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C H A R L E S TO N S TAG E AT T H E H I S TO R I C D O C K S T R E E T T H E AT R E

W O R L D

P R E M I E R E

MARCH 9 - 25, 2012


LEAD TITLE SPONSOR The Albert Sottile Foundation Joyce Long Darby and Mary Ellen Long Way In 1943, Albert Sottile, president of The Pastime Amusement Company, created a foundation for the purpose of providing college scholarships to the children of his employees. The major movie theatres in Charleston were owned and operated by Mr. Sottile through this company. Born in Gangi, Sicily, he arrived in Charleston at the age of thirteen. His life truly exemplified the American Dream. As he achieved success in business, he strove to share with his fellow citizens in numerous ways. Today, The Albert Sottile Foundation continues to benefit the Charleston area through funding of educational, cultural and artistic endeavors. His granddaughters, Joyce Long Darby and Mary Ellen Long Way serve as trustees.

PRESENTING SPONSOR Mr. and Mrs. William B. Hewitt Mr. and Mrs. William B. Hewitt have supported the arts in the Charleston community for a number of years. The Hewitt family believes in giving back to the community and is proud to support Charleston Stage in its 34th season at the Historic Dock Street Theatre.

ASSOCIATE SPONSOR Mr. and Mrs. Steven Swanson The Swanson Family is a longtime supporter of Charleston Stage and of the arts community in Charleston. They are proud to sponsor Inga Binga in its world premiere at the Dock Street Theatre.


Julian Wiles, Founder and Producing Artistic Director Marybeth Clark, Associate Artistic Director

World Premiere!

Written and Directed by Julian Wiles Scenic Design by J. Kenneth Barnett III Lighting Design by Julian Wiles • Costume Design by Barbara Young Properties by J. Kenneth Barnett III • Technical Direction by Paul Hartmann Sound Design and Production Stage Management by Amanda Wansa TheatreWings Apprentice Stage Management by Shelby Smith TheatreWings Apprentice Assistant Stage Management by Kaitlyn Fulford The video and/or audio recording of this performance by any means whatsoever is strictly prohibited. Charleston Stage is a constituent member of Theatre Communications Group (TCG), the national organization for the American Theatre. Charleston Stage’s productions are made possible in part by grants from the South Carolina Arts Commission, a state agency which receives support from the National Endowment for the Arts; the City of Charleston; the County of Charleston; the City of North Charleston, and contributions from friends like you. 4 | (843) 577-7183 | www.charlestonstage.com


Notes From the Playwright The idea for this play evolved a number of years ago when my friend (and Charleston Stage costumer) Barbara Young gave me The Ambassador’s Son by Homer Hickam for my birthday. This book is a fictionalized account of Jack Kennedy’s exploits in the South Pacific during World War II. Earlier Barbara had also given me Hickam’s The Keeper’s Son, a fictionalized account of the German U-boat raids along North Carolina’s Outer Banks. These books piqued my curiosity, and I decided I wanted to learn more about Kennedy and this period in history. I remembered that Kennedy had spent some time in Charleston during World War II, so I began some research and came upon the Inga Arvad story. It is a fascinating tale. Only after the death of FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover in 1972, and the release of his secret and confidential files, did the full truth of this clandestine, World War II romance come to light. Even then, it was not until the publication in 1992 of Nigel Hamilton’s JFK: Reckless Youth, which exhaustively chronicled Kennedy’s younger years, that the story of Jack and Inga become public knowledge. I’m sure many will ask, “How much of the play is true?” First, let me state upfront that Inga Binga is a work of fiction. That being said, the basic story is true. Inga Arvad, a former Miss Denmark, met Ensign Jack Kennedy in Washington in 1941. Soon after, a passionate love affair was underway. When Jack’s superior officers at the Office of Naval Intelligence in Washington learned of the affair—and that Inga was rumored to be a Nazi spy—they transferred Kennedy to Charleston. Inga followed, and she and Jack spent three weekends together—two at the Fort Sumter House and one at the Francis Marion Hotel. For dramatic purposes, I have combined these three weekends into one. In real life Jack did have a lifelong best friend named Lemoyne “Lem” Billings. Lem made two trips to Charleston to visit Jack, though Lem and Inga were not actually in Charleston at the same time. The press became very interested in the Jack and Inga affair, with a mention appearing in Walter Winchell’s nationally syndicated column in January 1942. From the FBI files we also know that Jack and Inga were fretting over a possible Life Magazine exposé. Under orders from J. Edgar Hoover, Inga’s and Jack’s hotel rooms were bugged, their phones were tapped, and the FBI slipped into Inga’s Washington apartment and went through her files. The characters of the two FBI agents and the reporters in the play are fictitious, but are based on characters who would have been part of the real story. History doesn’t give us their names. “Inga Binga” was Jack’s pet name for Inga Arvad. In turn, she often called him “Young Kennedy” because he was four years her junior. At other times she is heard on the FBI recordings calling him “Honeysuckle.” I gleaned these tidbits and others after reading all of the declassified FBI files associated with this case at the Massachusetts Historical Society in Boston. So, in the end, the play contains a lot of incidents that did happen and a lot that might have happened. Hopefully the two will give audiences a window into World War II Charleston and insights into a long ago love affair. Julian Wiles Playwright, Founder, and Producing Artistic Director www.charlestonstage.com | (843) 577-7183 | 5


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Acknowledgements Theatre and playwriting are collaborative arts and I would like to thank a number of people who helped me along the way. • First, I must thank the wonderful and generous sponsors of this play: Mary Ellen Way and Joyce Darby and The Albert Sottile Foundation; Bill and Laura Hewitt; and Steve and Emily Swanson whose support made possible the extensive research in Boston, as well as underwriting our terrific guest actors from New York who are playing the lead roles. • To Barbara Young, not only for giving me several books that inspired me to get started on Inga Binga, but also for being a dedicated and valued reader of drafts along the way. • To the staffs of the Charleston County Library, the Massachusetts Historical Society and the John F. Kennedy Library for their help and assistance. • My friend and historian Harlan Greene who made the very simple suggestion that I read the News and Courier articles from February 1942. These gave me many insights into wartime Charleston including the air raid sirens and blackouts that protected Charleston in early 1942. • To Charleston Stage’s amazing staff who does so many jobs so well that I have been able to find time to write. • To my daughter Marianna who served as editor for this play, reading a number of drafts, offering encouragement and critical insights even as she corrected my poor spelling and bad grammar. • To my son Nicholas who gave me great new scriptwriting software last Christmas which sped along the writing process. • To my wife Jenny who provided a sounding board, read many drafts and who makes every day an adventure. Julian Wiles Playwright, Founder, and Producing Artistic Director

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Dock Street Theatre • America’s First Theatre The Historic Dock Street Theatre, America’s first theatre, was the first building in America built exclusively to be used for theatrical performances. Originally constructed in 1736 on the corner of Church Street and Dock Street (now Queen Street), the original Dock Street Theatre was probably destroyed by the Great Fire of 1740. In 1809, the elegant Planter’s Hotel was built on this site. After the Civil War, the Planter’s Hotel fell into disrepair and was slated for demolition. But in 1935, after Milton Pearlstine made the property available to the City of Charleston and at the urging of the mayor and other prominent citizens, the building was selected for a Depression Era WPA (Works Progress Administration) project. At that time, a new performance space modeled on 18th century London playhouses was constructed within the shell of the old Planters Hotel, the hotel’s lobby serving as the lobby of the new theatre. After being closed for two centuries, the Historic Dock Street Theatre re-opened in 1937 and quickly became the centerpiece of the Charleston arts scene. In 2010 following a three year, $19 million dollar renovation by the City of Charleston, the Historic Dock Street Theatre once again re-opened to reclaim its place as the jewel in Charleston’s artistic crown. Today the Historic Dock Street Theatre hosts some of Charleston’s finest performing arts organizations, including Spoleto Festival USA. Charleston Stage, which became the resident professional theatre at the Dock Street Theatre in 1978, produces over 120 performances here. Each season Charleston Stage plays to an audience of more than 42,000 patrons, including more than 20,000 South Carolina students who enjoy special school day performances throughout the year.

