fairly important Fairly unimportant Not important ESP.G.18 at all Source: bfu,interviewed population(sample): survey 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Source: bfu, (sample): population survey ESP.G.20 interviewed (sample): 1013 PeoplePeople interviewed 1013 Very high Fairly high Fairly low Very low Source: bfu, population ESP.G.20 Source: bfu, population surveysurvey ESP.G.22 People interviewed (sample): 1013

15–29

Spontaneous mention of tobogganing rules, 2013 Assessment of the risk of injury while tobogganing, 2013 Match speed and method to skill level 40 Spontaneous mention of tobogganing rules, by frequency of going Wear a helmet 30 Match speed and method to skill level 40 tobogganing, 2013

28 2 13 8 74

Source: bfu, population survey

60%

Spontaneous mention of tobogganing rules, 2013

Observe markings15–29 and signs

1314

917

40%

ESP.G.19

Show consideration to others

8

17 37

20%

Source: bfu, population survey SP, S. 46

13 6

38

0%

People interviewed (sample): 1013

4

14 38 51

12 32 43

2

Total

13

13

35

2

Assessment of the risk of injury while tobogganing, 2013 Importance of wearing a helmet when tobogganing, by frequency and Match speed and method to skill level 40 language area, 2013 Assessment of people's skills, 2013 30 Weartobogganing a helmet

34

39 Assessment ofWear thea helmet risk of injury while tobogganing, 2013 13 35 32 8 23

4

Total

19

15–29

20

Total

51 39

44

Total

39

44

20 Goes tobogganing30–44 at least occasionally 30 15–29 20 45–59 Goes tobogganing leasttobogganing occasionally Neveratgoes 15 60–74 Never44goes tobogganing 30–44 19 75–85

28

55

24

39 56

49 48

39 41 43

41 40 41 41 31 55

Switzerland 18Ticino tobogganing 43 60–74Never goesFrench-speaking

3150 42 57

42 49 49

42

13

4

13

4

6

2 14 3

14 12

30

49

14

6

Ass

Occ

Peop

Sou

Imp lan

1 2 12 5

12 4 12 18 2

1528 26

2911 36 4 3 18

4 4 5 5

Go

5 5 2

7

2

Ticino 20% 40% 57 60% 80% 36 100% 7 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 9 9 48 Very high Fairly high Fairly lowNot Very low all Fairly important Fairly unimportant 0% 20% 40% 60% important 80% at 100%

0% 75–85

35

Very important

Very important Fairly unimportant Not important at all PeoplePeople interviewed (sample): 1013Fairly interviewed (sample): 1013important 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Source: bfu, population ESP.G.23 Source: bfu,interviewed population surveysurvey ESP.G.21 (sample): 1013 People Very important Fairly important Fairly unimportant Not important at all Source: bfu, population survey ESP.G.23 People interviewed (sample): 1013 Source: bfu, population survey

ESP.G.22

Importance of wearing whenand tobogganing, age, 2013 Importance of wearing a helmet when tobogganing, bfu by frequency 46 Sports a– helmet Behaviour attitudes bySelf-reported modes of behaviour – STATUS and 2013 language area, 2013

15–29

Sou

2

43 22 14 29 43 44 37 44 13 33

49 39 39

German-speaking Switzerland 42 45–59 Often goes tobogganing 31 German-speaking Switzerland French-speaking 18 Occasionally goes tobogganing Switzerland

2

Peop

Total

39

44

13

4

Peop

Sou


Home and leisure In the home and leisure sector, around 600,000 people suffer injuries every year and 1,500 die; they fall, injure themselves with tools and equipment, burn themselves or suffocate. The bfu is convinced that accidents due to constructional defects or faulty technical equipment can be avoided. However, since the major share of responsibility lies with the individual, behaviour-oriented prevention work is vital.


Home and leisure – Accidents

Overview

Development in the number of people injured in the home and leisure sector, by activity, 2006–2010

Development of the number of people injured in the home and leisure sector, by accident circumstance, 2006–2010

Activity

Accident circumstance

2006 2007 2008 2009 On the way to/from work (excl. road traffic)1 Total on the way 19 640 18 500 18 660 19 790 to/from work (excl. road traffic) Unpaid work Travelling while doing 1 310 1 330 1 210 1 240 unpaid work

2010 20 460

Accident involving means of transport

15 520

Contact with person Getting trapped, crushed

13 250 12 980

13 710 13 170

13 630 14 090

13 120 13 740

13 430 13 560

3 640

3 460

3 570

3 890

4 110

Shopping Care/maintenance of home and garden

3 610 31 820

3 530 31 520

3 640 32 670

4 120 32 640

3 560 33 920

Other DIY activities around the house

22 470

20 780

22 220

22 480

21 730

Fall on level ground Fall from a height Fall on stairs, steps Other fall Other blunt force Total: blunt force

20 200 19 590 19 900 19 540 117 760 113 160 118 290 119 220 Education, school 21 210 21 210 21 210 21 210

