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WRITTEN AND PUT TOGETHER BY THE BETHANY PRESS TEAM

...“At least this Bugle’s in tune!”... Issue 14

Spring 2009

Ian’s Story by Ian Weatherston I arrived in Edinburgh with just a holdall, after leaving Ipswich. My head wasn‘t in a good place at all. I ended up in the Royal Ed for a week and a half. Then I was shifted into a B&B in Leith. I went to Pilrig church where I started talking to an old guy who told me about Bethany.

I‘ve started volunteering at Barnardos and going to some groups to improve my literacy and computer skills. For me, it was like starting all over again. I felt nervous. Coming to these groups gave me a lot of confidence as I learnt the things I should have learnt years ago. The staff have been very patient. Learning is what you make of it. If you decide to do it, stick it out.

I Was Like a Wee Lost Soul When I came to Bethany for an interview they got in touch with a place I used to go to get support for drinking. Bethany offered me a temporary flat and I got a support worker. When I moved in my Dad died. I was like a wee lost soul. I didn‘t know where to turn and what I was doing.

I Had a Turning Point Then gradually things started to change and the mist started to lift. I had a turning point when I made some good conscious decisions about my life. This was through talking about things and getting support from Allison, my support worker, and my CPN. Then I found out I can do things without drink. I never used to think there were nice people in the world. Giving up drink has made me stop beating myself up.

Ian busy decorating: Photo by Mark Rintoul

My Own Permanent Address I‘m not saying my life is brilliant now, it‘s a lot better than what it was. Now I‘ve got my own permanent address, I‘ve been busy decorating and collecting things for my flat, putting my personal touch to it. I‘ve got my driving licence back and I‘m hoping to start work with Fareshare soon, driving their vans. This has made me feel more settled. I‘m proud of myself for what I‘ve achieved. This is through all the help I‘ve had. I wouldn‘t have all that I‘ve got today if I was still drinking like I used to. If you want help, go and ask for it. Don‘t let pride get in your way!

Included in this issue… A Fond Farewell

2

Rabbie Burns

4

Dog Fouling in Leith Play Area

6

Visit to the Royal Yacht Britannia

7

Food Waste, or is it Surplus?

8

Jean Muir Exhibition

9

Memories of a Young Dad

10

Situation Acceptable?

11

Valentine’s Day Poems

12

International Women’s Day

13

Reviews

14

Bible Book Search

15

Sudoku Fun!

15

And lots more…!!


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My Trip to Blackpool by John Cook One Saturday I booked some tickets to Blackpool for me and my daughter, Megan, as my friends were going there for the day. The tickets were only £20 and it was my first time there. Well it was early to bed that night as we had to get up at 6am the next morning.

What a laugh we had, for me it was like being a big kid again, I could not sleep that night with all of the excitement. In the morning we all set off at 7.40am to get there in time for the coach. It was a wet and windy day. John and I had a fag before the bus came. When the bus finally arrived, I thought about time!

The night before John, myself and Annabel made up the sandwiches for the coach trip there.

Half way along the journey we played some bingo- it was good fun but I never won a game, maybe next time!

Hospital Stay

A Fond Farewell

by Douglas Forbes

by Keith Janes

Between Christmas 2008 and the New Year I had a horrible experience in hospital. I was taken ill at home and I rang NHS 24.

Come full circle in ten years: Liverpool to Leith, and back again. For the most part my stay up here has been great. I return to live in Liverpool only to be closer to long-standing friends and family who, in the West Midlands, would only be a two hour train ride away, instead of seven from here.

They arranged for a taxi to take me to the Western General. The doctor there referred me to the Royal Infirmary. Eventually they took some samples and I was admitted to a ward. I was in agony. Once on a ward, the nurses were kind and helpful. But I had a whole night of pain, fear and uncertainty. Someone from Destiny Church came to visit me while I was in hospital. Today, 12th January 2009, I feel OK. I am looking to the future and hoping to find work, perhaps in a supermarket or cleaning, both of which I have done before.

I wouldn‘t have missed my time in Edinburgh for anything. I have made friends, both Christians and otherwise, and these friendships will endure. Bethany Christian Trust has enabled me to visit places and sights I probably would never have gone to without them, for example, the Falkirk Wheel, the

Blackpool promenade

On the way back we all had a sing song. Megan had a ball and she has twisted my arm into taking her again next year. For £20 it is worth it!

Royal Yacht Britannia, holidays in Arbroath and Aberfeldy, day trips and picnics on the beach...the list goes on. And of course, I found my faith up here. There have been bad times over the last ten years too, losing my Mum being the worst. My ongoing ‗O.C.D‘ problems came and went and came again. But always, always, there were (there still are), folk around me who helped and supported me through the toughest times. I shall always be grateful to them. They will live in my heart and memory forever. And so, having already bade you loyal readers a fond farewell, I do so once more and for the last time. Take care, thank you and God Bless.

