Page 1

16 17 A N N UA L R E P O R T


2


Yaama Yaamandaay nhinda Muruu nguwollay yamaylaannha Yanai biaime baray

Acknowledgement by Kamilaroi Elder Uncle Len Waters

3


BE STATEMENT 6 / BE PHILOSOPHY 8 / BE PEOPLE 10 FROM THE CHAIR 14

/ FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 20

MAVEN 26 / BE PROJECTS 42 / ARTISTIC VIBRANCY 101 / MAJOR ACHIEVEMENTS 108

/ FINANCIALS 114

/ KEY SUPPORTERS 130


STATEMENT

Beyond Empathy (BE) is a community arts organisation with the core objective of using a community-led arts model to generate social change for disadvantaged and marginalised communities. We work predominantly with NSW regional and remote First Nations communities. We have demonstrated that arts-led activity is a vehicle to building valuable life skills, transforming the self-perception of people with very low esteem and creating genuine community connectedness. Everything we are able to achieve is thanks to the generosity and commitment, of the artists we employ, and the communities who participate in our projects. By undertaking a collective creative process journey together, they create outstanding contemporary cutting-edge art. Breakthroughs in self-discovery, the creative process and the highest quality arts products eventuate when seemingly ordinary people make extraordinary contributions. And we are anchored by our connection to traditional First Nations culture and values at all times. WATCH HERE

6


7


OUR PHILOSOPHY

At BE we have learnt that by concentrating on producing high quality arts projects we create the right environment for health, education, employment and economic development outcomes to occur, rather than imposing traditional program models onto communities that are often ineffective and unwelcome. The need for improvements in these key areas of daily life are well documented in Australia’s First Nations communities and current evidence indicates that the mainstream ways of thinking and doing are not successfully strengthening the quality of life much needed for our First Peoples. The trauma experienced as a direct result of the ongoing process of Colonisation is now deeply embedded in our First Nations communities and we need to find new ways to disrupt the cycles of trauma and then apply healing measures. In traditional culture the arts were not a separate part of community life; the activities of song, dance and picture making were daily activities used to transmit, cultural; knowledge, practices and values. The galvanising potential of the arts for community and individual resilience, should not be overlooked or side lined by those in power. Implementing quality community arts projects is one method of achieving both a disruption and healing outcome and through our Community Arts, Cultural Development (CACD) model we have achieved measurable, tangible results. Another of our key beliefs is to allow the artistic process to unfold and not insist on pre-determined outcomes. Artists need autonomy to allow creative expression to truly flourish in their work. Community members need to have a say in the final product and have genuine control over the process, so it can meet their needs and provide the much-deserved satisfaction of accomplishment.

art. influence.

8


The Arts brings people together for activities that nourish and reward all participants through the process of creation, it brings joy and a sense of pride when a project is performed, or art works displayed to the broader community. The final product is then enjoyed by audiences but the journey itself is a powerful healing tool. Innovation is integral to BE’s processes and artistic output. We harness the skills and experience of our CACD artists to discover new possibilities. We allow works of art to evolve within multi-layered community engagement processes. They are encouraged to take creative risks and produce vibrant and nationally significant works.

change.

Our methodology is accessible, flexible, adaptable, acknowledges diversity and the distinctiveness of each community we work within. No two communities are the same, even when bound by their Aboriginality, and circumstances are always changing. Overall, we believe in creating great art and everything else that flows from that is an extra benefit. We support artists and communities to challenge the traditional methods of creating art and it works to achieve social connection and change.

9


10


BE PEOPLE

11


12


BOARD Anna Buduls Philip Crawford Este Darin-Cooper Tony Green David Leha Kim McConville Vivienne Skinner

PATRON Linda Burney

EXECUTIVE AND SUPPORT TEAM Kim McConville Alexandra Gardner-Marlin Daryl Paull

SOCIAL MEDIA AND COMMUNIATIONS Raphaela Rosella

DESIGN TOTO Branding + Design

PROJECTS MOREE Jemma Craigie Minna Lethbridge Matty Priestley Nate Weatherall

ILLAWARRA Philip Crawford Gemma Parsons Shaniece Igano

SEA OF BELLIES Jo Davidson Valerie Quinlin

THE MAVEN PROJECT David Leha Kirk Page

ELDERS Aunty Paula Duncan Uncle John Wright

CREATIVE CONTRIBUTIONS Lillian Banks Bibi Barba

Neville Sharpley Keith Baker Barlow Laurel Batholomew Mehi Beale David Binion Janelle Boyd James Bradley Johnny Brown Anna Cater Raquel Clarke Cameron Connors Stephen Connors Patrick Cornwall Seamus Coyle Cathy Craigie Glen Crump Wayne Cutmore Daniel de Fillipo Jade Dewi Victoria Hunt Jaymen ‘Jwalk’ Drahm Neil ‘Audie’ Duncan Aunt Paula Duncan Cathy Duncan Jessica Duncan Lisa Duncan Shae Duncan Jeddy Fernando Danielle Fog Natalie Green Nicole Green Eric Gruener Tim Hagan Brad ‘Yogi’ Harrison Jess Hill Victoria Hunt Shaniece Igano Gambirra Illuma Izzy Illuma John Kayne Wendy Kimpton Mitch King Buddy Knox Qualia Knox Kawin Knox Peter Knox Emma Korhonen Toby Knyvett

Carmel Lardner Jonathon Larson Tim Leha Freya Ludowici Kaylan Lyons Ned McDowell Fiona McFarlane Simone Mellor Richard Mosse Emmanuel Moore Lloyd Munro Jr Aunt Amanda Naden Stacey Naden-Haines Daniel Neurath Kirk Page Tessa Parsons Ryan Pearson Leetona Pitt Valmay Pitt Jaydee Picker Mathew Priestley Jess Reece Blake Rhodes Mervin Roberts Emily Roberts-Field Sarah Roberts-Field Rhoda Roberts Brodie St John George Shaw Luke Shirlaw Darrel Smith Dakota Jericho Smith Luke Swan Isaac Tanikomave Connie Taylor Dequita Taylor Anne-Marie Taylor Talaria Taylor Tina Taylor June Tighe Dorothy Tighe Kai Tipping Nick Waterman Ethan Waters Adric Watson Shaun Weatherall Uncle Len Waters Steve Widders

13


making ever richer the colourful tapestry of be’s engagement

FROM THE CHAIR Anna Buduls

14


Even though Beyond Empathy has existed for well over a decade, we continue to learn and adapt our practices to better help families and their communities experiencing disadvantage. We have always known that giving our participants a voice to tell their stories through artistic expression in its various guises is just one small step in helping break the cycle of disadvantage affecting these young people and their families. We also know that on-off, or even repeated, intervention is often not enough if our participants return home to families affected by violence and if their peers continue to engage in antisocial behaviour, largely through lack of anything better to do with their time. So, in 2017 we decided that our work in Moree would continue to include as wide a grouping of young people as possible. Not only this, but we would also work with women in families that had suffered abuse over the years. We wanted to give these women a voice and help them heal. In 2018 we will continue these work streams, and we are also hoping to fund a Beyond Empathy version of a Men’s Shed so we can work with the older males and fathers in community. Our view is that by working more holistically with families and, of course, elders, we have a better chance of leaving a lasting, deeper and more positive impact in the trajectories of the disadvantaged lives of our young people.

15


We are also deepening our engagement with other community organisations working in Moree and surrounds so that engagement with our clientele becomes more seamless and consistent between organisations. We alone can’t provide a fix for the multilayered problems that affect our participants so we are hoping that by putting loads of effort into strengthening and maintaining partnerships, this will eventually pay off with more consistent and lasting outcomes. We still work one-on-one and one-by-one. We just want to do it across a greater number of people. And our relative maturity as an organisation now allows us to expand our work this way. We now have a cohort of young people with whom we have successfully worked in past years and they are now stepping up and taking leadership roles with us in working with the next generation of young people. While we continue our deep involvement with the Moree community, we still are strongly committed to a range of programs working with the young people in other NSW regions and some interstate communities. The demand for our work using art to bring about change is not diminishing. As always, we are grateful to our supporters and donors. Without you we couldn’t do what do. But for our strategies directed at tackling intergenerational disadvantage to work, there must be longevity of funding. We hope you will all continue to show your faith in us and our work for years to come. Finally, I want to thank Kim McConville and her dedicated team for their tireless efforts, for never giving up on a problem, and for never giving up on any of our young people and their families.

16


17


18


All art forms, especially with Aboriginal communities, work. Because that’s the way we been teaching all the time. We been teaching that way since time began. These kinds of projects, what BE does, it gives a little bit of balance for our little ones, it gives them a belonging. Matt Priestly, local Aboriginal artist and long-time Moree community member

19


FROM THE executive director Kim McConville

20


Back in June 2016 we were incredibly fortunate to receive three years’ of funding from Gandel Philanthropy for the Maven project. The Maven project is a long-term national enterprise for Aboriginal cultural and artistic leadership. It aims to cultivate professional development opportunities for emerging First Nation artists in regional areas to grow their employment, cultural and artistic sustainability through the guidance, mentoring and creative leadership of mid-career First Nation artists. Initially, the project involved emerging First Nation artists in NSW, but over time Maven has engaged a national cohort, as residencies and exchanges are established across borders with partner organisations and artists countrywide. In 2017, we collaborated with artists in WA and QLD. Maven was developed in the belief that the best and most significant learning happens through the cultural exchange of knowledge. The writing and translating of songs, making music, creating dance and performance, visual art and film are the compounds that create the common ground, which enables the exchange to occur. In the creative space, two-way learning occurs. Two-way learning means both ways – it infers that both parties have much to learn from each other and that teaching and learning occupies a neutral space - the third space.1 In this negotiated space, neither person presumes superiority or power over the other. Teacher and learner, mentor and mentee, artist and emerging artist oscillate between these definitions or roles, creating a rich, ingenious and vibrant learning environment. It is inspiring and this is where BE resides. Our job is to activate this space, time and time again. The community arts and cultural development space is filled with chance, where our artists and community producers keep the process open for as long as possible. They are questioning all the time, resisting the urge to solve or conclude or work towards a pre-determined outcome or imposed timeline. This space isn’t for everyone and at times, we have to forcibly kick back against conventional ways of working and creating. David Leha and Kirk Page, who have led these processes, have mastered the art of making work

1 (Purdie, Nola, Two Way teaching and Learning: towards culturally reflective and relevant education / Nola Purdie; Gina Milgate, Hanna Rachel Bell).

21


these are stories told by kids from their perspective.

22


in this way. Whilst sometimes they feel all at sea, their unyielding connection to country and making work which draws on their intuitive cultural knowledge and practice has resulted in projects that stretch beyond the bounds of what innovation can be. It has been a huge learning curve for me. Working beside them, witnessing their practice evolve and form and being immersed in their conversations has been an honour. I feel like we have come of age and the journey going forward has been indelibly determined by them. We see this in the Illawarra where we are working collaboratively with children from public housing areas to make Protection, a unique blend of film and animation that tells stories of childhood. Protection is inspired by the lives and experiences of the film’s adventurous and often hilarious young cast. These are stories told by kids from their perspective. There’s a re-telling of Goldilocks – featuring a display home and a big, bad real estate agent. There’s witches, parties and billy-cart derbies, and a lovely wedding to an imaginary prince. And there are stories of death and grief, about bullying and racism and facing up to your fears and mistakes. Protection is an authentic celebration of childhood and a tribute to the resilience of children. At its heart, it is a deeply-engaging film of hope and optimism. Several of the short vignettes took flight in 2017 with many of the young stars presenting their films to unusual audiences. With such determined carriage and growing confidence, they took a trip to Parliament House as the guests of our Patron, Linda Burney, for Child Protection week. Staying overnight with these children reminded me of what it was to be real, raw, honest and homesick. They captivated politicians and the local Canberra media with such delight and

23


made all of us proud to BE. Presentation to the staff at Origin Energy in Sydney opened hearts and minds. Ways to connect with schools in and around Sydney flowed as a result of the children’s animated and engaging presentations. Four belly films were produced in 2017 with Brisbane, Forster Nambucca and Moree communities celebrating the contributions of midwives, support workers, local artists, Mums and bubs. The passion of the contributors is undeniable and shows so well why the belly casting programs works. The films particularly acknowledge the commitment of Jo Davidson, the lead BE artist who has held this program in the palm of her hand for over fifteen years. Her sustained connection with each of the communities, including new ones in 2017, ensure each of the local programs are nurtured with kindness and skill. I am sure Jo goes to bed each night dreaming of plaster! Moree came to life this year through the NEXUS project. Graced with the presence and expertise of some of Australia’s finest street artists and OiYou producer George Shaw, four social housing hot spots were transformed with local stories and so much colour. Long cyclone fences covered in art shouted out loudly to local residents ‘you are worth it’ with powerful words of respect and memorials to local community members passed. The joy these works brought to residents was palpable. It is true, looking at things of beauty can change brain vibrations and create feelings of well-being.