21 070 122 430

Cutting, scratching, tearing, severing

21 210

Pricking, piercing Bite, by an animal or person

72 770

Total: invasive, penetrating force

14 050 16 670 10 550 13 790 55 060 262 060 553 990

Accidents not involving vehicles or away from public roads

Source: bfu, revised extrapolation

14 460

45 520

Caring for children, relatives

1

13 370

46 780

36 610

Basic needs Eating, drinking 13 520 14 460 15 660 14 150 Relaxing, sleeping 14 810 16 060 16 160 15 110 Bodycare 9 430 9 370 10 150 9 490 Other basic needs 12 900 13 300 14 290 13 020 Total: basic needs 50 660 53 190 56 260 51 770 Other activity Total: other activity 280 210 249 080 260 370 279 010 Total 558 070 525 170 548 080 570 190

Blunt force 12 890 13 500

48 020

35 310

79 190

2010

47 820

35 080

Leisuretime, games 68 590 70 030 73 290

2009

43 820

32 950

Total: leisuretime, games

2008

Contact with object, animal

34 710

Total: education, school

UHF.T.01

170 850 143 440 154 700 169 970 169 620 53 300 51 390 55 830 56 890 52 180 47 880 48 590 48 450 52 000 49 850 5 870 5 870 5 870 5 870 5 870 14 100 15 880 15 750 16 370 17 200 374 940 353 370 369 710 389 200 382 750 Invasive, penetrating force 50 000 48 310 50 650 52 540 48 470 6 250 46 120

6 250 40 030

6 250 41 720

6 250 43 330

6 250 41 900

102 370

94 590

98 620 102 120

96 620

Thermal mechanism 4 560 4 750 4 790

4 490

4 220

Other thermal mechanism

3 550

3 550

3 490

3 490

3 300

Total: thermal mechanism

8 110

8 300

8 280

7 980

7 520

Other mechanisms 4 340 3 750 4 530 13 100 12 880 12 690 14 680 14 240 14 780 1 390 1 260 1 280 4 340 3 930 4 060

3 910 12 260 15 250 1 150 4 140

3 720 11 600 15 100 1 110 4 230

34 800 72 650

34 180 70 890

31 340 67 100

Contact with hot liquid, hot object

Breathing hazard Poisoning, acid burn Stress Natural influences Foreign bodies in the eye, nose, mouth, ear Other mechanisms Total: other mechanisms Total

Home and leisure – Accidents  Overview

32 850 68 910

34 130 71 470

558 070 525 170 548 080 570 190 553 990

Source: bfu, revised extrapolation

48

2007

1 430

Cooking, cleaning work

Other unpaid work Total: unpaid work

2006

UHF.T.02

bfu – STATUS 2013


10

Age / Gender

People injured in the home and leisure sector, by activity and age, 2010

People injured in the home and leisure sector, by activity and gender, 2010

Activity

Activity

0–16 17–64 65+ On the way to/from work (excl. road traffic)1 Total on the way to/from 230 20 230 0 work (excl. road traffic) Unpaid work 0 1400

Travelling while doing unpaid work Cooking, cleaning work Caring for children, relatives Shopping Care/maintenance of home and garden

Total 20 460

30

1430

Male Female On the way to/from work (excl. road traffic)1 Total on the way to/from 11 230 9 230 work (excl. road traffic) Travelling while doing unpaid work

Unpaid work 1280

Total 20 460

150

1430

1540 0 600 260

25750 3990 490 21800

9320 120 2470 11860

36610 4110 3560 33920

Cooking, cleaning work Caring for children, relatives Shopping Care/maintenance of home and garden

6380 120 600 12120

30230 3990 2960 21800

36610 4110 3560 33920

0

14720

7010

21730

Other DIY activities around the house

17630

4100

21730

1520 15080 3 920 83 230 Education, school Total: education, school 17 070 4 140 Leisuretime, games Total: leisuretime, 51 600 17 620 games

4470 35 280

21070 122 430

13530 76 760

21070 122 430

0

21 210

11 070

21 210

3 550

72 770

33 180

72 770

1130 5150 1670 5400 13 350

14050 16670 10550 13790 55 060

6100 10240 5710 8720 30 770

14050 16670 10550 13790 55 060

65 910 118 090

262 060 553 990

147 510 308 520

262 060 553 990

Other DIY activities around the house Other unpaid work Total: unpaid work

Basic needs 2760 10160 1710 9810 2140 6740 1360 7030 7 970 33 740 Other activity 61 350 134 800 142 140 293 760

Eating, drinking Relaxing, sleeping Bodycare Other basic needs Total: basic needs Total: other activity Total 1

Accidents not involving vehicles or away from public roads

Source: bfu, revised extrapolation

Other unpaid work Total: unpaid work

7540 45 670 Education, school Total: education, school 10 140 Leisuretime, games Total: leisuretime, 39 590 games Eating, drinking Relaxing, sleeping Bodycare Other basic needs Total: basic needs Total: other activity Total 1

UHF.T.04

Basic needs 7950 6430 4840 5070 24 290 Other activity 114 550 245 470

Accidents not involving vehicles or away from public roads

Source: bfu, revised extrapolation

UHF.T.12

Share of fatalities in home and leisure, by age, 2010

1%

13%

86%

HF.G.04

0–16

17–64

65+

Fatalities 2010: 1734 Source: BFS, statistics on causes of death

bfu – STATUS 2013

UHF.G.05

Home and leisure – Accidents  Age / Gender

49


Home and leisure – Accidents

People injured in the home and leisure sector, by accident circumstance and age, 2010 Accident circumstance

0–16 17–64 Blunt force 4 080 7 950

Accident involving means of transport

People injured in the home and leisure sector, by accident circumstance and gender, 2010