London Underground

Gorgie Farm

by Susan Coughlin

by Sue Richards

Eetchy screetchy trains Damaging my brains What‘s the hurry? What‘s the rush? When you arrive Your brains are mush

I used to volunteer at Gorgie City Farm. It‘s free to go and see the animals. They have a pig and ducks and ponies and lots more!


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My Busy Life

Being Baptised

by Margo Grant

by Douglas Forbes

My week starts with the Bugle Group at Bethany. I write articles, poems and stories for the magazine. Time flies while you are having fun! But also we share ideas about what to put in– and drink lots of tea and coffee!

I was baptised on June 8th 2007. I went to Roots, a course telling you about the Bible and Jesus. It prepares you for baptism.

After the Bugle, I go to Leith FM to DJ between 1.45 and 2.30 pm. We play music for the listeners and we promote Bethany and local events. Rocco and Mel are training me to be a duty manager. I go shopping next and then home to watch TV and listen to music.

Baptism at Destiny Church involves a full immersion. It takes place after the service. It makes you feel happy, you feel the presence of the Holy Spirit.

My keyworker comes from 9-12 noon. She is wonderful—like a sister to me. In the afternoon I go shopping and sometimes to the cinema if there is a good film on.

Destiny has a special baptism pool, a bit like the one in this picture.

A Blanket by Joan McDougall

I go to Ocean Terminal on Wednesday afternoons and sit in the café where I watch all the people and any ships coming in. Sometimes I take photos of the scenery over the water. It is like being on the continent.

Cold bitter shivering frosty night Where we gonna sleep? How do we sleep tonight, from the burling, brutal, biting icy wind? Royal Yacht Britannia

I am collected on Thursday mornings to go to the Lunch Club. We do arts and crafts and have a four course lunch. The staff and other pensioners are friendly and amusing. Once more, I relax in the evening. On Fridays I go to Bethany for the Get Creative group. We make pictures, collage, masks and other imaginative projects. We are doing a special project for the Burns‘ Homecoming Year. Saturday is my day of rest—a long lie, washing and go out if I feel like it. I watch TV but often there is not much I want to watch, as I do not like reality shows. On Sunday I go to church and then visit my Aunt Evelyn for lunch. That is my busy week—Then I am ready to start again!

A door in the street, No…no…don‘t want to be seen. In at the back of a shop curled up in a black bin liner, Cardboard box for a blanket. Where did it all go wrong? Why is it happening to me? Remember when I was strong, Seems so long ago. If, but, why, if, but, why? Sick of this self sympathy cry, No longer want to die. At least there is some hope, For me and not forgetting you too! Seek out from the ashes, help, support. One step at a time, can‘t do no more, One step at a time, lifting from the floor, Going towards that hopeful door. Negative grin into the bin. Positive door want to explore, Want to explore, got to explore.


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St Monans 1 by Susan Coughlin

I took my nerves out for the day, To St Monans by the sea, My neurons were complaining, I‘d treated them abominably. The soothing sounds of the sea, Were so healing to me, The air so clean and refreshing, Bringing much needed clarity.

Present Day Rabbie by Gerry Mckenna Just what would poor old Rabbie say If Bingo he was asked to play? I cannae see him joining in In fact, I really think he‘d win. He‘d much prefer a postman‘s knock Including some canoodling talk.

St Monans 2

A sweet lassie to ensure a kiss

by Susan Coughlin

What‘s Bingo got compared to this? I just cannae see it fitting well

St Monans is Pie Jesu to me, Uplifting, refreshing and by the sea, Restoring me so wonderfully, Pie Jesu Dominae.

With pipes and toasts and haggis swell. Mashed neeps and tatties of the best Why can‘t Bingo have a rest? Just think of me while you all eat hearty I‘ll be at a Benidorm show, Singing with you oor Rabbie‘s rhyme Now all together AULD LANG SYNE

One Day Doon the Glen by Steven Gibson

A friend and I were heading for Crail last year, to go camping. We were in the East Neuk of Fife. It was the Easter weekend so I was worried there would be no room for us , because we hadn’t booked. I got chatting to a local man on the coach. He gave us some great advice. A place I’d never heard of, St. Monans, was cheaper and bound to have places. So St. Monans it was, right on the coast, like Crail. A sweet quiet place with a harbour and great coastal walks. I loved it so much these poems just came to me.

One day Doon the Glen Stood a moose Wi‘ a thousand men. Wi‘ cries of ‗FREEDOM‘ As they rushed forth ‗Doon wi‘ the Sassanachs‘ As they clashed with the English. But me, I‘m just a moose Wi‘ wars I make nae banter I think I‘ll just turn and head hame Tae my wife and children.