24


Last year was a giant one for the Beyond Empathy team. The dedication, inspiration and generosity of the BE team was a source of energy for us all when the going got really tough. They are an extraordinary and unique bunch of people and it is special to work with all of them. Our work would not be possible without the ongoing support of our many donors and funding partners, large and small. We are so lucky to benefit from your long term and significant support. Our heartfelt thanks extend to each of you. Beyond Empathy is supported by a dedicated group of directors, each with expertise, who allow us to focus on our work at the coalface. With them at the helm, we are safe. We are grateful for the enormous financial generosity of directors Tony Green, Vivienne Skinner, Este Darin-Cooper and their families. Their kindness sustains us. In January 2018 our Chair Anna Buduls, became an Officer (AO) in the General Division of the Order of Australia for her “distinguished service to the business and finance sectors through her advisory roles, and, as a supporter of, and advocate for, policy development to reduce homelessness, and to the welfare and charity sectors.” Words cannot adequately describe Anna’s remarkable and intelligent leadership and unrelenting focus on alleviating poverty and intergenerational disadvantage. The significance of her financial support year in year out is the heartbeat of our organisation.

25


26


M AV E N

27


Maven is about building trust between all participants, artists and community, without trust there is no third space. Lead artist and creative director David Leha

MAVEN The Maven project builds Aboriginal cultural leadership through a collaborative professional development model to teach art-making skills and create new work. The process is always about gathering together as a collective, and is grounded in artistic independence, ownership and cultural autonomy. The Maven Project respects the deep cultural cycle of life-long learning and teaching that guides Aboriginal communities. It recognises that Aboriginal people have all they need to teach and guide their young people and their communities to artistic and cultural independence. Art and narrative sit at the centre of this process. Over 14 years, BE has built a community of practicing Aboriginal artists, who started as participants in their workshops and projects. In turn, these alumni are teaching new participants, imparting artistic and cultural skills. The local artist alumni need to keep developing their own practice - which we are actively facilitating through mentorships and professional opportunities The Maven project has placed First Nation peoples and cultures at the centre of all our decision making. It has created a rich and experimental, honest and challenging learning setting for established and emerging First Nation artists. Some of Australia’s most exciting mid-career First Nation artists activate and extend this setting through the delivery of inventive and risky new art projects steeped in cultural practice and story. By providing intensive and tailored cultural and creative process mentoring Maven provides opportunities for First Nations artists to reach their full potential.

28


Throughout 2017, BE has been led on a journey of selfdiscovery through the Maven program; which includes Yanaya and the Horses Mouth projects. Kirk Page and David Leha are currently developing two new works in a non-linear and experimental way. Both projects reclaim a First Nation way of being, knowing and expressing identities. We can also report it is having a profound effect on our organisation and that it is reshaping our future directions. It’s generative and exciting territory, pushing the boundaries of invention. Ideas and processes emerge through the process if we keep the process open for as long as possible and actively resist the urge to solve or conclude a process or story. It’s an emergent and deeply cultural way of working which has been defined by our First Nation artists. Kim McConville

29


The result of the ‘third’ space approach is to disrupt the old ways of creating art, it is not disruption for the sake of it, it has the purpose of creating the highest quality art product. Kirk Page, Horses Mouth lead artist.

30


The lessons we learnt through Maven in 2016 resulted in the appointment of David Leha in 2017, as Creative Director for all BE projects. His creative and professional development as Creative Director has been and will continue to be a key focus for BE. We are anticipating this will alter how we work and we have seen some outcomes, within the Yanaya project already that we expect will be reflected across the organisation in 2018. The ‘third space’2 is now central to how we operate at every level of the organisation from the governance/ management team through the lead and emerging artists and with all the community members we engage. Everyone is teacher and learner simultaneously and no one is above the other. There is no need for hierarchy as everyone is oscillating through these roles at all times. “The ‘third space’ is created by true collaboration, you will not achieve the ‘third space’ if you are not humbled by the talent of those around you, if you are not prepared to support them to surpass you.” Kim McConville The outcomes of this egalitarian approach are always new and surprising.

87%

Number of participants feel they have been well supported to fulfil their artistic ambitions as a result of the project – they believe the art is responsible for their personal transformation

10

Number of emerging artists worked on projects outside of BE, due to involvement in project

23

Number of artists who have undertaken leadership roles in delivering projects within BE

8

Number of mid-career First Nation artists who have undertaken creative leadership roles in BE projects

2 Purdie N, Milgate G and Bell RH, 2011, Two way teaching and learning: toward culturally reflective and relevant education. Australian Council for Educational Research.

31


HORSE'S MOUTH

Horse’s Mouth is a big and inventive idea that defies the conventional methods of making dance and movement -based works. Horse’s Mouth responds to all our stories and resists the idea of working towards a pre-defined artistic output. Horse’s Mouth draws together BE’s expertise in inspiring the artistic; autonomy, independence, boldness and vitality of Aboriginal artists, and NORPA’s expertise in devising innovative performance works with dramaturgy, creative development processes and production values. The roles of the lead creatives and established artists is to guide these stories and lived experiences to shape a story telling that is deeply cultural in process and form, evolving directly from the knowledge and life experiences of those who created it. Horse’s Mouth seeks to interfere with the ongoing legacy and chaos caused by Colonisation. It reclaims a First Nation way of being, knowing and expressing identities. Through the crafting of a performance work using inter-disciplinary, intracultural practices - Horse’s Mouth purpose is to reshape and remodel the way we approach the making of a theatre and performance work. Horses’ Mouth will be part protest, part disruption and part ceremony. The emerging artists will work alongside established professionals; Victoria Hunt, Jade Dewi and Kirk Page to develop rigorous physical and conceptual processes. They will be their guides, and at the same time, they will be their collaborative co-creators. During the process, each person will oscillate between teacher and learner, learner and teacher. Horse’s Mouth is a partnership project with Northern Rivers Performing Arts (NORPA). 32


Creative Process Horse’s Mouth disrupts the traditional artistic director and choreographer lead models and prioritises collaborative practices between First Nation emerging artists and established artists. It’s a process and a journey that takes the emerging artists on to create a performance that, in the end, will involve community too. These creative and talented emerging artists are eager to carve out new professional pathways for themselves. They are often overlooked in the professional arena to which they belong and so have been invited to Horse's Mouth as a young leader of their Nation and as a custodian of their future. Performance works are devised through a series of creative intensives, led by Kirk Page with 11 young Aboriginal, emerging dance artists from diverse regional communities in NSW and one emerging writer.

33


Highlights • In 2017 two 10 day creative intensives were conducted for 10 emerging artists in partnership with NORPA. The artists explored; improvisation, body weather, pilates, basic acro, rolling, koupapa (earth foundation), voice, partnering and counter balance, body percussion, choreography, yoga and stretch, conditioning, image work, sensitivity work and manipulations. • New ways of working: concepts of time are recognised as central to the process because the work in creation evolves from a deep sense of experimentation to develop the form and content of the piece. The work has not started with a pre-developed script or image of what the piece will be. The artistic vision evolves through the process. • Shae Duncan has since been invited to perform at Yabun Festival in 2018, alongside Cristine Anu and will travel to Bali with Kirk and Jade, to participate in a cross-cultural dance and movement festival.

34


• 4 Maven dance artists Shae, Jaymen, Mitch and Carmel worked with Victoria to develop an original performance piece on healing for the NSW family and Community Services Conference at the Sydney Convention Centre. After only 3 days to create the work they performed to a room of over 800 people. The work they created was deeply personal, moving and confronting.

Creative Team Lead Artists; Kirk Page, Victoria Hunt and Jade Dewi Supporting Artists; Julian Louis, Ryan Virtue, Kate McDowell and creative assistant, Ajita Cannings. Emerging Artists; Shae Duncan, Jayman Drahm, Carmel Lardner, Shana Obrien, Johnny Browne, Karwein Knox, Mendia Kermond, Jye Yuren, Sarah Roberts –Field, Emily Roberts – Field and Mitch King.

45%

How well does the art activate a process of community transformation?

85%

How well does the art enable people to move from particularized thinking to a connection with the group?

63%

73%

90% How well has BE reached audiences, built new audiences and provided people with reqarding experiences of the arts? How well has BE supported the development of great art and strengthened artistic and cultural practise? How relevant is BE to the times we live in and the pople we live with?

45%

How well does the art reconnect people and community that are fragmented and dislocated?

85%

How well does the art enable us to reach depths otherwise impossible?

35


YANAYA (Returning) is an artist-led, language revitalisation and performance project in northern NSW with the Gomeroi, Unniwan, Dunghutti and Gumbagnyirr nations. It activates relationships between people, families and communities and embraces a deep analysis of the exchange that language enables through music and song. Using melody as the direction-finding tool, YANAYA activates memory, encouraging the continuation of ancient Songlines. As each participant embodies their song, they also embody their language. Songlines can’t exist without people to sing them. Over three years First Nation musicians and storytellers and their families across in Tamworth, Armidale, Moree and the Illawarra will develop and perform a new music-based work. The works will be presented first in the communities where it is made and then to a national audience. Through revitalizing family songs and composing new songs we will activate new stories and language.

36

YAN


Creative Process The project process involves a cascade of mentoring opportunities for everyone involved. Professional, midcareer and emerging artists continually oscillate between being a teacher and learner, learner and teacher, where no one assumes superiority or dominance over the other.

melody as the direction finding tool.

NAYA

The YANAYA stories evolve from the relationships that exist between the emerging artists and their families across generations. The genres being explored range from hip hop to blues, soul and country music. Through sharing language, stories and history (products) through a process determined by our identity (culture) the work being made (songs for YANAYA) is deeply influenced and reflects that exchange. Identifying people who could translate lyrics into language and that could send the emerging artist to, deepened this cultural process. Sometimes there are no known language words to translate lyrics, so together the language teacher and the artist has to unpack what is trying to be communicated and then find language phrases to communicate the lyrics. YANAYA is a partnership project with New England Regional Art Museum and First Nation Families across the New England And Northwest Region.

37


73% of artists have benefited from new work following their way as a direct result of being involved in the project

87%

87% of artists belive this process has helped them value themselves and their work more

of artists belive this process has helped them value themselves and their work more

Highlights • Yanaya is a work in creation with 12 emerging First Nation artists all who have a long history and connection to story and music in their families. Group outcomes

• Securing a number of small grants to progress the Yanaya platform, including; performing and recording, mentoring with professional artists, engaging producers that resulted in a festival performance. • Recording an album with language pieces included. This was not only a great thing for the YANAYA songs, songs it was a new and rich professional experience for the emerging artists. • Performing at a variety of festivals, conferences and other events such as; Black Gully Music Festival, Tamworth Country Music Festival, local Moree events, the NSW AECG Language Revival Conference, Origin Energy for NAIDOC, Singleton Cultural Spectacular. • David and two emerging artists participated in Riddim and Poetry workshops at Minnibah Aboriginal School with University of New England. • David and Vicky Gordon co-wrote pitch for Bare Foot Brothers. 38


Creative and Professional Development for David Leha

•D  avid has been working with a group of inspiring mentors to develop his; producing and directing, music and performance, and cultural awareness and engagement frameworks. In 2017, his mentors included; Larissa Behrendt, Wesley Enoch, Emma Donovan, Professor Ray Kelly, and Elders Uncle Len Waters and Steve Widders. With the support of these mentors David has faced and dealt with the challenges of language acquisition and translation, sometimes with languages that have fewer than 300 words remaining. •D  avid has articulated a noticeable change in himself through his leadership role in the project. He believes the influence of working closely with families in the Gomeroi and Unniwan nations has been critical for his self-development. •D  avid attending 30 professional singing lessons. David events

•p  erforming with Christine Anu and Casey Donovon as back-up vocals at two different events. •5  0-year anniversary of the 1967 referendum, for the Prime Minister. •P  articipating in the ‘Music in the Key of Yes’ concert (1967 anniversary celebration) at th«e Opera House for Sydney festival. Other performers included; Thelma Plum, Dan Sultan, Yirramal, Alice Skye and Emily Waramarra. •P  reschool visits on the NSW Central Coast and the University of Newcastle. •D  elivered workshops and song in Juvenile Detention Centre, Palmsbury Victoria. •T  arnanathi festival and Creation Lab project, in Adelaide. •D  elivering a keynote address through language song at Yirramboi Festival, in Melbourne. •W  orked on Anti-tobacco project with Tom Calma in Darwin and Blue Mountains. •C  o-produced closing ceremony at Horizon Arts and Culture Festival, Sunshine Coast QLD.

39


15 families working on revival of Songlines through contemporary genres

7

communities collaborating

4

11

other language and spoken word pieces developed

Yanaya key artists

12 emerging artists

1

11

creative Intensive conducted

songs completed

15 families connect with their living Songlines

2 presentations to school groups

40


Diverse artist partnerships

Partnerships

4 professional mentors

University of New England

11 families

New England Regional Art Museum

12 emerging artists collaborating together

Minnibah Preschool

Tim Hagan –producer and hip-hop artist

Centre for Hope

Gambirra

Albert Music

LJ Hill

University of Melbourne

Buddy Knox

Victorian Aboriginal Child Care Agency

University of Newcastle

Teanji Knox Michael Leslie Izi Illume Len Waters – translating songs into Gomeroi

76%

80%

Heather Keens Devo Devrim

YANAYA Ensemble Performed alongside:

90%

Wild Marmalade The Big Itch Duncan Woods and the Notable Few Ben Connor Buddy Knox

How well has BE supported the development of great art and strengthened artistic and cultural practise?

Roger Knox One voice Mob Choir Devo Derim

How relevant is BE to the times we live in and the pople we live with?

Declan Kelly

80%

How well does the art activate a process of community transformation?

