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CONTENTS

F EAT U R E S

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12 BIG GUYS AIM SMALL

With craft brands thriving, large suppliers are buying up and empowering small distillers. 18 OLD ELK DISTILLERY Where strategic innovation meets craft. 32 NEXT GEN SHALL BE SERVED

Gen z'ers, millennials transform merchant realities & practices. 40 WINE LIST STEALTH

With a balance of brand power and obscurity, on-premise-only wines play an unsung but valuable role.

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44 BLOODY SAVORY

Led by the famous & flexible Mary, savory cocktails are here to stay.

P ROF I LE S 24 VALENTINE'S COCKTAILS

V-Day inspired cocktails are the perfect recipes to stir up some romance for bar guests.

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28 NEU&ICE

The new cava experience. 31 BEVSTRAT

Full sales & logistics solutions for your beverage business. 52 DON'T GET BOXED OUT

It's vital to play to your strengths and not challenge big box playbooks. 56 GEORGI VODKA

Georgi Vodka celebrates their 50th Anniversary. 60 PROWEIN 2018

The industry's biggest trade show continues to evolve and lead.

DE PA R TM E N TS 2 EDITOR'S WIRE 4 THE FIND 6 NEW PRODUCTS & PROMOTIONS 36 WINE BUZZ

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MAKE. EVERY DAY.

AMERICA’S FIRST QUADRUPLE DISTILLED AND TRIPLE FILTERED PREMIUM VODKA.

SKYY® Vodka distilled from grain. 40% alc./vol. (80 proof). ©2017 Campari America, San Francisco, CA. Please enjoy responsibly.

2017 BIN 63


VOLUME 83, ISSUE NUMBER 5 FOUNDED IN 1934 www.binmag.com Editor-In-Chief - Victoria Araceli Vann CEO & President - Michael Chu Publisher - David L. Page Marketing Director - Zachary Austin Design & Layout - Melanie Greenwood Marketing Coordinator - Brittney Unger Circulation Manager - Dora Park - Contributing Writers Jack Robertiello Juan Alvarez Kristen Wolfe Bieler Dale DeGroff Amanda Schuster Julie Harrington Giffin Faith Parker Miko Clark Wilfred Wong Jeffrey Lindenmuth Ed McCarthy Editorial, Production and Sales Office Headquartered at: Beverage Industry News 160 W. Foothill Parkway, Suite 105-95 Corona, CA 92882 951 272-4681 For Advertising: mchu@binmag.com Letters To The Editor: victoria@binmag.com

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PA I R S W I T H A L L Y OUR PAS S IO NS

A red for all seasons, and any reason. Say it with Siena. www.ferrari-carano.com 800.831.0381


F

the find

OFFBEAT OLD-WORLD MARASKA LIQUEURS GET FRESH BOOST Worldwide Libations is the new U.S. importer for the Croatian supplier Maraska, whose portfolio includes one of the country’s leading Slivovitz brands (SRP $24.99). Maraska also has Pelinkovac, a bitter liqueur based on wormwood, and, aptly, one of the original maraschino liqueurs made in the world, produced solely from the 100,000 marasca cherry trees owned by the company in Zadar, on Croatia’s Dalmation coast.

THE MACALLAN GOES TO THE DOGS? Marking the upcoming Chinese New Year—the Year of the Dog—which is set for February 16th, The Macallan has released a Chinese New Year Limited Edition gift box, containing two bottles of Macallan Double Cask 12 Years Old. Only 2,500 packs will be available in the U.S. SRP $130; 86 proof. themacallan.com

GLENFIDDICH STAYS BUSY WITH INNOVATIONS Christmas 2017 marked the 130th Anniversary of Glenfiddich. The distillery continues to innovate while honoring their long legacy, with two new expressions in their Experimental Series, crafted by Malt Master Brian Kinsman: u Glenfiddich Winter Storm (SRP $250) is the first-ever single malt Scotch to be finished in ice wine casks, imbuing a unique layer of sweetness and complexity. Packaged in a striking white ceramic bottle and embossed presentation box. u Glenfiddich Project XX (SRP $79.99) is the result of an unusual collaboration. Glenfiddich’s Kinsman invited 20 experts from 16 countries to explore and each select a cask from a warehouse in Dufftown. From the character of these casks, Kinsman created Project XX—a complex vatting of casks, from soft and fruity ex-bourbon to rich Port pipes and Sherry butts.

ST. PADDY’S DAY IS CALLING…. St. Patrick’s Day falls on a Saturday this year. Not ideal for bar operators who crave a mid-week boost. On the bright side, licensees both on- and off-premise have more Irish whiskey SKUs at their beck and call. For instance, Pernod Ricard has four offerings new since last St. Paddy’s:

Midleton Dair Ghaelach Bluebell Forest Edition (SRP $299.99) is finished in barrels made from Irish oak grown in the Bluebell Forest of Castle Blunden Estate in County Kilkenny, offering a true and unique flavor of Ireland.

4 BIN 2018

Green Spot Chateau Montelena (SRP $99.99) is the second in the Wine Geese series of Green Spot to be finished in unique wine casks; this one rested in French oak Zinfandel wine casks from Napa Valley’s Chateau Montelena.

Jameson Blender’s Dog (SRP $69.99), the second of three in The Whiskey Makers Series to launch in the U.S., focuses on the art of marrying whiskeys.

ST. PATRICK’S DAY 2018 IS ON: SAT MAR 17 TH

Jameson Caskmates IPA Edition (SRP $29.99), following on the heels of a Stout edition, continues to show the unique character of Jameson finished in barrels that had previously held beer.


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1. TABOR 2013 TANNAT, SHIFON VINEYARD

2. GLEN MORAY CLASSIC SHERRY CASK FINISH

3. DORDA SEA SALT CARAMEL LIQUEUR

Israeli wineries continue to merit attention by releasing interesting, adventurous wines; only a handful of Israeli Tannats are made. This first release from Tabor Winery comes from the Shifon vineyard, 950 meters above sea level in the Golan Heights. The 2013 Tabor is full-bodied, with excellent balance of red fruits (strawberries, currants, plums) and oak, plus notes of thyme and mint. Firm acidity and tannins suggest cellaring, or opening now with hearty food. Kosher but not Mevushal.

Glen Moray’s newest addition to their Classic Range, the Glen Moray Classic Sherry Cask Finish, spent six to seven years in ex-bourbon barrels and then was finished in Oloroso casks for 9-12 months. The malt marries profound Sherry flavors with Glen Moray’s legendary Speyside smoothness, notes Master Distiller Graham Coull. It displays aromas of dried fruit, cinnamon and toffee; and rich flavors of sweet vanilla, dark chocolate and oriental spice. 80 proof.

Chopin Vodka has expanded their Dorda liqueur line to include Dorda Sea Salt Caramel Liqueur in addition to Dorda Double Chocolate, crafted at the family-owned distillery in Krzesk, Poland, from caramel, premium sea salt and Chopin Rye Vodka. Highly versatile, Dorda Sea Salt Caramel Liqueur is recommended straight, chilled; in hot chocolate or coffee; in cocktails; or over ice cream. 36 proof.

SRP: $39.99 royalwine.com

4. HIGHLAND PARK ‘THE DARK’ Highland Park has launched their latest special edition, called “The Dark.” This 17-year-old single-malt matured in first-fill Sherry casks has deep flavors of dried fruits, nuts and spices overlaid with hints of smoky peat. The Dark is the first of two special editions—The Light arrives in spring 2018. Both editions share the story of the contrasting seasons of the whiskey’s Orkney islands home. 105.8 proof.

SRP: $300 highlandparkwhisky.com

6 BIN 2018

SRP: $29.99 glenmoray.com

5. IRON SIDE RESERVE PINOT NOIR Wine fron Iron Side Cellars—introduced in 2012 by Latitude Beverage, creators of the 90+ Cellars brand—is produced by the company rather than sourced. Brand new to the Iron Side portfolio, the Reserve Pinot Noir from Monterey is bold and fruit-forward, showing off black cherries and sweet spice in the ripe style that has been growing in popularity. The Pinot Noir joins a California Cabernet Sauvignon and Napa Valley Reserve Red Blend.

SRP: $24.99 ironsidecellars.com | latitudebeverage.com

SRP: $24 chopinvodka.com

6. ZIRKOVA ‘ONE’ & ‘TOGETHER’ VODKAS New from Ukraine, ultra-premium grain vodka brand Zirkova—distilled at the Zlatogor Distillery built by Tsar Nicolas II in 1896—has two distinct offerings. Zirkova One was created to be sipped straight, so that its viscosity, smoothness and mouthfeel can be savored. Zirkova Together was created for cocktails, to elevate the flavors with which it’s mixed. Ten percent of gross revenue goes to the non-profit We Are Together Org, supporting activism and social change.

SRP: $35 zirkovavodka.com


D E S I G N P R O V I D E D C O U R T E S Y O F Y O R K W A L L C O V E R I N G S , I N C . © W A V E R LY. P L E A S E E N J O Y R E S P O N S I B LY

WITH NEW USA IMPORTER, ROYAL DUTCH DISTILLERS

NOW AVAILABLE THROUGH SOUTHERN GLAZER’S WINE AND SPIRITS. CONTACT DISTRIBUTION@ROYALDISTILLERS.COM WITH INQUIRIES. CHERRY HEERING® LIQUEUR, 24% ALC./VOL., 48 PROOF. IMPORTED BY ROYAL DUTCH DISTILLERS, MIAMI FL© 2018.

Thirsty for more?

V I S I T W W W. H E E R I N G . C O M


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7. DONNA ROSA ‘RABARBARO’ LIQUEUR Washington D.C.-based distillery Don Ciccio & Figli is relaunching Donna Rosa Rabarbaro, a rhubarb liqueur in an aperitivo style. The striking new label alludes to the legend of a colony of witches on the Amalfi Coast. Donna Rosa is a bitter aperitivo based on an infusion of three types of rhubarb roots, honeysuckle, rose petals and 17 selected botanicals; aged in oak for 12 months, it is bottled at 40 proof.

SRP: $35.99 donciccioefigli.com

10. CONCANNON ‘CLONE 7’ CABERNET SAUVIGNON Spotlighting their legacy as pioneers in clonal selection, Concannon Vineyard has released the introductory vintage of a Clone Series with the 2014 Concannon “Clone 7” Cabernet Sauvignon from the Chalk Hill AVA of Sonoma County. Concannon clones 7, 8 and 11 account for an estimated 80% of all California Cabernet Sauvignon vines. The series will highlight these three Cabernet clones across various California appellations, starting with 7. Very limited.