65+

Total

Accident circumstances

Male Blunt force 8 310

3 490

15 520

Contact with object, animal 17 730 22 020 Contact with person 2 930 9 790 Getting trapped, crushed 4 320 7 550 Fall on level ground 41 620 70 450 Fall from a height 19 290 22 890 Fall on stairs, steps 7 960 29 750 Other fall 2 360 1 910 Other blunt force 3 120 11 990 Total: blunt force 103 410 184 300 Invasive, penetrating force Cutting, scratching, tearing, 15 310 28 960 severing

5 770 710 1 690 57 550 10 000 12 140 1 600 2 090 95 040

45 520 13 430 13 560 169 620 52 180 49 850 5 870 17 200 382 750

4 200

48 470

Pricking, piercing Bite, by an animal or person Total: invasive, penetrating force

3 840 25 520 58 320

1 290 6 270 11 760

6 250 41 900 96 620

Thermal mechanism 770 3 260

190

4 220

Contact with hot liquid, hot object

230 420

3 300 7 520

400 840 2 140 200 380

3 720 11 600 15 100 1 110 4 230

Other thermal mechanism 2 030 Total: thermal mechanism 2 970 Other mechanisms Breathing hazard 1 400 Poisoning, acid burn 6 650 Stress 8 590 Natural influences 910 Foreign bodies in the eye, nose, 2 100 mouth, ear

6 910 10 870 118 090

31 340 67 100 553 990

Contact with hot liquid, hot object

1 120 10 110 26 540

Other thermal mechanism 500 2 570 Total: thermal mechanism 1 270 5 830 HF, S. 49, 50, Other mechanisms Breathing hazard 1 400 1 920 Poisoning, acid burn 1 390 9 370 Stress 2 580 10 380 Natural influences 320 590 Foreign bodies in the eye, 290 3 560 nose, mouth, ear Other mechanisms Total: other mechanisms Total

4 940 19 490 10 920 45 310 142 140 293 760

Source: bfu, revised extrapolation

UHF.T.05

Share of fatalities in home and leisure, by cause of accident, 2010

1%

1% 7% 1%

Accident involving means of transport

Total

7 210

15 520

Contact with object, animal 19 720 25 800 Contact with person 6 820 6 610 Getting trapped, crushed 7 730 5 830 Fall on level ground 63 130 106 490 Fall from a height 32 120 20 060 Fall on stairs, steps 18 270 31 580 Other fall 1 550 4 320 Other blunt force 7 510 9 690 Total: blunt force 165 160 217 590 Invasive, penetrating force Cutting, scratching, tearing, 27 460 21 010 severing

45 520 13 430 13 560 169 620 52 180 49 850 5 870 17 200 382 750

Pricking, piercing Bite, by an animal or person Total: invasive, penetrating force

2 530 14 370 44 360

Thermal mechanism 940

Other mechanisms Total: other mechanisms Total

13 330 32 980 245 470

48 470

3 720 27 530 52 260

6 250 41 900 96 620

3 280

4 220

1 270 4 550

3 300 7 520

2 320 4 950 6 510 200 2 130

3 720 11 600 15 100 1 110 4 230

18 010 34 120 308 520

31 340 67 100 553 990

Source: bfu, revised extrapolation

UHF.T.13

Share of fatalities in home and leisure, by age, 2010

1%

Falls

8%

Female

13%

Breathing hazards (drowning/suffocation) Means of land transport Smoke/fire/flames Effect of mechanical forces

82%

Other

Fatalities 2010: 1734 Source: BFS, statistics on causes of death

86% UHF.G.04

0–16

17–64

65+

Fatalities 2010: 1734

50

Home and leisure – Accidents  Age / Gender

Source: BFS, statistics on causes of death

bfu – STATUS 2013 UHF.G.05


People injured in the home and leisure sector, by accident location and age, 2010

People injured in the home and leisure sector, by accident location and gender, 2010

Accident location

Accident location

0–16 17–64 65+ Private residence Kitchen 6410 24660 8380 Living room, bedroom 21710 26790 15040 Bathroom, toilet 2990 8790 4460 Indoor staircase 4840 12920 6100 Other indoor living area 4900 10430 6570 Playground 650 440 250 Garden, swimming pool 12890 22530 10220 Access road, parking space, garage 4890 10770 4320 Other, outdoor living area 2850 13160 4370 Other, private residence 60 330 0 Total: private residence 62 190 130 820 59 710 Residential home, housing facilities Residential home, military facilities 670 6480 1180 Medical facilities 2940 2820 540 Total: residential home, 3 610 9 300 1 720 housing facilities Education, school School, university 7080 3520 Kindergarten, daycare facilities 1840 0 Sports complex 2270 610 Games area, playground 5430 250 Other educational facilities 2940 1490 Total: education, school 19 560 5 870 Sports complexes Sports ground 1940 1080 Public swimming pool 780 620 Snowsports facilities 2390 1540 Other sports complexes 0 990 Total: sports complexes 5 110 4 230 Public infrastructure Public road, cycle track 1580 7950 Path, pavement 3560 18300 Side road, car park 2450 5250 Bus stop, railway station 0 4260 Playground 2850 850 Park 4110 5190 Total: public infrastructure 14 550 41 800 Commercial surroundings Industry, construction, agriculture 460 7310 Office, business 280 4160 Restaurant, hotel 480 6980 Total: commercial surroun1 220 18 450 dings

bfu – STATUS 2013

39450 63540 16240 23860 21900 1340 45640 19980 20380 390 252 720 8330 6300 14 630