How well has BE reached audiences, built new audiences and provided people with reqarding experiences of the arts?

60%

How well does the art enable people to move from particularized thinking to a connection with the group?

53%

How well does the art reconnect people and community that are fragmented and dislocated?

80%

How well does the art enable us to reach depths otherwise impossible?

41


42


Mavens are information hoarders and community influencers. Mavens are information brokers sharing and trading what they know. To be a Maven is to be a teacher. But it is also even more emphatically to be a student. Malcolm Gladwell Canadian journalist and author (The Tipping Point, Outliers)

43


BE PROJECTS


CCC MOREE there are some good people here you know, it’s a good town, it’s a good community.

46


Moree is the home of Beyond Empathy, where the organisation first began and in 2017 it hosts the greatest variety of arts projects. We love that Moree is home for us, it’s where our roots are. It doesn’t have the glamour of the remote desert locations and consequently is one of those small communities that is always over looked. For us it is a hot bed of creativity and inspiration. We love the work the Moree community generates and it has significantly contributed to our identity as an organisation. CCC Moree cultivates Creativity, Culture and Connection through a suite of projects that

drive community engagement and support the development of local celebrated art; creating career pathways for local midcareer and emerging First Nation artists by connecting them with established artists. Culture sits at the heart of CCC Moree. CCC Moree projects, experiment with new artforms and ways of making art to activate opportunities for engagement and connection with the local community to contribute to a vibrant society and dynamic culture in Moree.

47

MOREE


Social housing for Aboriginal peoples in Moree has reached crisis point. In 2013 the town was the break and enter dwelling capital of NSW, ranking in the top three local government areas for malicious damage to property. The relationship between residents and service providers has reached a critical point where many providers will no longer attend certain social housing precincts. Although there are challenges in establishing our projects, we don’t find the challenges insurmountable and are repeatedly struck by the beauty that comes through from the community in their projects.

48


6 22 43

76%

How well does the art activate a process of community transformation?

76%

66%

active projects

78% local people employed

How well has BE reached audiences, built new audiences and provided people with reqarding experiences of the arts? How well has BE supported the development of great art and strengthened artistic and cultural practise?

local young people received mentoring

58%

How well does the art enable people to move from particularized thinking to a connection with the group?

How relevant is BE to the times we live in and the people we live with?

72%

How well does the art reconnect people and community that are fragmented and dislocated?

86%

How well does the art enable us to reach depths otherwise impossible?

49

MOREE


we may not be able to change people’s circumstances, but a little bit of colour may change their outlook on the day ahead...

NEXUS Social housing precincts are commonly littered with burnt-out abandoned houses creating safety risks for service providers that need to service the community. NEXUS is a public art project designed to re-establish relationships between the First Nation community and service providers in Moree. World class street artists and the acclaimed street art production company, Oi You, mentor local, emerging street artists and BE artists, to create a high quality public artwork with the residents in four locations to revitalise the public space and foster a sense of pride and ownership. NEXUS facilitates better integration between the social housing and surrounding community through art. The inventive and site responsive artworks produced have revitalised each location drawing the attention of the surrounding community and creating a sense of pride in the people who live there. Each artwork is site specific and the local residents were included in the design process. The usually contentious spelling of the traditional tribal group was used in its three different spelling versions across the murals; Gomeroi, Kamilaroi, Gamilaroi.

50


CREATIVE PROCESS Public art can be defined as: art which has as its goal a desire to engage with its audiences and to create spaces - whether material, virtual or imagined within which people can identify themselves, perhaps by creating a renewed reflection on community, on the uses of public spaces or on our behaviour within them. (Sharp, Pollock et al. 2005: 1003). The NEXUS artworks in Moree built new audiences because it gave the surrounding community, who otherwise may never enter an art museum or gallery, something they could relate to, something that was meaningful and relevant. The installation of these art works on very public cyclone fences meant a high level of visibility and accessibility to the public. While initial discussions revolved around 8 artists coming in to Graffiti Bomb Moree for one weekend, we decided that it would be much more valuable to have less artists in community for a longer period of time to allow deeper connection to grow between people and place.

51

MOREE


Each artwork came out of consultation and slow-burn discussions between the artists and community in each place and each artwork became a reflection of the unique cultural identity of each pocket of the community and tapped into the deep pride felt across each place. The fact that world renowned graffiti artists came to Moree and painted fences in their areas, not the central part of town or more affluent areas surprised people and gave them a sense of pride.

52


HIGHLIGHTS • Over 400 People attended the unveiling of the artworks * Barwon police station made the most culturally significant mural the cover for their Facebook page. Though a small act, this can help heal the divide between the community and local police. • An increasing awareness in local providers that public art has a purpose and is not just for visual enjoyment, has resulted in two new artworks being planned and funded by FACS and the Local Council in 2018. • Two local artists and young people collaborated with the visiting professional artists on the artworks. • Despite the low expectations of the broader community that the artworks would be vandalised, this has not eventuated. They have remained untouched and local residents have been maintaining the area and keeping it clean. • The BE team has been invited to the regular South Moree tenants meeting, so we can further facilitate the community’s vision for the future.

or start to shift the lens through which they see their community and themselves. Vans the Omega

53

MOREE


Over 400 people attended the unveiling of the:

5 fences

2 walls

4 concrete blocks

400sqm of pathway

Feedback Community feedback in relation to these art works cited: ‘more people hanging in the parks’ ‘improved sense of happiness when looking at the artwork daily’ ‘identifies the place as ours’ ‘pride and appreciation for being given the ‘gift‘ of the artwork’

54


Creative team Program managers; Minna Lethbridge and Jemma Craigie

90%

75%

Lead artists; Vans the Omega, Emmanuel Moore, John Kaye, Tim Johnson Emerging artist; Mehi Beale Local artists; Welshy, Elton Boney, Geraldine Boney, Mitchell Green, Melanie Boney, Jenny Craigie

Partnerships Social Housing Improvement Fund – NSW Family and Community Services Moree Local Aboriginal Land Council Families in Stanley Village, Sullivan Place and Arunga Park, Cooee Park, and the Boomerangs Football Club

80%

How well does the art activate a process of community transformation?

100%

How well does the art enable people to move from particularized thinking to a connection with the group?

95% How well has BE reached audiences, built new audiences and provided people with reqarding experiences of the arts? How well has BE supported the development of great art and strengthened artistic and cultural practise? How relevant is BE to the times we live in and the pople we live with?

70%

How well does the art reconnect people and community that are fragmented and dislocated?

100%

How well does the art enable us to reach depths otherwise impossible?

55

MOREE


MPD Studio Mad Proppa Deadly

The MPD studio is a partnership with the Ted Noffs Foundation and a mini pilot of their successful ‘Street University Model’, which provides workshops and activities that incorporate creative use of art, music, dance, theatre, multi-media, writing, life skills development and technology and design in a highly visible, youth-friendly venue. They also deliver vocational and educational workshops and bridging programs to further education. The Street University movement has as its primary aim the re-connection with the community and cultivation of social inclusion of young people. Its strength lies in its capacity to engage and motivate disadvantaged young people and its ability to provide them with the material and social support needed to actualise ideas and ambitions.

14

songs

During 2017 we offered music workshops with Australian band Sticky Fingers, in a purpose-built music studio, inside a shipping container. The studio is open on Thursday and Friday nights and delivers music sessions for young people (YP) not at school, younger kids 8-14 and then 14-18 later in the afternoons. Local agencies make referrals to the program.

1

In the ‘third space’ created by music production the counsellors get the opportunity to build meaningful relationships with the YP, which leads to more structured and considered counselling interventions.

video clip

MPD Studio is a partnership project with the Ted Noffs Foundation.

56


CREATIVE PROCESS The ability of the project to achieve solid outcomes has been slowed down by three key issues; the logistics of where the studio is located and how it is accommodated by host site, the reliability and engagement of relevant local partners and the general challenges of supervising a large group of youth with a variety. This has not dampened the spirits of organisers and artists, but it does impact the development of artistic products. The MPD studio is the early stages of a broader Night Culture Program. Once we have a wider variety of artistic activities and more volunteers from across the community, it will be easier to engage more young people in meaningful ways.

57

MOREE


HIGHLIGHTS • 10 – 30 young people in attendance each week, 10 – 15 as regulars. These are strong attendance figures for Moree youth. • So far 5 tracks are in development and two of the tracks will be featured in a clip celebrating the Graffiti Jam and the unique identities of the small pockets of communities across Moree. • Nate will continue his own professional development working with producers such as Adit from Horrorshow and Izzy Illume and will mentor 2 local Moree young people in running the MPD Studio during 2018. • The presence of a casual Noffs Counsellor each week has been valuable and provides another avenue for connection for the young people. • The BE team participated in one training session with the Noffs Foundation. It gave us the opportunity to ask questions and discuss challenging situations and develop strategies.

58


Creative team Program managers; Minna Lethbridge, Jemma Craigie

55%

75%

Lead Artist; Nate Weatherall, Artists; Izi Illume (producer), Gambirra Illume (musician), David Leha aka. Radical Son (musician), Crabs – Sticky Fingers (mentor/musician), Sticky Fingers (mentors/musician) Volunteers; Lloyd Munro Jr, Dakota Smith and Lewis Taylor

Partnerships Major partner; The Ted Noffs Foundation The Salvation Army Miyay Birray Youth service Hunter New England, Central Coast Primary Health Network

45%

How well does the art activate a process of community transformation?

63%

How well does the art enable people to move from particularized thinking to a connection with the group?

90% How well has BE reached audiences, built new audiences and provided people with reqarding experiences of the arts? How well has BE supported the development of great art and strengthened artistic and cultural practise? How relevant is BE to the times we live in and the pople we live with?

63%

How well does the art reconnect people and community that are fragmented and dislocated?

80%

How well does the art enable us to reach depths otherwise impossible?

59

MOREE


60


We are really trying to create a space where the kids can be free, be themselves - try to spark that creative mind in them. When a lot of them struggle to read and write - it’s really hard. The older kids love the space - and when they come there they really want to do it. They really want to do music and you see that in them and they enjoy it. What I love about being in the studio is that you work as team and you fuck up and then laugh about it. Just being together in a space together and you’re having fun. We are constantly trying to build the best possible environment for the kids, to keep them happy, to have fun and enjoy it. Nate Weatherall (lead artist)

61


HOMEtruths is a 3-year arts-based project that engages Aboriginal women in Moree affected by domestic violence in creative and therapeutic processes to reset healthy boundaries. It brings artists Cathy Craigie (author and playwright) Bibi Barba (visual artist) and Raphaela Rosella (photographer) into community to work with women affected by domestic violence on collaborative art making. The non-judgemental and empowering processes of art making make it possible to explore this difficult territory. The project generates artwork for performance and exhibition first in Moree and then Sydney. The aim is that the women’s experience is transformed through the artist led processes and together they produce collaborative works that will break the silence on domestic violence in the community.

62


HOMETRUTHS The purpose of the work is to serve as an advocacy tool to further the discussion about domestic violence and develop culturally appropriate strategies. "The reasons for Aboriginal over representation in domestic violence statistics are at once incredibly complex but also quite clear. They are clear because they are, in some ways obvious; inter-generational poverty, historically imposed governmental policy aimed at destroying family units and the inevitable social dysfunction wrought by colonialism. They are also complex because these underlying problems have no simple solutions". The Hon. Linda Burney MP (BE patron) speaking at the opening of the exhibition in Sydney. Each artist spends time with the group of women and supports them to translate their experiences into art mediums; written, photographic and painted works. The process of creating together enables powerful personal and community reflection. It offers new ways to explore, re-think and share difficult personal histories and realities, and supports growing a wider understanding of complex issues. HOMEtruths is a partnership project with Thiyama-Li Family Violence Service.

63

MOREE


Creative Process In 2017, BE artist and award-winning photographer Raphaela Rosella worked with filmmaker Adric Watson to further develop her photography practice into moving image and film. They captured 50 minutes of footage which was edited into a loop and projected as part of the final HOMEtruths installation and Exhibition in Moree. The footage will be accompanied by a soundscape developed by David Leha under the guidance of music designer Phil Okerstrom and drawing from his own experience and conversations had in community about love, respect, longing and belonging. Cathy and Rosie spent three days in September in community, two funerals in that week halted activities for two of the days and Rosie and Cathy spent the third day cooking and yarning with two of the HOMEtruths participants, Jen and Laurel. In October, Cathy and Rosie spent a further 3 days in Moree to finish their work with the women. Using the town’s Aboriginal keeping place, the Dhiiyaan Centre, they worked with young women and their mothers creating scrapbooks using old and current photos and talking about life’s challenges and their hopes and dreams for the future while planning for the exhibition. Across the three days, 11 women both young and old came and sat in the space and participated in various ways.