SRP: $90 concannonvineyard.com

8 BIN 2018

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8. APOTHIC SPARKLING WINE First came Apothic Red; then white, and pink, and more reds. So why not sparkling? Introduced as a limited release and dubbed “Bubbles with Attitude,” Apothic Sparkling blends Pinot Noir (45%), Chardonnay (35%), Riesling (12%) and other varieties. The flavor profile include strawberry and white peach with a hint of vanilla. Fermentation at low to moderate temperatures helped preserve the fruit flavors and create expressive aromatics; stainless steel tanks preserved its brightness. Limited markets.

SRP: $16 apothic.com

11. AMARO DELL’ETNA M.S. Walker is introducing the U.S. to Amaro dell’Etna, a Sicilian digestif that has been produced near Mt. Etna in Italy for more than 100 years. Its recipe utilizes over 20 herbs and aromatic plants, including organic orange peel, licorice, cinnamon and vanilla. Amaro dell’Etna’s flavor profile exhibits bitter citrus as well as rhubarb and licorice. Meant to be served as an easy-to-sip digestif or as the base for cocktails. 58 proof.

SRP: $39.99/1L mswalker.com

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9. SHACKLETON BLENDED MALT SCOTCH WHISKY Whyte & Mackay’s new Shackleton Blended Malt Scotch Whisky aims to capture the spirit of the original whisky taken by British explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton on his 1907 Antarctic expedition. Using intact bottles recovered from under the ice, Master Blender Richard Paterson created Shackleton Blended Malt Scotch Whisky. This blend of Highland single malts yields a richer profile than traditional blended Scotch; it is robust with notes of vanilla, honey, ginger, licorice and a touch of smoke. 80 proof.

SRP: $35 theshackletonwhisky.com

12. CANTINE SETTESOLI SICILIAN WINES Palm Bay International is launching a new range from Cantine Settesoli—a community of over 2,000 growers crafting wines on Sicily’s Mediterranean coast for generations. The range is 100% estate-sourced and bottled; line priced at $11.99. The Cantine Settesoli line comprises both indigenous and international varieties, including Grillo, Nero d’Avola, Pinot Grigio and a Red Blend. The packaging’s bold sun image, map of Sicily and quotes from individual growers reinforce the wines’ story.

SRP: $11.99 palmbay.com


CONVENTION HIGHLIGHTS • Dynamic General Session Speakers • U.S. Beverage Alcohol Forum (USBAF) • Brand Battle • 2 Exhibit Halls • Over 400 Suppliers • Increased Media Presence: Trade and Lifestyle Outlets

75TH ANNUAL CONVENTION & EXPOSITION April 30 - May 3, 2018 | Caesars Palace Las Vegas

• 80 Lower Level Hospitality Suites • 120 Traditional Hospitality Suites • Sessions on Industry Hot Topics • Don’t miss our Competitions!

Celebrating 75 years as the premier industry event connecting America’s distributors with suppliers, importers and exporters! Register as a wholesaler or distributor to find new brands, brand extensions, cutting-edge products and services and to take part in sessions on industry hot topics. Participate as an exhibitor to network with industry decision makers and innovators and to gain exposure for your existing or new brands, products or services. If you are seeking initial or expanded distribution in the United States, the WSWA 75th Annual Convention & Exposition is where you need to be.

REGISTRATION IS OPEN

For information on exhibits and suites, registration fees, sponsorship, and the most current Schedule of Events visit wswaconvention.org For sponsorship inquiries please contact Cindy Nachman-Senders, Cindy@wswa.org

For more information go to:

WSWACONVENTION.ORG 10 BIN 2018

Wine & Spirits Tasting Competition Tuesday, May 1, 2018 | 10:30 am - 5:00 pm

Call for Cocktails Mixology Competition Wednesday, May 2, 2018 | 10:00 am - 12:00 pm

Wholesaler IronMixologist Competition Wednesday, May 2, 2018 | 1:30 pm - 4:00 pm


BA R

N IO

SPIRITS COM ESS PE SIN TI T BU

2015 GO

LD WIN NER


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Catoctin Creek, one of two small distillers acquired by Constellation in the past two years, was founded in 2009 as the first legal distillery in Loudoun County, Virginia, since Prohibition. / Tuthilltown Spirits was among the first American craft operations to join forces with a large firm; William Grant & Sons took over in 2010 and bought it outright in 2017. / Barrel-sampling at Westland in Seattle, known for championing American single malts; they have also developed a Native Oak series of limited editions. / Hand-blending at Angel’s Envy, founded by father and son Lincoln and Wes Henderson and now part of Bacardi’s portfolio. / Stranahan’s, based in Denver, has thrived under ownership by Proximo Spirits since 2010, expanding production as well as leading the national effort to establish American single malt whiskey as a category.

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erhaps large spirit companies learned a lesson from how slowly major brewers responded to the growing interest in craft beer, but whatever the case, they have shown an increasing willingness to swoop in and grab small distillers who show promise.

The handful of deals rung up in the past year or so are surely not the last, but they are worth noting: in fall of 2016, Constellation Brands October picked up acclaimed Utah-based High West Distillery for $160 million, and followed up in January with minority investments in whiskey producers Catoctin Creek Distilling Company and Bardstown Bourbon Company. In December 2016, Rémy Cointreau took on Seattle-based Westland Distillery; that month also saw West Virginia’s Smooth

Ambler, maker of Old Scout Bourbon and Greenbrier Gin, enter the Pernod Ricard fold. In fact, Pernod Ricard had kicked off 2016 by acquiring a majority interest in small batch German gin Monkey 47. William Grant & Sons arguably was ahead of the curve, taking over New York State’s Hudson Whiskey line from maker Tuthilltown Spirits in 2010, before last year buying the entirety of the producer’s enterprise. Proximo Spirits also got in the craft-owning game early; they bought

WITH ‘CRAFT’ BRANDS THRIVING, LARGE SUPPLIERS ARE BUYING UP— AND EMPOWERING— SMALL DISTILLERS BY JACK ROBERTIELLO

Stranahan’s Colorado Whiskey that year as well. And Bacardi similarly grabbed Kentucky-based American whiskey maker Angel’s Envy in 2015. “Within our broader whiskey portfolio of Irish and Scotch, it made sense to enter into the original partnership to give us a foothold in the American whiskey market,” says Andy Nash, Vice President Marketing for William Grant. “We have a great reputation especially in bars for

ABOVE LEFT: Local peat contributes character to Westland’s “Peated” bottling; the Seattle-based distiller was bought by Rémy Cointreau at the end of 2016. / RIGHT: One of the big hurdles for small producers is sheer capacity; that’s no longer an issue at Tuthilltown, where brand new barrels await their turn holding Hudson Whiskey.


building our own brands, and there’s a lot we can do with super-premium bourbon. Many of these small distillers are one-man bands having to do everything from fermenting the mash to getting distribution, and we have sales and marketing, and distributor partners, and know-how in building brands over a long period.”

MEET THE NEW BRAND... SAME AS THE OLD? For most of these small distillers, the effects of the entrance to the big time have been slow and steady, with the results mostly visible inside their walls. But shifts did take almost immediate effect.

14 BIN 2018

CLOCKWISE FROM ABOVE: Stranahan’s has a cultlike following for its annual Snowflake limitededition; fans camp out and line up for a chance to buy two of the 1,400 bottles released the first weekend of December. / Smooth Ambler in West Virginia was bought by Pernod Ricard in 2016; they produce gin as well as whiskey. / Topping off at the Hudson Whiskey bottling line. / Stranahan’s signature packaging—with a tin cup atop each bottle—helps it stand out on retail shelves.

“There have been a ton of changes,” says Wes Henderson, co-founder with his late father Lincoln Henderson of Angel’s Envy. “The balance for a company like us is to be able to maintain our identity within a larger framework while being able to utilize what a larger company can provide for us—using the mothership to do the things that keep us from being what we should be.” Ironically, small distillers say they prize the freedom gained by being introduced to a company filled with experienced hands. “For us, what is most important is that it gave us back of the house support from a financial and legal perspective,” says John Little, CEO of Smooth Ambler. Handing over trademark protection, compliance with the TTB on labeling and other essential matters to PRUSA staff frees him to represent the brand to the trade and consumers. Of course, access to the Pernod distributor network provides a leap into being able to sell more product more efficiently. “But for me personally what it allowed us to do is basically to make and sell whiskey rather than have to spend so much time on every other detail,” says Little.

CLEARING THE ROUTE TO MARKET PRUSA’s Senior Vice President of New Brand Ventures Jeff Agdern says that’s exactly the focus for most craft distillers: production capacity and route to market. “What we’re trying to do is find a way that we can partner with brands like Smooth Ambler to enable them to continue to do the things they have proven to do well and then plug them into aspects of our sales and marketing division,” he says. To help with expansion of the production facility in West Virginia, the distilling team at PRUSA’s Canadian Hiram Walker facility were tapped, “on a consultant basis rather than a takeover basis. It’s accelerated the speed of learning for them,” Agdern says. And while recommendations that come from such teamwork may be mostly minor and internal, they contribute at the very least to consistency in production—an issue that has dogged many craft suppliers. Rémy Cointreau has taken a similar approach with Westland, says Mark Brenne, CEO of the distiller acquired as part of Rémy’s interest in international malt whiskey. “Rémy liked the vision the

STRANAHAN’S SNOWFLAKE PHOTOGRAPH BY ALDEN BONECUTTER

IRONICALLY, SMALL DISTILLERS SAY THEY PRIZE THE FREEDOM GAINED BY BEING INTRODUCED TO A COMPANY FILLED WITH EXPERIENCED HANDS.


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Westland team had for American single malt, but it’s going to take many years to get recognition. We’ve been trying to make sure the they can focus on making high quality products every day.” To do that, the distilling teams of Westland and Rémy’s Islay Scotch whisky maker Bruichladdich have been visiting each other’s facilities. Constellation has experience with smaller brands, many of them in need of the sort of hand-selling High West requires, says Constellation’s Vice President of Marketing Carl Evans: “With smaller brands, we tend to be very thoughtful about what that growth trajectory is going to look like and what parts of the market are going to be like for growth. The first thing we think about is not so much what’s going to change but what’s not going to change. We get involved because there is some magic there that we want to maintain or grow. ” Challenges like larger capacity for distillation and aging are simple enough to manage to help smaller brands hit certain levels of growth, but being thoughtful as the brands grow is important as well. “Scarcity is a real thing and can drive demand. If you’re thoughtful and let consumer demand drive where the allocations go, you can make smart decisions about allocation,” says Evans. For example, High West’s Midwinter’s Night Dram, released in November, sold out in certain markets within weeks; with Constellation’s aid, High

West can now monitor those accounts so they can adjust allocation for next year’s release.