190 0 0 0 110 300

10790 1840 2880 5680 4540 25 730

130 190 310 140 770

3150 1590 4240 1130 10 110

5280 12000 4180 1230 0 1600 24 290

14810 33860 11880 5490 3700 10900 80 640

230 1340 2940 4 510

8000 5780 10400 24 180

Natural environment Waters 2800 4400 230 Beach, coast, shore/river bank 1960 1390 450 Other natural environment 19060 36170 14730 Total: natural environment 23 820 41 960 15 410 Other accident location Total: other accident location 12 080 41 330 11 380 Total 142 140 293 760 118 090 Source: bfu, revised extrapolation

Total

7430 3800 69960 81 190 64 790 553 990 UHF.T.11

Male Female Private residence Kitchen 11 090 28 360 Living room, bedroom 22 870 40 670 Bathroom, toilet 6 010 10 230 Indoor staircase 9 540 14 320 Other indoor living area 10 250 11 650 Playground 1 090 250 Garden, swimming pool 23 730 21 910 Access road, parking space, garage 11 320 8 660 Other, outdoor living area 6 950 13 430 Other, private residence 60 330 Total: private residence 102 910 149 810 Residential home, housing facilities Residential home, military facilities 5 400 2 930 Medical facilities 3 290 3 010 Total: residential home, 8 690 5 940 housing facilities Education, school School, university 4 660 Kindergarten, daycare facilities 880 Sports complex 480 Games area, playground 2 350 Other educational facilities 2 450 Total: education, school 10 820 Sports complexes Sportsground 2 670 Public swimming pool 930 Snowsports facilities 660 Other sports complexes 990 Total: sports complexes 5 250 Public infrastructure Public road, cycle track 5 530 Path, pavement 15 250 Side road, car park 5 260 Bus stop, railway station 810 Playground 2 200 Park 7 400 Total: public infrastructure 36 450 Commercial surroundings Industry, construction, agriculture 6 200 Office, business 1 850 Restaurant, hotel 3 450 Total: commercial surroun11 500 dings Natural environment Waters 2 630 Beach, coast, shore/river bank 290 Other natural environment 36 330 Total: natural environment 39 250 Other accident location Total: other accident location 30 600 Total 245 470

Total 39 450 63 540 16 240 23 860 21 900 1 340 45 640 19 980 20 380 390 252 720 8 330 6 300 14 630

6 130 960 2 400 3 330 2 090 14 910

10 790 1 840 2 880 5 680 4 540 25 730

480 660 3 580 140 4 860

3 150 1 590 4 240 1 130 10 110

9 280 18 610 6 620 4 680 1 500 3 500 44 190

14 810 33 860 11 880 5 490 3 700 10 900 80 640

1 800 3 930 6 950 12 680

8 000 5 780 10 400 24 180

4 800 3 510 33 630 41 940

7 430 3 800 69 960 81 190

34 190 308 520

64 790 553 990

Source: bfu, revised extrapolation

Home and leisure – Accidents  Age / Gender

UHF.T.14

51


Home and leisure – Accidents

Falls

Fatalities from falls, by age and gender, Ø 2006–2010

People injured in falls, by accident location and age, 2010 Accident location

0–16 17–64 65+ Private residence Kitchen 2 390 2 710 4 020 Living room, bedroom 11 570 4 010 10 160 Bathroom, toilet 1 610 5 710 3 610 Indoor staircase 3 920 10 420 5 200 Other indoor living area 800 4 860 4 360 Playground 650 0 250 Garden, swimming pool 7 250 8 230 6 290 Access road, parking space, garage 2 210 5 440 4 070 Other, outdoor living area 1 100 5 010 3 400 Other, private residence 60 0 0 Total: private residence 31 560 46 390 41 360 Residential home, housing facilities Residential home, military facilities 0 530 460 Medical facilities 1 710 1 390 120 Total: residential home, 1 710 1 920 580 housing facilities Education, school School, university 2 950 1 740 Kindergarten, daycare facilities 810 0 Sports complex 1 130 200 Games area, playground 2 180 0 Other educational facilities 1 190 0 Total: education, school 8 260 1 940 Sports complexes Sports ground 1 900 830 Public swimming pool 470 620 Snowsports facilities 2 390 1 540 Other sports complexes 0 700 Total: sports complexes 4 760 3 690 Public infrastructure Public road, cycle track 1 580 5 720 Path, pavement 3 560 11 920 Side road, car park 0 4 610 Bus stop, railway station 0 2 440 Playground 2 020 180 Park 990 1 510 Total: public infrastructure 8 150 26 380 Commercial surroundings Industry, construction, agriculture 460 3 390 Office, business 280 3 810 Restaurant, hotel 240 3 510 Total: commercial 980 10 710 surroundings Natural environment Waters 1 430 2 320 Beach, coast, shore/river bank 1 070 570 Other natural environment 8 670 12 540 Total: natural environment 11 170 15 430 Other accident location Total: other accident location 4 640 18 540 Total 71 230 125 000 Source: bfu, revised extrapolation