64


It’s easy to have preconceptions about Moree. As a Sydneysider, I knew it was famous for its hot springs, discharged from the ancient waters of the Great Artesian Basin. As a journalist who’d spent the last two years reporting on domestic violence, I knew something else, too: Moree was notorious for its violence, ranking in the top three areas for domestic assault in NSW. I spent four days in Moree, and now feel even less qualified to write with confidence about the town than I did before. But three words keep recurring in my mind: resilience, love and survival. The women who sat with us and sketched out the first drawings hinting at their experiences came to us with open hearts. They trusted a few among us - who they’d never met with stories that were raw and unflinchingly honest. As their children raced and cartwheeled across the Salvation Army hall, we sat together in circles and in pairs together, working organically and unknowingly towards a sense of what the Home Truths project could become, of what we could mean to each other over the next few months. I was barely six weeks pregnant when I arrived in Moree, and few apart from my closest family and friends knew. But news travels fast in small country towns – and like quicksilver in Moree - and pretty soon I was enveloped into that quintessential female space of empathy and support so peculiar to impending motherhood. It struck me over those four days how vital all those children in the background were. How they had given these women a reason to go on when life was unspeakably dire, when they were mired deep in drugs or prostitution; how they gave them a reason to recover, a reason to get away from violence that could feel as inescapable as destiny. These children were their lifeblood, a connection to their most ancient and vital cultural practice – motherhood. As a feminist, I’ve inwardly railed against mothers being more identified with parenting than fathers. But among these women, some of whom had no active connection to the symbols, stories and totems of their people, motherhood was their ancient practice – the thing that made them whole again, made it all worth surviving. Being invited into this strong, feminine space, I saw for the first time how powerful Indigenous women could be – especially in the grindingly poor areas of South Moree, where jobs are virtually non-existent and drugs and alcohol numb the stultifying boredom of those hot, weary days and nights. Motherhood was strength, it was purpose - it made everything else worth fighting and living for. What equivalent was there for their jobless and frustrated men? For the first time, a picture started to emerge, though I am definitely left with a lot more questions than answers. Were these men beating and controlling their women partly because, in part, they felt shamed by their power? Colonisation, policies of assimilation, chronic unemployment and grinding poverty left these men virtually no ability to provide in a way that would bring them pride, or connect them backto their traditional power. That wasn’t the case for the women. Their channel back to culture could be reopened with childbirth – if they chose to embrace it. Their pride was in the love, resilience and survival they instilled in their children. I know next to nothing about the lives of women and men living in Moree, and I don’t claim to understand the specific roots of their intimate violence. But I am determined, over the next six months – as a new life grows inside me – to learn as much as I can about their lives, and help them to shape their stories of resilience, love and survival into narratives that do them justice. Jess Hill is an investigative reporter who contributes to Radio National's Background Briefing and The Monthly. She has reported exclusively on domestic violence in 2014-15, and was the recipient of three of the 2015 Our Watch Walkley Awards, including the Gold Award for reporting on violence against women.

65

MOREE


Highlights A participant, Jen, who wrote her story one year ago when the project began, had the opportunity to reflect on what has changed since then. For Jen, reading her story from a year ago and realizing how far she has come in life since then gave her a sense of strength, resilience and a realization that she has the power and skill to exact and drive change in her life and those around her that she loves. The group is working towards an exhibition in December; in a highly visible empty shopfront in the centre of town, of Rosie's images, film projections, sound and written material from the women as well as old photos. The exhibition will have an interactive element that will give the wider Moree community the opportunity to add pieces of writing and stories of their own to a collage wall, telling a whole-of-community story of love, respect and the strength of women - led by the voices and stories of those who are least likely to be heard.

66


Creative Team Program managers; Minna Lethbridge, Jemma Craigie Artists; Raphaela Rosella, Cathy Craigie, Jess Hill, Izi Illume, David Leha Volunteers; Jenifer Whitton, Laurel Bartholamew, George Madden, Luke Swan

Partnerships Thiyama-Li Family Violence Service Dhiiyaan Aboriginal Centre

67

MOREE


LUU-WIRRINGGAA

Luu-Wirringgaa means ‘all possible for Aboriginal woman’ in Gomeroi. Luu-Wirringgaa (previously known as Meei Yinar however, the name has been changed in line with the preference of local women) is a facilitated, arts led women’s group developing social, life and work skills for Aboriginal women in Moree (15 - 54 years), who live with, domestic family and community lateral, violence as part of their lives. To be a part of the group, women become clients of Thiyama-Li and have a one-on-one induction meeting with Thiyama-Li to develop a Personal Development Plan (PDP) around their health, housing, justice and other wellbeing needs and a Personal Creative Plan (PCP) with BE present, to identify their strengths and articulate some artistic and creative goals. It is designed to improve the community engagement and social harmony among the Aboriginal women in Moree. It gives the women life skills and leadership training, and provides entrepreneurial skills and support for them to sell their textiles if they want to. The women’s self of self-worth is fostered by exhibiting and selling their works and the community perception of the women is also transformed making it easier for them to participate in future community activities. Luu-Wirringgaa is a partnership project with Thiyama-Li Family Violence Service.

68


Creative Process Luu-Wirringgaa is a legacy and direct outcome of the HOMEtruths project. It was initiated by the women who participated and includes Iocal women in Moree from all different parts of the community who have come together from a domestic and family violence background to create art and design, along the way we have had some very challenging days and some very beautiful designs have come out of the group. Leading Aboriginal textile artist Bibi Barba, works with the women to incorporate traditional and contemporary symbols and stories from their Gomeroi country in the designs. Through making quality products and artworks they can be proud of and recognised for, they ensure a broad audience and market for their work, building social acceptance and recognition from their families and the broader Moree community.

69

MOREE


When Bibi isn’t in town, the group have been working with local artist Janelle Boyd towards a Christmas collection of soft furnishings. Bibi continues to work one day a week as Creative Director, ensuring the ongoing creative development of the collective and artist led protocols and intellectual property define creative outputs There are very specific challenges engaging their interest in a project; as their disadvantage and isolation is so profound, affecting their capacity to participate in group activities. Through art (design / print making), they produce textiles for print and other craft, exhibiting the final products and selling them locally and further afield at shops, galleries and markets.

Highlights • The women meet three days a week in a local studio for art workshops, facilitated by us and our local family violence partner, Thyiamali that will deliver 5 ‘artist in residence’ blocks a year. • When the group first started, many women in the room wouldn't speak to each other outside of the space, because of family divides or simply never having met. The result was continual conflict and tension - bravely of which, most of the group sat through day in and day out because they saw the workshops as an opportunity to step outside of their worlds. More recently, these women have been witnessed supporting each other in their tasks. • Items produced are sold at local markets and events and opportunities to expand to local and metropolitan stores and online sales will be explored in 2018.

70


Creative team Program Managers; Minna Lethbridge, Jemma Craigie

45%

55%

Lead Artists; Bibi Barba, Janelle Boyd Community Artists: Juney Moon, Jenny Craigie, Dorothy Tighe, Mona Fernando, Betty Lou French, Angie Swan, Mariah Swan, Lizzy SwanHaines, Tina Taylor, Loretta Tighe, Gladys Carol, Geraldine Boney

Partnerships Thiyama-Li Family Violence Service

68% How well has BE reached audiences, built new audiences and provided people with reqarding experiences of the arts? How well has BE supported the development of great art and strengthened artistic and cultural practise?

Yaama Ganu Gallery Dhiiyaan Aboriginal Centre

How relevant is BE to the times we live in and the pople we live with?

35%

How well does the art activate a process of community transformation?

45%

How well does the art enable people to move from particularized thinking to a connection with the group?

45%

How well does the art reconnect people and community that are fragmented and dislocated?

75%

How well does the art enable us to reach depths otherwise impossible?

71

MOREE


First On The Ladder


72


First On The Ladder is a three-year, art-meets-sport collaboration between Polyglot Theatre and Beyond Empathy, in partnership with the Rumbalara Football and Netball Club in Shepparton, Victoria and the Moree Boomerangs in New South Wales. Polyglot Theatre; the leader in the Australian arts scene in creating an interactive and participatory theatre experience for adults and children, in collaboration with BE celebrates the culture and achievements of Aboriginal children and their communities through the process of zine-making, animation and public arena visual spectaculars. The project begins with arts-based activities at local sports clubs (as bipartisan gathering places for families) and builds to a grand community performance finale in the final year. The project aims to bring the cooperation and respect that exists and thrives within the sports clubs into the broader community. Art and sport have strong alignments; they both require teamwork, participation, expression of energy and an audience (though both can be achieved without this). They are powerful tools for community engagement, awareness building, advocacy, social change and celebration. First On The Ladder is a partnership project with Polyglot Theatre, Boomerangs Rugby League Club and Rumbulara Football and Netball Club

73

MOREE


Creative Process First on the Ladder is such a joy to work on. These two sporting clubs are key institutions in their respective towns, and having the opportunity to collaborate with them, in such an open-ended way, is a rare opportunity for all of the artists involved. The works we have created together so far are playful and grounded and have established a great connection between us all. The plans we have hatched for 2018 will build on those connections and reach out further into both communities in ways that we think will really turn heads. Ian Pidd, First On The Ladder Project Director The project focusses on the young people from the sports clubs – celebrating their culture and achievements through a range of creative experiences including zine-making, street art, radio broadcasting and play workshops. The project utilises a range of locations and artistic mediums to engage the audience in unexpected ways, intersecting with everyday life. The collaboration between Polyglot and BE will inventively combine the companies’ renowned expertise in children’s theatre making and community cultural development respectively, resulting in new original and accessible high-quality art works and a cross-region cultural exchange.

74


Highlights • 2 017 was a boisterous and successful year for the project. • In Moree, members of the creative team facilitated workshops at the Barwon Learning Centre to create paste-ups, zines and animations. Two editions of the zine Boom were published and 18 paste-ups were exhibited. 10 community partners were involved in the project. •T  wo radio stations, Rumba Radio in Shepparton and the BBC (Boomerangs Broadcast Corporation) in Moree, were established. The radio broadcasts were facilitated by Project Director Ian Pidd to provide participants with the opportunity to deliver live FM broadcasts on game days, building their skills in sports commentary, DJ-ing and audio production. Rumba Radio broadcast live three times, and BBC broadcast live five times. Broadcasts were also recorded and are available to listen to through speaker.com. •C  reative play workshops for younger children in each community saw participants harnessing their creativity through drawing activities, developing characters and storylines, and constructing sets (including a complete café), costumes, and parades of strange and wonderful creatures. There were six play workshops in Shepparton and three in Moree.

75

MOREE


76


Over 150 young people were engaged in the project – across 45 separate workshops in Shepparton and 24 sperate workshops in Moree

85%

70%

Creative team Program manager; Simone Ruggiero Lead artist; Ian Pidd

85%

Local artist; Skyla Dylan, Janelle Boyd, Darlene Dylan

How well has BE reached audiences, built new audiences and provided people with reqarding experiences of the arts?

Partnerships Major partner; Polyglot Boomerangs Football Club Barwon Learning Centre Rumbalara Football and Netball club

How well has BE supported the development of great art and strengthened artistic and cultural practise? How relevant is BE to the times we live in and the pople we live with?

85%

How well does the art activate a process of community transformation?

65%

85%

How well does the art enable people to move from particularized thinking to a connection with the group?

How well does the art reconnect people and community that are fragmented and dislocated?

85%

How well does the art enable us to reach depths otherwise impossible?

77

MOREE


PLAY is a community program instigated through a partnership with Polyglot Theatre that began in late 2016. A team of Aunties and emerging young First Nations’ artists have been trained by Polyglot artists and play makers over a series of intensives in late 2016 and 2017. The four trained, local women run workshops at the footy oval on home games for the Moree Boomerangs, in schools and in community Growing up as a child in Moree, might mean at an early age a child is responsible for 3 or 4 younger siblings, this means many Aboriginal children miss out on ordinary play time taken for granted in the wider community. Intergenerational poverty, low expectations, drug and alcohol misuse and other poor health indicators are part of the daily reality of growing up in Moree. PLAY aims to disrupt these cycles of disadvantage and introduces back into their world, some important cognitive concepts, crucial to healthy brain development.

PLAY 78


Creative Process The local PLAY team work with a wide range of materials and lots of it, including; recycled materials, boxes, lengths of masking tape, elastic and paint. They use the skills they have learnt to set up play workshops in places across the community. Barren parklands, vacant house blocks and home games for the rugby team come to life with replicas of; Moree’s iconic baths, rainbow serpents, paper Mission dolly’s and fairy tale costumes. Everything is made out of paper, tape and other found materials. The women work with the kids of all ages on being creative and just letting their imaginations run wild. More and more local women have been keen to become part of the PLAY program with Connie Taylor joining the PLAY team.

79

MOREE


80


Highlights • The women facilitated a workshop at Moree East Primary School and two more at Sullivan’s Place and Wales Park for the Graffiti Jam celebrations.

76%

• 420 kids involved and interacted with Play workshops. These include children from visiting towns during the Boomerangs football season. • Five local women trained and employed. These women worked independently throughout the year developing their own strategy, and now feel a great sense of ownership of their project.

Creative team Program manager; Simone Ruggiero Lead artist; Ian Pidd Local artists; Paula Duncan, Valmae Pitt, Mandy Haines, JD Picker, Connie Taylor

76%

80% How well has BE reached audiences, built new audiences and provided people with reqarding experiences of the arts? How well has BE supported the development of great art and strengthened artistic and cultural practise? How relevant is BE to the times we live in and the pople we live with?

Partnerships

Feedback

Boomerangs Football Club

Community feedback so far is fantastic and the women love being able to facilitate visual arts activities in the heart of their communities.

75%

55%

How well does the art activate a process of community transformation?

How well does the art enable people to move from particularized thinking to a connection with the group?

45%

How well does the art reconnect people and community that are fragmented and dislocated?

85%

How well does the art enable us to reach depths otherwise impossible?