MANAGING GROWTH Smooth Ambler’s Little cites help with long-term planning, especially PRUSA’s skills in forecasting, as giving him a clearer picture on what to expect to be able to bottle in the future. “It’s a complex spreadsheet program from analysts taking every product and every blend and proof and even evaporation into account, letting us know where we’ll be in five

“WE SOLD, BUT WE DIDN’T SELL OUT.” — WES HENDERSON, ANGEL’S ENVY

A common theme among craft operations bought by large firms: the freedom from day-to-day minutia, paperwork and marketing has allowed them and to concentrate on consistent quality in their products. ABOVE: Smooth Ambler and Catoctin Creek.

to ten years,” he explains. “We were shooting from the hip before, making whiskey as fast as we could. Now we know how much wheated or rye whiskey we can make and how much we’ll have in the time to sell it.” What gets lost sometimes in the initial headlines and reactions is the conjoined reality of acquirer and acquiree: both sides of the transaction are deeply invested in the brands’ reputations. “We have to make sure as we grow we don’t lose our sense of connection to the brand. That’s the thing I worry about the most,” says Little. “That’s a challenge: if your are selling ten times as much, how do you have that many interactions with your fans?” When he stopped selling two Old Scout iterations, it was rumored Pernod Ricard was the cause; in fact, the cause was low inventory. A balance is required, says Wes Henderson at Angel’s Envy: “They [Bacardi] are letting us continue to do what we’ve always done and be the company they acquired two years ago. We made strong assurances to our consumers that were were going to do the same, maybe become more efficient but not change what our brand identity was all about. We sold, but we didn’t sell out.” ■


OLD ELK SPIRITS WHERE STRATEGIC INNOVATION MEETS CRAFT By Amanda Schuster

What does the word “innovation� mean to you? For most, that word is associated with modern technological advances - new phones, new cars, new cooking gadgets, medical breakthroughs, faster ways to access information, or even how to order food on the internet. For entrepreneur Curt Richardson, his career in innovation technologies began with OtterBox, the company he founded in the 1990s that is best known for its industry leading protective phone cases. It turns out many of the same visionary sensibilities can be applied to starting up and marketing products from a craft distillery, which since 2013 he has set out to do with Old Elk Distillery - producers of Dry Town Gin, Nooku Bourbon Cream and Old Elk Blended Straight Bourbon Whiskey. 18 BIN 2018


From the outside, it may seem that the only similarity between Old Elk Distillery and Otter Products is that they are both based in Fort Collins, Colorado. However, speaking to Richardson is an eye-opening lesson in what can make products as timeless and common as gin or whiskey seem innovative. “In ways, there are many similarities in creating consumer products in different industries. So for me, we approach products that we’re making at Old Elk very similarly as Otter’s products – we focus on the consumer and developing premium brands,” he says. Technology trends move at breakneck pace. The moment a new phone comes to market, its upgrade is sometimes only a few months in the future. Explains Richardson, “The difference between Otter and Old Elk is Otter is like a gerbil wheel on steroids. The refreshing thing about spirits in a lot of ways is it takes time, and that time is appreciated.” The notion of “craft” when it comes to spirits has many associations. Old Elk aims to set itself apart by positioning their craft as one for experienced people who have honed their trade. Says Richardson, “We put as much time into the business and the brand, as we have with the actual

liquid, which I think is refreshing. I’m excited to see what the outcome of all that work, time and labor produces in the long run.”

"Our town is huge in the beer industry and has some great smaller distilleries, but for me, it wasn’t about jumping into either of these spaces. I wanted to do something new and innovative, and I wanted to do it on a whole other level." CRAFTWORKS IN FORT COLLINS But why open another Colorado distillery in the first place? Richardson identified certain unmet needs. “Our town is huge in the beer industry and has some great smaller distilleries, but for me, it wasn’t about jumping into either of these spaces. I wanted to do something new and innovative, and I wanted to do it on a whole other level.” That other level involves a measured amount of patience. “We did a lot of work for three years before

we ever came out with the products… We didn’t want to be marginal or short ourselves on time.” Of course, behind every great spirit is a great master distiller. Enter Greg Metze - a long time veteran of the storied Seagrams Distillery in Lawrenceburg, Indiana. He was initially brought in to consult on Old Elk Bourbon in 2014. However, he says “After working together, when I had heard that Old Elk was looking to expand into global markets and build a distillery, I expressed interest in joining their team. I joined Old Elk in June of 2016.” Since then, he has become a vital member of the company as well as a mentor to many of the people working at the distillery, a number of whom graduated from the local Colorado State University brewing program. “They put together a really fine team of smart, young, passionate, hardworking folks.” A big draw for Metze was the focus Old Elk has on building new and innovative products, building everything on integrity, values, and craftsmanship, and their experience in growing global brands.

OLD ELK BOURBON Can bourbon actually be innovative? Richardson is very confident that it


Curt Richardson, Founder

can be. “We’re really looking for those timeless products. When we thought of bourbon we thought, ‘Well how do we create a really good bourbon?” One of the ways this is achieved is that Old Elk Bourbon uses a high percentage of malted barley in its mash bill - 34%, which is four times more than traditional recipes. “We invested in a higher malted barley recipe to deliver a unique flavor profile which has a spice similar to a rye, but smooth characters from the malted barley,” Metze explains. “We were very intentional to use the minimal amount of corn, to allow for this larger quantity of malted barley. The high barley malt content adds almond notes and a sweet, smooth character, the rye adds a bit of spice, and the corn provides the robust bourbon foundation.” Time also plays a meaningful role, but in this bourbon it is not just in terms of barrel maturation, it also means a significantly longer proofing process than a typical bourbon. This slow cutting process requires repeat cuts and resting periods. Of course, the water used in the cuts also significantly affects the flavor profile, according to Metze: “Our slow cutting technique for our bourbon uses water sourced ultimately from the Rocky Mountains.” Along with Old Elk Distillery’s innovative approach to the production of bourbon, is their plan for used bourbon barrels. They have partnered with a local brewery which is utilizing used bourbon barrels to produce aged beer with a collaborative 20 BIN 2018

Luis Gonzalez, CEO

marketing approach. This downstream approach allows for the barrels to be used in a variety of ways and extends the opportunity for Old Elk to work with leading local and regional breweries.

NOOKU BOURBON CREAM Bourbon is also the key ingredient in Nooku - a Native American name for the white snowshoe hare - a nod to the surrounding Rockies. One might think a cream spirit is not reinventing the wheel, but according to Richardson, it is entirely new: “With Nooku, I don’t even look at it as a faddish thing. It is not technically categorized as a cream liqueur because we do not add any additional coloring, sugars or supplemental spirits.” He elaborates, “People look at it and are intrigued by the title ‘bourbon cream’, but initially think it’s just like a traditional liqueur. But it’s not. It’s totally different. It’s made completely differently. That’s the innovation side of the product… It’s new, but it’s very simple, the perfect balance of real bourbon and real cream.” The concept has clearly worked. It has won prestigious awards, including a gold medal in the 2017 New York International Spirits Competition in which all spirits are judged blind by category and price by industry buyers and bartenders. It has also won silver in the 2017 San Francisco World Spirits Competition.

DRY TOWN GIN Presenting new American whiskey products is enough of a challenge, but a spirit such as gin, which is made all over

the world, has to really set itself apart, including its name. Dry Town is a nod to Fort Collins’ own history - it had remained a dry town after Prohibition until 1969. Since so much new gin is associated with high end cocktail culture, the concept of Dry Town is one of accessibility and founded in freedom. “We want consumers to feel free to drink this in any setting, any way they want,” says Old Elk CEO Luis Gonzalez. That accessibility also comes through in its approachable, not overly junipery flavor profile. “Dry Town Gin is distilled with 10 botanicals through an 18-hour soak and vapor extraction process,” says Metze. “This technique and these botanicals [juniper, orris root, sage, orange, lime, angelica root, black pepper, ginger, lemongrass, and french verveine] were carefully selected to craft a gin that stands up in a Martini or in your favorite mixed cocktail.” Its fresh, easily quaffable flavors won Dry Town a double gold in the 2016 New York International Spirits Competition as well as Colorado Distillery of the Year and numerous other awards, including gold in the 2017 San Diego Spirits Festival. Why the three different brand names? “I would rather build a house of brands than a branded house. I think there’s more strength in that,” remarks Richardson. “At Old Elk Distillery, we are passionate about building premium brands and intentionally position each product to meet the needs of that spirit category,”


adds Gonzalez. “Each product in the Old Elk Distillery portfolio has a different development process, story, and character. We decided to structure the distillery as a House of Brands because it allows the spirit to showcase its’ unique identity and connect the liquid to the brand.” He explains how each product is distinct, but also how they work together as a brand representation, “Old Elk Bourbon, being the flagship product, represents the foundation of the distillery’s line of brown spirits. The innovation behind the liquid of Nooku Bourbon Cream inspired the brand and packaging design. Dry Town, being the only clear spirit, deserved its own identity which celebrates freedom and the goal of crafting a spirit that prevails over the traditional gin.” “You can have the greatest product in the world,” says Richardson, “but if people don’t know and connect with the brand, then it doesn’t bring a lot of value… Our philosophy is to do well with a few rather than come out with a whole bunch and not do it well. I think it’s a different philosophy than a lot of people take.” It’s also about quality association. Says Gonzalez, “At Old Elk Distillery we craft spirits with the goal to elevate the category landscape through innovation. Whether it’s the botanicals and vapor extraction process for Dry Town Gin, the way we cut our bourbon and the investment in higher barley content for Old Elk Bourbon, the ingredients that allow for Nooku to be simply real bourbon and real cream, or packaging innovations for each brand, we are consistently driving to bring innovation into all aspects of our product 22 BIN 2018

portfolio and business philosophy.”