52

Total 9 120 25 740 10 930 19 540 10 020 900 21 770 11 720 9 510 60 119 310 990 3 220 4 210

0 0 0 0 0 0

4 690 810 1 330 2 180 1 190 10 200

0 190 310 140 640

2 730 1 280 4 240 840 9 090

5 160 10 520 2 750 560 0 1 470 20 460

12 460 26 000 7 360 3 000 2 200 3 970 54 990

0 400 2 570 2 970

3 850 4 490 6 320 14 660

230 80 7 900 8 210

3 980 1 720 29 110 34 810

7 070 81 290

30 250 277 520

Age 0–60 61–70 71–80 81–90 91+ Total 0–60 61–70 71–80 81–90 91+ Total

Male

Female Fatalities

Total

39 19 48 21 113 101 230 358 99 234 529 733 Fatalities per 100,000 inhabitants 1 1 13 5 50 34 249 207 853 675 14 19

Source: bfu, updated extrapolation

58 69 214 588 333 1 262 1 9 41 222 720 17 UHF.T.09

People injured in falls, by age and gender, 2010 Age 0–16 17–25 26–45 46–64 65+ Total 0–16 17–25 26–45 46–64 65+ Total

Male

Female People injured 36 220 35 010 7 750 12 450 18 990 16 910 32 030 36 870 20 080 61 210 115 070 162 450 People injured per 100,000 inhabitants 5 190 5 320 1 800 2 980 1 660 1 490 3 210 3 720 3 590 8 160 15 450 21 670

Source: bfu, revised extrapolation

Total 71 230 20 200 35 900 68 900 81 290 277 520 10 510 4 780 3 150 6 930 11 750 37 120 UHF.T.10

UHF.T.15

Home and leisure – Accidents  Injury localisation

bfu – STATUS 2013


0%

Lack of physical fitness

Source: bfu, population survey People interviewed (sample): 1013

100%

EHF.G.06 Less frequent cause

More frequent cause

Peo

EHF.G.05

Share of senior citizens (65+), who take fall-prevention measures, 2013 Share of senior citizens (65+), take fall-prevention Share of senior citizens (65+) who,who according to their own measures, statement,

2013 "do Share something to keep fit"rate to prevent falls, 2013 of people who the following causes of falls as important, 2013 Doing something to keep fit 88

40%

67

87 74

27

20%

40 47 45 47

28

40% 40 60% 40

French-sp. Switzerland

0%

75–85

28

82

61

6582 68

47

German-sp. Switzerland

Poor physical condition

56

60–74

Female

Male

Using technical aids Poor lighting conditions Getting information on how to avoid falls 20% Getting information on how to avoid fallswith a preventive Taking medicaments faults in buildings 0%Structural effect Taking medicaments with a preventive effect

65 87

63

61

80%

76

66

100%

62 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 64 People interviewed (sample): 205 (only people aged 65–85) 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% interviewed (sample): 205 people (only people aged 65–85) PeoplePeople interviewed (sample): 205 (only aged 65–85) Source: bfu, population survey EHF.G.06 15–29 30–44 45–59 60–74 75+ People (sample): 1013 Source: bfu, population survey EHF.G.06 Source: bfu, interviewed population survey EHF.G.15

Source: bfu, population survey

EHF.G.13

Share of senior citizens (65+) who, according to their own statement, "do something keep fit" towho, prevent falls, 2013 Share of senior to citizens (65+) according to their own statement, "do something to keep fit" to prevent falls, 2013 88

91

91

89

89

85 84 Share of senior citizens (65+) who, according to their own83 statement, 91 100% 91 89 89 88 "do to keep fit" 2013 80%something 85 to prevent falls, 84 83

88

91

85

91 84

89

100%

100% 88 80% Poor lighting conditions 100% 91 80%88 60% 80% 60% Structural faults in buildings 40% 60% 40% 20% 40% 20% Poor physical condition 0% 20% 0%

89

91 79

bfu – STATUS 2013

Source: bfu, population survey

EHF.G.14

15–29

Source: bfu, population survey

40%

30–44

45–59

People interviewed (sample): 205 (only people aged 65–85) Source: bfu, population survey PeopleSource: interviewed (sample): 205 (only people aged 65–85) bfu, population survey

91

61

76

8 Sh u

60

66

40 62 64

60%

20

80%

60–74

0 Peo

75+

So

EHF.G.13

EHF.G.16

EHF.G.14

89

Peo

So Sh

u

100

89

85 (65+) who, according 84 Share88 of senior citizens to their83own statement, 80%use "aids" (e.g. handrails) to prevent falls, 2013

80

100% 60%

60

87

82

81

79

86

84

78 70

40

20

0%40%

0

Female

20%

Male

20%60%

Male

Total

0% People interviewed (sample): 205 (only people aged 65–85) Source: bfu, population survey People interviewed (sample): 205 (only people aged 65–85)

Home and leisure – Behaviour and attitudes  Self-reported modes of behaviour

Share of senior citizens (65+) who, according to their own statement, use "aids" (e.g. citizens handrails) to prevent falls, 2013 Share of senior (65+) who, according to their own statement, use "aids" (e.g. handrails) to prevent falls, 2013

10

100 4

"do something to keep fit" to prevent falls, 2013 91

"d

6

78 89

Source: survey (65+) who, according to their own statement, EHF.G.15 Sharebfu, of population senior citizens