81

MOREE


The Illawarra The South Coast of NSW is our filmmaking centre. Our films have been nominated at film festivals around the world; Sao Paulo, Brazil Cyrpus, Canada, US, Germany and sometimes we win accolades eg Special Jury Prize, Warsaw Film Festival 2013 for Rites of Passage. Filmmaking is often our finest work, many projects performed and created in other mediums result in a film about the journey or event for that project. Films are a highly effective communication tool and they serve many functions for us; evidence of the artistic process, evidence of a project occurring, a means of communicating with community, educational tools for children and for the pleasure and beauty of good film making. Protection is the jewel in the crown of our film making‌

82


PROTECTION

Since BE’s inception, we have been working with young people and young adults who share a common legacy resulting from an absence of protection as a child. Sometimes these people also have scars as a direct result of the interventions delivered in the name of reinstating protection. Protection is an innovative film project that seeks to turn this common double negative on its head. Protection works with children under 12 and their families who have experienced recurring hardship, many of whom live in public housing. The children, their families, neighbours and broader community have produced images and narrative video material and it has been animated to look like hand-made lead pencil sketches, water colour paintings, screen prints, charcoal, chalk and coloured pencil drawings. The project has produced a feature-length animated film, a play installation (the Cubbies Project) developed in partnership with Polyglot Theatre, and an educational presentation for schools about developing resilience (the Cinema Cubby). The content is all about childhood. It communicates about childhood from the perspective of people who have experienced hardship, but it reveals what we all have in common: laughter, tears, fears, courage and resilience.

83

ILLAWARRA


Creative process Children and young people have been involved in all aspects of the artistic work including the presentation and promotion. During the project they have recorded live video, created characters and stories about childhood and crowd funded for some professional post production for their film. 2017 was the final stage of Production for the 4 year project and started with finding roles for various kids who we had contacted and spent time with in the previous years’ Protection workshops but who hadn’t managed to get into one of the narrative story lines. So, there were a number of voice over stories that were developed for these children, including video workshops and voice workshops. This means of course they too are included in the final film and can join in on all the activities that come with the presentation of their film to all kind of audiences in all kinds if venues.

84


Creative Team Artists; Phillip Crawford, Gemma Parsons, Emma Korhonen, Shaniece Igano, Daniel de Filippo

Partners (people or orgs who assisted with the film) Petes Take Away, Five Island Secondary Collage, Warrawong Primary School, Warraong High School, Gala Cinema, Illawarra Film Society, Southern Suburbs Taskforce, Jennifer Macquarie & Fountaindale Group-Tallimbar Village, Andrew MansonBarrington Homes-Brooks Reach, Precise Vision Optomatrist, Lake Illawarra Police, Shellharbour TAFE, Wollongong TAFE, McKeons Swim Centre, Coomaditchie United Aboriginal Corporation, Fins Fangs “N� Feathers, Fuzion Performing Arts, Aish's Seafood, Relativity Studios, Illawarra Seabird Rescue, Eaton Gorge Costume Hire, Ray White Real Estate Warrawong, Lake Heights Primary School, Wollongong Army Disposal Store, Barrack Heights, Primary School, Red Point Artists, Red Point Furniture Restorations, Anglicare St Lukes Village, Amazing Ponies, Lorraine Lehman-Jones, Delaney's Cakes, Soundfirm, Brendan Ward, Raylene Butler & Harry Jackson, Elwyn Brown & Leeann Holten, Kyharne Butler, Jim Manalitus, Wendie Verdon, Marie Alwert, Greg Stewart, Mark & Annette Herring, Honora Jenkins, Sain Davies

Adult Artists and Collaborators Daniel De Filippo Crew/Editor, Phil Okerstrom Music, Tessa Parsons Production Manager, Liam Dallas Assistant Editor, Evelyn Meli Cisneros Additonal Crew/TAFE student placement/Policy Development, Millie Taylor Additonal Crew/TAFE student placement/ Policy Development, Shane Bently Additonal Crew/TAFE student placement/Policy Development, Poppy Van Org Grangier Additional Camera, Diego Ruiz Sound Mix, David Sharp Story Group, David Wypych Animator, Josh Cleaver Additonal Crew/TAFE student placement/Policy Development, Ryley Miller Animator , Chico Requieron

Animator, Madison Salier Animator, Lucie Towers Animator, Adele Feletto Publicist, Jenny Brisco-Hough, Story Group, Donna Waters Story Group, Susie Brown Story Group, Lakia Igano Marketting, Ken Pitt Additional Sound, Scott Hudson Additional Crew, Bronwyn Purvis Additional Crew, Ryley Jones Additional Camera, Becky Parsons Additional Animation, Peter Heddles Camera Drone, Jessica Rees Composer/ Performer, Roza Rojano Special Effects Make Up

Actors (who were not participants) Robina Beard, Louisa Raft, Ray Bayani, Agnes Donovan, Allison Carriage, Tara Parkes, Kasey Maher, Belinda Hawker, Steve Parsons, Brad Hughes, Ben Verdon, Jake Harris, Marc Gambuzza, Ben Walsh, Feargus Manning, Will Skarpona, Jess Rees, Lagos Hamers, Orion LeppanTaylor, Jamie Herring, Kirsten Herring, Jay Korhonen, Rylan Stevenson, Juliet Scrine, Betty Spilsted, Kirsten Hort, Vimala Colless, Calum MacLeod, Natalie Harris, Breanna McGaffin, Jay Trew, Dulcie Dal Molin, Jim Hawker, Dennis Sykes, Peter Scrine, Melanie Fleet, Kelly Dunn

Actors who are parents, relatives or neighbours of the participants or ex Rites of Passage Jenene Pazsit, Dorothy Thomas, Sam Heagney, Emily Heagney, Mervin Roberts, Irene Condan, Summer Harris, Zac Steele, Kyle Hewson, Maria Rees, Tracey Carlson, Jess Brown, Amanda Black, Kim Thompson, Chaise Barbaric, Kane Porter, Lumpy Actor, Rayleen Butler, Mark Rees, Sonny Brown, Renee Porter, Lisa Quinn, David Muggeridge, Lorraine Brown, Narelle Thomas, Aunty Bullie, Brianna Muir

85

ILLAWARRA


Highlights • Protection has produced 32 short animated stories, an play installation (the Cubbies Project) developed in partnership with Polyglot Theatre and an educational program for schools about developing resilience (the Cinema Cubby) • Protection is an innovative design as it can be presented to audiences in a variety of ways, at different lengths and using different story lines depending on the audience and can also be used in classroom and education settings. • Editing Protection with two Rites of Passage (a previous highly successful BE film) leaders Daniel de Filippo and Shaniece Igano driving the editing process, mentored by the BE team. • Part of the Crowd Funding campaign included a visit to Parliament House in Canberra, where we set up the Cinema Cubby in the wind, on lawns.

86


• BE patron, Linda Burney MP, and the Illawarra local member, Stephen Jones MP, hosted the kids visit in Parliament House. Stephen did a “shout out” to the kids about the project in Parliament, which means that their names and the project and now in the Official records.

78%

• Three children participants travelled to Melbourne and presented at a school in Melbourne’s western suburbs and then at ACMI. A partnership with ACMI is now a possibility for some aspects of Protections tour and sharing. • Publicity for Protection was really strong during the campaign and the kids appeared on a National Channel 7 show and on local Channel 9 News in Canberra and the Illawarra and were in the Fairfax Newspapers in Canberra and the Illawarra. • The crowd funding video was viewed over 250 000 times on Facebook. Over 80% of the views were “organic” which meant that they were the result or people sharing. The post itself reached well over 585 000 people and the post had 12 500 “reactions” which are Likes, Comments and Shares.

75%

How well does the art activate a process of community transformation?

60%

How well does the art enable people to move from particularized thinking to a connection with the group?

75%

78% How well has BE reached audiences, built new audiences and provided people with reqarding experiences of the arts? How well has BE supported the development of great art and strengthened artistic and cultural practise? How relevant is BE to the times we live in and the pople we live with?

45%

80%

How well does the art reconnect people and community that are fragmented and dislocated?

How well does the art enable us to reach depths otherwise impossible?

87

ILLAWARRA


BLUE ROSE The Blue Rose project uses film to explore the experiences of people who don't use verbal language as their primary way to communicate. Blue Rose is being made in collaboration with people of all-abilities over several years. The people who star in the film material are people that don’t use verbal or a formalised language as their main way to communicate and interact with others and the world. In the same way that BE’s film Rites of Passage advocated for and encouraged the community to respond differently to disenfranchised young people, Blue Rose provides an opportunity for participants and their families to challenge prejudice, highlight issues of access, put a spotlight on their concerns regarding service delivery and champion tolerance. The Blue Rose project focuses on developing simple portraits, stories and scenarios inspired by the life experiences and interests of the participants of varying ages. As part of the film process, workshops and activities take place within the Illawarra region of NSW. The content and activities are flexible and are led by the participant interests.

88


Creative Process Because a number of the stars don’t watch video or film in the same way or for the same reasons that many of the rest of us do, the team developed a way of experiencing the film material in a way that has been inspired by the stars themselves. The result is an interactive sensory installation.

play with shadows and light.

The Blue Rose installation enables visitors to play with shadows and light, and create visual echoes as they walk across an interactive projection. Adults and children alike enjoy the chance to make music by moving their hands or body in front of an invisible beam, go travelling in a virtual cockpit, or relax in a sensory cocoon, and the portraits of the stars are projected throughout these environments. The BE Team has enlisted the expertise of award winning lighting, interaction and video designer Toby Knyvett, whose body of work includes pieces for the Sydney Opera House and the Vivid Festival as well as being a regular collaborator with project partner Merrigong Theatre Company. The stars have become involved in the project through organisations who support people with disabilities and their families such as The Cram Foundation and Interchange Illawarra, as well as through creative institutions such as The Wollongong Conservatorium of Music who provide music therapy for people of ‘all-abilities. Blue Rose offers everyone that chance to understand the experience of people with all-abilities, for example, people who might be diagnosed with autism, or intellectual disabilities. says Susan Wallis, President of Interchange Illawarra and mother of another of the Blue Rose stars Along the way the team have made some video material with people who do use verbal language and some of these more linear films are also featured in the installation and have been viewed in a variety of settings. One of these One of the Team was nominated for an Australian Online Video award in 2017.

89

ILLAWARRA


Highlights • 2017 was a little quiet for Blue Rose as we concentrated our efforts on Protection.

80%

80%

• We completed filming ‘Chef Rachael’ • ‘One of the team’ was nominated for an award and we sponsored Reece’s parents to attend the awards night.

87%

Creative team Team; Toby Knyvett, Gemma Parsons, Phillip Crawford, Leland Kean (Merrigong Theatre Company), Shaniece Igano, Daniel de Filippo, Tessa Parsons, Lakia Iagno, Taylor Mason

How well has BE reached audiences, built new audiences and provided people with reqarding experiences of the arts?

Partnerships

How well has BE supported the development of great art and strengthened artistic and cultural practise?

Merrigong Theatre Company, The Cram Foundation, Interchange Illawarra, The Disability Trust, Wollongong Conservatorium of Music, Wollongong City Council, Ability Links.

80%

How well does the art activate a process of community transformation?

90

How relevant is BE to the times we live in and the pople we live with?

60%

53%

73%

How well does the art enable people to move from particularized thinking to a connection with the group?

How well does the art reconnect people and community that are fragmented and dislocated?

How well does the art enable us to reach depths otherwise impossible?


Feedback Having the opportunity to be involved in this project where we were able to raise awareness of what is possible and the importance of community for our son Reece diagnosed with an Intellectual disability and Autism, really shone through with the online video ‘One of the Team’. For my husband Craig and I to be sponsored to attend the Online Video Awards night was an amazing experience we will never forget. To see our son up on the big screen and for the video and its message to be in a forum where it was valued, meant a lot to us being shortlisted into the finals, ‘absolutely fantastic’. It was such a positive experience and even though the video wasn’t a winner at the OVA it was for us and still is as the video is continually used to show what is possible with persistence, commitment, involvement, inclusion and wonderful spirit of all involved. Thank you Phil and Beyond Empathy team, it really was so wonderful to be involved and it still supports us today in spreading the inclusive message of the importance of community & friendship!

91

ILLAWARRA


92


We might look different, we might play differently, we might not speak language the same way you do. But our experience of life is made up of humour as well as challenges, just like yours. If you take the time to see our stories we have many things to share that will inspire you with fundamental truths about the way we all interact with our world. Blue Rose

93


SEA OF BELLIES

everyone has a mum and birth story to share; birth is perennial and universal. Program lead Jo Davidson

94


Sea of Bellies is our longest running project beginning 13 years ago in Moree. We had another big year with the program expanding into new locations, and achieving two huge success stories in the trip to Canberra for the Moree Mubali women’s group and the production of four shot films. Both featured in our highlights of the year section of this report. It is an innovative health intervention strategy. It uses creative art processes as a bridging tool to connect young First Nations women (14- 24) to local Aboriginal midwifery services and generalist health services. Importantly the program also enables the development of informal Aboriginal mothers’ groups to support social connection and health outcomes for young mothers and their unborn and new born babies (0- 9 weeks). The women enter the program to make and decorate plaster casts of their pregnant belly, feet and hands and are registered in the local antenatal health program. Sea of Bellies encourages women to celebrate their pregnancy and motherhood by building a caring relationship through the very personal and creative experience of casting their pregnant belly and then, once the trusting bond is forged, the antenatal health care is provided. Each week ‘arts workshops’ are offered by the local midwifery team at a venue in the local community such as the local hospital. The midwives make plaster casts of the young women’s pregnant bellies. The young women turn up to work on their belly cast, they paint them with the invited Elders and local artists depicting stories of family, connection and birthing. Once complete, they help other young women make their belly casts. Other health workers are also invited and whilst the women are working on the creative activities, the health workers perform health checks, provide healthy food, undertake screenings and provide information and support. The young women learn about the birthing process and what to expect.