HOW TO BE PRESENT IN A SATURATED INDUSTRY AND NOT BE WASHED OUT. Richardson shares another important association between producing and marketing electronics accessories to producing and marketing spirits: “A lot of our learning is from Otter. From a marketing standpoint we’re using a lot of that experience we’ve gained in the consumer electronics world. If we’re going to do innovative things it’s going to be how we go to market and how we sell our products out there and introduce them.” The key strategy is employing the right people to make the right connections between distributor and consumer. “At Otter we’ve always used a lot of brand ambassadors. We will hire people in the states we’re going into to be brand ambassadors and work alongside our distributors. We don’t want to cram a lot of product into the pipeline. People have pumped product into the marketplace and then don’t back up the distributor or customer and it gets lost in the numbers,” he maintains. “For us it really is about that true partnership with the distributor - partnering with the accounts, with the front line reps, and other strategic relationships that allow us to align with athletes, celebrities, artists, and those type of relationships - to help drive product, build a brand, make it so people just want to buy the product… The toughest part always is bringing the right people into your culture and making sure everyone is on the same page - talking to people, tastings, product placement, cocktail

menu creation, all of that. It takes time and it takes dedicated people who are dedicated to the brand and that’s what we’re looking for.” Having well made products available is only half the battle. “Servant leadership that drives a culture of accountability and integrity, allows us to do what is right for the customers while maintaining confidence throughout the organization and authenticity throughout the brands.” says Gonzalez. Repeat sales depend on a positive association with a brand’s overall character and account support. Gonzalez continues, “It’s a lot more than delivering a product, it’s about delivering an allinclusive strategy that elevates the brand and drives it through the marketplace for our customers. We know our partners have several brands to focus on, and the holistic plans we deliver are not only about a transaction, but centered around supporting the success of our retail and distribution partners.” Richardson draws a final association with Old Elk’s similarity to tech products: “For Otter space it’s the peg space velocity that lets us know how well the product is selling. Same will be for the spirits - how quickly the shelves are empty. For us that success will be that reorder rate. So we’ll work really hard to help our distributors and customers with that.”


Š 2018 Fetzer Vineyards, Hopland, Mendocino Co., CA

Discover these Fetzer stories and more at Fetzer50th.com #FetzerStories, #Fetzer50th


V

valentine’s cocktails

Setting the mood for Valentine’s Day can be easy with the right ingredients—from cherries to chocolate, these V-Day inspired cocktails are the perfect recipes to stir up some romance for date night or friends and bar guests.

A ruby red cocktail perfectly sets the tone for V-Day.

Pomegranate adds flavor and color to this sweet and fruity mix.

Ruffino’s Cupid’s Arrow

Cherry Sour Bourbon 2 oz Cherry Heering Liqueur 2 oz Bourbon 3 oz Fresh Lemon Juice 3 oz Simple Syrup Bitters Egg White

Method: Add all ingredients to a mixing glass and give a vigorous, dry shake. Add ice, and shake vigorously again. Fine strain into a lowball glass filled with fresh ice. Garnish with an orange wedge.

2 oz Ruffino Moscato d'Asti 1½ oz Pomegranate Juice 1 oz Dry Vermouth 1 oz Soda Water

Method: Combine ingredients and pour into a rocks glass with ice. Lightly stir. Garnish with pomegranate seeds and rosemary sprig.

Dessert Fizz Chocolate, strawberries, bubbles…check! This sparkling drink has all the ingredients for romance.

Svedka’s Choco Raspberry Freeze 2 oz Svedka Raspberry Vodka 2 scoops Chocolate Ice Cream 1 oz Heavy Cream 6-8 Raspberries Chocolate Shavings 1 tsp Vanilla Extract

Date night idea: a grown-up milkshake with two straws.

24 BIN 2018

Method: Combine all ingredients in a blender, and blend at high speed for 10-20 seconds. Pour into a glass and garnish with whipped cream, chocolate shavings and a raspberry.

1½ oz Van Gogh Dutch Chocolate Vodka, chilled 1 Strawberry, chopped Handful of Mint leaves 1 tsp Agave Nectar ¼ oz Fresh Lemon Juice 3 oz Sparkling Wine or Champagne, chilled Method: Muddle the strawberry and mint with the agave and lemon. Add Van Gogh Dutch Chocolate and strain into chilled Champagne flute. Top with the sparkling wine or Champagne. Garnish with a strawberry slice on rim.


2018 BIN 25


V

valentine’s cocktails

Casa Noble’s ‘Bae-cation’ 2 oz Casa Noble Crystal Tequila 1 oz Lime Juice 1 oz Grapefruit Juice ½ oz Agave Nectar Sparkling Water Grapefruit wedge

Method: Place Casa Noble, lime juice, grapefruit juice and agave nectar into shaker with ice. Shake until chilled. Strain into glass over ice (salt or lime-and-chili powder rim optional), top with sparkling water, and swirl. Garnish with grapefruit wedge.

Cool drinks are still hot—gin and roses add a twist to a pink classic.

Brockmans ‘Frosé’ ½ oz Brockmans Gin 1 oz Rose Liqueur Squeeze of Fresh Lemon Juice 3 oz Sweet Rosé Wine 2 small scoops Crushed Ice

Method: Combine all ingredients in a shaker with ice. Strain contents into a large stemmed wine glass filled with crushed ice. Garnish with sugared or fresh rose petals.

Turn up the heat with an agave and lime concoction to share with “Bae.”

Red Tempest Take a walk on the wild side with this “exotic” fruit mix.

1½ oz Crystal Head Vodka ½ oz Amaretto Liqueur 1 oz Fresh Orange Juice ½ oz Monin Wildberry Purée ¼ oz Monin Exotic Citrus Syrup 2 oz Soda Fresh Rosemary

Method: Combine first five ingredients in a shaker until wellmixed. Add ice and a sprig of rosemary to shaker. Shake well then strain into a cocktail glass with ice. Top with soda. Skewer blackberries onto a sprig of fresh rosemary for garnish.

26 BIN 2018

u Butterfly Pea Flower Tea 1½ oz Reyka Vodka 1 oz Fresh Lemon Juice ¾ oz Butterfly Pea Flower Tea Syrup Dry Champagne Method: Combine ingredients. Shake and strain into glass, then top with Champagne.

A pop of purple makes for a fun contrast on V-Day.


2018 BIN 27


NEU&ICE The New Cava Experience By Hector Silva

Neu&Ice sets the stage with the introduction of Neu&Ice Blanc and Rosé Cava, a premium new brand exclusively designed for drinking over ice and a refreshing new way to enjoy the authentic taste of Spain's sparkling wine style.

for 9 months, both sparkling Cava blends are elaborated with the traditional method known as méthode champenoise. With Neu&Ice, aficionados can now add ice to their Cava without any loss to the taste or body of the liquid.

Neu&Ice. With a rich history of growing grapes since the seventeenth century, the family of Oriol Rossell are experts in the production of both wine and Cava. Their award-winning products are widely recognized worldwide.

As Cava continues to gain traction throughout the United States, Neu&Ice is poised to change the way that consumers enjoy drinking sparkling wine by adding ice to their glasses. For most purists, drinking Cava or Champagne over ice would be considered blasphemy, however, on the fashionable European terraces in the heat of the Mediterranean sun, notable French Champagne producers noticed a new trend emerging, and one that strays far from tradition. Consumers were forgoing conventional drinking standards, and adding ice to their Cava and Champagne glasses to maintain freshness.

“Launching just in time for the 2018 WSWA Convention this spring, Neu&Ice allows you to easily turn any moment into a celebration,” said Ainhoa Bages, Brand Manager of Neu&Ice, GlobalCom. “We’ve taken Spain’s iconic sparkling wine style and made it even more refreshing. Neu&Ice is fresh, fun, bubbly and a great value."

GlobalCom, is a young and dynamic company with extensive international experience in the world of wines and spirits. Sisters, Tania and Ainhoa Bages, of GlobalCom, contributed to the creation of Neu&Ice, which is quickly gaining traction in the international beverage marketplace.

Taking note of this growing European trend, Neu&Ice was created as a new variety to quench the thirst of Cava lovers. Neu&Ice Blanc is made from a proprietary blend of Macabeo, Xarel-lo and Parallada grapes, while Neu&Ice Rosé is a special blend of Grenache and Pinot Noir. Aged 28 BIN 2018

Neu&Ice is the collaboration of two visionary companies, who partnered to create this cutting edge brand. With the great quality and experience provided by Oriol Rossell Winery and the innovative ideas provided by the Bages Medina sisters of GlobalCom, Neu&Ice went from concept to production and has received rave reviews from both trade and consumers. Oriol Rossell, is a family owned winery in Cal Cassanyes, Spain, that produces

Tania Bages, Sommelier of Neu&Ice, Globalcom, stated, “Creating Neu&Ice together with the great team of Oriol Rossell has been a fascinating experience. We have achieved a product of superior quality, with hypnotizing aromas and an exceptional flavor that is light, very refreshing, and with supreme elegance.” For further information, please contact RILO Import & Export INC at: riloimport1@hotmail.com or www.nopartywithoutwine.com


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N E G T X NE E B L L A SH

d E V R SE ORM ANSF R T S ES NIAL AC T I C ILLEN R M P , S & ’ER IES ROSS GEN Z NT REALIT COLN IN A L H ID C V MER BY DA

R

aised with cellphones and video games, too busy to visit the mall, and averse to buying the same brands their parents drink, Gen Z’ers and Millennials are challenging merchants to up their game and rethink how best to profit from these digital-savvy customers.

“Younger customers come into our stores and check this or that brand on their smart phone,” says Vince Trunzo, co-owner of Affiliated Consulting, which oversees marketing for a co-op of 350 Armanetti, Cardinal and Miska wine and liquor stores in Illinois. He adds, “They want a discovery wine or spirit they can tell their friends about—and post, too.” Simply put, we are entering a new demographic reality. Millennials—those born in the early 1980s—and Gen Z’ers— still younger consumers born in the mid-1990s—today comprise the biggest group of consumers in the U.S., having overtaken aging Baby Boomers in sheer numbers: Gen Z’ers and Millennials total more than 75-to-100 million consumers, 32 BIN 2018

according to research reported by the Wine Market Council. These legal-drinking-age (LDA) consumers pose a host of challenges and opportunities to independent on- and off-premise operators. Do you need to be a social media expert? What do they really like to drink? Which brands appeal to them? And where can an operator turn to for help?

see-saw signs David Jabour, President of Twin Liquors, an 80+-store group in Texas, observes, “Gen Z’ers and Millennials are not brand loyal compared to Baby Boomers and older customers. It’s difficult if you are a brand owner, because Gen Z and Millennials want to experiment.” On

the other hand, while not necessarily loyal, these consumers are still attracted to brands. “We focus on national brands, not private labels, in all our stores,” adds Jabour. “A brand with a story is critical. Younger consumers like authenticity.” “Younger consumers coming out of college are experimenting with all sorts of spirits and wines,” says David Churchill, owner of Churchill’s Wine & Spirits in Bridgehampton, NY. But he, too, sees some brands being warmly embraced: “Vodka is a blank canvas, and Tito’s is on fire, as it’s so easy to mix. Reds like Josh or Joel Gott, priced between $15-$20 are also popular with younger customers,


YOUTH SHALL

BE

SERVE

d

as are the 3-liter Bota Box varietals like Pinot Noir and Sauvignon Blanc.” Some retailers report success going the opposite direction from recognizable brands. In Williamsburg, Brooklyn, for Chris Bordeaux, Manager of Uva Wines & Spirits, it’s all about small producers, whether it is natural wines or local spirits. Echoing the famous quote from Field of Dreams, Bordeaux asserts: “If you carry natural wines, they will come.” Bordeaux says his younger customers are especially enthusiastic about so-called “orange” wines—made when white grapes are given extended maceration and skin contact, ranging in price from $14-$90, including Cantina Giardino for $30 a bottle. Bordeaux also sells a great deal of natural wine, with such wines’ minimal intervention providing extra appeal. It’s predominantly local in terms of spirits brands at Uva. Says Truzo of the Armanetti, Cardinal and Miska store group, “We see Millennials drinking more and more premium spirits and wines, so in all our social media communications we make sure that we call attention to premium discovery wines and spirits.”