100%

So

80 2

45 47

40 40

EHF.G.14 EHF.G.15

Ticino

French-sp. Switzerland 83

People interviewed (sample): 205 (only people aged 65–85)

Total

TicinoTicino Ticino

French-sp. French-sp. Switzerland Switzerland French-sp. Switzerland

75–85

60–74

.13

Source: bfu, population survey People interviewed (sample): 205 (only people aged 65–85)

20%

70 65 83 68 89

89

84

27

0% People interviewed (sample): 1013

83

German-sp. Switzerland Switzerland German-sp.German-sp. Switzerland

75–85 75–85

60–74 60–74

Female Female Female

People interviewed (sample): 205 (only people aged 65–85)

91 40

40%80%

0%

84

85

0%

61 56 89

91

85

63

86

German-sp. Switzerland German-sp. Switzerland German-sp. Switzerland French-sp. Switzerland French-sp. Switzerland French-sp. Switzerland Ticino Ticino Ticino

61

Share of senior citizens (65+) who, according to their own statement, use Share "aids"of(e.g. handrails) prevent 2013 to their own 65 statement, senior citizensto (65+) who,falls, according 61 67 Consumption of substances "doofsomething to keep fit"who, to prevent falls,to2013 74 Share senior citizens (65+) according their own statement, 87 "do something to keep fit" to prevent81 falls,842013 82

88

83

80% Eating the right food Consumption of substances Eating the right food 60% Using technical aids

Peo

62 64

So Sh

German-sp. Switzerland

84

89

100%

2013

75–85

89

66

Peo

60–74 75–85 75–85 75–85

keep fit

91

Ta 2

Source: bfu, population surveythe following causes of falls as important, EHF.G.06 Source: bfu, population survey EHF.G.13 Share of people who rate

Total

something85to

Ticino

Doing

91

61

4

76 82

Less frequent cause

40 28 40

75–85

Source: bfu, population survey

68

6

People (sample): 205 (only people0% aged 65–85) Source:interviewed bfu, population survey EHF.G.05 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% Source: bfu, population survey EHF.G.14 15–29 30–44 45–59 60–74 75+ interviewed (sample): PeoplePeople interviewed (sample): 1013 205 (only people aged 65–85)

60–74

More frequent cause

87

65

80%

8

74

Source: bfu, population survey

Ticino

EHF.G.13 Less frequent cause

67

French-sp. Switzerland German-sp. Switzerland

80%

German-sp. Switzerland

Taking medicaments with a preventive More frequent cause physical (sample): condition effect 1013 PeoplePoor interviewed

60–74

60%58

45 58 47 47

60%

27

15–29 30–44 45–59 60–74 75+ People interviewed (sample): 1013 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% Source: bfu, population survey People interviewed (sample): 1013

40

40%

60–74

40%

88

51

60–74

20% 42

61 56 37

63

Sh "d

10

65

34 63

66

75–85

6634

62 5164

49

0% Lack of physical fitness

Lack of lighting/poor lighting 20% Poor lighting conditions Using technical aids49 Building faults 0% 42 Lack of physical fitness Getting Structural faultsinformation in buildingson how to avoid falls 0% 20%

37

40 40

Taking substances Eating the right food

Female

Building faults

76

40%

Female

27 63

15

Female

61

66

Lack of lighting/poor lighting Poor physical condition

61 31

Male Female Female

Taking substances

69

31

45 47

20

15 89

83 29

Male

69

68 29

85 84

Doing something to keep fit 60% Being pressed for time Consumption of substances

Total

40

So Sh

14

89

71

Male

65

85

Male

56

EHF.G.05

86

91

60–74

61

71

Being pressed for time Structural faults in buildings

Total

80%

80%Objects scattered about

74 14

Total

85

Objects scattered about

67

63

86

Not paying attention Poor lighting conditions

60% 40% 80% 40% 20% 60% 20% 0% 40% 0% 20%

60%

Share of senior citizens (65+), who take fall-prevention Share of people who rate the following causes of falls as measures, important,

Total

Slippery floor or shoes

Ta

100%

Share of senior citizens (65+) who, according to their own statement, "do something to keep fit" to prevent falls, 2013 91 100%201388 2013 Not paying attention

65

61

Consumption of substances

80% 60% 100%

80%

58

Slippery floor or shoes

Assessment of the significance of the causes of falls, 2013

100%

51

60%

Source: bfu, population Assessment of thesurvey significance of the causes of falls, 2013

HF, S. 53

88

40%

People interviewed (sample): 205 65–85) 0%(only people 20% aged40%

EHF.G.05

Share of people who rate the following causes of falls as important, 2013

100%

20%

42

HF, S. 53 Self-reported modes of behaviour

Source: bfu, population survey

People (sample): 205 (only people aged 65–85) Source:interviewed bfu, population survey

ent,

100%

Less frequent cause

.13

ent,

80%

Ticino

60%

49

French-sp. Switzerland

40%

People interviewed (sample): 1013

Male Male

ant,

20%

28

effect Building faults

58

More frequent cause

Male

ant,

0%

Total Total

05

42

Total

05

Lack of physical fitness

EHF.G.15

53

EHF.G.16

Peo

So


Appendix Anhang

An interpretation guide

Explanation of the symbols in the tables

SSUV

Sammelstelle für die Statistik der Unfallversicherung UVG/Central Office for Statistics

0

under the Federal Law for Accident Insurance

A zero means that nothing applies (no cases,

(AIL).

no amount) or that the relevant figure is less than half the lowest decimal place ... Ø

Three dots instead of a figure mean that this

among employees who are compulsorily in-

is not available or is not recorded.

sured under the Federal Law for Accident Insurance (AIL).