95

NATIONAL


Creative Process Empowering and skilling up local artists, health and community workers in arts related practices, community development, stakeholder and relationship support is central the program. Maintaining a focus on exhibiting bellies for local audiences has driven creative outputs and the ongoing development of stories that communicate beyond those who made the works. Although the health outcomes are exciting, the quality of the bellies and stories held within them, painted by local artists is the heart of the program and is what the young women value most.

96


2017 Highlights •T  he program is now 13 years old beginning in Moree where Mubali continues to grow in strength, employing 4 Kamilaroi women, with participants and health workers now fully aware of its effectiveness and enjoyable atmosphere. •T  he filming of short documentaries in Brisbane, the Mid North Coast (MNC), Forster and Moree was concluded and Forster and MNC launched onto our website seaofbellies.org.au. • The development of a partnership with Birthing in Our Community, alongside IUIH and ANFPP in Brisbane has resulted in local Aboriginal artist Ida Savage creating a small social enterprise of belly casting. Ida came through Sea of Bellies training as did Missy Knox, a Logan based artist who also started a small belly casting business in 2015. • MNC local artist Valerie Quinlin joined BE in 2005 and has transitioned from participant to leading her own belly casting program. Over 2017, Valerie worked with over 25 Mums pouring, casting and sculpting bellies in Coffs Harbour and Nambucca Heads. • The MNC young mums attended smoking cessation workshops. 74% of the group accessed new health supports through relationships built in the creative workshops and of that group, just under 50% sustained new habits over a six-month period or longer. • Forster participants held a NAIDOC exhibition and film launch, including paintings by local Aboriginal artists of family stories. Local artist, Karen Fletcher developed the theme further in her work and held a solo exhibition at the Ceramic Break Gallery in Warialda. • The Forster mother’s group developed a social enterprise making, printing and dying baby clothes, witnessing the slow and respectful evolution of the Tobwabba women’s space. • Establishment of a new project in Lismore, named Binjil Dubais – meaning pregnant women in the local Bundjalung language. 15 casts have been poured and several hands and feet including 2 rare full bub sets of hands and feet. • In partnership with Lismore Regional Council local Aboriginal artist Caitlin Wilmot is employed to open and work in the studio one day per week, assisting the midwives, mothers and artists to prepare for a 2018 NAIDOC exhibition. • New relationships have been forged with Casino, Ballina and Cabbage Tree Island communities. 53% of young Mums attend the group regularly and of that number 37% are exploring the idea of a belly casting social enterprise, open to all young Mums in the Lismore community, to continue this project after Council support (studio and wages) ends midyear.

97

NATIONAL


art knows more about health than health knows about art Marianne Wobcke, Australian Nurse and Family Partnership Program (ANFPP)

77 total workshops

24

more than

200

health professionals attended workshops

pregnant Aboriginal women attended

an average of

3 Elders present at each workshop

106 bellies created

2 8

Aboriginal women employed

98

small businesses started in 2017


2017 Active Communities

Creative team

Moree

21 Midwives and Aboriginal Health Workers

Lismore

Artists; Ida Savage, Missy Knox, Caitlin Wilmot, Francene Edwards, Denise Buchanan, Annalise Wilson, Valerie Quinlin, Karen Fletcher, Raylene Avery, Skyela Gillon, Cindy Duncan, Paula Duncan, Val Pitt.

Program manager and visual artist; Jo Davidson

 id North Coast – Coffs Harbour, M Nambucca Heads, Tobwabba and Forster Sydney - Rozelle and Redfern Brisbane – Strathpine and Salisbury

65%

Partnerships

70%

The Institute for Urban Indigenous Health, Birthing in Our Communities Australian Nurse and Family Partnership Program The Mid North Coast Local Health District, Lismore Regional Council

75%

Lismore Regional Gallery Galambila Aboriginal Medical Health Service Macksville Hospital Aboriginal Health Service Tobwabba Aboriginal Medical Health Service Tobwabba Art Studio, Forster Local Aboriginal Land Council The Hunter New England Local Health District Kamilaroi Midwifery Service Kamilaroi Child and Family Health Moree Family Support Service

How well has BE reached audiences, built new audiences and provided people with reqarding experiences of the arts? How well has BE supported the development of great art and strengthened artistic and cultural practise? How relevant is BE to the times we live in and the pople we live with?

Gunawirra Rozelle Mudjin-gal Redfern

83%

How well does the art activate a process of community transformation?

70%

How well does the art enable people to move from particularized thinking to a connection with the group?

56%

83%

How well does the art reconnect people and community that are fragmented and dislocated?

How well does the art enable us to reach depths otherwise impossible?

99

NATIONAL


ARTISITIC VIBRANCY

100


101


Artistic Vibrancy is what happens during the process of creation, and as a result of the showing or viewing of the art created. Artistic Vibrancy is our goal, it is the coming together of many factors and it is visible and tangible in its outcomes. Our artists measure our vibrancy, they know when vibrancy happens, what it looks and feels like and they describe it in their feedback to us. The Australia Council for the Arts, the official arts funding body of the Australian Government asks us to measure our artistic vibrancy and we do so with enthusiasm because although on the one hand it is a requirement, it is also how we self-reflect on our efficacy, on how to improve our processes and performance, and how to gauge our impact. For the Australia Council; Artistic vibrancy includes artistic excellence, audience stimulation, innovation, development of artists and community relevance.

Kirk really wants us to let go of what we know, and go on a journey with him. Ryan Pearson, participant in Horses Mouth

102


Artistic Excellence The strength of the project lies in its inclusiveness and sharing nature. The greatness of the art comes with the caliber of artists and profundity of souls involved and their willingness to share skills, ideas and cultural knowledge. The situation is transformational and associates us all with life’s mysteries and depths, if participants are prepared to go there, through the art we can open the door. Jo Davidson Sea of Bellies

Audience Stimulation We are highly respected throughout the communities we work in both on the ground and via workers and professionals. The issues we speak of through the works we create are relevant to children and communities today. We will find out more about this as we tour the film‌ Phillip Crawford Protection

Innovation Nexus transformed the way people felt and engaged with the places they lived. Evidence of this is not one artwork has been touched and outsiders from those communities go to take photographs and engage with the locals. Local feedback is that they are proud of their home. We see and hear evidence of people wanting more.

103


The model we use to create an arts project, connecting an established artist/s with emerging artist/s and a group of community members; sometimes a new group coming together for the purpose of the project and sometimes an already established community group, has inherent benefits for the stimulation of artistic vibrancy.

104


What we heard in 2017 In our surveys our strongest results are in the four following areas; • How well the art activates a process of community transformation. • How well that art creates a third space – a new space – for people and community to identify the things they have in common. • How well the art enables us to reach depths otherwise impossible. • How relevant we are to the times we live in and the people we live with. The strength of these results demonstrates some of the core values that BE places the highest value on; • positive community outcomes, • supporting the creative process to reach new heights, • encouraging self-discovery and self-reflection; and • not only being relevant in the contemporary world but being at the cutting edge of what matters to communities and individuals. Based on 2017’s feedback some focus areas for 2018 are; teaching the audience about disrupting the creative process, supporting participants to develop stronger relationships with their families through art and learning about traditional culture and language during our projects. The outcomes of the Maven project are bringing about positive changes in many areas of our organisation including how we; support employees, maintain cultural integrity and authenticity, position and incorporate traditional knowledge and values, how we support developing artists and engage Elders, and how we structure our leadership team. 2018 will be a year of ‘disruption’, disrupting the creative process and how art is produced in a community setting, and disrupting our old ways of thinking and doing, to find new ways of being and operating.

105


106


I can only speak from my own experience and without hesitation I can say my vision and artistic ambitions were strongly supported by Beyond Empathy. Raphaela Rosella HOMEtruths

107


108


MAJOR ACHIEVEMENTS

109


From little things big things grow… Some pretty incredible outcomes can be achieved with arts projects. When we say our projects result in health, education, employment and economic development activities for the individuals and communities involved, we really mean it. Below are some examples of the kinds of activities that our projects have generated and we are so pleased to report these developments for 2017…

1

SEA OF BELLIES Invited and supported by a Phd student studying Belly Casting around the world, a busload of Mubali women from Moree travelled to Canberra for an exhibition at the Australian National University. There were three main events; the exhibition launch, a women’s yarning forum and a memory workshop. All the events received excellent feedback and were enjoyed by local Aboriginal women and health professionals. The women also attended the Seven Sisters Storylines exhibition at the National Museum in Canberra. Just a short note to say how wonderful I thought the talk and exhibition were yesterday. It was such an achievement to bring the Moree ladies to Canberra and well worth the effort. You facilitated the event superbly and the conversation was sensitive and insightful and beautifully teased out the ladies’ stories. CEO Families Australia.

2 110

Moree Moree is our heartland, in 2017 the NEXUS project was our stand out accomplishment in our hometown. The NEXUS project culminated in a film production that really captures the beauty of the project. The music for the film was produced at our MPD Studio. We can’t wait to see where NEXUS leads us next…


3

BE FILMS Four BE films were produced by professional filmmakers in 2017, for four different communities, participating in our Sea of Bellies program, with well-known musicians developing the soundtracks. Filming for the short documentaries in Brisbane, on the Mid North Coast, Forster and Moree was concluded and Forster and the MNC launched onto seaofbellies.org.au. All four films were produced by Anna Cater of Mitra FIlms. Anna Cater has over 20-years’ experience producing documentary style films and has been sharing her expertise with BE for over ten years. The films were edited by James Bradley of Nirvana Films. Bradley has worked in film and TV for 35 years, currently as a Writer, Producer & Director but previously as Editor of over 40 documentary films and series. Musicians; Emma Donovan, Bertie Blackman and two Gomeroi- Dunghutti- Anaiawan BE leaders; Leetonna Pitt and Nate Weatherall collaborated on the musical score for the films.
 An Emma Donovon lullaby was used in the MNC film. WATCH HERE

4

Moree Secondary College School program Visiting Aboriginal artists were invited into the school to speak with the Years 9 to 11 Aboriginal Studies classes. Bibi Barba, Cathy Craigie, Raphaela Rosella and Jen Whitton have attended the sessions. Bibi presented to Year 9 students about her copyright case and spoke about Indigenous Intellectual Property and Copyright Law. Cathy, Rosie and Jen spoke about the HOMEtruths project, Cathy told her story about developing her career as a writer and they did some writing activities with the students. The reflections produced, about women they admire, will be included in the HOMEtruths exhibition in December. Students, Student Learning Support Officers and trainee teachers all attended the sessions it was an opportunity for; the school to be connected with current and upcoming BE projects, young interested people to connect in to BE projects and for BE to spread its practice and principles to others in the community.

111


5

Illawarra When we decided to crowd fund for the tour of the newly completed PROTECTION we had no idea the response we would get. We raised over $32,000 with 90% of the funding coming from newcomers. This is a powerful testament to the relevance of the concept and quality of the production. The money will be used to pay for groups of the children to tour with the film, providing a question and answer format post screening. This will be really exciting for the kids as many of them don’t get the opportunity to travel and it will add so much value to the screening for the viewers to be able to talk to the kids.

6

RITES OF PASSAGE Since they completed their work on Rites of Passage in 2014, several of the young people involved in that project have worked on some enterprise-based video projects through their start up business, stART. They helped pitch their services to various local organisations who then commissioned them to make video productions. These included IRT, Wollongong City Council, Uniting Care and Illawarra Multicultural Women’s Health. They have produced 20 videos over three years. BE has supported them with equipment, mentoring and auspicing the project monies. One young person, Shaniece Igano, has proved so valuable, that BE has employed her full time to work on our Protection and Blue Rose projects. Another, Daniel de Filippo completed his University Degree in Digital Media and has moved to Vietnam where he is teaching English and video production at a University over there. Another of the Rites of Passage young people has recently been employed by Barnardos as a youth worker. BE is so proud of these young people and the opportunities they have taken and made the most of.

112


What’s Happening in 2018… Well we’ll keep doing all the things we’re good at; touring PROTECTION, exhibiting belly casts for SEA OF BELLIES, taking direction from the Moree community about their aspirations for the future of their community, sharing the NEXUS project with others… MAVEN – where will it lead us? Internally and externally. 2018 will be a big year for seeing what becomes of Maven. We’ll keep on exploring our mentoring and creative process models and see what eventuates within Horses Mouth and Yanaya as a result. And we’ll work with our newly appointed Creative Director, David Leha to establish robust and ethical cultural principles and practices across the organisation. DEFIANT – is our newest project under development. Based in Lismore on the far north coast of NSW over two years, DEFIANT aims to disrupt the cycles of negative behavior patterns that are so contagious amongst young people and can have such devastating outcomes. Especially in First Nations communities, where suicide rates are about two times the rate than in the non-Aboriginal population and increases up to four times in the 25-29 age group in males (Australian Department of Health). Planning has begun for how DEFIANT will be disruptive, risktaking and bold yet still be grounded in traditional cultural values, connecting young people with their Elders so they can reconnect with their heritage as a way of informing contemporary productions and artworks.

