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WRITTEN AND PUT TOGETHER BY THE BETHANY PRESS TEAM

...“At least this Bugle’s in tune!”... Issue 3

July 2006

Beggars can’t be choosers? The question of whether we should give money to people begging is one which has brought to light different opinions amongst The Bugle Press Team. Here is your chance to hear the different views of members of our team. As you read you can consider what you think about giving to people who are begging. Is there a simple answer? Let us know your views! I think people who beg do so for a multitude of reasons. There are some who beg to buy drugs or drink. There are some who beg because they do not want to work. But there are some who are genuine. The people who are genuine may not know where to get help

Included in this issue: How does it feel to have to move out of your own home?

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Are children getting away with too much these days?

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Julie Cranston prepares for her X-Factor audition Martin Cannon interviews performers from Bethany’s Stars in their Eyes Stories and poems from Dunfermline’s Toastie Club

or how to ask for it. They also may be too proud to ask or have poor education. Maybe people who beg also have a physical disability which makes them feel inadequate so even less likely to ask for help. I really think if there was

more aggressive advertising about where and when help can be found with more trained people and organisations, plus the advertising, then there would be fewer people begging on the streets. Bill Young

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What’s it like to live as an outsider in Leith?

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Leith FM gets a five-year license

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Quiz time

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John Cook celebrates the Hearts Cup Final Win and has an exclusive interview with Andy Webster

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Faces of the Press Team… admire all our ugly mugs and find out how you can get involved...

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Turnover the page for more of our views on begging...


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I have found out that the quiet caring approach has had great rewards, when I approach people on the streets, for who am I to judge, those poor souls? I don‘t know what sort of mishaps have led them into the circumstances they now find themselves, they may have been affected by abuse, bereavement, abandonment by their parents or been orphaned. God said that we are to love our brothers and sisters as they also need to be loved and to be given comfort as well as being understood. Elizabeth Dudgeon I would not give money to people that are begging on the streets. They could be using the money for to buy drink and drugs. I would rather buy that person a cup of tea or coffee and a roll. People beg and they say that they are homeless but I feel that I could not trust them as you don‘t know If they are or are not homeless. They could also have a place to stay in. SO I SAY NO TO GIVING MONEY TO BEGGERS Jan McKenzie

I think yes you should give money to young people who are begging. Because it was cold I gave a young girl some money last year to get something to eat. She was sitting outside St James Centre on the ground. When I gave her the money she went to Burger King to get something to eat and drink. Gordon Kerr As part of our team discussion on this issue we talked about the impact of using drugs or drinking. One member of our Press Team writes below on the impact of drugs and alcohol on her own family. 9 ½ year ago my dad (Ian) was drinking all times of the day and AnnJane went up to the community group to see Liz and they stayed in a children‘s home for one night and 1 week later me and Ian and AnnJane went in to foster home and 1 year later my dad died with drink. AnnJane, my sister, was buying drink when I saw her in the shops and she was not buying baby stuff. Now she has no children to look after: one girl is named sky and I don‘t know what the other girls‘ name is and I don‘t see AnnJane anymore. Julie Cranston

This page: our discussion about begging continues... Sometimes it gets strange relating with people who reflect about their food. They are spending lots of money in eating…they are dramatically spending the whole week. They are looking after their precious products, thousands of pounds…they keep spending for their beautiful kitchen and fridge, never thinking about millions of chickens perhaps that have been killed when they cure and fill their bellies!! Begging is positive, because you save money and have a healthier life. You do not eat so much. You do not take for granted what you have.

Issue 3

My theory is it depends on who you give your money to. I reckon a person should watch very carefully who they give there cash to, as I believe in most cases the beggars will only go and buy drink or drugs or both with your hard earned monies. I do however believe some beggars will buy the right things with your hard earned cash. I reckon ninety percent are not genuine beggars in this city which I suppose spoils it for the rest. Has a tourist ever thought they might be helping some beggars kill themselves with the pound they gave so generously as they walk away so proud they have helped the poor? They have helped the poor do what? Get food ,juice, or get blottoed and high then possibly ballootered bashed up; so the pound a person might give to these people might not be a blessing it might just be a curse. Martin Cannon

Stefano Meloni As Jesus had compassion on the poor, when I see the homeless in the street, I remember God said ―love God and love your neighbour as yourself, greater love hath no man than he lay down his life for his friends‖. God loves these people. I believe Jesus can set them free from drugs or alcohol. Nothing for him is impossible. Thank God he set me free. Robert Taylor

I was 16 years old, just three days after my birthday, I walked out on my family. I found myself living in London in a place called cardboard city, a place where people on the streets have made their homes using plastic and cardboard. I used to sit on the streets with a sign that said ―Hungry and Homeless. Please help.‖ Some people would give me money but some people would say ―get a job!‖ This was the hardest time of my life, but I needed to eat, I had no choice.