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Grand Show Curtain

Charleston Stage commissioned premiere Charleston artist Jonathan Green to produce a “Grand Show Curtain” exclusively for Charleston Stage’s return to the Historic Dock Street Theatre. The original painting is in the collection of Barbara Burgess and John Dinkelspiel. Jonathan Green’s “Window of Wonder” prints are for sale at the Box Office. Unsigned Prints $25 • Signed $100

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Charleston Stage Leadership Julian Wiles Founder and Producing Artistic Director Director, designer, and playwright Julian Wiles founded Charleston Stage, Charleston’s resident professional theatre company in1978. It has since grown into South Carolina’s largest professional theatre and one of the state’s largest arts institutions. Over the past 33 years Wiles has directed and designed more than 200 productions and penned 27 original plays and musicals for the company. Wiles continues to serve as the company’s Producing Artistic Director, heading a staff of 12 fulltime theatre professionals. Mr. Wiles, a South Carolina native, grew up on a cotton farm in Ft. Motte, South Carolina. He attended Clemson University, received a history degree from the College of Charleston in 1974 and an MFA in Dramatic Art from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1976. Mr. Wiles has written or adapted 27 original plays and musicals for the company including The Boy Who Stole the Stars, Nevermore: Edgar Allen Poe, the Final Mystery, The Seat of Justice, Denmark Vesey: Insurrection, Gershwin at Folly, Frankenstein, The Modern Prometheus, Helium, and most recently Inga Binga. Julian Wiles is a recipient of the 2010 Elizabeth O’Neill Verner Award, the highest honor in the arts which is awarded by the South Carolina Arts Commission. Mr. Wiles is also a member of the Dramatists Guild. Marybeth Clark Associate Artistic Director and Director of Education Marybeth Clark, Charleston Stage’s Associate Artistic Director and Director of Education, is in her fourteenth season with Charleston Stage. Mrs. Clark has a degree in theatre/performance from the University of South Florida. She worked as an actor in professional theatres throughout the Southeast for ten years before settling in Charleston in 1994 where she was a member of the theatre faculty at Charleston County’s School of the Arts for middle and high school students. As an actor for Charleston Stage, Ms. Clark has appeared in Helium, Moon Over Buffalo, You Can’t Take It With You, The Marriage of Bette and Boo, Steel Magnolias, and A Christmas Carol. Each summer Ms. Clark directs Charleston Stage’s SummerStage Musical Theatre Camp for more than 60 young people. Productions have included Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, Seussical the Musical, Disney’s Aladdin, Disney’s High School Musical, Guys and Dolls Jr., Bugsy Malone Jr., and Willy Wonka Jr. Ms. Clark has directed more than a dozen MainStage and Family Series shows for Charleston Stage, most recently Alfred Hitchcock’s The 39 Steps, Blue, The Original Peter Pan, Chicago, A Christmas Carol, and Avenue Q. www.charlestonstage.com | (843) 577-7183 | 13


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The Cast (In Order of Appearance) CHARACTER

ACTOR

The Maid..........................................................................................................Constance Singleton Hank.................................................................................................................................... Victor Clark Skip................................................................................................................................... Josh Harris** Bud......................................................................................................................... Derek T. Pickens** Ensign Jack Kennedy....................................................................................................... Phil Mills* Lemoyne “Lem” Billings............................................................................................Brian J. Porter Betty.................................................................................................................................... Beth Curley Red................................................................................................................................. Luke Whitmire Inga Arvad...................................................................................................................Gardner Reed* FBI Special Agent-In-Charge, Washington Bureau........................................... Drew Archer * The Actor appears through the courtesy of Actors’ Equity Association, the Union of Professional Actors and Stage Managers in the United States. ** Members of Charleston Stage’s Professional Resident Acting Company

The Production Staff Director.............................................................................................................................. Julian Wiles Scenic Designer............................................................................................ J. Kenneth Barnett III Lighting Designer........................................................................................................... Julian Wiles Costumer.....................................................................................................................Barbara Young Properties by.................................................................................................. J. Kenneth Barnett III Technical Director................................................................................................... Paul Hartmann Sound Designer and Production Stage Manager....................................... Amanda Wansa TheatreWings Apprentice Stage Manager.........................................................Shelby Smith TheatreWings Apprentice Assistant Stage Manager................................... Kaitlyn Fulford TheatreWings Apprentice Sound Operator.....................................................Timothy Shaw TheatreWings Apprentice Deck Crew.................................... Abby Allardice and Sam Cass Union Steward and Light Board Operator...........................................Michael Christensen Union Flyman............................................................................................................Marty Durham Union Sound Operator..................................................................................................... Joey Ferri Support Sound.................................................................................................................NBS Sound

Special Thanks Special thanks to the Charleston Stage Scene and Costume Shop Volunteers, especially Barbara McGrath, and to Jack Buchanan and Andy Young for their help in set construction for Avenue Q and Inga Binga. Also, special thanks to Stuart Laurence Salon. www.charlestonstage.com | (843) 577-7183 | 15


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Scenes Setting: A Suite In Charleston’s Fort Sumter House Hotel, February 1942 ACT ONE

ACT TWO

Scene 1: Checking In, Friday Afternoon Scene 2: Arrivals, Later That Afternoon Scene 3: After Dinner, That Night

Scene 1: Scene 2: Scene 3: Scene 4:

15 MINUTE INTERMISSION

Going On a Picnic, Saturday Morning Covert Activities, Later That Afternoon Breakfast In Bed, Sunday Morning Undercover, Later That Night

Guest Artists Phil Mills (Ensign Jack Kennedy) Mills is excited for the opportunity to work on The Charleston Stage, and for the challenge of playing such an iconic figure. His New York credits include the premiere Booze in the Boroughs with the FACT Theater Company, Arrah-na-Pogue with the Storm Theater, and a reading of Tom Stoppard’s Indian Ink at the Roundabout Theatre Company. Regional credits: A Christmas Carol (Fred) American Conservatory Theater, The Verona Project (Sylvio) California Shakespeare Theater. Mills was also a featured principal vocalist at the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra for A Celebration of Leonard Bernstein, conducted by Michael Tilson Thomas. Film credits: Hung Up (co writer), The Conservatory (winner of a Student Emmy for Best Comedy). Recently Mills has been collaborating with Firespotter Labs creating viral internet videos which have been lauded by TIME Magazine, The Atlantic and The Guardian, among others. Mills can be seen on occasion performing stand up comedy at the New York Comedy Club. ACT credits include: O Lovely Glowworm, The Critic, Macbeth, Clothes for a Summer Hotel, The Diviners, The Debutante, Her Naked Skin, Hamlet, The Increased Difficulties of Concentration.  BA, Cornell University. MFA, A.C.T. Gardner Reed (Inga Arvad) Gardner is thrilled to be making her Charleston debut in this wonderful new play. Previous credits include Mona in the world premiere of Wendy MacLeod’s Find and Sign (Pioneer Theatre Company), The Woman in The 39 Steps (Portland Stage Company), Sister James in Doubt (Kansas City Rep), Joan la Pucelle in Henry VI and Lady Anne in Richard III (Alabama Shakespeare Co), Abigail in The Crucible (Actors Theater of Louisville), Lydia in Pride and Prejudice, and Emilie in Les Liaisons Dangereuses (Shakespeare Theatre of NJ), Beulah Baxter in Merton of the Movies and Henrietta in The Hollow (Dorset Theater Festival), and Jackie-O in The House of Yes (Red Envelope Productions). Born and raised in New Hamphire, Gardner received her BFA in Acting from Syracuse University before moving to New York City, where she now resides. Eternal thanks and love to her family for their endless support. 18 | (843) 577-7183 | www.charlestonstage.com