113


114


FINANCIALS

115


Beyond Empathy Limited ABN 22 114 367 814 (A company limited by guarantee) The directors of Beyond Empathy Limited (BE) present this report for the year ended 31 December 2017.

directors

measure to the development of protective behaviours in communities and individuals; 3. Quality community arts practice and its application to the needs of people whose lives have disruption and social isolation; and

report

4. Creating fantastic art.

directors The names of each person who has been a director during the year and to the date of this report are:

A B

A Buduls

Chairperson

4

4

K McConville

Director

4

4

V Skinner

Director

3

4

P Crawford

Director

4

4

A Green

Director

4

4

D Leha

Director

3

4

E Darin-Cooper

Director

4

4

A - Number of meetings attended B - Number of meetings held during the time the director held office during the year

long term objectives be’s long term objectives are to: • Unlock the cycles of disadvantage within our communities. • Innovative partnerships spanning government, business, philanthropy, and the arts. • Rigorous cultural development through artistic programming. • New audiences who engage with dynamic artistic product. • Construct more effective community arts and cultural development models for application across Australian communities.

strategies

company secretary

To achieve these objectives, be has adopted the following strategies:

Mr Tony Green held the position of Company Secretary at the end of the financial year.

• build internal leadership;

principal activities The principal activities of be throughout the year focused on raising the status of disadvantaged people by using community based art and cultural development practices. These programs achieved efficacious outcomes for both individuals and the community. The focus of the be strategy includes: 1. Investing in artistic leadership; 2. Dynamic artistic programs built in equal 116

• attract and retain quality staff;

• work in partnership with a range of community stakeholders as is evidenced by ongoing support of its projects and initiatives; • provide the best possible outcomes for young people requiring assistance; and • meet consistent standards of best practice.

performance Measures The charity measures its performance through both regular comparison of actual data to predetermined budgets. Regular reviews of project milestones are also conducted against committed deliverables.


information on directors anna buduls chairperson Anna has wide commercial experience and has also had deep involvement in the not for profit sector and in the development of welfare related policy for governments. For over 20 years she has been a professional non-executive director on a range of public, government and private company boards and she also owns a travel software company. Anna was appointed by the Minister for Human Services in late 2012 to conduct and independent review of the Centrepay system. She was also a Steering Group Member on the Federal Government White Paper on Homelessness (2008) and was a Review panel member Federal Government Jobseeker Compliance Penalty Regime (2010). She is currently also a member of the NSW Premier’s Council on Homelessness and has been on the Federal Government’s Social Inclusion Board. Anna is a philanthropist who gives to entities engaged with alleviating disadvantage, including her guiding and funding support and outreach programs for the homeless.

tony green public officer /director Tony is the Managing Director of several family companies that have developed and operated some of Sydney’s leading pubs: The Royal Hotel in Paddington, Greenwood Hotel in North Sydney, Clock Hotel in Surry Hills, Pontoon Bar at Darling Harbour and Merewether Surfhouse in Newcastle. For the last 16 years he has also been Managing Director of Andreasens Green Wholesale Nurseries, one of the largest wholesale nurseries in Australia, supplying native and exotic trees, shrubs and grasses to the building and landscaping industries generally and to projects such as The RAS Showground and Olympic Village at Newington, Fox Studios, The Conservatorium of Music and most of the major housing and commercial developments in and around Sydney. Tony has a Commerce/Law degree (majoring in Accounting) from the University of New South Wales and practised as a solicitor for Freehills in Sydney for nearly four years. He has worked with and supported many charitable organisations in recent years, but this is his first board appointment.

kim mcconville executive director Kim has been working with Aboriginal communities for 27 years and has used arts, culture and community development practices to influence change, increase health, wellbeing, education and learning outcomes for young people and their families experiencing recurring hardship. Kim worked for seven years with the award winning organization Big hART, before establishing BE in 2004 with long-time colleague and creative partner Phillip Crawford. Kim has extensive expertise in facilitating collaborative practices across divided and multiply disadvantaged communities, enabling divided groups and individuals to find new ways to work together. Her work is renowned for the ‘long haul’; staying with communities for ten years or longer. Kim has been awarded for her collaborative practices and forging new partnerships across Government, Corporate, Philanthropic and Community sectors.

phillip crawford director After several years of working in the community welfare sector, Phillip moved from Sydney to Melbourne to complete a Bachelor of Film and Television at the Victorian College of the Arts. His graduating film DENIAL won best short film at five national and international film festivals. In 1998 Phillip started working with BIG hART and over the following seven years he collaborated with communities all around Australia on various performance, installation and multi-media projects included in the programs of major arts Festivals: Adelaide, Melbourne and Ten Days on the Island in Tasmania. In 1999 Phillip won an AFI Award for his work on the BIG hART film project HURT, which screened on SBS television and was transformed into an installation work for the Australian Centre for the Moving Image. Phillip also won an award from the Film Critics Circle of Australia for HURT’s innovative combination of fiction and documentary, the Inaugural Justice Fellowship of the Arts from the NSW Law Foundation and Best Short Doco at Flickerfest. Phillip produced and was the overall creative director of ‘kNOT@Home”: an eight part TV series screened on SBS in 2006 and which was nominated for AFI and ATOM awards in Australia. In 2006, Phillip received an Australia Council Fellowship in Community Cultural Development, which enabled him to expand his work with a specific focus on the environment and conservation. Through this Fellowship he has coordinated the Lake Illawarra

117


MAP (Memory And Place) Project which utilised digital story telling techniques. He is the Director of the award winning film Rites of Passage.

david leha director Effortlessly crossing genres from soul to hip-hop and beyond, Radical Son is a standout vocalist and songwriter like no other. His often-poignant lyrics chart a course from Hopelessness to healing; mercilessly deconstructing what is, and forever imagining what could be. Radical Son’s music and stories are always guided by his Indigenous heritage from the Kamilaroi nation of Australia and the south pacific nation of Tonga. As a vocalist, Radical Son has a unique ability to deliver as a soul singer, rapper and spoken word artist. This natural dexterity defines his earned place and presence in the contemporary musical landscape. The back-bone of radical son’s stories continuously urge our human spirit to approach life through love and compassion.

este darin-cooper director Este is a consultant at Social Ventures Australia, a social purpose organisation that works with partners to improve the lives of people in need. In her role, Este helps business, government and philanthropists to be more effective funders, and social purpose organisations to be more effective at delivering services. Prior to her role at SVA, Este was a director of human rights strategy for the federal Government, where she advised the public, private and start-up sectors on data initiatives that included emerging technologies, big data and national security. Este spent several years working at major law firms in Australia, and was an Associate at the Federal Court to the former Justice Lindgren. She holds a Bachelor of Laws / Bachelor of Electrical Engineering (1st class hons) from the University of Melbourne. Este has been a long-standing supporter of the arts and is a passionate believer in the power of the arts to achieve social change. She is the founding director of the Darin Cooper Foundation, whose mission is to advance the Australian community through grants to arts organisations and education programmes. She is a member of Philanthropy Australia’s New Generation of Giving program,

118

and supports a range of arts companies to develop the careers of young Australian artists and engage with remote or disadvantaged communities. .

vivienne skinner director Vivienne is the Principle of Metropolis, a consulting firm working with the government and corporate sector in urban development, transport strategy, the arts and media. Until September 2013, she was speechwriter and senior adviser to the Deputy Prime Minister, Anthony Albanese. She was arts adviser to Premiers Nathan Rees and Bob Carr, and between 2006 and 2008 was communications manager for Regional Arts Australia. Vivienne has always believed that the arts can be used as a tool to improve the lives of marginalised young people. After growing up in the small NSW town of Cooma, Vivienne trained as a nurse before completing an arts degree at the Australian National University and beginning a career as a journalist. She worked as both a television and radio reporter with the ABC and was a newsreader with Channel 7 in Canberra. She has written for a variety of publications including the Sydney Morning Herald. Vivienne is a member of the Women’s Advisory Committee for The Big Issue and is a member of the Centennial Parklands Community Consultative Committee.

members’guarantee The company is limited by guarantee. In the event of the company being wound up, the constitution states that each member is required to contribute a maximum of $1 towards meeting any outstanding obligations of the company. At 31 December 2017 the collective liability of members was $10 (2015 – $10).

auditor’s independence Signed in accordance with a resolution of the directors Sydney, NSW, Dated: 14 March 2018


statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income

Note

12 months to 31/12/17

12 months to 30/6/2016

$

$

Revenue

Government grant funding

3(a)

606,000

692,995

Other tied project funding

3(a)

227,183

71,551

Untied donations

3(a)

704,931

1,234,632

Consultancy fees

3(a)

0

13,918

Interest

3(a)

14,006

23,074

Other income

3(b)

42,903

37,933

1,595,023

2,074,103

Administration expenses

170,613

220,324

Employment expenses

616,474

760,147

Project expenditure

791,495

1,106,741

Depreciation

14,685

22,288

Total revenue Expenditure

Net loss on disposal of assets

1,677

2,208

Total expenditure

1,594,944

2,074,103

Operating surplus / (deficit)

79

(40,736)

Other comprehensive income

-

-

Total comprehensive income / (deficit)

79

(40,736)

The statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income is to be read in conjunction with the attached notes.

119


statement of financial position

Assets Current assets Cash and cash equivalents Trade and other receivables Prepayments Total current assets Non-current assets Property, plant and equipment Total non-current assets Total assets Current Liabilities Trade & other payables Unspent project funds Income received in advance Employee benefits Borrowings Total current liabilities Non-current liabilities Employee benefits Borrowings Total non-current liabilities Total liabilities Net assets Equity General funds Total equity

Note

12 months to 31/12/2017 $

12 months to 30/6/2016 $

4 5

825,228 16,991 16,806 859,025

628,633 12,055 16,905 657,593

6

38,899 38,899 897,924

47,852 47,852 705,445

7 8 9 10 11

67,797 182,890 228,065 100,246 7,808 586,806

29,410 34,494 236,386 95,807 7,428 403,525

10 11

37,591 19,580 57,171 643,977 253,947

20,664 27,388 48,052 451,577 253,868

12

253,947 253,947

253,868 253,868

statement of changes in equity Note

General funds $

Balance at 1 July 2015

294,604

Surplus / (deficit) attributable to the entity

(40,736)

Total other comprehensive income for the year

-

Balance at 31 December 2016

12

253,868

Surplus / (deficit) attributable to the entity

79

Total other comprehensive income for the year

-

Balance at 31 December 2017

120

12

253,947


statement of cash flows Note

12 months to 31/12/2017

12 months to 31/12/2016

$

$

Grants received from Government

765,313

765,156

Tied project funding

288,044

25,022

Untied donations and sundry income

742,405

1,292,953

Interest received

14,006

23,074

Payments to suppliers, employees and project expenditure

(1,598,335)

(2,112,005)

Interest Paid

(1,677)

(3,131)

209,756

(8,931)

Payments for property, plant & equipment

(5,734)

(9,896)

Proceeds from sale of property, plant and equipment

-

2,000

Net cash used in investing activities

(5,734)

(7,896)

Cash flows from operating activities

Net cash provided by operating activities

13

Cash flows from investing activities

Cash flows from financing activities Proceeds from loan arrangement

-

-

Repayments of borrowings

(7,427)

(10,469)

Net cash used in financing activities

(7,427)

(10,469)

Net increase/(decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

196,595

(27,296)

Cash and cash equivalents at the beginning of the year

628,633

655,929

825,228

628,633

Cash and cash equivalents at the end of the financial year

4

121


notes to and forming part of the financial statements 1. corporate information The financial report of Beyond Empathy Limited (the “charity”) for the year ended 31 December 2017 was authorised for issue in accordance with a resolution of the directors on 14 March 2018. Beyond Empathy Limited is a registered charity under the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012 and a company limited by guarantee under the Corporations Act 2001. The nature of the operations and principal activities of the charity are described in the Directors’ Report.

2. summary of significant accounting policies (a) Basis of preparation Beyond Empathy Limited applies Australian Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements as set out in AASB 1053: Application of Tiers of Australian Accounting Standards and AASB 2010-2: Amendments to Australian Accounting Standards arising from Reduced Disclosure Requirements. The financial report is a general purpose financial report, which has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012, Corporations Act 2001, Australian Accounting Standards - Reduced Disclosure Requirements and other authoritative pronouncements of the Australian Accounting Standards Board. The charity is a non-for-profit entity for financial reporting purposes under Australian Accounting Standards. The financial report, except for the cash flow information, has been prepared on an accrual basis and is based on historical costs. The amounts presented in the financial statements have been rounded to the nearest dollar. The financial report is presented in Australian dollars.