I believe in giving resources to beggars in the streets because the Bible says ―give to those who ask of thee and to those who would borrow from thee turn not away‖. Having said this, Christians are desperately in need of the gift of the Holy Spirit – discernment. We also need desperately the love of God for that person. An alternative to giving money would be to offer food to them: this might prove that they are genuine or not.

Malcolm Brodie

Gordon Cameron


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Losing a Lifelong Home As her Nana moves into a care home, Dawn Hogg looks at the impact on the family Many old people go in to care homes. I have had my own experience of this with my Nana who has just gone into a home through no fault of her own; she broke her hip. The hospital staff felt that she would not be able to manage on her own any more, as she had the start of dementia. This is an illness that does affect a lot of people. They become dependant on family and friends as they lose their short-term memory but can remember their childhood very clearly. It‘s people close to them who notice the difference in them. I visited my Nana in her care home, Mayborn House. When she first moved in she just wanted to stay in her room. She wasn‘t happy that the decision was made without asking her. But she likes it now. I spoke to my Nana to see how she felt about going into a home. How did you feel about going into a home? I was very angry as I thought I was not told about the move, but my family say I was involved in the decision and that made me feel better. Do you like the home? I like my room as I have my own belongings and family pictures. It‘s nice to have company but sometimes it gets busy. But I can go to my room for peace and quiet.

Do you feel settled where you are? Yes I do. It‘s nice to know I won‘t have to move again as moving from ward to ward and to different hospitals was quite upsetting. Have you made friends in your home? I have made two close friends who I like spending time with. Do you get on with staff? I have got lovely people looking after me and they treat me like family and make me happy. Not being able to go to Nana‘s house and call it ―home‖ anymore is really hard for the family as it was where both my generation and that of my parents were brought up. I spoke to my sister, Jane, about my Nana going into a home. How did you feel when

you heard your relative was going into a home? I was a bit upset at first as my Nana is a very independent lady and I thought she would find it difficult to give up her independence. Do you think it was the right decision? Having spent some time thinking about it I do now realise it was the right decision. My Nana needs the care and attention she gets from the home. How did your relative react to the decision? My Nana had fallen at home and broken her hip. She had been in three hospitals by the time she moved into the home. I think she was glad that this means she won‘t be moved again. Did the family discuss the

move together and how did you choose the home? My Nana‘s children were given a list of residential homes from the social worker and went to several before choosing Mayborn House. What was it that made you choose the one you have? My uncles liked the atmosphere as soon as they entered the home. The staff were very welcoming and the other residents all seemed happy. I spoke to several of the staff to find out how my Nana was settling in. They said she has settled in very well. The staff mentioned that Nana has regular visits from the family and that this has made her realise that although her circumstances have changed her family are still about, and that will never change.

Little Angels or Little Devils? I watched a clip of a TV programme yesterday. It was about a programme on how this woman was able to turn these kids from little devils trying to get their own way into little angels doing as they were told.

I don‘t know how you were brought up, but if I ever dared to have a tantrum when I was a kid I‘d get a thrashing from my parents. They definitely wouldn‘t let me carry on like a spoilt brat. Some people think this

Jimmy McCurdie would be child abuse but I think that if a child sees they can get away with something they will take advantage of the situation and things will get out of hand. No wonder mums and dads have a stressful time of things nowadays. I realise the government and parents may at times not see eye to eye but maybe there is some neutral ground and decisions they can agree upon. What’s your view?