”We focus on national brands, not private labels. A brand with a story is critical. young consumers like authenticity.“ —David Jabour, Twin Liquors

ning. Raymond C. “RC” Faigle, owner of the Orange Crate bar in Syracuse, NY, whose clientele is anchored by nearby Syracuse University, says, “Our customers, 50/50 men and women, may start off ordering Tito’s, Grey Goose, Bacardi or Patron at about $7-$9.50, but move later in the evening to our well brands, which are priced lower at $4.50 or $5.” George Seibel, owner of the Dark Horse Tavern in Cortland, NY, home to the Cortland State University of New York (SUNY Cortland), says he works closely with his son, Vincent, who is the establishment’s manager, to make sure selection and pricing are correct and appealing to his collegiate customers. Value in the Well Says Vincent Seibel, “From 21-22, it’s As if Millennials and Gen Z’ers were not all about beer from Bud Light at $4-$10 chameleonic enough in terms of branda pitcher; in spirits, it’s flavored vodka, a buying attitudes, it seems that on-premwell brand with cranberry, popular with ise these consumers are even apt to adjust both men and women, sells for $4.50 and their stripes over the course of an eveTito’s for $5.50 or $6, or Jim Beam Red Stag Black Cherry for $4.50 or $5, Obscurity which is popular with both women is appealing for younger LDA and men.” consumers at Uva Summing up, “It’s all about in Brooklyn. pricing, it’s all about well brands,” says Amber Hubbard, Bacardi On Premise Sales Manager, Western New York, Southern Glazer’s Wine & Spirits. At the same time, Hubbard adds, “Gen Z’ers and Millennials are increasingly gravitating to classic, premium pours like Bacardi, Patrón and Heaven Hill, so the opportunity for operators to upsell is always there.” n 34 BIN 2018

While Millennials have been tagged as less brand-loyal than Baby Boomers, some products, like Tito’s Vodka and Jim Beam’s Red Stag, have emerged as call brands.

1TI0Ps

FOR INDEPENDENT MERCHANTS AND OWNERS

➊ LEAVE YOUR COMFORT ZONE Bring In New Spirits/Wines

➋ FEATURE BRANDS

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➌ GO LOCAL

Search Out Home-Grown Products

➍ ADD NEW CATEGORIES

Natural Wines, Obscure Varietals

➎ BE SENSITIVE TO PRICING

Be Fair, Affordable & Offer Value

➏ HOST TASTINGS

Showcase Discovery Wines & Spirits

➐ REACH OUT AND TIE IN

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W

wine buzz

AS THE BLEND TURNS: MAJOR BRANDS DOUBLE DOWN ON ‘DARK’ The evolution of Red Blends continues.… As spinoffs within several major brands have demonstrated, consumers have shown that their taste for smooth, ultra-ripe and often a tad sweet red wine can extend willingly to expressions labeled “dark,” among other descriptors. Suppliers are now testing whether that rich, jammy recipe can be applied to varietal red wine as well, most notably Cabernet Sauvignon. Is the line between Varietal Red and Red Blend going to get blurry in a hurry?

Dark Horse, part of the E&J Gallo stable, is serving up Dark Horse Double Down California Dark Red Blend (SRP $9.99). Press materials for this “dark and luxurious” have winemaker Beth Liston asserting: “I went all-in, using rich, jammy wine like Petite Sirah and Zinfandel. I blended these with Teroldego and Tannat to add intensity, weight, and firm tannins.”

RED WINE MEETS WINTER SPICES IN NEW WINE COOLER Aiming to re-define and revive the wine cooler category, St. Mayhem Hückfest, a collaboration between Art+Farm Wine in Napa winemaker Andy Erickson, combines red wine with winter spices for a winterin-a-can cooler. Hückfest (13.1% ABV) starts as a blend of 49% Syrah, 35% Mourvedre and 16% Grenache from Amador County; and is then spiced with cloves, cinnamon, orange peel, almond extract, ginger, nutmeg and blueberries. The end product is not so much a breakthrough as a throwback to glögg, or mulled red wine. St. Mayhem offers the coolers in a variety of formats including 250ml cans (SRP $12 for two), 750ml bottles and 19.5l kegs. artfarmwine.com

Delicato Family Vineyards has extended the Gnarly Head line with 1924 Double Black. Technical notes for the “dark, dense” wine highlight “rich aromas of black cherry” and “smoky charred notes” followed by “concentrated” flavors of blackberry and currant, plus “structured tannins and a generous finish.” SRP $14.99.

Meanwhile, Ste. Michelle Wine Estates has introduced a Red Blend alongside the Intrinsic Cabernet Sauvignon, reiterating the brand’s technical calling card of super-extended maceration. Winery notes for the new blend trumpet “breaking all the rules” of winemaking: “With extended maceration of 9 months, winemaker Juan Muñoz-Oca took it a step further and aged Cabernet Franc grapes on Malbec skins and Malbec grapes on Cabernet Franc skins to create bold and memorable flavors with a complex punch in each sip.” SRP $22. The fact that these three nationwide suppliers are pushing their Red Blend franchises into new territory suggests that Americans’ penchant for ripeness still has plenty of ways to be satisfied.

36 BIN 2018

TRIPLE PLAY: GLUTEN-FREE, VEGAN & KOSHER COME TOGETHER Health consciousness in America never stands still; people are constantly seeking out cleaner, safer, healthier options in all sorts of products. In food and beverages, many consumers are leaning toward wines that are not using any animal products or gluten. (Celiac is now to be found in 1 in 10 people according to the Celiac Disease Foundation.) Expecting gluten-free and vegan wines to become increasingly popular, Worldwide Libations, LLC is now offering wines from Tres Buhis in Spain, as well as Pavolino from Veneto, that are gluten-free, vegan and Kosher, priced from $10 to $13.99 SRP. worldwidelibations.com


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INDUSTRY FOCUS

WINE LIST STEALTH WITH A BALANCE OF BRAND POWER AND OBSCURITY, ON-PREMISE-ONLY WINES PLAY AN UNSUNG BUT VALUABLE ROLE BY JEFF SIEGEL

T

he complaint from restaurants big and small is becoming all too common: They know. Diners, thanks to wine-searcher. com and smartphone apps, can check the retail price of the wines on restaurant lists with a couple keystrokes. They also know who else sells the wines and how common they are. In other words, two more reasons not to buy those wines. One solution, which has become increasingly popular over the past several years: wines sold primarily on-premise. With limited, if any, retail distribution, these restaurant-targeted wines, don’t have easily discernible prices—solving the wine apps dilemma and allowing for more flexible mark-ups. In this, they are becoming more and more important to beverage managers and restaurateurs in these days of declining

wine sales and lower customer traffic. It’s one more edge in the battle to increase the size of the guest check. These wines differ from traditional restaurant private labels because there’s

an actual winery behind them, and just not a name on a label—a difference that is crucial in appealing to today’s more savvy restaurant wine drinker. Most wine buyers will rarely have onpremise-only wines dominate their lists, says James Tidwell, a Master Sommelier and Beverage Director at Four Seasons Resort and Club in suburban Dallas. “Rather, they use them as a point of differentiation for the restaurant,” notes Tidwell. “Wineries might create a wine for a specific price point or outlet, have a second or third label that is offered on-premise only, have cases of a past vintage that is on offer in order to make way for a newer vintage, or any number of other reasons. These are only a few of many ways to find the wines.” These six points can help make onpremise-only wine work more effectively: 1. Find a producer who understands what you’re trying to do. “It’s a question of quality vs. quantity,” says Fabien Moreau, winemaker for Domaine Christian Moreau Père et Fils, a

James Tidwell 40 BIN 2018

One of these wines is not like the others... The Chablis Grand Cru “Les Clos” is a limited wine that Domaine Christian Moreau and importer Frederick Wildman & Sons steer on-premise.


INDUSTRY FOCUS

top Burgundy producer whose on-premise labels include a Grand Cru Chablis. “We are limited in our production capabilities so we cannot provide enough inventory to supply a large retail chain, nor all independents, nor the grocery channels. So this approach works well for us.” 2. All producers, though, aren’t created equal. The way to approach this, says Martin Sinkoff, the Director of Marketing for Frederick Wildman, is as “a fine wine channel that includes restaurants—but not all—and fine wine stores as opposed to a more ‘branded’ channel which would include chain restaurants and larger volume stores.” Does the producer you want to work with match the brand that you’ve established for your restaurant?

Jaboulet's “Nouvelère” Crozes-Hermitage is another wine that Frederick Wildman & Sons offers expressly to restaurants.

42 BIN 2018

These wines differ from traditional private labels because there’s a real winery behind them, not just not a made-up name.