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Being That Sense of Quest

Nature at its best

by Automatum

by Gordon Cameron

Putting my nose to the window,

In Tyne Park, out in the ground

To filter the senses.

Squirrels can be found

Remembering old places and friends,

Eating nuts, in their element.

Fading in the isolation of transition.

Swans appear in the river,

Snow has fallen, blanketing the world,

Swimming so elegantly and swiftly.

A shroud to still the crystal calm.

The tall trees tower into the eternal sky

A sense to decant and cherish,

Where the birds sing their lullaby.

With a toast upon the perfection of cut glass.

All is peaceful and quiet.

To look up to the sky, soar upon a cloud.

The Prince of Peace hovers over the place.

To circle around a singular fir tree from my window,

It‘s a happy day, joy abounds everywhere.

Nestling upon a circular valley forever.

A new era has come.

Like a bird, in my dream of recurring thought.

I see that now as an accompaniment, For that dream is a memory now. That bird conscience, to float upon the wing of air, Spirited away, just being that sense of quest.

Communion For A Friend

Memories by Joan McDougall

by Automatum The soup‘s ready, broccoli, green verdant mushrooms, Button, past their prime, but cold and silky, almost as if meat. Touch like rubber, vestigial filters left as smell upon the finger, Brittle they snap, as if host broken for Easter. A Communion to share with a friend, Some garlic, the faithful companion with salt as an accelerant. Gently, shallots cut fine, A final topping of mustard, to jolt the flavour to another level. A simple farmhouse soup. All we need now is a simple log fire, As an accompaniment of warmth and crackle, And fireside chatter.

Stories of old Stories of new, Getting together, Right out of the blue. Toastie drop in, Women‘s Group, Beans on toast, Anne‘s Homemade soup, Great for the brain, Helps me keep sane. All in all, all in all, Such memorable times Back to the big ―smoke‖ To work with the precious vulnerable folk, The precious vulnerable folk. I would just like tae say it’s been a wonderful visit. I so admire all the people who volunteer in the different organisations, giving up their time to do really important work.


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Dog Fouling in Leith Play Area by Janet McWhirter I live in Leith and I have two boys who go to Leith Primary School. I am very, very angry at all the dogs mess and litter that is in the Leith links play area, in front of the school. Not all dog owners let their dogs in this area, because there are signs that say ―NO DOGS ALLOWED!‖

Pupils share their opinions

In the pupils letters they said; We found dogs dirt, broken glass and litter in the links, most of the flowers are killed from dogs and people stamping on them; I am very disappointed that some people are letting their dogs foul in a play area that we play in; We would be very grateful if you would use a different patch of grass to let your dog run free and to do the toilet; We all love the links!

The signs are too small

However, irresponsible dog owners still let their dogs foul this area. PLEASE STOP IT NOW!! I recently interviewed Mr Friend, the headmaster at Leith Primary School, about this and he said; It’s unacceptable that the children are put at risk of being harmed, and it’s unnecessary. We see people just let their dogs run around there in a way that they wouldn’t on the rest of the links. From the point of view of lazy dog walkers, it has created a pen. There is nothing that says the triangle belongs to the school...but I think the fence was clearly created in order for the school to make use of it. There are dogs repeatedly fouling the area. We want the children to use it and the signage is inadequate.

Children play here

A lot of the children wrote letters to irresponsible dog walkers to persuade them not to let their dogs in the play area.

CCTV Van at work

Mark told me about the CCTV vans that are designed to deal with the offence of dog fouling. Before photographs and filming can be done the wardens have to follow certain procedures. However, CCTV has been used extensively as recently February 2009. Part of the problem is that there are not enough bins on Leith links, but the wardens believe that there are plenty. I‘ve seen dog poo just abandoned in bags, in the area.

The pupils have since been involved in a week long campaign to catch offenders who allow their dogs to foul their play area. Some of the children letters were then attached to the fence to discourage the dog owners from doing this. Not enough bins?!

Now I plan to ask the council when the Links will get more bins and decent sized signs?‖ DID YOU KNOW?  Dogs faeces may contain

Well done kids!

I discovered the Greener Leith website where I started a discussion about dog fouling in the play area. There were lots of responses. You can go to www.greenerleith.org. Through the forum I was put in touch with Mark Bannon, an environmental warden working in the area. I asked Mark why wardens are not seen every day. He said his team of four are responsible for wards 4,5,12 and 13. I think that the council needs to employ more wardens, working in each ward.

worms that cause Toxocariasis, which can result in serious eye disorders and blindness  You can help to stamp out dog

fouling in your area by running a local campaign. Find out more by calling the Keep Edinburgh Clean programme co. ordination on 0131 529 2703.  In line with current law, fixed

penalty tickets of £60 are issued to anyone who fails to clean-up after their pets. If the fine is not paid, a penalty of up to £500 can be issued by the procurator fiscal.