Cast Biographies Drew Archer (FBI Special Agent-In-Charge, Washington Bureau) Drew is excited to be returning again to his Charleston Stage family.  A current Atlanta resident, Drew was a Charleston Stage Resident Actor from 2003-04.  You may have recently seen Drew as Leaf Coneybear in Charleston Stage’s 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee.  Previous Charleston Stage credits also include Hairspray (Wilbur), Big River (Tom Sawyer), Oliver! (Artful Dodger), You’re…Charlie Brown (Charlie Brown), Importance of Being Earnest (Merriman), and Beneath the Sweetgrass Moon (Ramblin’ Rabbit). Other Charleston credits include [title of show] (Jeff ) and Xanadu (Thalia) at the Village Playhouse. Other regional credits include Forever Plaid (Sparky), A Year With Frog and Toad (Snail), 1940’s Radio Hour (Wally & BJ), Lucky Stiff (Harry), The Andrews Brother (Lawrence), and My Way.  Drew has a BFA in Theatre from Valdosta State University.  He would like to thank Julian and Maybeth for this great opportunity and Lindsey for being Lindsey. Victor Clark (Hank) Victor is thrilled to be back on the Dock Street stage! His last appearance with Charleston Stage was as Atticus Finch in To Kill A Mockingbird. Other favorite roles with Charleston Stage include Lloyd in Noises Off, 11 different characters in Greater Tuna, Jim in All My Sons, Paul in Born Yesterday as well as appearances in Ah, Wilderness, The Skin Of Our Teeth and The Seat of Justice. Other favorite roles while in Charleston include Boolie in Driving Miss Daisy, Dr. Sanderson in Harvey, and Bill in On Golden Pond. Victor played Brother Man in Cat on a Hot Tin Roof with the Greenbrier Valley Theatre where he met his future bride, Marybeth who was playing Maggie The Cat and the rest is history. Many thanks to his family for their love and support! Beth Curley (Betty) Beth is thrilled to be performing once again with Charleston Stage. You may have recently seen Beth as Mary Sunshine in Charleston Stage’s production of Chicago and The Woman in Charleston Stage’s The 39 Steps. Beth recently performed with What If? Productions in Durang, Durang, and Durang! and as Yitzhak in their 2011 Piccolo production of Hedwig and the Angry Inch. Other favorite local acting credits include: Raymonde (A Flea in Her Ear / Village Playhouse), Lotty (Enchanted April / Village Playhouse), Bunny (The House of Blue Leaves / Village Playhouse), and Alice (Closer / theatreverv). When not on stage, Beth is the Director of Marketing for Charleston Stage. Josh Harris (Skip) Charleston Stage Professional Resident Actor Josh Harris is from Sherman, Texas and attended Southeastern Oklahoma State University. Josh has two degrees in Musical Theatre and Acting/Directing with a minor in dance. Theatre credits include: Hysterium (A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum), Bellhop (Lend Me a Tenor), Claudius (Hamlet), Hortensio (Taming of the Shrew) and Antonio (Twelfth Night) with the Oklahoma Shakespearean Festival. Educational Credits include Adolph (The Last Night of Ballyhoo), JJ Peachum (The Threepenny Opera), Roger (Grease), Horton (Seussical), Beast (Beauty and the Beast) and Nicely-Nicely (Guys and Dolls). You may have recently seen Josh as Nicky, Trekkie Monster, and the Bad Idea Bear in Charleston Stage’s Avenue Q. www.charlestonstage.com | (843) 577-7183 | 19


Derek T. Pickens (Bud) Charleston Stage Professional Resident Actor Derek T. Pickens is a recent graduate from the Savannah College of Art and Design (SCAD) with an MFA in Performing Arts and has a BA in Theatre Education from Greensboro College in North Carolina. While attending SCAD, Derek appeared in A New Brain (Mr. Bungee), Songs for A New World (Man 2) and his thesis production of Thrill Me: The Leopold & Loeb Story (Nathan Leopold). His other credits include the national tours of Horrible Harry (Harry) and The Energized Guyz (Nikki Neutron) as well as regional productions of Bye Bye Birdie (Hugo), Disney’s High School Musical (Ryan), and Seussical the Musical (The Cat in the Hat). He can also be heard on the Studio Cast Recording of Will You Know It’s Me? (Natural Theatricals in Washington, DC) and is a proud member of the Equity Membership Candidacy program. You may have recently seen Derek as Princeton and Rod in Charleston Stage’s Avenue Q. derektpickens.com Brian J. Porter (Lemoyne “Lem” Billings) Brian is excited to be performing once again with Charleston Stage. You may have recently seen Brian in Charleston Stage productions of Chicago (Sergeant Fogerty/Juror/Dancer), A Christmas Carol (Ebenezer Scrooge, 2010), and The 39 Steps (Clown, Man 2). Other Charleston Stage acting credits include: Cabaret (Emcee), The Producers (Kevin), Joseph... Dreamcoat (Judah), A Christmas Carol (Bob Cratchit) and Twelfth Night (Curio). Brian has performed as a professional actor in Memphis, Atlanta, and on a resort island in Michigan. In addition to numerous acting credits, Brian has professionally directed and designed multiple productions. Some of Brian’s favorite roles include Assassins (Balladeer), On the Town (Gabey), The Tempest (Ariel), Little Shop or Horrors (Seymour), and Picasso at the Lapin Agile (Einstein). In addition, Brian has served as Executive Director for two non-profit theatres. You may also have recently seen Brian as Hedwig in What If? Productions’ Piccolo production of Hedwig and the Angry Inch. Brian is the Executive Assistant to the Producing Artistic Director for Charleston Stage. Constance Singleton (Josephine, the Maid) Constance moved to Charleston after a long career teaching drama and speech. She has appeared in numerous productions in her home town of Peoria, Illinois, including Jean Genet’s The Maids, as well as Peggy Conklin in William Inge’s Picnic. She also appeared as an extra in local films including The Notebook. Constance is Drew Archer’s cousin and looks forward to performing with him on the Dock Street Theatre stage. Luke Whitmire (Red) Luke is a junior at Charleston Southern University double majoring in Communications/Theatre and Religion. With Charleston Stage, you may have recently seen Luke as Young Ebenezer and the Ghost of Christmas Future in A Christmas Carol, Ethan in Helium, and Mullins in The Original Peter Pan. Other favorite acting credits include: Scooter Thomas in Scooter Thomas Makes it to the Top of the World, Tin Man in The Wizard of Oz, Naphtali in Joseph and The Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, and Sasha/Ensemble in Fiddler on the Roof. He wouldn’t be here without the love of his family and friends, or the support and inspiration of his best friend. He would also like to thank Marybeth Clark and Julian Wiles for their direction and encouragement. Most of all, he thanks Jesus Christ for his talents both on and off stage. 20 | (843) 577-7183 | www.charlestonstage.com