3. Remember the big picture. Understand how on-premise wines fit within the confines of the three-tier system. Theoretically, all wines must be available to both on- and off-premise, but most distributors can work within three-tier to help you identify wines that aren’t readily available to retailers. 4. Know how you want these wines to fit onto your list. Is it for pricing? For uniqueness? For prestige? “Selling wine is hard work in all channels,” says Sinkoff. “Fine wine buyers have their criteria. But so do ‘branded’ wine buyers. The key as always is to know the customer and adapt the supply to the demand; the ‘offer’ to the ‘ask.’ … So too visibility, prestige, the ‘bell cow’ effect, that is, influence in the market, are also measures of success.” There isn’t necessarily a one-size-fitsall approach; rather, the on-premise wines that you add must work for your approach,

Wine storage doubles as part of the decor at the Four Seasons at Las Colinas, near Dallas.

and because one wine fits elsewhere doesn’t mean it will work for you. As Moreau notes in an obvious but instructive example, “It is rare that you would find our wines at an Italian restaurant.” 5. Name recognition matters. Restaurateurs, beverage managers and wholesalers can’t emphasize it enough: One of the reasons on-premise wines work as well as they do is that customers recognize the name of the winery, can find the website on their cell phones, and think of it as “real” producer. That they may have visited the winery and are buying a wine that isn’t available elsewhere adds to the wine’s appeal. This is much different than traditional private label, where the brand doesn’t have a physical presence and only exists as a name in an order book, and may make the consumer—who can’t find the producer on the Internet—wonder what’s going on. 6. So does pricing. Says Tidwell: “On-premise-only wines allow a restaurant to make a normal margin. Some might take a larger margin if the wine is of a quality that is beyond the cost (in other words, a great value), but others might take a smaller margin in order to attract guests to the more unfamiliar wines.” ■


2018 BIN 43


LED BY THE FAMOUS & FLEXIBLE ‘MARY’, SAVORY COCKTAILS ARE HERE TO STAY

here’s no lack of savory in cocktailing. Gin’s tang of juniper, vermouth’s herbal zip, Sherry’s nutty astringency—all were important to many original cocktail whistle wetters. Vermouth and gin together gave us the sublime Martini, the drink’s crisp pungency the pure definition of savory. But today, it’s the Bloody family—the Mary, the Caesar (made with clam broth) and the Bull (made with beef broth)—that are the mainstays on the savory menu, based largely on their ubiquitous brunch appeal. Lately though, bartenders with a culinary flair have introduced new sorts of savory into their flavor tool kit, broadening the trend both geographically and creatively. The Midwest has long been known as the unchallenged headquarters of groaning board Bloody Mary bars incorporating schooners of mixes, dozens of garnishes and

44 BIN 2018

enough appetizer add-ons to justify a big ticket. Said to be home of the world’s largest Bloody Mary bar is the Silver Grill Café in Fort Collins, CO, where 50 or so items including quail eggs and pickled cactus leaves are on display.

VARIATION SITUATION The Bloody model is ultra-flexible. Use aquavit, get a Danish Mary; use Scotch for a Highland Mary and Irish whiskey for a Bloody Molly. A Russian Mary is a shot of vodka, tomato juice and Tabasco. The Bloody Geisha calls for saké instead of vodka; the Bloody Maureen replaces vodka with Guinness. Similarly, savory cocktails work like canvasses for creativity.

LE BALSAMIQUE BY RYAN TANAKA / NIGHT VISION BY CAROLYN FONG

BY JACK ROBERTIELLO


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: At LA’s Le Petit Paris, Le Balsamique is based on vodka, but driven by strawberries and balsamic vinegar. At Cole’s, also in LA, Max Seaman revamped the Bloody Mary using top-quality tomatoes and a gaggle of garnishes. Night Vision, at Duke’s in Healdsburg, CA, features gin, carrot, caraway, lemon and dry vermouth. The Churchill Bloody Mary at Howells & Hood in Chicago comes in a 20-oz goblet.


SAVORY COCKTAILS

While not many operators take on this accessorized format, others seize opportunity to focus on Bloody presentation. Howells & Hood in Chicago serves the Churchill Bloody Mary in a 20-ounce goblet crowned with a skewer of pepper jack, grilled shrimp, cornichon, cherry tomato, cocktail onion and a Slim Jim, plus an Old Bay-seasoned rim. At Stoic & Genuine in Denver, an Alaskan crab leg is an $11 upgrade to their $10 “Best Bloody Mary,” which already comes with mini bottle of Tabasco, pickle ribbons, skewered lemon and lime wedges and two green olives.

BREAKFAST OF CHAMPIONS Riffs on the build-your-own motif are showing up as well. The Halifax at the W Hotel in Hoboken, NJ, recently launched a weekend brunch affair called “It’s About Bloody Time” with a DIY check-off menu that starts with a list of eight spirits and beers, two mixes, seven spices and sauces, plus 20 accessories including oysters, shrimp, bacon, salamiwrapped mozzarella, cornichons, pickled carrots and more. In Washington, DC, HalfSmoke offers The Breakfast of Shaw, a monster Bloody Mary topped with tater tots, French fries, mac-n-cheese bites, corn dogs, sliders, grilled chicken wings and celery. 46 BIN 2018

A ‘BLOODY’ BY ANY OTHER NAME? Although created in the 20th century, the Bloody Mary purportedly takes its name from Mary Tudor, aka Mary I, Queen of England (1553-1558), notorious for her literally “bloody” persecution of Protestants. Most drinks experts, including Gary Regan, trace the drink’s vodka and tomato juice foundation to Fernand “Pete” Petiot, a bartender at Harry’s NY Bar in Paris (no relation to Harry’s Bar in Venice), whose initial rendition was dubbed “Bucket of Blood.” Petiot was brought to NYC shortly after Repeal to work at the King Cole Bar in the St Regis Hotel. There, the name of the drink was changed to the Red Snapper for a while, and eventually the Bloody Mary. On the occasion of the cocktail’s 80th anniversary in 2014, historian John Mariani noted that it is not clear just when, when or how other bars around town began calling it the “Bloody Mary,” with reference to Queen Mary I. And to complicate matters, in a 1939 ad campaign for American-made Smirnoff Vodka, entertainer George Jessel claimed to have named the drink after a friend, Mary Geraghty.

From maximum to minimalist… At left, the $20 “The Breakfast of Shaw” at HalfSmoke in Washington, DC, basically comes with a meal as garnish. Above, “Tomato,” at The Pool Lounge in NYC, showcases the vegetable, enhanced with vodka, elderflower and lemon.

Elsewhere the Bloody is being rethought. At Cole’s in Los Angeles, Max Seaman just revamped theirs starting with quality tomatoes. “One of our goals was to get as much umami as possible, while moderating the sodium levels,” says Seaman. “We took a look at classic Worcestershire sauce and decided to “deconstruct” it by including many of its ingredients: anchovies, tamarind paste, garlic flakes, onion powder, miso paste and malt vinegar.” The drink is garnished with a chile-salt rim, celery stalk, pepper jack cheese, pickled egg, cucumber, carrot and green bean. A more subtle savory version can be found at LA’s Roku, where Charity Johnson created the Shochu Tomato. “It’s the epitome of a savory cocktail,” she says. “I always wanted to love Bloody Marys but they were too heavy for me. People can be a little afraid to try it at first but it is so simple and light.” In her version, fresh cherry tomatoes are muddled with basil leaves, and shaken with shochu, lemon juice and simple syrup.


SAVORY COCKTAILS

WHEN SUGAR IS LEFT OUT OF A DRINK’S SPOTLIGHT, THE FLAVOR COMBINATIONS EXPAND QUITE EASILY.

Tomatoes are already umami-rich but other savory ingredients are showing up lately. Tara Heffernon of Duke’s in Healdburg, CA, created a Pimm’s Cup variant using dried shiitake tea, shiitake tincture and yuzu oil; the drink’s popularity pushed it onto the regular menu. “Here we all tend to gravitate toward things that have an element of savory even if it isn’t strictly a savory cocktail, using a lot of savory ingredients to create something more harmonious,” she says. “For the fall into winter menu we all picked things like butternut squash, beets, mushrooms, salted cherry blossom, turmeric, all with a savory quality.”

COMPLEXITY TO BURN Does the Bloody Mary possess some special quality that has enabled it to evolve so dramatically? The iconic cocktail has had the honor of being analyzed by the American Chemical Society (ACS). Presenting a paper in 2011 at the 241st National Meeting & Exposition of the ACS, Neil C. Da Costa, Ph.D., declared

THE STALK THAT STIRS THE DRINK A celery stalk, often with leafy plumage, is the classic Bloody Mary garnish. While its vegetal status would seem to be especially copacetic as an ingredient, in fact the stalk adds more function than flavor. The practice reportedly originated in the 1960s at Butch McGuire’s Bar in Chicago; when an unnamed celebrity got a Bloody Mary but no swizzle stick, he grabbed a stalk of celery from the relish tray to stir his drink and history was made. 48 BIN 2018

the Bloody Mary “the world’s most complex cocktail,” explaining: “[F]rom the standpoint of flavor chemistry, you’ve got a blend of hundreds of flavor compounds that act on the taste senses. It covers almost the entire range of human taste sensations—sweet, salty, sour and umami or savory—but not bitter.” Indeed, when sugar is left out of a drink’s spotlight, the flavor combinations expand quite easily. A drink at Le Petite Paris in Los Angeles exemplifies how little tweaks can highlight a savory quality. Le Balsamique dashes balsamic vinegar into a mix of vodka, strawberries and lemon juice. And at Academia, just opened in Austin, Texas, the opening menu featured the Raw Dill (Linie Aquavit, Dolin Blanc Vermouth, St.Germain, saline, dill, salmon roe). Charity Johnson, who oversees cocktails for Innovative Dining Group’s various units of Roku, Sushi Roku and Boa Steakhouse employs such savories as macha and oolong teas, shishito peppers and sage. “Most of my cocktails will have an earthy or vegetal element to them,” she says. So many cocktails today lean toward citrus and sweet with perhaps some bitter, she says, but salty and savory can shift a drink’s flavors notably. Bar Manager and partner Tim Wiggins at Retreat Gastropub in St. Louis agrees. “The depth and different layers that savoriness can create, even a tiny pinch of kosher salt or pepper or coriander can really brighten a drink.” Coriander, sage, charred rosemary, carrot juice—even pumpernickel-infused Mt. Gay Rum—make their way onto his drink menu. Wiggins likes the way savory works with bitterness, balancing the astringency better than sweetness does. In one drink, Fresh Prints, he uses white miso with passion fruit pureé, white rum, pisco, grapefruit, lime and nutmeg. His best seller is the Wise Guy, made with gin, golden beet, pineapple, lemon, Mexican sparkling mineral water Topo Chico, burnt rosemary and pink peppercorn. With numerous vermouths, tangy aperitifs and ingredients including car-

SHOCHU TOMATO By Charity Johnson - Roku, Los Angeles, CA

2 oz Shochu ¾ oz Lemon Juice ½ oz Simple Syrup Cherry Tomatoes Basil Rim: Lemon + Salt & Pepper 1. In a shaking glass or tin, muddle 3 cherry tomatoes and 3 basil leaves thoroughly. 2. Add Shochu, lemon juice, simple syrup and ice. Shake well. 3. Rim the edge of your serving glass with a lemon wedge and salt and pepper. 4. Strain the mix over ice and garnish with cherry tomatoes and basil.

away, chamomile, turmeric and shiso brandy in the mise en place, Heffernon and co. at Duke’s are firmly in the savory camp. “Ninety percent of cocktails could use a little harmonizing through savory,” she says, adding that demand is growing stronger. “We get so many requests about savory—customers want something flavorful but not too sweet and get excited because it hasn’t been done that much, and they love to have something connected to food.” ■


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50 BIN 2018


Discover what all the hush is about.