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Issue 3

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Art Group Extravaganza On Friday 26th May a group of people from the Bethany learning centre went to an awards dinner the people that went were the one‘s that won an award two years ago for art work we did called faces to faces. We were asked to come back because we won; we were able to meet new people and to meet up with people we met two years ago. After the awards were given out we had a great time listening to a comedian called Elaine C Smith. She was very good! One

of the jokes she used was a man goes to the doctors to get a new brain the doctor said ―we have two the first is a mans brain this one will cost £10,000 the second is a women‘s brain this will cost £5,000 .‖ The man asked ―why so cheap for the women‘s brain?‖ The doctor replied ―because it‘s been used.‖ After we laughed we had the chance to dance when the Four Tops came on to the stage. They had come all the way from New York. They were dressed all in

Malcolm Brodie red even their shoes were red. A great time was had by all. Next time we are hoping to be up for an award, so if you like art or wish to learn how to do art and maybe have a great night out then come to the art group on Thursdays at Jane St at 1pm. To find out about the art group or any of Bethany’s other groups (including computing and literacy courses) call the number on the back page...

Julie Auditions for X-Factor This is part one, read part two in the next issue...

What is the X Factor?

When is the audition?

A TV programme where people audition to be a singing star. The Judges give their honest opinion of your performance.

11th of July and time is to be there at 12:00noon

Why do you want to go? To see if I want to be a singer. To try to do something different. What are you looking forward to most? Meeting new people and making new friends. Having a new experience. The buzz and excitement.

The Judges and Hosts >

Louis Walsh

Julie Cranston

I will go to Dorothy Perkins to buy denim side slit crop trousers and pink top and Where is the audition? red and white stripe dress Crowne Plaza Hotel in and red sandals and to Glasgow. River Island to buy pink and How will you get there? green belt and pink sandals Get a Bus to Glasgow Bus and next to buy pink dress and to New Look to buy Station then a Bus to white bag and sandals Crowne Plaza Hotel. How will you feel if they What are you going to say something bad? sing and why? My choice is Celine Dion, I'm Alive How will you choose what to wear?

Sharon Osbourne Simon Cowell

I‘ll be all right with it. How will you feel if you get through? Fine, level-headed!

Kate Thornton

Ben Shephard


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Stars in their Eyes: A SOLAG Production As a reporter for The Bugle I arrived at this show not knowing what to expect. As a performer at this show I was overwhelmed with anxiety and fear. The show started at 7pm sharp. I opened the show with Bowie‘s space oddity followed by Maggie Gaynor doing a Kelly Clarkson number. She was brilliant and the eventual winner. Andy Wilson won the adults section with a very tricky Bono number, The Sweetest Thing. YMCA were brilliant. Andrew Hutton was a fine Johnny Cash. Joel Cleerie pulled of a Will Smith number, Switch. Ian Sinclair was superb singing Amarillo. Steve Mcleod was riveting doing a Tom York number. Bethany‘s Chris sang a song that had the audience in total silence. Derek Slater was inspirational singing Blackbird. I interviewed some of the stars: Name: Andrew Hutton Age: 12 years School: Gracemount high Artist: Johnny Cash Song: I walk the line Is it your first time on stage? Yes it is. How were you feeling as going on? A bag of nerves. Name: Joel Cleerie Age: 12 years

Martin Ziggy Stardust Cannon

Two of the younger performers: Joel Cleerie was Will Smith and Andrew Hutton was Johnny Cash. School: Manifields Artist: Will Smith Song: Switch Would you do it again? You bet it was great! Who was your favourite? YMCA - they were funny. Your favourite of the young ones? Me of course! Did you enjoy the food? It was very eatible If I told you Tam Gaynor made it? I‘d bring it back up - he‘s a celt Name: Ian Sinclair Age: 9years School: St Mary‘s Primary Artist: Phil Kay Song: Amarillo Did you enjoy making the crowd clap? Absolutely, it was great Do you plan on being a superstar? Nut dinae hink sae Name: Derek Slater Age: 48 Artist: Paul McCartney Song: Blackbird Have you done this before?

I was a drummer in a band. Will you do this again? You bet As well as the performers, lots of other folks were involved. Tam Gaynor did the auction; he could sell snow to the Eskimos. Shirley took care of the tuck shop, Jaq and Rose did the make up, Liz was putting her hand in wherever needed, and Mark Morrish was the usher and ticket collector. I interviewed one of the team: Name: Rose hood Age: 21 years young Would you come back next year? I‘m gona hae tae, tae dae ti make up I’m doing shutupa ya face next year, is that ok? I suppose so you‘ll be wanting plenty make up on again. Both Andy and Maggie were worthy winners, and the votes were very close. There was an atmosphere second to none all night, feet tapping, hands clapping, people singing along.