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Inga Binga Historical Notes The basic historical elements of this story are true. Ensign Jack Kennedy did have a passionate love affair with Inga Arvad, a former Miss Denmark. Jack and Inga were introduced by Jack’s sister, who worked with Inga at the Washington Times-Herald. At the time, Jack was in Washington working for the Office of Naval Intelligence. Inga’s career as a journalist began in 1936 when she managed to wrangle an interview with Adolph Hitler. Hitler was apparently quite smitten with her; he granted not one, but three interviews and invited her to visit his private box at the 1936 Olympics. Her articles ran in Danish papers and with this triumph, Inga moved to New York to study journalism at Columbia University. A year later in New York she ran into the editor of the Washington Times-Herald, who offered her a column in his Washington paper. Because she spoke fluent German and, because of her past association with Hitler and other leading Nazis, rumors spread that she may be a German agent and the FBI began surveillance of her apartment and tapped her phone. This surveillance probably tipped off the Navy (an affair with a married woman was grounds for court martial at the time) who transferred Ensign Kennedy to Charleston, in an effort to break up the affair. As part of the transfer, Kennedy was not allowed to travel more than 30 miles from his base. But soon Inga was taking trains and planes to visit Jack in Charleston. From FBI bugs placed in their hotel rooms, we know they spent the first two weekends at the Fort Sumter House and a third weekend at the Francis Marion Hotel. Though they spent most of their time in their hotel room, the couple did find time to visit Middleton Gardens, dine at Henry’s Restaurant in the Market, golf at Yeaman’s Hall Country Club, and window-shop on King Street. One Sunday they even attended church together at the Catholic Cathedral of St. John the Baptist. In March of 1942, Inga and Jack’s relationship came to an end. [For additional historical information on the Kennedy/Arvad Affair, including a timeline of the important events, visit charlestonstage.com.]

Far right: John F. Kennedy talks to a group of enlistees at The Battery (Charleston, SC July 8, 1942). 22 | (843) 577-7183 | www.charlestonstage.com


Some Key Players Drawn From Real Individuals John F. Kennedy was the second of nine children born to Joe and Rose Kennedy. Kennedy’s father had made a fortune in banking and had served a controversial tenure as the U.S. Ambassador to Great Britain. Ambassador Kennedy made no secret that he thought Britain was a lost cause . Having spent part of his youth with his father in London, Jack wrote of his exploits in a college thesis, often disagreeing with his father’s view of things. This was published in 1940 under the title Why England Slept. Though he disagreed with much in his son’s book, Joe Kennedy used his influence with Henry Luce, the editor of Time and Life Magazines, to get Jack’s book published. Luce wrote the introduction. Why England Slept became a bestseller and led Jack to believe he may want to pursue a career in journalism. Jack’s father Ambassador Joseph Kennedy also used his influence to get Jack in the U.S. Navy after Jack had failed both the Navy and Army physicals. Jack had been a sickly child and still suffered from a bad back and undiagnosed intestinal problems—medical issues that often led to hospitalizations. Despite the health issues, Jack was determined to seek active duty. He began his naval career working for the Office of Naval Intelligence in Washington, but in early 1942 he was suddenly transferred to Charleston when the Navy learned of his affair with Inga. Following his affair, Jack was hospitalized for back problems and surgery was considered. Eventually Jack was able to return to active duty, leaving Charleston in the summer of 1942 (possibly thanks to strings his father pulled once more). After attending Naval Reserve Officers Training School in Chicago and PT (Patrol Torpedo) training in Rhode Island, Jack was sent to the Solomon Islands where he took command of PT Boat 109. Inga Marie Arvad was 28 years old when she met Jack Kennedy. She was born Inga Marie Petersen in Copenhagen, where she studied ballet and won the title of Miss Denmark at age 16. She traveled to Paris to compete in the Miss Europe Pageant. Despite being named a finalist, she eloped at age 17 with Egyptian diplomat Kamak Abdel Nabi. This first marriage was short-lived and she soon remarried, this time to Paul Fejos, a Hungarian movie director who made two films that starred his gorgeous new wife. It was at this time that she took the name Inga Arvad as a stage name. Inga’s films were financed by Axel Wenner-Gren, one of the richest men in the world who had made his fortune with the Electrolux vacuum cleaner. Some believe Inga was his paramour as well. While dating Kennedy, Inga did receive a $5,000 check from Wenner-Gren. www.charlestonstage.com | (843) 577-7183 | 23


Wenner-Gren, who was on the U.S. watch list for alleged pro-German sympathies, was living on his yacht in Mexico during the time in which the play is set. His yacht, which he purchased from Howard Hughes, was the largest in the world. At the time of the play, it was suspected he was using it to ferry fuel to Nazi U-boats that were allegedly operating in the Caribbean. This was never proven. After her first two movies, Inga became disinterested in both film and in her husband Paul. She turned to journalism, traveling to Berlin to cover the 1936 Olympics. There she interviewed a fellow movie actress who was engaged to Hermann Goering. Goering’s fiancée was so delighted with Inga that she invited Inga to her wedding. At the wedding, Inga met Adolph Hitler who was serving as Goering’s best man. Inga convinced him to sit for an interview and, charmed by her, he invited Inga to join him in his private box at the Berlin Olympics. Supposedly a photo of the two was taken in his box, though the fate of this photo is unknown. Still estranged from her husband Paul, Inga traveled to the United States after the Olympics to study journalism at Columbia, which helped her secure a position with the conservative and isolationist Washington Times-Herald. She was assigned a regular column called “Did You Happen to See?” which was a series of lighthearted interviews with the movers and shakers in pre-war Washington. One of her co-workers was Kathleen Kennedy, who introduced Inga to her brother Jack. Inga and Jack had a passionate affair until late March 1942 when they agreed to call it quits, perhaps as a result of the FBI surveillance and press coverage. The next month, Inga flew to Reno to divorce her husband Paul. In 1946, she married movie cowboy Tim McCoy and raised two sons. In a funny twist, McCoy’s full name was Timothy John Fitzgerald McCoy. Inga Arvad McCoy died of cancer in 1973 at the age of 60. Lemoyne “Lem” Billings was, by everyone’s account, Jack Kennedy’s life-long best friend. Because Billings was not involved in politics or the Kennedy administration he is not well known. The two met at prep school at Choate and remained close friends until Kennedy’s assassination in 1963. Billings was a frequent guest at the Kennedy homes in Palm Beach and Hyannisport, so much so that many considered him almost a member of the family. Billings also joined Jack on a tour of Europe in the summer of 1937. Though not actually in Charleston at the same time as Inga, Billings did come down to Charleston twice. Though their paths didn’t cross in Charleston, Lem and Inga did know each other from Washington. Like Jack, health issues kept Lem out of the service (he had very bad eyes) but again, through Joe Kennedy’s connections, Lem was accepted into the Ambulance Corps and served with distinction in North Africa through 1943. He then enlisted in the Navy and also served in the Pacific. After the war he and Jack remained close friend. In fact much of what we know about the young Jack Kennedy comes from the many letters Jack sent to Lem and Lem saved. Billings worked for Coca-Cola and other beverage companies and created the 1950’s “Fizzies” sensation that became a national fad. Never having married, Billings was widely known to be what was euphemistically called in those days, “a confirmed bachelor.” Billings died in 1981. 24 | (843) 577-7183 | www.charlestonstage.com