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Redbreast 21 Year Old, winner of best in show at San Fransisco Spirits Competition 2016. 2018 BIN 51


R ETAIL MANAGEM ENT

DON’T GET BOXED OUT IT’S VITAL TO PLAY TO YOUR STRENGTHS AND NOT CHALLENGE ‘BIG BOX’ PLAYBOOKS BY ROGER MORRIS

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hen brothers David and Robert Trone launched a discount wine store in Delaware in 1991— the first of what has now grown into the Total Wine & More chain—a half-dozen or so of the leading independent retailers in Delaware and just across the border in Maryland reacted as though someone had just handed them the script of an apocalypse movie and the four horsemen were charging toward their stores. Faced with Total’s vast selection and discount prices, they all shared the same doomsday question: How can we survive? Yet today, almost 17 years after that first Total Wine opened, all of the major Delaware independents are still in business, having learned how to co-exist with the competition. What lessons have they and other small retailers across the country have learned? First and foremost: Don’t try to

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compete on the big boys’ turf. “I simply do not consider Total Wine or the stores around me competition,” says David Govatos, owner of Swigg in Wilmington. “They run their model and run it really well. We run ours, and I think we have done well.” But if smaller retailers cede large selection and low prices as business weapons, what survival techniques do they have left? There are several.

FIGHT DISCOUNTS WITH EXCLUSIVES

Jordane Andrieu, owner of Héritage Fine Wine in Beverly Hills, CA, is a realist— which also makes him an opportunist: “I can’t compete on discounts,” he says, “because I have higher rents and more services. I need more-comfortable

margins.” He is perpetually on the lookout for small-production bottlings, close-outs, brand new SKUs—wines that are not on the big box stores’ radar.

CUSTOMIZE YOUR SELECTIONS

“I’ve been in business since 2005, working at boutique shops in Chicago and other areas that have Binny’s, Beverage Depot and Whole Foods,” says Jill Pienta, Manager of Vine & Table in Indianapolis. “I’ve learned that I have to have a more interesting collection of wines.” The word “collection” is apt, because it implies a thought-out, personal selection of goods that might not be available elsewhere. Andrieu says, “I place myself in specific areas—French wines, which I know personally, as well as organic, bio and natural—which give me strong differentiation.”


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R ETAIL MANAGEMENT

HOUSEHOUSEHOUSE WINE WINE WINE

IGNORE WHAT YOU CAN’T CONTROL

If a nearby big box store is selling a bulk, private-label Pinot Grigio for $5.99, so be it. You can’t sell that same Pinot Grigio even if you wanted to. For customers looking for cheap refreshment, have something else on hand; and for Pinot Grigio, you can still offer a killer value. The chains’ house brands don’t threaten independents as much as they might wine producers in the same price range. Budget-priced private-labels are mostly likely to impact sales of branded wine peers in the big box store; when people shop on price, a dollar difference under $10 is powerful. KNOW YOUR WINES—AND BE SURE YOUR STAFF DOES TOO

Box-store retailers tend to concentrate staff training on specials offered by distributors as well as their own house brands, whereas successful small retailers and their staff have tasted most of their wines and have learned the attributes of each bottle and the back stories of each producer. This allows them to enter hand-sell conversations with customers who are trying to match their own tastes and price range with the store’s stock. “To me, a more-knowledgeable staff is fundamental to increasing sales,” Pienta says.

PROVIDE PERSONALIZED SERVICE

Many customers come into a shop needing something more than a bottle of

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IF SMALL RETAILERS BUILD A REPUTATION FOR EASY, PERSONALIZED SERVICE, A TRIP TO THE BIG BOX BECOMES MORE A BURDEN THAN A REWARD. wine: advice. They are seeking help on anything from what sparkling wine to serve at their daughter’s wedding reception to what goes well with each course of a dinner party. While some chain stores may offer the same service in theory, in practice it’s difficult to find the same gal or guy when the customer returns with a follow-up question. Personalized service also means being 100% gift-ready, including suggestions for multiple price points and contexts as well as gift-wrapping options. “I also like to add perceived value with by always having nice packaging for gifts,” Andrieu says.

LEVERAGE YOUR LOCATION

Convenience stores still thrive in neighborhoods where supermarkets exist just blocks away because many customers prefer lack of crowds, no hassles and quick in-and-out shopping. The same convenience factor can boost wine shops. If small retailers build a reputation for easy,

personalized service, a trip to the big box becomes more a burden than a reward. Additionally, small stores can create a congenial atmosphere that entices customers to drop in on their way home to see what’s new—and perhaps have a taste of it.

TASTING

PLAY ‘SMALL BALL’

“We have small, weekly tastings that encourage customers to just stop by, and monthly ones that are walkarounds,” Pienta says. She also works with nearby restaurants to co-sponsor wine dinners when visiting winemakers come to town. By their sheer size, chain retailers may deliberately avoid doing anything small, preferring to invest heavily in major promotions, aiming to hit home runs. Meanwhile, small shops can score with singles and doubles.

KEEP IN CONSTANT TOUCH

Once retailers make a personal connection with a customer, it’s important to keep in touch without overwhelming them. E-mailings about events and new inventory additions, Facebook and Twitter chatter and customer loyalty programs all work. At the same time, your customers may appreciate an option to receive your store emails regularly but less frequently.

Of course, there is no guarantee of success in any business. But many retailers have found that it’s not literally or figuratively the end of their world when the big chains move into nearby neighborhoods. n


9 GENERATIONS OF DISCOVERY

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CONGRATULATIONS TO GEORGI VODKA ON THEIR 50TH ANNIVERSARY In 1968, Martin Silver was working as a Sales Executive for his father’s company. Always on the lookout for new and innovative ways to grow, he developed an idea to create a new popular vodka. At that time, Russian vodka was the consumer choice, for this reason he wanted to name his brand after a province of Russia. He chose the (now former) Russian Province of “Georgia” dropping the “a” at the end, and Georgi Vodka was born! Georgi Vodka is a “4 Times Distilled” American vodka, proudly produced and bottled in the USA from day one. 50 years later, Georgi Vodka remains a leader in the popular priced vodka category. Few brands have been able to achieve success in the marketplace for 50 years! We attribute our success to always keeping our retail partners and the consumer as our top priority. Martin and the entire Silver family would like to thank you for your business and invite you to join us in celebrating our 50th Anniversary.

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2018 BIN 57


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CHOPIN IMPORTS SIGNS EXCLUSIVE AGREEMENT WITH EUROPA INTERNATIONAL PTY LTD.

Australian Bitters Co. joins Chopin Vodka, Clase Azul Tequila, Portobello Road Gin and Adirondack Whiskey

Chopin Imports Ltd. (CIL), the marketing and sales company created in 2010 to manage U.S. sales of Chopin Vodka and DORDA Liqueurs, has finalized a multiyear agency agreement with Europa International Pty Ltd., owner of Australian Bitters co. Under this agreement, CIL will manage national distribution and sales for Australian Bitters while Raj Beri, CEO of Europa International Pty Ltd., will focus on innovation, production, marketing and brand. This announcement follows Chopin Imports path to build a portfolio of hand crafted family owned brands. “We are very excited to expand the depth of the Chopin Imports portfolio by offering our valued distributor partners exclusive access to this hand-crafted Bitters imported from Australia,” comments Tad Dorda, Founder of Chopin Vodka. “Our companies share the same family-owned values and a passion for crafting one-of-a-kind products made from the best ingredients.” Dana Chandler, COO of Chopin Imports, adds, “Our success is tied directly to our team of industry professionals and the strength of national wholesale agreements such as Southern Glazers Wine & Spirits. We look forward to achieving the same success for Australian Bitters.” For more information regarding Australian Bitters or Chopin Imports Ltd. (CIL) please contact John Solomon, Jsolomon@Chopinvodka.com.

NEW SPIRIT IN TOWN: 3 KILOS VODKA GOLD 999.9 Award winning New York based spirits company, 3 Kilos Vodka, announces the launch of their Dutch, ultra-premium 3 KILOS VODKA GOLD 999.9 into California. The spirit is created and bottled entirely in Schiedam, Holland, where it is fermented and purified by the perfected centuries old five column distillation process. The raw high proof grain spirit is polished off by blending with exceptionally pure water treated through reverse osmosis pressurized technology in order to remove all traces of impurity. 3 KILOS VODKA GOLD 999.9 features a gentle palate with hints of grapefruit, vanilla and almond, followed by a crisp mineral finish. With a signature patented gold bullion shaped bottle (available in 750ml and 1L), 3 KILOS VODKA GOLD 999.9’s design inspiration embodies purity and strength, and represents America’s historic opening of the United States Bullion Depository at Fort Knox, in 1937.

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IMPORTED BY FREDERICK WILDMAN AND SONS, LTD., NEW YORK, NY


PROWEIN 2018

PROWEIN 2018 March 18th - 20th

PROWEIN: WINE’S GLOBAL STAGE THE INDUSTRY’S BIGGEST TRADE SHOW CONTINUES TO EVOLVE AND LEAD BY W. R. TISH

advance for 2018—like any good business, the trade fair keeps retooling. Most notably, when exit polling indicated that nearly half the trade visitors took an avid interest in craft products, management acted: “The result was a new concept for our special show ‘same but different,’” explains Marius Berlemann, Global Head Wine & Spirits and Director of ProWein. “Instead of presenting unusual approaches for producing and marketing wines as before, the special show is now dedicated exclusively to the craft theme.” Among other adjustments and new features in store for trade visitors at ProWein 2018: n All exhibitors from overseas will be accommodated in one large hall

THE WORLD’S NO.1: INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR FOR WINES AND SPIRITS

18-20 March 2018 Düsseldorf, Germany

9 10 10 11, 12 13, 14 15, 16 15 17 17 7.0 12 10 13 17 13 12 13 7.0

www.prowein.com

Overseas Spain Portugal France Germany Italy Europe Austria Greece same but different Spirits ProWein Forum I ProWein Forum II Tasting zone by MUNDUS VINI Organic Wines Champagne Lounge Packaging & Design fizzz Lounge

Messe Düsseldorf GmbH P.O. Box 10 10 06 _ 40001 Düsseldorf _ Germany Tel. + 49 (0)2 11/45 60-01 _ Fax + 49 (0)2 11/45 60-6 68

www.messe-duesseldorf.de

SHOW WITH A PLAN: The Messe Düsseldorf fairgrounds, designed expressly to house trade shows, is like a big campus. The interconnected halls help group exhibitors thematically, are easy to navigate and feature excellent ventilation and signage.