Visit To The Royal Yacht Britannia

the queen. This room is the largest on the boat and its walls are covered with an array of by Sean Kennedy ornamental gifts from leaders from all over the world including On Friday 27th Feb 2009, members Canada, Papa New Guinea and of the Bethany Christian Centre and South Africa. tenants supported by the Bethany Supported Housing visited the Royal The engine room with all its Yacht Britannia. complicated-looking dials and meters must have been a hot sweaty place to work in and yet The Britannia is a well preserved every nook boat, owned by the queen, which and cranny has been has been used as a polished holiday and haven for restored to herself and pristine members of condition. her family. The boat has hosted four royal honeymoons and I enjoyed lounging in the sailor‘s welcomed aboard renowned figures mess, where a couple of the such as Bill Clinton, Ronald Reagan clients enjoyed, arm-in-arm, donning the peaked hats. One of and Nelson Mandela. the support workers proceeded to entertain us as he collapsed over Interesting features include the a fake pint of ale. mammoth dining room area for those fortunate enough to dine with The living quarters of the Royal

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marines were frugal with slim bunk -beds, three stories high. One would have to be attentive if you were stationed on the top bunk as to sit upright would be impossible with the low cabin roof. One would also have to be careful as falling out of bed was, also, an easy possibility. Not that a comfy bed was a high priority with many officers being hard at work, eighteen hours per day. In stark contrast, we were suitably prepared for a café latte and a bite of chocolate in the Debenhams Cafeteria, after our 90 minute tour. A thoroughly pleasurable afternoon was enjoyed by all and we would all like to thank the Royal Yacht Britannia for the free tickets which provided an insightful and joyous afternoon.

Trams in Edinburgh As the trams are months behind schedule, millions of pounds over budget and work appears to have come to a halt, we asked the Men‘s group, what do you think?

What happens when another vehicle blocks a trams progress? Every tram behind has to come to a halt til the problem is cleared. This weakness alone makes a nonsense of the whole idea of trams in Edinburgh.

They could have spent the money on better things. It‘s a waste of money. Our soldiers are putting their lives at risk and dying because they need better equipment, and the NHS is always looking for money. Anyway, who are the trams going to benefit? Nobody living in Edinburgh, It‘s for the tourists and politicians. I think the money would have been better spent putting people back to work in a way that would benefit Edinburgh as a whole. They can stick the trams where the sun don‘t shine because people who are in charge never have a clue what it‘s like for ordinary folk, it seems the left hand doesn‘t know what the right hand is doing.

The trams are a fiasco.

Gordon Innes

George Collins

I find that the tram project is a real inconvenience to the public, and I also feel that the type of money being spent on this, could have been spent on more worthwhile enterprises. John Gibson

People with wheelchairs and electric scooters are not allowed to go along Princes Street because of the tram works. Everyone is getting annoyed with all the diversions caused by the trams. John Cook

Henry Watt

Photos by Mark Small The biggest stuff up since sliced bread. John McNeil

While I believe it will be ―worth it in the end‖- it better had be! Local businesses and those living on top of the labrynth of road works, have suffered terribly. Someone somewhere had the romantic ―head in the clouds‖ idea that ―wouldn‘t it be lovely to go back to the age of the trams, when the world was young, you could leave your doors unlocked and fish and chips cost £1‖. Get real! This is 2009. We are what we are, not what we were! Keith Janes

The trams will only go from the airport to Newhaven. What about the rest of Edinburgh‘s folk? What about those on the South Side? Most folk live well away from the trams. The public don‘t have a say. Even the inspector in the exhibition said that the public don‘t have a say when I went in to discuss the issue with them. Stewart Monaghan


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Food Waste, Or is it Surplus?

How Happiness Changed my Life

by Janet McWhirter, Ian Weatherston and Shaun Rodgers

by Jamal Salah

As a group we were interested in food waste so we all went to visit the Fareshare project. This is our article about it. The government is keen to tell us what to do about our food waste. However, I don‘t think members of the government live in the real world. They had the G8 summit about food waste but were eating all the best quality food, which a lot of people in this country cannot afford to buy, and yet they have mountains of food in storage. Why do they not send it all to the people in this world that are dying of hunger each day? In this day and age nobody should die of hunger. We can ask our local supermarkets what they do with all their left over food, and if they are not already, campaign to get them to take part in projects, such as Fareshare. All shops should know about Fareshare. Fareshare is a project that redistributes surplus food to homeless people. It is estimated that 70% of homeless people are malnourished. It is shocking that 8-9 tonnes of surplus food a week is put in the bin. This

could be donated to Fareshare. Supermarkets cause a lot of problems by producing too much food and creating too much consumer demand for things we don‘t really need. When supermarkets advertise buy one get one free offers people often buy them because they think they are getting a bargain and sometimes the food just goes in the bin. If people buy one and get one free, why don‘t they give the free one to Fareshare, who can redistribute it to the homeless? Janet‘s idea is to encourage supermarkets to have a stall at the front door for customers to donate their free items to Fareshare. Dave from Fareshare agreed that this would be a good idea.