I spoke to some members of the audience, so find out what they thought: Name: Rona Age: next question Who did you vote for? David Bowie and Jonnie Cash What did you think of the show? Brilliant entertainment Will you buy a ticket next year? Yes definitely for sure Did you see any potential? No, but it was all good fun though Name: Linda Age: no comment Who did you vote for? My little Jonnie Cash, and I liked Bono What did you think of the show? Great stuff Was the atmosphere right? You bet the place was buzzing big time It‘s all great thanks to the Bethany Christian Trust and the staff. The show would not have been possible otherwise. I‘m already getting ready for next year. I‘m gonna do Joe Daltry and Shut up a ya Face. It was a truly magnificent night a night no one will ever forget.


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The Bugle visits Dunfe

For the first time this Bugle includes stories researched and written by Press Te Rob Winton shares his homeless ordeal. At a loss as to what to do next with my life, having just dumped a job after only five weeks in Mallorca, I flew back to the U.K. to go and live in London. No money, no accommodation, no problem (I thought). I am a British citizen and I can get all the help I need from the world renowned welfare system. East London sounded good so I made my way to Stratford. This is where I will live, and getting work shouldn‘t be a problem at all. All I need to do now is nip into a council office, register as homeless, get somewhere to live and sign on the ‗jam roll‘. ―Sorry, you aren‘t entitled to housing here. You don‘t have a ‗local connection.’‖. I stood silent for a few seconds (unusual for me) before I asked the social security receptionist if she was joking. She assured me that she wasn‘t and hauled over an advisor. The advisor was very pleasant but completely useless. I told her I was going nowhere until I saw her boss. Her boss was brilliant. I put a question to her: ―If I had just arrived from Gambia, without ever having paid a penny in tax or national insurance, and without ten years of service in the Royal Navy, would I be entitled to help with housing?‖ Boss lady gave a knowing look , and admitted that this was likely. The advice she offered me

was to seek out a private landlord and claim housing benefit. She gave me a list of approved landlords. Next it was off to the dole office around the corner to sign on. I was greeted by a very enthusiastic middle aged woman who told me that her son had been waiting for a council place for over a year and he was born and bred in the borough! It was Monday and I got an appointment to sign on at the earliest available time - Friday! I mentioned that I was skint and she said they would sort me out with an emergency payment when I came in on Friday. Three quid or so down the drain and a repeated story was the result of standing in a phone box trying to find a landlord. The answer was always the same: ―Housing benefit? Have you got a deposit and a month‘s rent? (£1,000 in London). Sorry we have nothing at the moment. So it was back to the relative comfort of the airport floor for the night. The next couple of days were similar. Money was getting critical now and deciding I was making zero progress I authorised myself an even larger unauthorised overdraft, got a cheap flight, and headed for somewhere where I had lived before: Fife. I could now not make the Friday appointment in London because I was now in the dole office in Dunfermline... Phone London and transfer the claim. Yes? No! The computer system is new and it will not allow some-

thing that basic. I would have to make a fresh claim and guess what? My appointment (and emergency payment) would not be on Friday (the day after tomorrow), but the following week. ―Is there any flexibility in the system?‖ I asked. Of course not because it was a new computer system. After a couple of hours of voicing my dissatisfaction with the system (and getting complete sympathy from the staff) I left with a Monday appointment. Off now to the council office, surely I can get some help with somewhere to stay tonight. This was not a sunny Spanish island anymore, this was cold bleak Scotland. I was told to speak to the council‘s homeless officer on the phone and she would get me sorted out. She told me that there would be no problem and some one would call me back in ten minutes. So I waited….and waited…and waited. Now the council workers in the office were packing up and leaving and the phone still hadn‘t rung. Eventually the message came to ring a number later and get directions. I left and headed to the James Bank Centre (homeless unit) which someone casually suggested that I try in the mean time. Staff member Leslie let me in and we were soon joined by Alec. Alec mentioned that the homeless officer had phoned to refer me already but had called to cancel and put someone else forward instead because she could not reach me to give me directions, as I don‘t have a mobile...