Average/mean value UVG

Abbreviations/Terminology

BFS

• All employees (aged approx. 16 to 65) are

Bundesamt für Raumentwicklung/Federal

compulsorily insured against occupational

Office for Spatial Development

accidents.

Bundesamt für Statistik/Federal Office for

Unfallversicherungsgesetz/Federal Law for Accident Insurance

ARE

Statistics based on SSUV data cover accidents

• All employees are compulsorily insured

Statistics

against non-occupational accidents if they

The statistics used are those for road vehicles,

work a minimum of 8 hours a week for one

kilometres driven, causes of death and for the

or several employers.

population.

• All unemployed persons (jobseekers) are in-

bfu

Beratungsstelle für Unfallverhütung/

sured against non-occupational accidents in

Swiss Council for Accident Prevention

accordance with the “Ordinance regulating

Case fatality Reference value for severity of accidents (no. FEDRO

accident insurance for unemployed persons”.

of fatalities per 10,000 casualities)

Working

Expression used for daily allowance payments

Bundesamt für Strassen/Federal Roads Office:

days lost

based on accident-related absences from

Police-registered accidents

work.

Injuries and Persons injured and fatalities

Data sources

fatalities Injury

Unless defined otherwise:

severity

Slightly injured: Little impairment

Initial situation

Severely injured: Severe, visible impairment

In Switzerland, around 1 million people are injured in non-

that prevents normal home activities for at

occupational accidents, around 2,000 of which prove fatal

least 24 hours or requires a hospital stay of

(p. 9). These figures are the result of bfu extrapolations.

longer than 1 day.

Estimates are necessary since hardly any data covering all

International Road Traffic and Accident Data-

population groups or the whole of Switzerland is available

base (OECD)

for the non-occupational sector. The statistics published

Institut für Verkehrsplanung und Transport-

generally only cover part of the actual incidence of acci-

systeme, ETH Zürich/Institute for Transport

dents. The explanations of the individual data sources will

Planning and Systems (IVT), Swiss Federal In-

help in interpreting the figures.

IRTAD IVT

stitute of Technology (ETHZ), Zurich NBU

Non-occupational accidents in road traffic,

BFS: Statistics on the causes of death

sports, home and leisure

Basis

• Full record of all accident fatalities among • Comprehensive

permanent Swiss residents

No. of cases Proportionate figure of the road accidents not regist.

actually registered by the police

Benefits

OECD

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and

Drawbacks • Hardly any data on the causes of accidents

Development 54

Appendix

and injury patterns bfu – STATUS 2013


bfu: Revised extrapolation

Swiss Sports and Recreation Observatory

Basis

Basis

• Estimate of the number of injuries and fatal-

• Indicator 4.1: Incidence rates in selected sports

ities (resident Swiss population) based on a variety of data sources

• The extrapolation has been revised and is now based on data acquired in a special

bfu: Statistics on sports accidents fatalities Basis

• Includes all accidents that happen during

household survey. In 2011, information on

sporting activities (excl. road traffic accidents)

the number of accidents that had occurred

if the victims die as a result of the injury either

in 15,000 households was obtained by tele-

at the site or within 30 days of the accident.

phone and in Internet surveys (circumstances

used:

and location of the accident, activity at the time of the accident, consequences of the in-

• Data from the following organisations was

SSUV: UVG statistics of the Central Office for Statistics under the Federal Law for Accident

jury, demographic features).

Insurance (UVG) SSUV: UVG statistics

sda: Schweizerische Depeschenagentur/

Basis

Swiss news agency

• Extrapolation of a 5% sample of all reported non-occupational accidents suffered by

SAC: Swiss Alpine Club

people aged approx. 16 to 65 compulsorily

SHV-FSVL: Swiss hang-gliding association

insured under the UVG (2010: approx. 4m

SLRG: Swiss life-saving society

insurees)

SLF: Swiss Federal Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research

• Cases with a claim to disability or survivors’ pension are included in full

Benefits

• Injury patterns known in detail

bfu: Economic costs

• Data on activity and situation as well as cat-

Basis

egories regarding cause

• Sommer H, Brügger O, Lieb C, Niemann S. Volkswirtschaftliche Kosten der Nichtberuf-

Drawbacks • Population groups missing (children, stu-

sunfälle in der Schweiz: Strassenverkehr,

dents, senior citizens, other people not in

Sport, Haus und Freizeit. Berne: bfu – Swiss

employment)

Council for Accident Prevention; 2007. bfureport 58.

FEDRO: Police-registered accidents Basis

• A traffic accident is considered to have occurred if people have been injured or killed or

ARE/BFS: Mobility in Switzerland

material damage has been caused by vehicles

Basis

on public roads and thoroughfares. Since

Benefits

• Last updated: 2009

• Results of the 2010 microcensus on travel behaviour

1992, people are only considered road acci-

BFS: Kilometres driven by private motorists

dent fatalities if they die within 30 days of the

Basis

• Time series: 1950–1993

accident.