122

(b) Significant accounting judgements, estimates and assumptions The preparation of financial statements requires management to make judgments, estimates and assumptions that affect the application of policies and reported amounts of assets, liabilities, income and expenses. The estimates and associated assumptions are based on historical experience and other various factors that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis of making the judgments. Actual results may differ from these estimates. The estimates and underlying assumptions are reviewed on an ongoing basis. Revisions to accounting estimates are recognised in the period in which the estimate is revised if the revision affects only that period, or in the period of the revision and future periods if the revision affects both current and future periods. The key estimates and assumptions that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to the carrying amounts of certain assets and liabilities within the next annual reporting period are:

impairment of assets The charity assesses the impairment at each reporting date by evaluating conditions specific to the charity that may lead to impairment of assets. Where an impairment trigger exits, the recoverable amount of the asset is determined. Value-in-use calculations performed in assessing recoverable amounts incorporate a number of key estimates. In assessing recoverable amount the directors have applied the specific sections of the standards applicable to not-for-profit entities in Australia. (c) Revenue recognition Revenue is recognised when the charity is legally entitled to the income and the amount can be quantified with reasonable accuracy. Revenues are recognised net of the amounts of goods and services tax (GST) payable to the Australian Taxation Office.

government grant funding Grants received on the condition that specified services are delivered, or conditions are fulfilled, are considered reciprocal. Such grants are initially recognised as a liability, and revenue is recognised as services are performed or conditions fulfilled. Revenue from non-reciprocal grants is recognised when received.


tied project funding

depreciation

Tied project funding received on the condition that specified milestones are delivered, or conditions are fulfilled, is considered reciprocal. Such funding is initially recognised as a liability, and revenue is recognised as services are performed or conditions fulfilled. Revenue from untied project funding is recognised when received.

Items of property, plant and equipment are depreciated over their useful lives to the charity commencing from the time the asset is held ready for use. Depreciation is calculated on a straight line basis over the expected useful economic lives of the assets as follows:

untied donations Untied donations are recognised as revenue when received.

interest Interest income is recognised as it accrues. (d) Expenditure All expenditure is accounted for on an accruals basis and has been classified under headings that aggregate all costs related to the category. Where costs cannot be directly attributed to a particular category they have been allocated to activities on a basis consistent with use of the resources. (e) Cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents in the statement of financial position comprises cash at bank and atcall short-term deposits with an original maturity of three months or less. For the purposes of the statement of cash flows, cash and cash equivalents consist of cash and cash equivalents as defined above, net of any outstanding bank overdrafts.

Class of fixed asset Motor vehicles Plant & equipment

Depreciation rate 20% 15-40%

The carrying values of plant and equipment are reviewed for impairment at each reporting date, with the recoverable amount being estimated when events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value may be impaired. The recoverable amount of plant and equipment is the higher of fair value less costs to sell and value in use. Depreciated replacement cost is used to determine value in use. Depreciated replacement cost is the current replacement cost of an item of plant and equipment less, where applicable, accumulated depreciation to date, calculated on the basis of such cost. (h) Trade creditors and other payables Trade payables and other payables represent liabilities for goods and services provided to the charity prior to the end of the financial year that are unpaid. These amounts are usually settled in 30 days. The notional amount of the creditors and payables is deemed to reflect fair value. (i) Unspent project funds

The liability for unspent project funds is the unutilised amounts of funding received on the Trade receivables, which comprise amounts due condition that specific milestones are delivered from the provision of services provided to customers, or conditions are fulfilled. It is anticipated that are recognised and carried at original invoice the milestones will be met and the conditions amount less any allowance for any uncollectable fulfilled within twelve months of balance amounts. date, accordingly the amounts have not been discounted. An allowance for doubtful debts is made when there is objective evidence that the charity will (j) Income received in advance not be able to collect the debts. Bad debts are The liability for income received in advance written off when identified. relates specifically to government grants and (g) Property, plant and equipment tied project funding received in the current financial year which relates to projects due Property, plant and equipment costing $1,000 to be commenced in the next financial year and above is capitalised. Items of Property, plant or milestones due for completion in the next and equipment are recorded with asset classes. Property, plant and equipment is stated at cost less financial year. (f) Trade and other receivables

accumulated depreciation and any accumulated impairment losses.

123


(k) Employee benefits

(l) Income tax

Short-term employee benefits

Beyond Empathy Limited is a charitable institution for the purposes of Australian taxation legislation and is therefore exempt from income tax. This exemption has been confirmed by the Australian Taxation Office. The charity holds deductible gift recipient status.

Provision is made for the charity’s obligation for short-term employee benefits. Short term employee benefits are benefits (other than termination benefits) that are expected to be settled wholly within 12 months after the end of the annual reporting date in which the employees render the related service, including wages, salaries and sick leave. These benefits are measured at the amounts expected to be paid when the liabilities are settled. Shortterm employee benefits are measured at the (undiscounted) amounts expected to be paid when the obligation is settled. The charity classifies annual leave entitlements as short-term employee benefits as it is the policy of the charity for all benefits to be settled wholly within 12 months after the end of the financial reporting period, due to all employees being required to take leave over the month of January. Provision is made for the charity’s annual leave obligations at the undiscounted amounts expected to be paid when the obligation is settled. The net change in annual leave obligations is recognised in the statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income under employee benefits expense. Benefits such as wages and salaries are recognised as part of current trade and other payables in the statement of financial position.

Other long-term employee benefits The charity classifies long service leave entitlements as other long-term employee benefits as they are not expected to be settled wholly within the 12 months after the end of the annual reporting date in which the employees render the related service. Provision is made for long service leave entitlements which are measured as the present value of the expected future payments to employees. Expected future payments incorporate anticipated future wage and salary levels, on costs and durations of service. The net change in long service leave obligations is recognised in the statement of profit or loss and other comprehensive income under employee benefits expense.

124

(m) Goods and services tax (GST) Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of GST except where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office, in which case it is recognised as part of the cost of acquisition of an asset or as part of an item of expense. Receivables and payables are recognised inclusive of GST. The net amount of GST recoverable from or payable to the Australian Taxation Office is included as part of receivables or payables. Cash flows are included in the statement of cash flows on a gross basis. The GST component of cash flows arising from investing and financing activities which is recoverable from or payable to the Australian Taxation Office is classified as operating cash flows.

change to reporting period Application was made to the ACNC (Australian Charities and Not-for-Profits Commission) to change Beyond Empathy Limited’s reporting period to a calendar year so that it aligned with that of major contributing Government Funding Agencies, both federal and state. On 7 October 2015 the ACNC approved the following reporting periods; 2014 – 1/7/2013 – 30/6/2014 2015 – 1/7/2014 – 30/6/2015 2016 – 1/7/2015 – 31/12/2016 (18 Months) 2017 and subsequent years – 1 January to 31 December


3. revenue, other income 12 months to 31/12/2017

18 months to 30/12/2016

$

$

Prior year unspent funds carried forward Add: Current year grants received

22,182

61,935

Arts NSW Australia Council (OZCO) – Key Producers Create NSW Australia Council – Public Outcomes Armidale Dumaresq Council

150,000 270,000 20,000 67,276 -

225,474 302,100 25,000 90,668 10,000

Dept Planning & Environment Dept of Family & Community Affairs Less: Unspent grants at end of reporting period

50,390 135,869 (109,717)

(22,182)

Government grants recognised

606,000

692,995

(a) Revenue Government grant funding

Tied project funding

Prior year unspent funds carried forward Add: Current year grants received Less: Unspent funding at end of reporting period Tied project funding recognised

12,312 288,044 (73,173)

12,213 71,650 (12,312)

227,183

71,551

Untied donations Consultancy fees Interest

704,931 14,006

1,234,632 13,918 23,074

Revenue

718,937

2,036,170

Other income Total other income

42,903 42,903

37,933 37,933

Total Revenue and Other Income

1,595,023

2,074,103

(b) Other income

4. cash and cash equivalents 2017

2016

$

$

Cash at bank

18,538

32,510

New England Mutual shares

10

10

Short term deposits

806,680

596,113

825,228

628,633

125


5. trade debtors

Staff and contractor advances

2017

2016

$

$

5,159

2,254

Other receivables

16,832

9,801

Provision for bad and doubtful debts

(5,000)

-

16,991

12,055

6. property, plant and equipment Motor vehicles

Plant and equipment

Total

At 1 January 2017

62,306

42,498

104,804

Additions

4,325

1,409

5,734

Cost or fair value

Disposals

-

-

-

At 31 December 2017

66,631

43,907

110,538

Accumulated depreciation at 1 January 2017

(27,986)

(28,966)

(56,952)

Disposals

-

-

-

Charge for the year

(10,889)

(3,798)

(14,687)

At 31 December 2017

(38,875)

(32,764)

(71,639)

Net carrying amount at 31 Dec 2017

27,756

11,143

38,899

Net carrying amount at 31 Dec 2016

34,320

13,532

47,852

7. trade creditors + other payables 2017

30/6/2016

$

$

Trade creditors

55,001

20,054

Accrued expenses

12,796

9,356

GST payable

-

-

-

-

67,797

29,410

Payroll liabilities

126


8. unspent project funding 2017

2016

$

$

Unspent government grants

109,717

22,182

Unspent tied project funding

73,173

12,312

182,890

34,494

9. income received in advance 2017

2016

$

$

Government grants

170,890

151,386

Tied project funding

57,175

85,000

228,065

226,155

10. employee benefits 2017

2016

Current

$

$

Annual leave

83,401

68,850

Long service leave

16,845

26,957

100,246

61,983

37,591

20,664

37,591

20,664

137,837

116,471

2017

2016

$

$

7,808

7,428

7,808

7,428

19,580

27,388

19,580

27,388

27,388

34,816

Non-current

Long service leave

11. borrowings

Current

Loan – Allira Holdings Pty Ltd (unsecured) Non-current

Loan - Allira Holdings Pty Ltd (unsecured)

127


A director-related entity of Mr Anthony Green, Allira Holdings Pty Ltd, made an unsecured loan of $55,000 to BE for the purchase of a new motor vehicle in 2013. The loan is unsecured and is repayable at a rate of $750 per month inclusive of 5% interest.

12. general funds (a) Movement in funds – 2017

General funds

At 1 Jan 2016

Income

Expenditure

At 31 Dec 2017

$

$

$

$

253,868

1,595,023

(1,594,944)

253,947

13. cash flow information Reconciliation of net surplus for the

year to net cash flows from operations: 12 months to 31/12/2017

18 months to 31/12/2016

$

$

Net surplus (loss) for the year

79

(40,736)

Depreciation of property, plant and equipment

14,685

22,288

Amortisation of leased vehicles

-

-

Profit/(loss) on sale of assets

-

208

Trade and other receivables

(4,935)

7,699

Prepayments

99

(8,734)

Trade creditors and other creditors

38,387

(2,098)

Income in advance/ unspent funds

140,075

(28,673)

Employee benefits

21,366

41,114

Net cash flow from operations

209,756

(8,932)

(Increase)/decrease in assets

Increase/(decrease) in liabilities

128


4. Contingent liabilities and capital commitments (a) Contingent liabilities To the best of the directors’ knowledge and belief there are no contingent liabilities at balance date. (b) Capital commitments There are no capital commitments at balance date. 15. Related party transactions (a) Director / key management personnel compensation For the 2017 reporting period, 2 Salaried Directors acting in key management positions received total remuneration of $258,760, 1 Director was paid $2,000 for cultural advice and 1 Director received $9,600 for rental of office space. (b) Transactions with director-related entities A company controlled by a Director has received an amount of $9,000 as repayment of loan. Transactions between related parties were made on normal terms and conditions, no more favourable than those available to others.

directors’ declaration In accordance with a resolution of the directors of Beyond Empathy Limited (the ‘Charity’), the directors declare that in their opinion: 1. The financial statements and notes: a) comply with the requirements of Division 60 of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012 and the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Regulation 2013; b) comply the requirements of the Corporations Act 2001; c) comply with Australian Accounting Standards – Reduced Disclosure Requirements; and d) give a true and fair view of the financial position of the charity as at 31 December 2017 and its performance for the year ending on that date. 2. There are reasonable grounds to believe that the charity will be able to pay all of its debts, and when they become due and payable. Signed on behalf of the directors:

Other than the above transactions, no director of the charity has, since the end of the previous financial year, received or become entitled to receive a benefit by reason of a contract made by the charity or a related entity with the director or with a firm of which the member is a director, or with an entity in which the director has a substantial financial interest 16. Economic dependency The charity is economically dependent upon ongoing funding from its Corporate Sponsors, Donors and Government funding bodies. Should this funding be withdrawn the charity may not be in a position to continue all of the projects currently in operation. 17. Additional charity information The registered office of the charity and its principal place of business is: Beyond Empathy Limited 24 Curtis Street ARMIDALE NSW 2350

129


SUpPORTERS Thank you to everyone who makes our projects possible.

philanthropic Funding

THE TONY FOUNDATION


G OV E R N M E N T F u n d i n g

I N D I V I D UA L D O N O R S Arun Abbey Nicole Angelone Roger Apte Darcey Becker Anna Buduls Chris Charles Patrick Couglhan Bryony Cox Este Darin Cooper Alexandra Garner-Marlin Glen Gooding Tony Green Leslie Green Mitch Jamieson Pauline Kanhalikam Graham MacKay

Kim McConville Barbara McConville Daniel Neurath Daryl Paull Anne Picone Ashleigh Scott Robin Simms Georgina Skinner Margot Skinner P M & V Skinner Samuel Skinner Thomas Skinner Elaine & Malcom Treadgold T Winley Andrew Zanetti


be.org.au

132

Profile for wendy kimpton

BE ANNUAL REPORT 17/18  

BE ANNUAL REPORT 17/18  

Advertisement