I was offered accommodation by The James Bank Centre and stayed there until I was offered a house 8 weeks later. I grabbed it. Now, about that emergency payment. I was given a number to call, which I had already tried before, so when I eventually got through to someone they told me that I had to apply in the jobcentre (I knew that, the jobcentre staff did not) because they did not deal with emergency payments. So, when you are in need of money in a hurry the hoops you have to jump through are never ending. Presumably this is designed to make you despair, go out and get intimate with the front of a train or something, thereby saving the tax payers of Britain forking out money to you when they could be using it on a billion pound government white elephant. Anyway, the phone calls were made and after around three hours, and a lot of favours called in I got that payment. I have concluded that we all know (including the staff) that the benefits system stinks. It is changed regularly so that the thousands of employees of the system never get to understand it. Successive employment ministers have felt compelled to change it so they can label it as 'all my own work' even though they are clueless as to the workings of it-having never had the experience of needing it. The saddest thing of all is that in the main, the people who use state benefits to live, have a vote and choose not to use it. If you are one of them, register to vote and go and do it!


Issue 3

My Inspiration My name is Carole. I‘m 46 with 3 girls at home. The Toastie Club is not just for the homeless. My marriage broke down through really bad circumstances and I did not go out, only for essentials. I was depressed and needed help, when a friend told me about the Toastie Club. I have made friends, realised I am not alone and now want to become a care worker. It‘s been my inspiration and brought me back to my own self. Carole Qamar

Toastie Time, by Carole & Eileen We come along on Monday And some on Thursday too. We come to eat the Toasties With a cup of tea or two. We talk and read the paper And share a natter here, And staff are always ready, With a helpful, listening ear. Toastie Club‘s a family place With pool and music time, Uncle Bill and Aunty Margaret, Keep us all in line.

I love going to the Toastie Club. The staff at the Club are very helpful and friendly and they don‘t judge people. They welcome you, they listen to you, and they make you feel safe. The toasties are great. It makes my day coming to the Toastie Club cause the staff care and it takes away those blues. Janet Sutherland A Poem for Support Workers You‘re more than a support worker to me, You‘re a friend—can‘t you see? You make my calls, You check my mail, And listen to problems, And take me out. You make me laugh, And make me feel worthwhile. You don‘t have to do what you do, But I thank God that you do. You give me hope and are so kind, Without you I‘d go out of my mind. You‘re always kind and cheer me up, ―Would you like a coffee? I‘ll give you a cup!‖ I‘d like to do something worthwhile, When I see you I want to smile! I hate it when it‘s time to part— When I leave here, my life will start. I bet you‘re glad when you go away, The jokes on you—Ha! Ha! You‘ve got to come back another day! Mo Hodgson (Mo receives support from Bethany’s supported housing in Fife.)

Janet interviewed several residents at James Bank (a hostel in Dunfermline) to find out about their experiences of homelessness and how they find it living in a hostel. What is it like being in James Bank? David: It is okay. Alex: It‘s better than being on the streets. Chie: It‘s better than most hostels I‘ve been in. Jason: It‘s terrible. How long have you been here? David: Four years and three months. Alex: Seven months. Chie: For three weeks – I‘ve been in and out of hostels since I was sixteen. Jason: Eighteen months on and off. How did you end up in James Bank? David: Family problems. Alex: Drug problems. Chie: Family problems. Jason: Family problems. Have you made any friends?

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Tasty Toasties Each edition we look for a tastier toastie. This time, Janet Sutherland spoke to Toastie Club volunteer Eileen, to find out her favourite toastie…. Eileeens ideal toastie filling…. Strong cheese and red onion. Eileen has been a volunteer with the Toastie Club for 2 years. She enjoys working with homeless people. Eileen‘s hobbies are drama, and baby-sitting. She has a new grand-daughter and ―she fills my heart with joy‖. David: Yes, loads of friends. Alex: Yes, lots. Chie: Yes Jason: Yes Have you stayed in James Bank before? David: No Alex: Yes Chie: Yes Jason: Yes Why do you think people end up at James Bank again and again? David: Drug problems and family problems. Alex: Drug problems and family problems. Chie: People are not able to get another place to stay. Jason: There is not accommodation for them. Where would you like to be in five years time? David: In a job and with my own flat. Alex: Hopefully in a good job. Chie: With a good job and settled down. Jason: Working and having my own house.