Setting the Stage WARTIME CHARLESTON It’s difficult, now 70 years later, to imagine what must have been going through the minds of Charlestonians in February 1942. Just two months earlier, news of the devastating attack on Pearl Harbor had arrived. A few days after Pearl Harbor, Nazi Germany also declared war on the U.S. With the first U-boat attack off the North Carolina coast in January of 1942, the great oceans that once seemed to have kept world conflicts far away now became the means of imminent attack. War preparations were well underway in Charleston. Air raid sirens were placed atop St. Michael’s steeple, the Francis Marion Hotel, and County Hall on King Street. Air raid shelters were set up all over town and plans for blackouts were being put into effect. Suspicion of spying (even sabotage) was rampant, especially by foreigners or anyone who appeared foreign. Inga Arvad certainly had reason to be concerned she would fall into this net. Even American citizens were not exempt from suspicion. On February 19, 1942, President Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066, which set the stage for the internment of U.S. citizens of German, Italian, or Japanese ancestry. Though the order would mainly be used to inter Japanese citizens on the west coast, some citizens of Italian or German ancestry were affected as well. FEAR OF U-BOAT ATTACKS Fears must have certainly been further aroused when German U-boats began attacking Allied shipping along the East Coast. This began with the sinking of the merchant ship Allen Jackson and the loss of 22 seamen on January 18, 1942 off the Outer Banks of North Carolina, just up the coast from Charleston. Before the war was over, at least 3,500 merchant ships and 175 warships fell prey to German U-boats in the Atlantic. Though most attacks on East Coast shipping occurred farther north in the Cape Hatteras area, Charleston held blackouts and submarine watchtowers were erected on Sullivan’s and other islands up and down the coast. One of these can still be seen on Dewees Island today.

Captured German crew of U-Boat 352 line up in ranks at the Charleston Naval Base. www.charlestonstage.com | (843) 577-7183 | 25


Air patrols also watched the waters off the coast and Charleston was on high alert—for good reason. On May 9, 1942, while Jack Kennedy was still in Charleston, American forces engaged the German U-Boat 352 between the Outer Banks and Bermuda. Severely damaged by depth charges, the U-boat was forced to surface but kept fighting. Though the German crew lost 17 sailors in a surface firefight and managed to scuttle their boat, the remaining German crew was captured and brought to Charleston Naval Base where Kennedy was stationed. (See photo of captured German crew lined up at Charleston Naval Base.) J. EDGAR HOOVER AND THE FBI SEARCH FOR NAZI AGENT SPIES As World War II was breaking out in Europe, even before the war came to the shores of the U.S., J. Edgar Hoover’s FBI was already hard at work ferreting out foreign agents. As early as 1938, they captured their first German agent. Soon after the war broke out, FBI agents apprehended German spies that had come ashore via U-boats on the beaches of Florida and New Jersey. As part of this ongoing effort, Hoover himself approved the wiretaps and surveillance of Inga and Jack in February 1942. J. Edgar Hoover actually began his career searching for spies during the first World War. He moved up through the ranks of what was then known as the Bureau of Investigation (it became the FBI in 1935). In 1924, he was named the director and charged with cleaning up some of the illegal and warrantless surveillance the bureau had been undertaking. Rather than eliminating these shady practices, Hoover not only continued them under his tenure, but kept them secret by storing many of the most clandestine files in his personal office to keep them out of the regular FBI files where others might find them. It was in these personal files that the records of the FBI surveillance of Jack and Inga in Charleston were found. Some have speculated that Hoover used these embarrassing files to keep the Kennedy brothers (Jack’s brother Bobby was then Attorney General and technically Hoover’s boss) from forcing Hoover to retire during the Kennedy Administration. Though already past retirement age, Hoover didn’t retire until 1972. Because of Hoover’s high-handed methods, his career remains under a cloud. He became very controversial in the last years of his reign at the FBI. Perhaps because Hoover was such a complex and secretive man, rumors about Hoover’s own private life made the rounds in Washington. Hoover never married and for many years he lived with his lifelong friend and assistant, Clyde Tolson. The two vacationed together and are buried side by side. Many have speculated that the two lifelong friends may have had a sexual relationship, though there is no evidence of this. Rumors that Hoover was seen dressed in drag at a party in New York also circulated widely in the 1970s, but there is no concrete evidence of this and the incident is strongly discounted by historians. 26 | (843) 577-7183 | www.charlestonstage.com


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Who We Are

Administrative Staff

Founder and Producing Artistic Director

Julian Wiles

jwiles@charlestonstage.com Associate Artistic Director & Director of Education

Marybeth Clark

mclark@charlestonstage.com Executive Assistant to the Producing Artistic Director

Brian J. Porter

bporter@charlestonstage.com Director of Marketing

Beth Curley

bcurley@charlestonstage.com Director of Finance

Judy Halberda

jhalberda@charlestonstage.com Director of Sales

Allison Schnake

aschnake@charlestonstage.com Director of Music Education

Amanda Wansa

awansa@charlestonstage.com Box Office Manager

Nancy Goral

ngoral@charlestonstage.com Gifts Manager

Samantha Mills

smills@charlestonstage.com Grants Coordinator

Betty Haring

bharing@charlestonstage.com

Production Staff Production Manager

J. Kenneth Barnett III

kbarnett@charlestonstage.com Technical Director/Lighting Designer

Paul Hartmann

phartmann@charlestonstage.com Costumer In Residence

Barbara Young

byoung@charlestonstage.com

Box Office Staff 30 | (843) 577-7183 | www.charlestonstage.com

Sean Barry, Ingram Brooks, James Ferguson, Josh Harris, Mindy Huston, Jillian Kuhl, Stacey Lathem, Vanessa Moyen, Derek Pickens, Leah Vogelpohl, and Gabriel Wright


2011-12 Charleston Stage Board of Trustees

Officers Mrs. Jennifer Murray South Carolina Bank and Trust President Mr. Dave Marley Wells Fargo Private Bank Vice President Mrs. Suzanne Lynch Wells Fargo Bank Treasurer

Trustees Mrs. Natalie Bluestein Bluestein & Douglas Director’s Circle / Spring Fundraiser Chair

Mrs. Jeanne Condon Merrill Lynch Mrs. Katherine Glenn Community Volunteer Mr. Jonathan Kiser Group Dynamic Rentals Gala Chair Mrs. Monica Lavin College of Charleston

Mr. John Rosen Rosen, Rosen & Hagood, LLC Business / Sponsorship / UPstage Co-Chair Mr. Gregory C. Rothschild The Carolinas Financial Network UPstage Co-Chair

Mrs. Jennifer McElveen Community Volunteer

Mr. Halsey Schreier Smith Moore Leatherwood LLP Governance Chair

Mrs. Marie-Louise Ramsdale Ramsdale Law Firm

Mr. Chris South Blackbaud

Ms. Rachael Rose Tristan

Mr. Joshua Whitley Smyth Whitley, LLC

Contact Us Classrooms and Rehearsal Studios The Plaza at East Cooper 629 Johnnie Dodds Blvd, Suite 7 Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464 P: (843) 856-3822 Scene & Costume Shop 19 Warren Street Charleston, SC 29403 P: (843) 577-0868 F: (843) 577-9869 The Historic Dock Street Theatre and Administrative Offices 135 Church Street Charleston, SC 29401 P: (843) 577-5967 F: (843) 577-5422 Mailing Address Charleston Stage P.O. Box 356 Charleston, SC 29402 By Email: email@charlestonstage.com www.charlestonstage.com | (843) 577-7183 | 31