When I started to live on what God provides for me I started to be happy. I humbled myself and controlled my temper. I started doing things which make me happy. One day a guy kicked my bike for no reason. He bent it, I got a bit angry, but I had the spirit to change the anger to happiness. It was fantastic when I absorbed my trouble with ease and patience. This love has helped me to be kinder and happy. I repented by changing. I changed from eating unhealthy food to eating healthy food. I became vegetarian. I cut down on cigarettes, and I started to work out. I now have the desire to read and draw. I thought it was hard to draw pictures, but it is not, if you like it.

Finally, supermarkets should try to order less food to go to their stores so they would not have so much waste. They would rather throw the food into their bins than give it away free. There are some people that rake the bins to get food but they risk being charged with stealing, which is wrong. It all boils down to money, said Ian. The situation has been like this for years, the rich get richer and the poor get poorer.

The Men’s Group by Ronnie Britton The Men‘s group is ok. You can play pool and drink tea. Tim is ok to talk to. I find it very hard to communicate with men. I communicate with girls better. I go to the Fareshare cookery courses at the Cyrenians. I enjoy cooking. I can‘t bake to save myself! I make soup, apple crumble and shepherd‘s pie. In March I will do the Italian cooking course. I put my name for every course on cooking!

It makes me even more cheerful to know some dogs called Ben and Archie. They belong to the neighbour at the back garden. They are good company, but I do not like them when they fight!


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I went to the Jean Muir exhibition at the Chamber Street Museum. I enjoyed the exhibition as I have an interest in fashion design. I come from a very artistic family. My niece is studying fashion at Bristol University. Another niece is studying art and a nephew is studying photography. by Margo Grant

I was disappointed in the exhibition because it was so small, partly because they are doing up the museum. There weren‘t enough exhibits on show or enough space. Famous people who modelled and enjoyed wearing her clothes included Joanne Lumley and Patricia Routledge. I look forward to the museum refurbishment being completed.


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Memories of a Young Dad by Gerry Mckenna I often walk past the places I used to take my daughter when I was separated from my ex wife. I took her to a small zoo called the Buckey House. The walls on the outside were covered in shells from our beach in Leven. Then I took her along the beachfront to Johnny‘s, which was like a small fair, or the shows as we say in Leven. She loved going round and round and she liked to listen to the laughing policemen. When I walk past these places today it is very strange to walk past them without Samantha, my daughter. When I go on a bus or train I want to point out to her the horses, cows, sheep, birds or whatever animals I see or would like her to see. When I hear any kind of strange noise, like an aeroplane, fire engine, ambulance, police car or motorbike, she isn‘t there to get excited about seeing these things.

Sunshine on Sunday by Susan Coughlin

Samantha had a natural interest and appreciation of the world around her. I carried my daughter everywhere I went. I made sure she wouldn‘t get run over on the road. I had been to the doctor complaining of a sore foot and back and he said to me have you got any family? I said yes, I had a daughter. He said I must stop carrying my daughter about. Aye right, no way! We often went for a walk just to see if we could spot a pussycat. I used to take her out in the mornings about 4 or 5am, with some stale bread or some budgie seed I got from a friend. But I never told my wife about this at the time. She was still asleep when I came in from the back door. I took her away along to a place called Silverburn. We sat on a bench which was surrounded by trees and bushes.

You would not believe the birds that came down from the trees at that time of the morning; blue tits, zebra finches, red robins, garden thrushes, jenny wrens, sky larks and a bird which I can‘t quite put a name to. It was like a hummingbird, but it had all the colours of the rainbow and a beautiful tail. Our time together deepens me spiritually as well. Reconnecting her with the world in later years, but not knowing why. I hope I have renewed her appreciation of the world around her. I am thankful for the wonders of all that we see around us, because I have gone from being the hard, macho man, to the man who has been brought back to nature. Maybe some relative took me into the country when I was young. And I thank God for the beautiful world he has created.

I Miss You by Anonymous I miss your cry, even though you never made a sound I miss your walking, even though your feet never touched the ground I miss your hugs, even though we never got the chance to hold, I miss your laugh, even though no jokes were told. I miss riding with you, even though you never had a horse to steer,

Sunshine on Sunday I‘m in Pilrig park. All the neds are in their beds, Not like when it‘s dark. A peaceful Sunday morning What do I find? Secret snowdrops hiding While the sun is warm and kind.

I miss you being here, because in my heart I hold you dear. I miss you sleeping, even though you never got the chance to yawn, I miss you my darling, like the morning would miss the dawn.