Issue 3

Belter Perseveres in Leith Page 8

Tranent is located about a mile inland from the south shore of the Firth of Forth. The town has a population of 8,300 people. Tranent is formerly an important mining centre. Tranent lies about 300 feet above the level of the sea. The name Tranent derives from its ancient form ―Trevement‖ (―Tref‖ – a homestead or village, and ―Nant‖ – a valley‖) meaning ―the village in the valley‖) and refers to its natural situation. Tranent people have the nickname ―Belters‖, I am not 100% sure where they get the nickname from. Growing up in Tranent wasn‘t too bad until I went into secondary school. Tranent schools would fight against other schools from Prestonpans, Port Seton,

Ormiston and Pencaitland. They would fight mostly on a Friday or Saturday. Growing up I found people are friendly and do welcome people from different places, as the fighting did finish through time. Now Tranent and the surrounding areas are friendly, they get on with each other now, more than before. I get on really well with people from other towns in East Lothian. I feel that I‘m friendly and helpful to others as they are friendly back. My personal thought on people of Tranent getting on with people of Leith is that they all join together, are friendly and Leithers are welcoming to others outside of Leith. I moved into Leith 4 yrs ago come October. I was staying in Greendykes but

moved out due to a bad relationship. I didn‘t like staying in Greendykes because the people were not that friendly, there manners were beyond a joke. But now that I stay in Leith I feel a bit safer than being in Greendykes. It feels really odd as I couldn‘t settle because I didn‘t know anyone in Leith but now I‘m happy getting on with people and starting to know my way about the area.

Jan McKenzie

I feel that I stand out a bit. This is because of my accent. This is because some people don‘t understand what I‘m saying, because I sometimes talk too quick. The three best things about Leith are: the people are friendly, there are good pubs and the bus service is great. The worst three things are: when people come out of the pubs at the weekends they sometimes end up fighting, when you open the door for someone they don‘t say thank you and the other one is when people knock into you they don‘t say sorry. I would recommend Leith as a visiting place as there are a lot of things to see and do in Leith.

The foot of the Walk

Leith on the Waves Over the past five years or more, the shape and character of Leith has accelerated to the point where it‘s fast becoming a modern and engaging ―suburb‖ of Edinburgh. The rejuvenation of the waterfront, the trendy and stylish new apartments, cafes, restaurants, the upgrade of the walkways, cycle paths and parks, is all helping to reinforce ‗Leith‘ as having a strong ―community‖ bond…. Now to add more spice to the area‘s identity, Leith FM (87.7) will be broadcasting 24 hours, 7 days a

week!!?!*?!.... ―Leith what, who, where?‖ you may be thinking, well my curious bees, let me entertain you… The ―City of Leith‖ has it‘s own radio station Leith FM (87.7), situated above the Dockers Club (Academy Street), they have been on the air for the last 3and a half years, although due to license restrictions they‘ve only been allowed to broadcast twice a year, two weeks each time. But now, due to perseverance, self-belief, 30 hour days, stomach ulcers and hard work galore, the ―L.F.M.‖ team has success-

fully been granted a five year 24/7 license! (Strike up the band)… Believe me, this is a fantastic coup for the people of Leith, i.e. ―Yae kin take awae oor independence but yae won‘t take awae oor station‖!!! Ha ha ha… I recently attended an open day organised by L.F.M. to promote ‗n‘ encourage anyone/ everyone who feels they can contribute/assist/ support/enhance ―onair/off-air‖, anything that can help this exciting project to prosper and sustain its future as an-

Derek Slater other ―voice‖ (don‘t forget ‗Leither‘, great read!) in telling ‗Edinburgh‘ ―There‘s more sunshine down Leith‖… ha, ha, hee!!! Anyway, at the ‗open‘ day I met various people/ages/interests/ ideas, a spectrum of characters who wanted to get involved. I found this so refreshing to see and hear original-quirky-zanypredictable-off-beat ‗n‘ promising ideas, thoughts and themes, in making Leith and Leith FM shine!! … stay tuned, to be continued...