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2011/12 Sponsors and Hosts

2011/12 Business Members

Business Members

Show Sponsors Mrs. Katherine Glenn Mr. and Mrs. William B. Hewitt Publix Super Markets Charities The Albert Sottile Foundation - Joyce Long Darby and Mary Ellen Long Way South Carolina Electric & Gas Company Mr. and Mrs. Steven Swanson Wells Fargo Woodfield South Point The Henry and Sylvia Yaschik Foundation

Platinum Business Members: Appalachian Springs Charleston Magazine Handsome Properties

Silver Business Member: Robert Bosch, LLC John C. Dunnan Gallery

Bronze Business Members: College of Charleston School Gold Business Members: of Arts Blackbaud, Inc. Dunes West Golf Club Southern Lumber and Durlach Associates Millwork Corporation Rosen, Rosen & Hagood, LLC Vendue Inn Taylor & Associates

Media Sponsor Charleston City Paper

Family Series Sponsor Piggly Wiggly Carolina Company

Annual Gala Sponsors Gold Associate: Firefly Records SCBT

Silver Corporate: Bluestein & Douglas, LLC Dixon Hughes Goodman, LLP Brandon and Katherine Guest Wells Fargo Private Bank

Friends of the Gala Buddy Bebergal Robbie Rice Dietrich Haynes, Inc. Doug and Cheryl Majewski Palmetto Exterminators

Next Stage Donor Mr. and Mrs. John and Jill Chalsty Dr. Celeste and Mr. Charles Patrick Ms. Susan Pearlstine and Mrs. Jan Lipov Mrs. Anita Zucker

Education Sponsor BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina BMW Manufacturing Co. Robert Bosch LLC Mr. Bryan Cribb Doug and Jennifer McElveen Pearlstine Family Fund of Coastal Community Foundation of SC Mrs. Marie-Louise Ramsdale Target Stores Jerry and Anita Zucker Family Endowment Fund

Director’s Circle Reception Hosts Elliot Davis, LLC Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice, LLP

UPstage Reception Host Blind Tiger Pub

Actors Fund

The TheatreWings High School Apprentice Program, is a FREE intense, hands-on, pre-professional theatre-training program for students in grades 9-12. For more information contact Marybeth Clark, Director of Education, at (843) 856-3822 or mclark@charlestonstage.com. 2011/12 TheatreWings Apprentices Abigail Allardice...................................School of the Arts Grace Barry........................................Wando High School Brooke Bazemore................................School of the Arts Grace Benigni........................................School of the Arts Sam Book...............................................Academic Magnet Sam Cass.................................................School of the Arts Sam Chase..............................................School of the Arts Prentice Clark........................................School of the Arts Kaitlyn Fulford.............................................. Home School Rachel Hunsinger................................School of the Arts Riv Jenkins............................................Academic Magnet Anna Kalik..............................................School of the Arts Sophie Kendrick...................................School of the Arts Emilie Laplante.....................................School of the Arts Lorinda Lofton.................................................Porter-Gaud Sydney Mack........................................Academic Magnet Benjamin McCoy..................................School of the Arts Eva McLaurin................................................. Home School Aaron Morgan..................................Wando High School Nikita Narodnitskiy.............................School of the Arts Elizabeth Norton.............................................Porter-Gaud Ray Nugent...........................................Academic Magnet Emily Kahn Perry..............................Wando High School Cory Popowski......................................School of the Arts Maddy Seabrook.................................School of the Arts Timothy Shaw.......................................School of the Arts Shelby Smith........................................Academic Magnet Cory Stegelin.........................................School of the Arts Victor Swatzyna...................................School of the Arts Caroline Todd........................................School of the Arts

Mark Elliott Motley Foundation

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2011/12 Director’s Circle Members Director’s Circle is a group of Charlestonians who wish to promote the growing professionalism, creativity and excellence of Charleston Stage performances and arts education programs. Members provide support for professional actors and musicians from across the U.S. and underwrite its extensive arts education programs, which reach over 20,000 Lowcountry youth each season. For more information, please contact the Development Office at (843) 856-5316.

Director’s Circle Box Members

Members as of February 20, 2012

First Federal of Charleston

Director’s Circle Platinum Members Jill and John Chalsty Ned C. Ginsburg and Jocelyn B. Cate Brandon and Katherine Guest

Mr. and Mrs. William B. Hewitt Celeste and Charles Patrick Joe and Claire Schady Michael Shewan and Pat Patrick

Ted and Susan Soderlund Mrs. Maurice Thompson Wells Fargo Private Bank Dave Marley

Joanne and Morgan Morton Mr. and Mrs. J. Darryl Reyna Dr. and Mrs. J.W. Rhodes Lisa and Joe Rice

James H. Suddeth Dr. and Mrs. Chris Tountas

Director’s Circle Gold Members Dennis Drew Elisabeth and Spencer Lynch James and Beatty Martin Jim and Mary Millette

Director’s Circle Silver Members The Addlestone Foundation Susan Addlestone Berlijn Natalie and Scott Bluestein Sarah and Michael Book Nancy Bush Andy and Alfina Capelli Mr. and Mrs. Stuart Cass Jackie Clark Thomas and Alma Clymer Janis and Charlie Coe Jeanne Condon; Merrill Lynch Dr. and Mrs. Rand Cuthbertson Nancy and Ralph Edwards

Bonnie Fraser Sam and Pat Gilner Katherine Glenn Ann M. Hanlon MD Wes and Donna Henry Christina S. Homer Edward and Gina Kozek Mr. and Mrs. Bill Lyles Suzanne and Paul Lynch Mr. Douglas McCoy and Mr. Danny Jones Valerie B. Morris, CofC Barb and Bob Nicolai

Darice Norton David and Anne Peterson- Hutto Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm Rhodes Debbie and Greg Rothschild Lisa and Robert Silvers Catherine and Christopher South W. Cecil and Charline Stricklin Ferd and Nancy Tedesco O.L. and Toni Thompson Tristan Restaurant Paul and Jennifer Vannatta Sandra and Philip Vineyard

Director’s Circle Young Professional Members Monica and Casey Lavin Jennifer and Sean Murray

2012/13 UPstage Members

UPstage Members Jana Baker Diane Clarke

Mr. and Mrs. John Rosen Halsey and Meg Schreier

Ryan Glenn Brittany Murray

Joshua and Cowles Whitley

Members as of February 20, 2012 Sarah and Hanes Swingle

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2011/12 Charleston Stage Contributors Contributions to Charleston Stage directly support our vast arts education initiatives that reach over 20,000 Lowcountry youth annually. Year round, students participate in Charleston Stage’s in-school outreach enrichment workshops, TheatreWings Apprentice Program for high school students, after school acting classes, and low-cost and free special school-day matinees. This funding also provides scholarships for underprivileged youth. All contributions to Charleston Stage are fully tax deductible. For more information, please contact the Development Office at (843) 856-5316. The following contributors have made donations to Charleston Stage between May 1, 2011 - February 20, 2012:

Benefactors ($25,000 +) City of Charleston The Gaylord and Dorothy Donnelley Foundation Piggly Wiggly Carolina Company  Wachovia Wells Fargo Foundation  The Henry and Sylvia Yaschik Foundation 

Angels ($10,000 - $24,999) The Albert Sottile Foundation - Mary Ellen Long Way and Joyce Long Darby Mr. and Mrs. John Chalsty Mr. and Mrs. William B. Hewitt  Mr. and Mrs. Douglas McElveen Dr. Celeste and Mr. Charles Patrick Ms. Susan Pearlstine and Mrs. Jan Lipov South Carolina Arts Commission The Jerry and Anita Zucker Family Foundation Inc.