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n The Japanese government is creating a pavilion dedicated to Saké n Exhibitors from Greece will also be relocated alongside Austria

TASTE TEST: Tasting opportunities at ProWein range from self-guided tasting zones to regional seminars and specialized areas, including an expanded organic wine area and the Champagne Lounge.

BUILT FOR CHANGE Of course, such changes are possible because the facility is literally designed to morph. (ProWein is one of 20 shows put on in the Messe Düsseldorf facility every year.) Three years ago the show jumped from Halls 1-7 to 9-15. ProWein 2018 will occupy 9-17, plus Hall 7.0 for the “Craft” show-within-a-show. This modularity also helps visitors handle the scale; within each hall, the fact that exhibitors are grouped by theme or origin helps walking the show feel entirely manageable. The show’s March timing coincides with the northern hemisphere vintage releases—one reason so many producers choose to launch new products here.

n The organic wine area will be larger and more comprehensive, complemented by a matching catering concept and lecture area n And the “fizzz craft Lounge” will shift into Hall 7.0 to complement the “Craft” theme. Marius Berlemann, Global Head Wine & Spirits and Director of ProWein

PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF MESSE DÜSSELDORF

E

very March, for three days of ProWein, Düsseldorf becomes the epicenter of the wine world. The show’s fundamental strengths—central location, optimal calendar timing, trade-only focus and a superb facility and organization—have helped ProWein grow dramatically over two decades. Set this year from the 18th to 20th, ProWein expects to top 2017’s 58,000 trade visitors and 6,500+ exhibitors. But, even while attendees are certifiably happy—98% satisfaction was reported by visitors last year, and exhibition space sold out five months in


WHOLE WORLD, ONE PLACE: With 6,500+ exhibitors, all major wine nations and regions are represented at ProWein; there are also more than 400 spirits exhibitors from 30 countries and 500 ancillary events throughout the show.

AMERICAN INTERESTS

ProWein is truly an international stage; about 85% of exhibitors are from outside Germany, as are more than half the visitors. By policy, ProWein attendees are Even more so, suppliers know that this 100% trade; and with fewer distractions is THE place to get attention—from from nearby wine regions, the net importers and exporters, from buyers, result is a business-first atmosphere and and from 1,000 international journalists. especially qualified audience. Referring In short, ProWein is the wine industry’s to 2017’s exit polling, Marius Berlemann most vibrant and important global stage. says, “An especially positive note was the high percentage of executives: at A ROUNDED EXPERIENCE least two thirds of all visitors were Though wine remains the unabashed top decision-makers. They came to focus of the show, spirits representation Düsseldorf with clear intentions: almost has grown now to 400+ exhibitors— 60% of all trade visitors concluded their and are certain to play a key role in the business deals right at the trade fair and/ new “Craft” space. And while exhibitors or planned to do so right afterwards. form the backbone of the show, ancillary Furthermore, one in two visitors found tastings and seminars continue to new suppliers.” improve the ways visitors gain knowledge Show management is well aware that and interact. The full spectrum of American industry members operate unapproximately 500 events will range from der very different laws than other nations. region-based tasting seminars to multiBut U.S. participation has grown steadily origin presentations such as the selfover recent years—just like our wine inguided tasting zone devoted to winners of dustry—and remains very important. Prothe annual Mundus Vini judging. Wein’s research in 2017 determined that Other highlights will include the as many as 54% of producers already exworldwide unique Champagne Lounge port to the U.S. and 30% plan to do so in featuring 40 producers. This lounge the future. The U.S. now ranks in the top will be located in the center of the five among visitors from foreign counChampagne segment which will tries, representing 5% of foreign include 150 other brands. The Since its ProWein attendees. special “Packaging & Design” inception in 1994, “It is our goal to bring the number of ProWein show complements the wine even more U.S. buyers to exhibitors has grown ranges of ProWein, shining Düsseldorf,” says Berlemann. 15 times; its number of some light on the evervisitors 30 times; and the “Over the past few years, in important developments in occupied space particular, we have found 18 times. what’s ON the bottle. that ProWein is also becoming

For general information and tickets: prowein.com For details regarding exhibiting or visiting, contact Messe Düsseldorf North America: (312) 781-5180; email: info@mdna.com For hotel and travel information, contact TTI Travel: (866) 674-3476; email: info@ttitravel.net; traveltradeint.com

more and more important in the U.S. and has strongly gained in standing. We wish to further drive this development with high commitment.” Among their efforts: ProWein acted as a title sponsor for the this year’s TEXSOM conference, giving the show exposure to top members of the on-premise trade. Also, for U.S. buyers, importers and wholesalers coming to the show, “Route USA” signage guides U.S. visitors to those exhibitors exporting to the U.S. or planning to do so. Keenly monitoring feedback from both sides of the exhibition tables, ProWein continues to grow and evolve, solidifying its position as the global platform the wine industry deserves. n

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62 BIN 2018


KENNY CHESNEY’S CARIBBEAN CLASSICS START WITH

BLUE CHAIR BAY® RUM CREAMS 2018 BIN 63


90 POINTS

WINE ENTHUSIAST Drink responsibly


FIGENZA.COM PLEASE DRINK RESPONSIBLY. ©2016 Figenza. 31% alc./vol. Imported by Carriage House Imports Ltd., Springfield, NJ.


DRINK RESPONSIBLY www.disaronno.com #disaronnowearsmissoni

2017 BIN 57


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last call • Quai des Brumes By Ms. Franky Marshall Ingredients: ¾ oz Rosé Pineau des Charentes 1 oz Rye whiskey (40% ABV) ¼ oz Amaro 1 barspoon Amaro Sfumato

Strong Spirits Fortified wine gets heavy BY MEGHAN RILEY

W

ith spirit-forward cocktails making a comeback, bartenders are getting creative with their liquor lineups, with classic aperitifs like vermouth and Campari being traded out for stronger counterparts (especially in winter months). One such concoction comes from Ms. Franky Marshall, Bar Director at Le Boudoir in Brooklyn. Her “Quai des Brumes,” pairs Pineau des Charentes with whiskey and amaro. Pineau des Charentes, a fortified wine made with Cognac, adds “a touch of freshness and fruit” to an otherwise smoky and high-octane drink, according to Marshall. Wanting to experiment with the “underutilized” French aperitif, Marshall says her intent was to make a cocktail that was “brown spiritforward to show a combination that we haven’t seen that much of—yet.” When featuring a low-alcohol ingredient in a heady cocktail, however, it is important to consider the big picture: “You have to choose the other ingredients wisely so the unique character of the Pineau des Charentes does not get lost,” says Marshall. “It’s worth paying attention to the ABV and particular flavors of the other players.” ■

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Method: Add all ingredients to mixing glass. Stir with ice. Strain into rocks glass over ice. Garnish with a flamed orange disc.


     

     

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We serve outstanding Bloody Marys KELLY y GONZALEZ internationally famous Bloody Marys are served in the world’s top restaurants, hotels, race tracks and casinos from California, Las Vegas, to Florida, the Bahamas, the West Indies and other famous resorts around the world. Our specially formulated, delicious recipe was developed for the Bloody Mary drinker who is not satisfied with “ordinary Bloody Mary Mixes.” We’re the best — Check Us Out!

For FREE Samples, Call (714) 378-5149

L.A & Orange County Young’s Market Co. (800) 627-0227 TLD Acquisition Co. LLC (310) 324-5111 Sysco Foods (909) 595-9595

San Diego

Rainbow Dist. Co. (619) 308-1177

Palm Desert/Indio Fulton Distributing (760) 347-8669

Kelly-Gonzalez International, Inc. 18627 Brookhurst St., Suite 323, Fountain Valley, CA 92708 • Fax (714) 378-5169

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BEVERAGE INDUSTRY NEWS

To Reach: 20,000 REACH IAL T POTEN ERS M CUSTO TH! N O EACH M

• The owners and managers who make the purchasing decisions for California’s top on- and off-sale establishments. • Store managers who choose which products to promote, which displays to set up, and where to set your product on their shelves. • Bar managers who choose which products go in the well and which are featured in the back bar. • Bartenders who directly influence customer choice.

Call for our low advertising rates and deadlines.

Southern California 951.272.4681 Northern California 925.932.4999 MARKETPLACE

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Distibuted by: Northern California: Southern Wine & Spirits Company Southern California: Haralambos Beverage Company Mesa Distributing Company GBL W.A.Thompson MARKETPLACE

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Distributed by Southern Wine & Spirits MARKETPLACE

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ULTIMATE BEVERAGE CHALLENGE PRESENTS

ULTIMATE SPIRITS CHALLENGE 2018 E

ach year in March, the world’s foremost spirits authors, educators, buyers, and journalists, led by F. Paul Pacult, convene to judge spirits entries from all over the world. The coveted USC Chairman’s Trophy is awarded to the top scoring spirit in major categories. Brands are also recognized with the accolades Finalist, Great Value and Tried & True Award. Spirits in categories appropriate for cocktails receive not only an evaluation for the neat product but also a cocktail evaluation, thus providing more complete results. This in-depth evaluation is unique to Ultimate Spirits Challenge.

DEADLINE: FEBRUARY 21, 2018 ENTRY DETAILS: ultimate-beverage.com/usc2018enter QUESTIONS: info@ultimate-beverage.com or 1-347-878-6551

UBC GUIDE: HIGH SCORING PRODUCTS FROM ULTIMATE SPIRITS CHALLENGE 2018 WILL BE INCLUDED IN THE BEVERAGE MEDIA GROUP TOP U.S. MARKETS OCTOBER 2018 ISSUE.

ultimatebeverage.com


‘IMPACT HOT PROSPECT’ AWARD WINNER

PROUD TO BE AN IMPACT HOT PROSPECT BRAND FOR THE THIRD CONSECUTIVE YEAR.

Carmenet Reserve Chardonnay is one of the fastest growing Top 75 Chardonnays1 in America, regardless of retail price, appellation or country of origin (+71.1%). 12-2-17 MARKETED BY BRONCO WINE COMPANY I WINES FOR THE AMERICAN TABLE® I WWW.BRONCOWINE.COM I 855.874.2394 I DRINK RESPONSIBLY. DRIVE RESPONSIBLY.

Beverage Industry News | February 2018  

Beverage Industry News | February 2018

Beverage Industry News | February 2018  

Beverage Industry News | February 2018