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The Belgian Nun

Situation Acceptable?

by David Grimley

by Automatum

I am a resident at Bethany Christian Centre in Leith. I am in recovery for alcohol and drug abuse. Part of the program involves 15 weeks of groups discussion about your addictions and how you can start a new life through our Lord Jesus Christ. All of these groups were of great help and value but the talk that really struck a chord was about a Belgian nun who was 16 years clean of drink and drugs but she had a relapse. Her relapse lasted 3 years. She is now sober, and drug-free after her three years of misery.

Looking into ephemeral structures

Here are some of the key points of survival she talked about on how to combat addiction:-

The obligatory fire alarm asserts itself, with the green light of officialdom,

1.It is dangerous to let go of your discipline

Confirming the situation is acceptable.

2.Keep progressive sobriety

Through the vent the noxious burnt gasses are expelled,

3.Get involved 4.Keep focused on recovery

Though when the wind changes direction, there is a wif of blow back, raising anxiety.

5.Lapse to relapse is a process

Now questioning this state of acceptability,

6.The way you react to being an alcoholic or drug user

I have a carbon monoxide patch upon the boiler.

7.Mechanisms of recovery 8.You are responsible for your own recovery

The walls, temporary things. The wallpaper discerningly pattered, With shades and bumps, protruding into the room. It reminds me of the Star Wars garbage dispenser scene, Where they get stuck, with walls pushing in upon them. The high vaulted ceiling and peculiar shape of my room Makes it feel like the brick world is pushing itself in upon the space.

A cheap fix to accompany the fire alarm. Perhaps the situation is not acceptable.

9.Some kind of complacency 10.Remorse or guilt 11.Irrational thinking

Giving

12.Frustration—excuses

by Gordon Cameron

13.People, places, things are not happening fast enough 14.Do not set your goals too high. A study done in 1971 showed that 33% of recovering addicts relapsed within 2 weeks, 60% relapsed within 3 months. At the end of 8 months 63% had relapsed, and at the end of 12 months 67% had used. The study shows that addicts relapse because of triggers, thinking, feelings, behaviours and consequences. I hope and pray that anyone with addictions or in recovery will take heart in knowing that they are not alone and there is light at the end of the tunnel.

But when thou doest alms, let not thy left hand know what thy right hand doeth True religion is to visit the fatherless and widows in their affliction and keep himself unspotted from the world. Fasting is essential along with prayer to please God. Also giving pleases God: we have to bring our tithes to God otherwise we are guilty of robbing God. However, all our giving must be accompanied with thanksgiving. Jesus condemns those who blow their own trumpets. When we give it should be done quietly and we should not let others know that we are giving. Otherwise they have their reward in this world. Not only should you not give yourself credit for giving, you should also consider the help that is most meaningful to others.


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Valentine’s Day

Here are some Acrostic poems, written by women in the Edinburgh Women’s group. Come along on Tuesdays to the Acorn Centre, Great Junction Place between 12.30pm-2.30pm

Friends Forever Remember, Remember I am always there Each day, every day Never far away Day after day

Very special to me Always love u

Someone to share special time with by Patricia

Live and love forever with u Every moment is special No day goes past I don‘t miss u Time is precious with u I love u Need you always Ever more by Kiren

Dawn is my daughter Always there for me Unique and very special to me Giving me two wonderful grandchildren Hope her wishes come true Together we will make it happen for the future Everlasting love Remembering the day you were born by Linda

M is for the precious memories O is for everything you helped me overcome T is for the times we share H is for your heart so warm E means how exceptional you are R is for being the best role model a daughter could ever have asked for Love forever, my dearest MOTHER xx by Dawn

Sitting in my armchair on Valentines Day Waiting for the post "Hurry up Mr. Postman" I think Praying he's not lost. I'm sitting on pins and needles Listening out for the postbox Scanning the air with my ears Waiting for the letters to drop. I hear a faint thud Coming from the direction of the door "ABOUT TIME!" I cry out as I leap to my feet "The Postman's here". I burst out the living room door Thundering down the hall "Out of my way people" I say Before diving on the mail. "Bills, bills, bills, miscellaneous, Free sample" before glancing a shade of red "Yes, she's not forgotten" I say in excitement "She's remembered". I start ripping open the envelope Before pulling out the card Opening it in faster than a second I start reading what's inside. "To somebody, Can't wait until we meet From Anybody Mmm.....short but sweet". Walking into the centre of the room I place it on the coffee table Positioning it in the centre I sit back down on my chair. by Steven Gibson


International Women’s Day

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8th March 2009 Women’s Group– Dunfermline Reflections by Joan McDougall Friday afternoon- yes, Friday the 13th- brought another surprise. Off we went to Dunfermline to the Women‘s Group in the Link Church. Margaret and Trudy welcomed us with warm, strong handshakes and wee smiles which made me feel really relaxed and comfortable. We sat down to mugs of tea and beans on toast, big, fat chunky doorstops of brown bread and plenty of beans. Some of the girls and the tutor, Natalie, were already there. This was wonderful. I had never done flower arranging before. We all sat round the big square table chatting. Then Natalie led us step by step through the activity which she did exceptionally well. One minute the table was littered with all sorts of different leaves and shrubs and the next minute we had flower constructions up and flowing, and, at the end, we added our fresh flowers. We all worked happily together and all our flower arrangements were good- really nice- and we all looked rather pleased with ourselves. Thank you girls, Margaret too, not forgetting Natalie. Well done everyone, such a pleasant afternoon and I enjoyed it so very much… I hope to be back in the summer to see you all again.