Mr. and Mrs. Gregory Rothschild Sandpiper Retirement Community Halsey and Meg Schreier Michael Shewan and Pat Patrick  Mr. and Mrs. Christopher South Mrs. Maurice Thompson  Mr. and Mrs. Philip (Flip) Vineyard  Andrea Volpe Mr. Joshua Whitley Womble Carlyle Sandridge and Rice, LLP 

Producers ($1,000 - $2,499)

Addlestone Foundation Susan Addlestone Berlijn Saul Alexander Foundation The Allardice Family Anthony and Linda Bakker Blackbaud, Inc.  Drs.  Michael and Sarah Book Ms. Nancy Bush  Grantors Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Capelli  ($5,000 - $9,999) Mr. and Mrs. Stuart Cass  BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina Jackie Clark Colbert Family Fund Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Clymer  Natalie and Scott Bluestein Mr. and Mrs. Charles Coe  Firefly Records Dr. and Mrs. Barbara Cuthbertson  First Federal of Charleston Mr. Dennis Drew  Mrs. Katherine Glenn  Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Edwards  Mr. and Mrs. Brandon Guest The Dubose and Dorothy Heyward Memorial Fund  Ms. Bonnie Fraser Mr. and Mrs. Dave Marley - Wells Fargo Private Bank Ned C. Ginsburg and Jocelyn B. Cate  Dr. Ann Hanlon The Mark Elliot Motley Foundation Haynes, Inc. Pearlstine Family Fund of Coastal Community Dr. and Mrs. Wesley Henry Foundation of SC Heritage Trust Federal Credit Union Publix Super Markets Charities Sam, Cindy, Liz and Jeb Hines  SCBT Ms. Christina Homer South Carolina Electric & Gas Company Jonathan Kiser Mr. and Mrs. Steven Swanson  Paul and Louise Kohlheim  Woodfield South Point Mr. and Mrs. Edward and Regina Kozek Monica and Casey Lavin Executive Producer Ted and Tricia Legasey ($2,500 - $4,999) William and Jeanne Lyles Bob Bell Paul and Suzanne Lynch  Bocci’s Italian Restaurant James and Beatty Martin BMW Manufacturing Co. Mr. Douglas McCoy and Mr. Danny Jones Robert Bosch, LLC The Mil Corporation  Charleston County Dean Valerie Morris  Jeanne Condon - Merrill Lynch Joanne and Morgan Morton Sam and Pat Gilner Ms. Darice Norton Dixon Hughes Goodman, LLP Dr. and Mrs. John Palms   Elliott Davis, LLC  Mr. and Mrs. David Peterson-Hutto  Frankie at Seaside Mrs. Marie-Louise Ramsdale Handsome Properties Mr. and Mrs. J. Darryl Reyna  Orton Jackson  Dr. and Mrs. J.W. Rhodes  Joanna Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm Rhodes  Mr. and Mrs. Spencer Lynch Mr. and Mrs. Joe Rice Suzanne and Paul Lynch  Mr. and Mrs. John Rosen Mr. and Mrs. Jim Millette  Dr. and Mrs. Robert M. Sade  Jennifer and Sean Murray Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Schady 

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Mr. and Mrs. Robert Silvers Dr. and Mrs. William Simpson  Mr. and Mrs. Ted Soderlund  Southern Lumber and Millwork Corporation  Mr. and Mrs. W. Cecil Stricklin  James H. Suddeth  Target Stores Mr. and Mrs. Ferdinand Tedesco  Mr. and Mrs. O.L. Thompson  Dr. and Mrs. Chris Tountas  Tristan Restaurant  Mr. Paul Vannatta Vendue Inn Andrea Volpe 

Supporting Players ($500 - $999) Lauran Chapman Beacham Buddy Begeral Jon and Hayley Carter College of Charleston, SOTA  Dunes West Golf Club  John Durlach Associates Rick and Diane Jerue Sandra Klein Douglas and Kay Kugley  Sue and Gregory Lenox Doug and Cheryl Majewski Stephanie P. McDonald Arthur and Elizabeth Namerow Rosen, Rosen & Hagood, LLC Mr. and Mrs. Halsey Schreier  Taylor & Associates Edward and Liesl Westbrook Robert Zinko 

Patrons ($250 - $499) Marylou Ardrey Robert and Jane Avinger John Bennett  Mr. and Mrs. Richard Betts Mr. and Mrs. Tom Boyer Theresa Brim and Ken Kwochka Gearin Broderick Mr. and Mrs. Randy Clark Anne and Michael Compton Jeffery Craver and Michael Rzepka Bobby Cremins Charitable Fund Robbi Rice Dietrich John and Karen Farrell Jacqueline Fritz Tim and Teresa Fulford Mr. & Mrs. David K. Hannemann  Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Herbert Robert and Judy Horst Heidi Lantin Charles and Joan Lipuma  Terence Moore

Mr. and Mrs. Robert Morris Richard Muenow  Barb and Bob Nicolai Palmetto Exterminators, Inc. Susan and Ned Payne Scott and Marlene Quattlebaum Grace and Rick Reed Dr. and Mrs. J.W. Rhodes Roger & Darla Ryan Ann and Bruce Thompson O.L. and Toni Thompson Julian and Erline Wiles The Wise Family 

Friends (up to $249) Brian Ackerman Carroll Ahearn Jayne and Christopher Ahlstrom Herbert Ailes J Michael Albano Eric Anderson Claire Angelac Mr. Ray Ardis Doc and Marylou Ardrey Jana Baker Ed and Ann Bartko Arthur Baxter Steve Bedard Sue Bennett Barry and Ann Blake Ryan and Sharyn Bluestein Col. and Mrs. Raymond Borelli Tim Brennan Vanja Broadwater Gearin Broderick Dennis Brooks Wayne L. Burdick Louis and Karen Burnett Zachary Burt Donna Butler Donna Canada Jean Carlton Carolina Sound Communications/ Muzak/ Perry Family Thomas Carr Enid Causey Mr. and Mrs. H. Chapman McKay Diane Clarke Nicholas Clekis George Coleman, Jr. James Connolly Julia Parker Copeland Peter and Marion Cotton Bill Crater DD Crawford Dean and Hannah Creed Bryan and Kari Cribb Mike and Marcella Curley Marilyn Curry


