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What was relevant ten years ago may not be as relevant now, and what’s relevant now may not be relevant in ten years. Brands will always need to reinvent themselves and reconfigure themselves to appeal to the most amount of consumers at the given time. Olivier Sonnois

CEO, Brands Within Reach Nestle-owned Perrier’s been arguably the most daring of the group, updating itself across several verticals. The company’s 2011 introduction of a 250 mL slim can has been a huge success in North America, as has their production of limited-edition bottles and cans created in partnership with designers and wellknown artists. In 2013 Perrier celebrated its 150th birthday with a limited run of bottles featuring the art of Andy Warhol, and a year later the company debuted a collection in collaboration with three internationally known street artists. Perrier’s also innovated through the addition of new flavors into its portfolio, and in February the company launched ‘District Perrier’, an online digital content destination that features games to redeem rewards, in an effort to drive in-store engagement. “Introducing younger consumers to the brand is a key opportunity for Perrier, so a natural approach is through engaging digital activations as well as introducing new flavors that are popular among young consumers,” says Priya Shenoy, Group Marketing Manager of French Brands for Nestle Waters North America. Voss, currently the fastest growing premium bottled water brand in the United States, has drawn on the previous successes of its premium water forefathers.

54 MARCH 2015 BEVNET MAGAZINE

Like Evian before it, Voss has gotten itself into the hands of celebrities and trendsetters, framing itself as the new creme de la creme water brand synonymous with luxury. As Fiji did with its then-revolutionary square bottle, Voss’ novel cylindrical glass bottle broke the mold for bottled water packaging. It’s placed major emphasis on placement in the hotel and restaurant industry and has also inserted itself into the bubbly segment, making it the only super premium brand in the United States available in both still and sparkling varieties. Another element of keeping up with the times has been an increased focus from brands on becoming eco-friendly. Continued efforts have been made by environmental activists to portray bottled

brand, which, despite being a massive player globally with nearly $1.5 billion in annual sales, has limited exposure in the United States premium water marketplace. Volvic’s followed suit with the current trends of the industry, recently updating its bottle to accentuate the brand’s volcanic origins and reducing its usage of PET by over 30% over the last ten years. Still, BWR’s CEO Olivier Sonnois says it’s what’s inside the bottle that will ultimately prevail in pushing Volvic into the future. “We really believe the consumer is becoming more educated of the differences of waters and will be more discerning moving forward,” Sonnois says. “We’re seeing more of a selection criteria based on the water

water as the face of environmental waste, and while the scrutiny and pressure has impacted the industry on the whole, it’s hit imported premium brands particularly hard. Across the category, brands have responded with increased initiatives to be mindful of their carbon footprint, reducing the amount of plastic in their bottles, ensuring that their bottles are 100 percent recyclable and prominently displaying their involvement in charitable activities and sustainability programs. As the exclusive importer and distributor of Volvic, Brands Within Reach (BWR), a U.S. based sales and marketing firm is tasked with the job of increasing the North American presence of the Danone-owned

that’s in the bottle, which is why we’re using our new packaging to talk about what Volvic has naturally occurring in its water - magnesium, silica, electrolytes.” There will be no resting on their laurels anytime soon. Premium water’s elite will need to to be on top of their game in order to sustain growth in what is an increasingly competitive category that isn’t going to slow down anytime soon. “What was relevant ten years ago may not be as relevant now, and what’s relevant now may not be relevant in ten years,” Sonnois says. “Brands will always need to reinvent themselves and reconfigure themselves to appeal to the most amount of consumers at the given time.”

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BevNET Magazine March 2015  

The March 2015 issue of BevNET Magazine.

BevNET Magazine March 2015  

The March 2015 issue of BevNET Magazine.

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