Women’s Strength by Joan McDougall Women‘s strength, an immeasurable length, Compassion shows without a word said, Flower arranging blooms happily beyond Another welcomed invitation. Another strong new bond, Women‘s strength, an immeasurable length This wee poem is dedicated to all the women at the Dunfermline Women’s group

Reclaim the Night! The Edinburgh Women’s group made banners for the Reclaim the Night march in Edinburgh, on 8th March, against rape and male violence. Read the women’s comments below on what it means to be a woman... It’s about having to get on with life even when I am not well. It’s nice to be a woman but it is difficult. You have so much responsibility and have to do everything. It’s never ending. It’s hard work. Men go to work and come home and sit and get waited on, but women go to work then do the housework and look after the kids. Women are more sensitive than men. I like being a woman as we can carry a baby, create a life. As a single mum, I have to fight for the rights of my children at school. Even when I am really worried I still have to smile and pretend everything is alright.


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Reviews Do you fancy yourself as a critic? Write a review for others to read

The Eagle in the Sand

The Lost Throne

Author Simon Scarrow

Author Chris Kuzneski

The 8th in the ―Eagle‖ series of books about the Roman centurions, Macro and Cato, this novel can be read as a stand-alone book or as one in a series.

Beginning with the murder of ten Greek orthodox monks by warriors carrying ancient weapons, this thriller keeps up cracking pace as the action moves to St Petersburg in Russia and back to Greece ending in a dramatic climax at the Mount Athos monastery complex in Thessalonika.

Our heroes, Marco and Cato, are sent undercover to Palestine by Narcissus, secretary to the Emperor Claudius, to deal with corruption and treason in the administration and the army. They are also charged with assessing the threat posed to Rome by the Parthians, Rome‘s longstanding enemy, who are ready to invade over the eastern border. On arrival at a remote desert fort, they find matters further complicated by a local tribesman, Bannus, who is trying to ferment rebellion amongst the followers of Jehoshua, who was crucified some years earlier in Jerusalem. Set around 50AD Mr Scarrow gives us a rattling good adventure story which keeps up its pace right to the last page. Some Christians may feel offended by the authors take on Jesus and the beginnings of Christianity, but taken just as a novel, it is a good, uncomplicated read. by Jim Craig

The Wrestler Directed by Darren Aronofsky Mickey Rourke is at the pinnacle of his American acting in the role of a professional wrestler, well past his prime.

Chris Kuzneski merges historical fact seamlessly with modern fiction in a well written, action packed sequel to his two other bestsellers, Sign of the Cross and Sword of God. This a book that will keep you on edge of your seat right to the last page. by Jim Craig

The Mystery of Irma Vep Directed by Ian Grieve This was a great show. It had a few scary moments, but it was a light hearted comedy which could be adapted for children. The quick sketch changes were amazing. There was only one swear word. The theatrical props were fun, and the wolf in particular was very funny. I was left wanting more. It was a diverse mix of comedy that had something in it for most people‘s sense of humour. The Egyptian sketch was particularly funny, adding a few old jokes, long forgotten by some, with new adapted ones. It stimulated the nervous system in a jovial way, 10 from the Men‘s Drop in attended, it was a fun trip. by Ivor Miller

Outside the ring all he has to show for his life is finding a relationship with his estranged daughter Stephanie (Evan Rachael Wood) and a relationship with a stripper, Cassidy (Marisa Tomei). After a heart attack he rebuilds his career and goes back into the ring only to die from a heart attack.

Recently the Bethany Men‘s group had a wonderful evening at the Lyceum theatre to see the production of Irma Vep, a comedy/farce which is a must see show. What an experience! On a dreich, Edinburgh evening we were given a real tonic! This production was fast paced, hilarious, witty and with great one liners. Andy Gray (of Pantomime Fame) and Steven McNicoll played the parts with numerous costume changes. These two actors were absolutely sensational (the wolf wasn‘t bad either). This was the perfect antidote to the midweek blues. A great night out was had by all. Many thanks to Tim for his foresight and vision for booking this one! Keep them coming Tim!

by Stewart Monaghan

by Ally Mitchell

Back in the eighties Randy the Ram Robinson was at the top of his game, but 25 years later he finds that the only thing he does best is fight other men for money.