Laura Day Julie Darnell Sarah de Barros Larry Deckel Prof. Gordon Dehler and Prof. Ann Welsh Gail Diehl G.P. Diminich Dr. Carol J. Drowota Pat Duker Chris Edwards Howard D. Edwards, Jr. Shelley Elliott Lori Evans Linda Flannery Jacob Frohreich Donald and Jane Furtado Patricia Gatens Mr. and Mrs. Steve Gilbert Mr. and Mrs. Richard Andre Gillard Ryan Glenn Nancy and Jim Gouse Eric Hadley Michael Haga Mary Ham Keitt Hane Martha Hane Helen Harper Lynn Harrington Eugene Hatchell Hellman & Yates, PA Annie and Neill Herring JoAnne and Nelson Hicks Kandy and Bill Higley Mr. and Mrs. Paul Hines Lori Hinman Roy C. and JuleAnn Hoffman Peter Holmi Whitney Hoskins Law Offices of Richard A. Hricik, PA Krista Huff Luther Hughes Don and Donna Ingram Kelly James Lavern James Rich and Liz Jenkins Mr. and Mrs. Rivers T. Jenkins, III. Myra Jones Nat Jones Laura Judson Lisa Kappel John Kearney Shannon Kennedy The Kennemur Family Alexandra Key Annette Kibler Harriet Kilgore Anne Kilpatrick Randy and Kaye Koonce Carl Korn Peggy and Eric Krawcheck Dorothy and Lois Kronemer Bob and Jackie Lane Judith Lemon Mr. and Mrs. Larry Lipov William and Barbara Lohse David and Terry Lupo Christopher and Elizabeth Mack John Mahala John and Temmy Mahoney Chrysoula Malogianni Robert Mandra

Carol J. Manheim, P.T. Charles Maraziti Mindi Martin Dennis and Ann Maxwell Joseph McAlhany Ralph McCullough Herbert and Diane McGuire Ben McInnes David and Karen McLaurin Peter and Bernice Mehlman Rhetta and Joe Mendelsohn Joanne and John Milkereit Mr. and Mrs. Donald Miller David Milli Albert Montillo, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. A.R. Montillo David Moore Mr. Michael J. Mrlik Donald Muglia Brittany Murray Renee Murray Brad Neville Curt Neville Madison Nix Anthony Oglietti Katherine Orlando Barbara Passmore Irene Pechenaya Reverend and Mrs. Philip G. Porcher, Jr. Ralph Principe Ruby Qurashi Christian Rabens

Susan and James Radley Danny Reed Edna and Al Roberds Susan and Robert Rosen A. Rougier-Chapman Maureen Ryan Nicholas and Barbara Santella Katherine Scardato Neil Schneider Mr. and Mrs. Marvin H. Sears, III Timothy and Tina Shaw Leonard Silverman Craig Sjurset Barbara and Stuart Smith Colton Smith Richard and Mary Gus Smith Tyson Smith Barbara Lou and George Smyth Mr. and Mrs. Larry Solice Kelly Springs Corin and Deveaux Stockton Hilda and Hal Sugg T Swartzlander Sarah and Hanes Swingle Francis and Ann Hurd Thomas June Todd Susan and James Trusso Mr. and Mrs. H. Wayne Unger, Jr. Drs. Jane Tyler and Curtis Worthington Jennifer Wain Mary Walker Kristin Wallace

Susan Walters Frank Warder Christina Watkins Greg and Kristin White John White Jr. Blake Whitney Mr. Larry Wiessmann Ms. Marlene Williamon Charles and Toula Williams Henry and Shirley Wolf Dr. and Mrs. Clawrence Woodruff John and Kathy Woods Sandra Woods Beth and Matt Yaun Mary and Benjamin Zamora

Memorials and Honorariums Bryan and Kari Cribb - In Memory of David Ardrey Philip and Patricia Greenberg In Memory of Jack Vane Mary-E Godfrey - In Memory of David Ardrey Jonathan and Sally Krell In Honor of Truere Rothschild’s 3rd Birthday Greg and Debbie Rothschild In Memory of Michael Goldberg Greg and Debbie Rothschild In Memory of Stevie Steinert Dr. Sigmund and Terry Schildcrout In Memory of David Ardrey Seabrook Island Club - In Memory of James Turck

Where To Dine Each year, these amazing restaurants lend their complete support to Charleston Stage’s Annual Dinner and Gala, Member Rewards Card Program, and UPstage Events. Help us express our gratitude by visiting and using their services often.

Annual Dinner and Gala Restaurants 39 Rue de Jean • 39 John Street • Charleston, SC • (843) 722-8881 Blu Restaurant and Bar • 1 Center Street • Folly Beach, SC • (843) 588-6464 Circa 1886 Restaurant • 149 Wentworth Street • Charleston, SC • (843) 853-7828 Graze • 863 Houston Northcutt Boulevard • Mount Pleasant, SC • (843) 606-2493 Grill 225 • 225 East Bay Street • Charleston, SC • (877) 440-2250 Jasmine Porch • 1 Sanctuary Beach Drive • Kiawah Island, SC • (843) 768-6253 The Library at Vendue Inn • 19 Vendue Range • Charleston, SC • (843) 577-7970 McCrady’s Restaurant • 2 Unity Alley • Charleston, SC • (843) 577-0025 MUSE Restaurant and Wine Bar • 82 Society Street • Charleston, SC • (843) 577-1102 Ocean Room • 1 Sanctuary Beach Drive • Kiawah Island, SC • (843) 768-6253 Poogan’s Porch • 72 Queen Street • Charleston, SC • (843) 577-2337 Tristan • 10 Linguard Street • Charleston, SC • (843) 534-2155

Member Rewards Card Restaurants 82 Queen Restaurant • 82 Queen Street • Charleston, SC • (843) 723-7591 Blossom Restaurant • 171 East Bay Street • Charleston, SC • (843) 722-9200 Bocci’s Italian Restaurant • 158 Church Street • Charleston, SC • (843) 720-2121 Circa 1886 Restaurant • 149 Wentworth Street • Charleston, SC • (843) 853-7828 Cypress Restaurant • 167 East Bay Street • Charleston, SC • (843) 720-0111 Hyman’s Seafood • 215 Meeting Street • Charleston, SC • (843) 723-6000 The Library at Vendue Inn • 19 Vendue Range • Charleston, SC • (843) 577-7970 Magnolias Restaurant • 185 East Bay Street • Charleston, SC • (843) 577-7771 McCrady’s Restaurant • 2 Unity Alley • Charleston, SC • (843) 577-0025 MUSE Restaurant and Wine Bar • 82 Society Street • Charleston, SC • (843) 577-1102

UPstage Reception Host Blind Tiger Pub • 38/36 Broad Street • Charleston, SC • (843) 577-0088

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Coming Up Next!

April 6 - 28, 2012

Book by William R. Brown Music and Lyrics by Charlie Smalls Directed by Marybeth Clark Musical Direction by Amanda Wansa Choreography by Cara Dolan

Adults: $38 - $52

Dock Street Theatre Sponsored by:

Lead Title Sponsor: The Henry and Sylvia Yaschik Foundation

Supporting Sponsor: Woodfield South Point

Ease On Down, Ease On Down the Road This imaginative romp through Frank Baum’s The Wonderful Wizard of Oz captured 7 Tony Awards when it opened on Broadway in 1975. After becoming a film with Diana Ross in 1978, it was largely forgotten. But The Wiz’s clever retelling of the Oz Story and its acclaimed sassy score (Ease on Down the Road, Believe in Yourself, Don’t Nobody Bring Me No Bad News) are too memorable to be forgotten. Just over the rainbow, the magical world of The Wiz awaits. Rediscover this legendary Broadway triumph in Charleston Stage’s imaginative multi-cultural production.

Seniors (60+): $36 - $52

Students (25 and Under): $22 - $52

TICKETS AVAILABLE ONLINE 24/7 AT CHARLESTONSTAGE.COM OR CALL THE BOX OFFICE AT (843) 577-7183, M-F 1PM-5PM.

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Inga Binga Program