Issue 3

Characters of Leith: In each issue of The Bugle we have decided to take a look at one of the characters of Leith; the people who make our community what it is

The Sheriff is a fantastic character who frequents all parts of Leith but is almost always seen in and around Great Junction Street. He is an older gentleman who wears a tartan jacket with a sheepskin collar. He wears a cowboy hat, glasses, and shoots anyone with his water pistol who passes. He is around five feet tall, infact every time I see the Sheriff out in the street I see people falling about

laughing. He is one of Leith‘s real characters, a funny guy; it seems to me he just wants to come out and make people smile. It has long been said when he was a lot younger he used to pull out his pistol and demand a pound for a nip; but he is a lot older now; but just as wise, he now pulls the pistol out and asks for ten pence for a tattie to make stovies. I was originally going to ask the Sheriff for an interview, but after giving it a lot of thought I decided the mystery of who he is where he comes from and what he has done with his life is probably better

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The Sheriff

than knowing the answers. Martin Cannon I feel the mystery of this gentleman is part of the magic of what he is. To me he is the sheriff of Leith, I don‘t know where he comes from or where he goes when he is of duty as the sheriff, he is probably a dancer with the Chippendales in his spare time. I don‘t know how many people he has arrested or jailed in his years I can only imagine. For me he shoots from the hip, a man not to mess with, he takes no prisoners, well unless he thinks they deserve some jail time that is. He is truly one of Leith‘s “The Sheriff”, featuring in Leith’s festival guide. characters.

Broom Beats Back Pain The unseen pain, to the naked eye anyway. Back pain; well it used to be the lifting of a fridge or cooker or something similar that would put me to the floor. I have had back pain since 1989. I remember lifting a heavy item at my work and ending up on the floor of the warehouse I was working in at the time. As I bent over I got a sharp pain in the bottom of my spine which was so sore it floored me. That was my first experience of back pain. I was off my work for nearly a week. The doctors told me to stay in bed.

Martin Cannon

four days, then walk about slowly for about two weeks, watching not to make any wrong moves, as I don‘t like the helplessness of being floored.

So in March 2006 I hadn‘t been floored for nearly two years but a strange thing happened. What was I doing ? Well? Making the bed .The next thing I was on the floor. So I crawled through to the living room on my back, pushing with my feet, and I tried to get up on the couch. This was at 9am and at 12noon I was still trying to get up on the couch I eventually got on the I have had an average of couch but could not get off one attack of the back each it. I tried everything. Eventuyear since then. I have alally at 3pm I managed to ways done the same thing: get off the couch and stand lay back in bed three or up straight; I was almost

helpless. I got to my feet but was scared to move. I eventually start to move half an inch at a time. Now around 4pm I‘m exhausted so, I thought, if I could make it to the kitchen I could use the mop and broom handles as walking sticks. Good idea, but how will I get to the kitchen? Seems miles away! But it‘s only about ten feet. I get to the kitchen my legs wobbling, still in my nightgown, and its 430pm. I make the mop and broom handle into crutches; they help

me walk and help me get to the couch. So I have a think; It wasn‘t a heavy object that floored me I was making the bed. So I think I‘m not going to stay in bed this time. I am going to fight it. So I start to walk miles and miles with my crutches, but I haven‘t left the house just backward and forward for days, loosening of the joints. My conclusion, as a sufferer, is this; Try not to lay in bed, for I believe it is better to try to stay mobile while suffering, it will ease off in time till the next time. To anyone who suffers what I suffer I know what they go through I wish them all good luck for the future.


Issue 3

Issue 3

Page 10

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LOOK FOR: THESHERIFF, EXTRAVAGANZA, TOASTIECLUB, BEGGARS, THEBUGLE, PRESSTEAM, JOKES, QUIZPAGE, HEARTSPARTY, ANGELSANDDEVILS

David Willis

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Malcolm Brodie

ACROSS 1. Being in a relationship with God 4. Someone who works in the residential departments of Bethany 5. They eat lots of these at the drop-in in Dunfermline 8. A helping hand towards other people 9. They can make a house into a home 11. They help in the Bethany shops 12. Many of the people who come to Bethany are without a home DOWN 1. Somewhere to improve literacy, numeracy and IT skills 2. When people are given help and encouragement 3. Stars in their Eyes, The Big Sleepout and many more events provide much needed money 6. This service is valuable to the homeless across Edinburgh 7. The Learning Centre has lots of new resources 10. This organisation was founded by Alan Berry in 1983


Issue 3

Issue 3 Page 11

The Hearts are having a Party! John Cook reports on the Hearts vs. Gretna Cup Final 2006 Saturday 13th May 2006 Hearts v Gretna big cup final Hamden Park Glasgow 2pm kick-off.

The first half what a load of rubbish First half finally over, second half they played a lot better I thought that they would. Have won! But never happened, next minute extra time my heart was in my

ing it from along Princes Street where I would see it a lot better. It was the best day of my life. Heading along and the crowd was just as bad. Headed up the Mound it was a lot better.