• Updated time series: 1994–2011

• bfu estimates 2012

• Highly suitable for determining focal points or changes over a period of years (detailed information on circumstances and parameters)

Drawbacks • Injury patterns are unknown

• For each travel mode, there is a large number of unrecorded accidents (unknown number of cases not registered).

bfu – STATUS 2013

Appendix 55


Appendix

IRTAD: Road accidents registered Basis

• All police-registered road accidents in OECD member states

bfu: Surveys Basis

• Representative random sample survey of Swiss roads

• Annually, in spring

IVT at the ETH Zurich: Speed measurements Basis

• IVT report no. 118: 25 years of IVT measurements of traffic flow

• Report updates

bfu: Population survey Basis

• Representative telephone survey among the resident Swiss population (approximately 1,000 people per year)

Benefits

• Representativeness

• Information on the acceptance of measures

Drawbacks • No clear conclusions can be drawn about actual behaviour bfu: Survey of personal protective equipment in winter sports Basis

• Representative random sample survey on snowsport runs

• Basis for the evaluation of the snowsport campaign

bfu: Statistics on the transportation of people injured in winter sports Basis

• In cooperation with SBS Swiss aerial cableways

• Information provided by the rescue services of selected aerial cableways

56

Appendix

bfu – STATUS 2013


Index

A Accident causes

21

Accident circumstances

10, 48, 49

G Gender

11, 19, 32–34, 37, 38, 40–43, 45, 49–52

Accident location

19

German-speaking Switzerland

Accident type

25

Gymnastics

Age

29, 30, 32–34, 45 36, 37

8, 11, 19–21, 22, 23, 30, 32–34, 37, 38, 41, 42, 45 17, 21, 33

Alcohol Athletics

36, 37

Avalanche accidents

42

B

H Helmet-wearing rates: Motorcycles/mopeds

29

Helmet-wearing rates: Bicycles

30

Helmet-wearing rates: Snowsports

45

Hiking

10, 36–39

36, 37, 39

Ball games

Bicycle 10, 14, 16, 18, 19, 22–24, 26, 28, 30, 36, 37, 39 Bicycle helmet

30

Blood alcohol concentration

q.v. Alcohol

I Injury localisation

39

(In) Built-up areas

21, 25, 26, 27, 29–31

International comparison

(Outside) Built-up areas

21, 25, 26, 27, 29–31

Italian-speaking Switzerland

Burns

28

q.v. Ticino

48, 50 K

C Cars

Kilometres driven

27

10, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22–24, 26–30

Children

8, 23

L 48, 49

Costs 12

Leisuretime activities

Cycling and skating

Location 21, 25, 26, 27, 29–31

Cycling sports Cyclists

36, 37, 39 10, 36, 37, 39 q.v. Bicycles

M D Daytime running lights

Material damage 30

12

Mopeds

14, 18, 22–24, 26, 27, 31 4, 17, 18, 20, 22–24, 26–28, 31

Diseases 8

Motorcycles

Drivers

Motorways 21, 25, 26, 27, 29–31

Drowning

20, 23, 24, 29, 31–33 40

E E-bike Extrapolation

Mountain sports

38, 39, 41

N 18, 22, 24, 26, 33

Non-occupational accidents

9, 11, 12

9–11, 14 P

F Falls Flying sports Focal points French-speaking Switzerland

bfu – STATUS 2013

10, 48, 50, 52

Passengers

20, 23, 24, 29

Pedestrians

10, 14, 16, 18, 19, 22–26, 28

38

Pedestrian crossings

10

Poisoning

19 48, 50

29, 30, 32–34, 45

Appendix 57


Appendix

R Rear-seat passengers

20, 23, 24, 29, 32

Region

29, 30, 32–34, 45

Risk behaviour

32

Road users

10, 14, 16–18, 22–24, 27, 28

Rural roads

q.v. Outside built-up areas

S Seatbelt

29, 32

Seatbelt-wearing rate

29 8, 24, 53

Senior citizens Snowsports Speed

10, 36–39, 42, 43, 44, 45 17, 20, 21, 32 32

Speed behaviour Sports, types of

10, 36–39, 44

Stopping distance

20

T Ticino

29, 30, 32–34

Tobogganing

45, 46

U UVG insured persons (compulsorily insured)

10, 39

W Water sports

10, 36–39

Wintersports

10, 36–39, 42–46

Y Young adults

8, 23

Young drivers

10

58

Appendix

bfu – STATUS 2013


bfu is committed to safety by public appointment. As the Swiss Competence Centre for Accident Prevention, it conducts research in the road traffic, sport, home and leisure sectors and passes on its knowledge to individuals and specialist circles by means of advisory services, training sessions and communications. More about accident prevention at www.bfu.ch.

© bfu 2013. All rights reserved; reproduction (e.g. photocopying), storage, processing and distribution are permitted if source is quoted (q.v. suggested source quotation below).

bfu – Swiss Council for Accident Prevention, P.O. Box 8236, CH-3001 Berne Tel. +41 31 390 22 22, Fax +41 31 390 22 30, info @ bfu.ch, www.bfu.ch

2.118.08 – 08.2013

Live safely: your bfu.

STATUS 2013  

Statistics on non-occupational accidents and the level of safety in Switzerland

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