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Bible Book Search

Bethany House Hostel

by Eddie Klimek

by Eddie Klimek

In the paragraph below the names of 21 books of the Bible are mentioned. See if you can spot them. Remember!- not all names necessarily stand on their own, but may be part of two or more words!

Now since my baby left me I found a new place to dwell; Down the end of Cooper Street They call Bethany House Hostel

At the Men‘s Group I made a remark about hidden books in the Bible; it was a lulu, kept them looking so hard for the facts. To some it came as a revelation. Others were in a jam, especially since the book names aren‘t capitalised. The truth finally struck home to numbers of readers. This should be a most challenging few moments for you. Yes, there are some books you‘ll have a hard job to find, those are the most fun. Can a human being really find all twenty -one of them? At the worst, you should find fifteen. No defect in genes is required, although I will admit it usually takes a minister to find one of them and there will be loud lamentations when it is found. What will keep you from answering this challenge? A little lady says she brews a cup of tea so she can concentrate better. How long will you keep working on it only you can judge, so long you try to compete. Relax now, you‘ve had fun seeking some books of the Bible, but it is by far more important to seek first his kingdom and his righteousness.

And I get oh so lonely, Oh so lonely, I get Oh so lonely I could die. Now reception‘s tears are flowin‘, Key worker‘s dressed in black; He‘s been so long in Lonely Street That he never can get back and he‘s just oh so lonely… I‘m so lonely… x2 Now through it‘s always crowded, You can still find some room; For broken-hearted lovers To cry away their gloom. Cos they get oh so lonely… So if your baby leaves you. And you got a tale to tell; Take a walk down Couper Street To Bethany Hostel (and you‘ll get…)

Interested in Radio Presenting? Come along to 98.8 Leith fm to see what the presenters do. We are looking for volunteers to get involved. Email studio@leithfm.co.uk or you can phone on 0131 555 0446

Oh so lonely....you just die

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Bible Book Search Answers– Mark, Luke, Kings,

Sudoku Fun! by Eddie Klimek

Acts, Revelation, James, Ruth, Numbers, Amos, Esther, Job, Hosea, Nahum, Matthew, Genesis, Titus, Lamentations, Romans, Hebrews, Judges, Peter,

by Sue Richards


Sue

Douglas

Written and put together By the Bethany Press Team c/o Suzi Rowland, Tim Porteus Bethany Community Education 32 Jane Street Edinburgh EH6 5HD susanrowland@ bethanychristiantrust.com

Margo

Ian

John

Gerry

Gordon

Steven

What is the Bugle? Well the dictionary says that it is a musical instrument like a small trumpet. Our Bugle is a quarterly magazine. The magazine is in its infancy. As beginners we at The Bugle are first learning our trade as reporters, editors or just plain gofers. In time we hope The Bugle will become a much read and much sought after local magazine that people will enjoy and discuss until the next issue.

Where is The Bugle available?

Eddie

Kate

From hostels, drop-ins, libraries, churches, doctor and dentist waiting rooms… look out for it!

Who are we looking for to write for The Bugle? The views expressed in The Bugle are not necessarily those of Bethany Christian Trust

Anyone! But especially people who are or have been homeless. Most members of our Press Team have been, or are currently homeless.

Janet

Why get involved? Bugle Press Team ―Automatum‖; Ronnie Britton; Gordon Cameron; George Collins; John Cook; Susan Coughlin; Jim Craig; Douglas Forbes; John Gibson; Steven Gibson; Margo Grant; Gorden Innes; Keith Janes; Sean Kennedy; Kate Kerrigan; Kiren; Eddie Klimek; Linda; John McNeill; Joan McDougall; Gerry McKenna; Janet McWhirter; Ivor Miller; Patricia; Tim Porteus; Sue Richards; Shaun Rodgers; Suzi Rowland; Jamal Salah; Mark Small; Irene Stirton; Henry Watt; Ian Weatherston;

We offer lots of support to help you if you are not sure about your reading or writing. You can meet new people, we have good fun together, and you will learn lots of new skills that are needed in putting The Bugle together.

Jan

Sean

Irene

Bethany Learning Centre, 65 Bonnington Rd

Tim

About Bethany The Bethany Press Team puts together each edition of The Bugle magazine. We meet almost every Monday from 10:00am-12:30pm at our New Learning Centre, 65 Bonnington Road, Leith

Suzi

Anyone can get involved with the Press Team. If you are interested in helping, call 0131 625 5411 If you have any comments on The Bugle drop us a line at the address at the top, or give us a call and ask for Suzi. The Bugle is funded by the Nancie Massey Charitable Trust

The Bugle #14  

I Had a Turning Point I arrived in Edinburgh with just a holdall, after leaving Ipswich. My head wasn‘t in a good place at all. I ended up i...