Well Sunday came the whole team were bringing the cup back home to Tynecastle. The atmosphere with all the other fans walking along Princes Street was amazing.

A crowd of people were singing,

Next minute all you heard was the Hearts fans singing The Hearts are having a party The Hearts are having a party The Hearts are having a party The Hibs are in there beds. Photograph from Scotsman.com

1pm in the afternoon I headed up to Gorgie for to go and see the cup final, finally I managed to get to the pub and relax and enjoyed my pint, I was shouting like mad at the TV.

mouth, after extra time the worst thing ever (penalties shoot out) hands on head dreading it the outcome, Well the final whistle went we won on penalties, well the whole pub went up in uproar!

I headed up to Gorgie it was absolutely jam packed as I walking along, so I thought that I would be better of watch-

Past and Present at Hearts John Cook interviews: Andy Webster Before you played for the current Hearts team what other club did you play for? Andy: I used to play for Arbroath, a part time team 2nd division – a good team at the time – I ended up leaving in the March but they ended up getting promoted that season – it was a good season – a good team to play in. What made you want to join Hearts? Andy: I came on a three day trial prior to joining the club, to see the set up, and to get to know the manager. Getting to the

premier league was a big ambition of mine and to be given the opportunity to join a club as big as Hearts was something I couldn‘t pass up. I think Craig Levein was a massive influence for me. He was a centre back himself and managed to pass on a lot of information to me, which I took on board – I think that‘s a big factor for me signing for the club. How did the team feel after the sacking of Phil Anderton? Andy: It‘s very difficult. The only thing the players can influence is the game

on Saturday that‘s what we‘re concentrating on things have been very difficult recently surrounding the club if the players do their job right it‘ll relieve the fans a wee bit and hopefully give them something to cheer about. Since you have been at the club what has been your best moment? Andy: There have been a few moments but the one which probably stands out the most is the game against Bordeaux. European games are special. (Especially) the one against Bordeaux you know and

then we beat Basel last season we played in front of 27,000 Hearts fans they‘ve great passion for the game I think the European games have been the highlights – beating the Old Firm – we beat Rangers at Ibrox – beat Celtic at Celtic Park was a massive achievement for the club as well and they were We are looking for Hibs supporters to come and join our team. If you are interested in reporting on Hibs news, get in touch.


WRITTEN AND PUT TOGETHER BY THE BETHANY PRESS TEAM

c/o Jess Philbrick Bethany Community Education 32 Jane Street Edinburgh EH6 5HD jessicaphilbrick@ bethanychristiantrust.com

What is the Bugle? Well the dictionary says that it is a musical instrument like a small trumpet. Our Bugle is a bi-monthly magazine. The magazine is in its infancy. As beginners we at The Bugle are first learning our trade as reporters, editors or just plain gofers. In time we hope The Bulge will become a much read and much sought after local magazine that people will enjoy and discuss until the next issue. Where is The Bugle available? From hostels, drop-ins,piclibraries, churches, doctor and denCaption describing tist ture waiting rooms‌ look out for it! or graphic. Who are we looking for to write for The Bugle?

The views expressed in The Bugle are not necessarily those of Bethany Christian Trust.

Bethany Press Team Paul Aspinall; Malcolm Brodie; Gordon Cameron; Martin Cannon; Julie Cranston; John Cook; Elizabeth Dudgeon; Dawn Hogg; Steven Gibson; Gordon Kerr; Kate Kerrigan; Bruce Lyon; Jimmy McCurdie; Jan McKenzie; Stefano Meloni; Jess Philbrick; Derek Slater; Janet Sutherland; Robert Taylor; Rob Winton; Bill Young.

Anyone! But especially people who are or have been homeless. Most members of our Press Team have been, or are currently homeless. Why get involved? We offer lots of support to help you if you are not sure about your reading or writing. You can meet new people, we have good fun together, and you will learn lots of new skills that are needed in putting The Bugle together.

About Bethany Press Team The Bethany Press Team puts together each edition of The Bugle magazine. We meet every Monday from 10:00am12:30pm at 18 Jane Street, Leith. Anyone can get involved with the Press Team. If you are interested in helping, call 0131 625 5411 If you have any comments on The Bugle drop us a line at the address at the top, or give us a call and ask for Jess.

The Bugle is printed by CLAN Edinburgh


The Bugle #03